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GENEALOGY C 'ELECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY P 



B , L , IC , LIBRARY 



3 1833 00730 8973 



VOL. XL. 



LIFE AND TIMES 



ANTHONY WOOD 



VOL. V. 



©*forl> 

HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY 



The Life and Times of 

Anthony Wood, antiquary, 
of Oxford, 1 63 2- 1 695, 
described by Himself 

COLLECTED FROM 

HIS DIARIES AND OTHER PAPERS 

BY 

ANDREW CLARK 

M.A. LINCOLN COLLEGE, OXFORD ; M. A. AND LL.D. ST. ANDREWS 



Volume V: Indexes 



PRINTED FOR THE OXFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
AT THE CLARENDON PRESS 
I 900 

[All rights reserved^ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/publications40oxfo 



K 

I 

PREFACE. 



1388022 

The indexes, which complete Wood's Life and Times, are longer 
and more minute than might have been expected from the nature 
of the work. 

The volumes contain over 1900 pages to be indexed, and in them 
quite an exceptional number of names. In his earlier years Wood's 
keenest interest was in genealogy. During the last fifteen years of 
his life, he was collecting biographical notices for his Athenae and 
Fasti. From first to last, therefore, he was tempted to bring into his 
personal papers a multitude of names of authors, ecclesiastics, gentry, 
peers, as also of names of places, with which no other Oxford 
resident would have burdened his diaries. The bare indexes of 
persons and places are thus very much heavier than we might have 
looked for in the record of an uneventful life of sixty-three years. 

Alongside of these single references, we have, mentioned over and 
over again, names of leading men in the state and in the University, 
and of Wood's own nearer relatives and intimate friends. Such 
hundredfold references require special treatment in the way of classifi- 
cation and spacing out, if the index is to lighten labour in consulting 
the volumes. This necessitates a separate index, which appears as 
Index I, to supply a clear outline of the names, in Oxford and out of 
it, which were of special importance in Wood's eyes. 

For political history, Wood's diaries are of course without primary 
value, but they are not without interest as a sidelight on public affairs. 
Samuel Pepys' diary has its intrinsic importance, from its author's 
official opportunities. Narcissus Luttrell's diary shows us the infor- 
mation accessible to a Londoner by careful and methodical perusal of 
the periodical press of the capital. Wood's diary, on the other hand, 
displays what was known about the movements of the day and the 



vi 



PREFACE. 



figures on the political stage by people who were quite outside 
politics and who lived in the provinces. It is true that, by reason 
of the large number of graduates then resident, political questions 
were more fully discussed and possibly better understood in Oxford 
than in most towns : but the news-letters, public and private, which 
came to Oxford were no doubt identical with those received in 
other county and market towns, so that Wood's notes exemplify 
the political knowledge then accessible to lawyer, and parson, and 
squire, in all considerable centres of population. Full indexes to 
them are therefore of something more than merely Oxford interest. 

For Oxford history, the volumes are of unique value. In Wood's 
lifetime Oxford was, continuously and conspicuously, protagonist in 
the great conflicts of the age, the Civil War, the Commonwealth, 
the Restoration, the attempt at Absolutism, the Revolution, the 
reaction in favour of the exiled king. Throughout his period, in all 
departments, political, religious, and social, as well as personal, Wood 
has considerable material for our estimate of the University. This 
material we can get, in a connected form, in Wood only, since it is 
next to certain that no other Oxford diary has survived, describing 
that stormy half-century, 1640-90. 

In these notes of Wood's own times, there are, however, very large 
and unexpected gaps. In addition to the bare autobiographical 
matter, these volumes have gathered up scraps of information of all 
kinds from the miscellaneous papers of Wood's writing and collecting, 
but even so the record of events and institutions is very incomplete. 

The imperfection is partly explained by Wood's aims. Up to 
1674, he was writing a history of Oxford to the year 1640, mainly 
from the materials collected by Brian Twyne. From 1680 onwards, 
he was closely engaged in the composition of the Athenae and Fasti, 
which begin in 1500. Throughout both periods, that is to say during 
the whole of his literary activity, his studies rendered him negligent of 
contemporary Oxford incidents. 

It must further be borne in mind that an important section of 
Wood's writings and collections, viz. his correspondence, has not yet 
been brought into a line with the rest of his work. There are, in 
Oxford libraries, letters written by him, and drafts of such letters, 
to Oxford men who had gone into the country, letters written to him 
by Oxford residents during his long absences at Weston Park (v. 69) 



PREFACE. 



vii 



or in London (v. 79), and letters from London and especially from 
Roman Catholic correspondents, which, if excerpted in chronological 
order, may provide a valuable supplement to the notes of men, 
manners, and events, given in these volumes. 

I greatly fear, however, that, even after that addition to our material 
has been made, Wood's account of Oxford in his day will remain 
sadly incomplete. There are several reasons for this. 

His deafness cut him off from personal knowledge of University 
affairs. In Thomas Hearne's diaries we are familiar with impressions, 
taken at first hand, of business transacted in Convocation and of 
sermons before the University. In both these respects Wood's notes 
are unmistakably inferior. His accounts of University business are 
mostly taken from the formal record in the current register of Convo- 
cation, to which the registrar (Benjamin Cooper) gave him access 
for a time: they are therefore, if accurate, tame and colourless. 
When he notices a University sermon, he is generally content with 
the bare record of the preacher's name, and this he got in many, 
if not in all cases, not from personal presence, but from the notes 
of his friends, e.g. of Andrew Allam (see Plate I at the end of 
Volume IV). We are not surprised, therefore, to find it expressly 
stated that Wood was uniformly absent from public functions in the 
University (iv. 40). 

Wood, further, had no College standing as a Fellow, to keep 
him in the currents of College business and rivalry. When the older 
generation of Merton Fellows, his contemporaries, died out, we find 
significant notes of flouts and snubs by the new generation, in 
consequence of which he seems after 1686 to have entirely forsaken 
the Common-room and its discussions. His notes about even his 
own College are therefore scanty, and we may reasonably infer that 
his notices of other Colleges are much more imperfect. 

In the then jealousies between the City and the University, it 
was impossible for Wood to have access to the minute-books of the 
City corporation, and, accordingly, he has little or nothing to say 
about civic matters. 

Even in matters of merely personal interest Wood's notes are sur- 
prisingly scanty. There is an impression that Wood was a persistent 
gossip, prying into all matters and constantly and carefully making 
notes of them. This conception comes mainly from the apocryphal 



viii 



PREFACE. 



stories collected in the next generation by Thomas Hearne and 
Richard Rawlinson (iii. 504-6). It is in absolute contradiction to the 
picture we derive from his own scattered notices of his way of life. 
In these we find, it is true, a few malicious personal reflections, 
which, as it happens, we can generally trace to the ill-natured tattle of 
' club-men ' at cookshop or tavern. For the most part, however, we 
have to picture Wood as a recluse, with no personal intimacies, cut 
off from general conversation by his deafness, occupied chiefly in 
perusing book-catalogues and making notes of title-pages, sending 
out broadcast letters of inquiry about dates of ecclesiastical pro- 
motions and burials, and, even in Oxford itself, dependent for his 
information on papers of queries left at men's rooms (iii. 497). 

These facts, while they explain and excuse the deficiencies of 
Wood's record of his time, render full Oxford indexes doubly 
necessary. Thus only can we bring into view all matters actually 
mentioned by him, and at the same time have a scheme of our 
triple Oxford history, academic, civic, collegiate, the manifest gaps in 
which may hereafter be filled in from the registers and account-books 
of the University, the City, and the Colleges, from the Gazette and 
other newspapers of the day, and from the mass of contemporary 
correspondence in the Bodleian, now open to search by the guidance 
of Mr. Madan's Summary Catalogue of MSS. 

I have given a list of the slips, either on Wood's part or my own, 
which I have noted in preparing the indexes. I have inserted in it 
a good many additional identifications of persons. None of these are 
of special importance, and all have been taken account of in the 
indexes. 

I have, in conclusion, to acknowledge my very great indebtedness 
to Mr. Madan's kindness. During the months of drafting these 
indexes, I have constantly been at a loss for facts and dates, which 
his unfailing courtesy has as constantly supplied. The same acknow- 
ledgement ought to have been made for the Index-volume of Wood's 
City of Oxford. The frontispiece of that volume was also due to 
his suggestion, and rendered possible by the loan of his copy of 
Benjamin Cole's very rare print. 

ANDREW CLARK. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Wood's History of his own Family i 

INDEX I: Biographical 23 

This index gives the sum of what Wood says about the most prominent 
men of his time and those with whom he came most into contact. 

INDEX II : Topographical 85 

Africa, America, Asia 85 

Countries of the Continent of Europe 85 

The British Isles 89 

Ireland 89 

Scotland 91 

Wales 91 

England, by Counties 92 

Cambridge University 96 

London . . . 104 

Oxford City 112 

Oxford Diocese 130 

Oxford County 131 

INDEX III: Academical 143 

The University 143 

The Halls 165 

The Colleges 167 

INDEX IV: Matters . . . 199 

An analysis, alphabetically under heads, of the chief subjects of interest 
in the spheres of social life and literary activity. 

INDEX V : Words ' . .236 

A short view of some peculiarities of Wood's diction and spelling. 

INDEX VI: Persons 250 

A final index of all names of persons and titles. 



ERRATA AND ADDENDA. 



IN VOLUME I. 

Page 3, note 5, for Sherington read Sheringham. 

8, line 2, for Lewin read Lewis, i.e. Erasmus Lewes of Jesus College. 

9, towards foot, for 660 A read 660 F, and for 1813 read 1810. 
16, line 5 from foot, for Stafford read Strafford. 

24, note 1, for 674, 677 read 670, 674. The note is in MS. Wood 26, p. 57. 
35, end of the first table, read (John) Petty, fellow of New Coll. 
41, for born Calfield read baron. 

82, note 3, for Esme Stuart, third read James Stuart, fourth. 

99, note 3, for Ralph read Richard. 
119, middle, read (Richard) Seaman of Oxford. 
141, line 10 from top, read to (Alice) the wife of. 
176, top line, read (Thomas) Adams. 
180, top line, read (Jane) daughter of ... Agas. 
185, line 11 from top, read (Francis) Godolphin. 
191, line 9 from foot, read (Alice) the wife of. 

194, in the genealogy read (Rowland) Crosby, and Lackington (i. e. Leck- 

hampton). 
199, line 9 from top, read (John) Low. 
202, top, read Col(n)ebrook in com. (Bucks). 
204, line 3 from foot, read 165(f). 

210, note 5, read (John) Fricker. 

211, line 13, for alderman (John) read alderman (Thomas). 
217, first line of note, read (Eliz.), sister. 

229, third line of note, read (John) Vincent. 

230, note 3, Fur praedestinatus, an attack (in Latin) on Calvinism, was issued 

anonymously in 1651, Lond., 8vo, by William Sancroft, afterwards arch- 
bishop of Canterbury. 

239, line 3, for 1651 read 1551. 

243, note 4, read (Christopher) Flower. 

246, note 6, Robert Haselwood is meant. 

250, line 5, read (Margaret) Hamden. 

269, col. 2 of note, the date of the letter is about 1589. 

271, middle, read (Ralph) Sheldon. 

278, line 2 from foot, read (John) Kent. 

303, middle, the note about John Oliver belongs to the year following. Wood 

has inserted it in the wrong almanac. 
313, line 13, for George Swett read Giles Swett. 



xii 



ERRATA AND ADDENDA. 



320, note 3, read the Vice-chancellor's accounts for the Schools, 1660-61 ; and 

note 4, delete carl of Arundel. 

321, middle, for MS. Bodl. 594 read MS. Ballard 70. 

329, line 6 from top, read Brideoke (of Chichester), and line 14 from foot, for 

Peter Priaulx read John Priaulx. 
350, middle, read (William) Wills. 
425, line 6 from foot, for Charles I read Charles II. 

427, line 9 from foot, for Francis White read John White ; and line 7 from foot, 
read (Richard) Hall, (Nicholas) Robinson, (Thomas) Harrison, (Henry) 
Mayne, (Richard) Carter: Wood's City, iii. 39. 

441, last line, read (William) Whitaker, (William) Reynolds, Mr. (Richard) 
Samuayes (rector of Meysey-hampton). 

469, line 4 from foot, for (Edmund) read (Edward) Turner. 

476, towards foot, for (Richard) read (Thomas) Frankland. 

478, middle, for Richardi read Thomae Frankland. 

483, line 3 from top, for Richard read William Levins. 

488, line 7 from top, read (Walter) Combs. 

500, first line of note, for Studham read Stadham(pton). 

507, note 3, for 73 read 473. 



IN VOLUME II. 

2, line 3 from top, read (Morgan) Godwyn. 
1 1 , line 7 from top, for com. Bucks read com. Oxon. ; and in note 4, for 
Amersden read Ambrosden. 

18, line 10 from top, the person meant is Thomas (afterwards President), son 

of Dr. Thomas Turner. 

19, middle, read lady (Anne) Harcourt. 
26, middle, read (Thomas) Adames. 

28, middle, for Margaret read Margery Coxeter. 

34, line 3, for (William) read (Christopher) Reynolds. 

37, note 2, for John read William Washburne. 

43, line 6 from foot, for Robert read Edward Perot. 

55, line 2 from foot, the name is Fogge. 

82, line 4, for persued read perused. 
101, middle, for walked ... pains read waked ... pain. 
115, line 7, read (Henry) Dighton. 
118, line 2, read (Obadiah) Walker. 

125, line 2 from foot, for Richard read John Holloway ; and so also p. 126, 

line 4 from top. 
130, line 9, for Ed(ward) read Ed(mund) Napier. 
135, middle, for 1868 read 1668. 

145, middle, read Mr. (John) Trevour. 

146, middle, read (Charles) Stanhop. 
150, line 6, read (William) Pudsey. 
152, note 4, for Basshe read Bysshe. 



ERRATA AND ADDENDA. 



xiii 



153, line 7 from top, for (Thomas) read (Robert) Norman ; and in line 10, for 

Hermore read Heimore. 
161, delete note 3 ; the gallery is the Bodleian picture-gallery. 
176, towards foot, old Williams is Thomas Williams. 
204, middle, read (John) Newlin. 
216, first line, old Williams is John Williams. 
218, line 6, read (James Alban). 
225, near middle, for Act last year read Act in 1669. 
230, middle, read (Sir Charles) Winter. 
233, middle, it is Pryce in the MS., not Pryce. 
240, line 2 from top, read Mr. (Edward) Sheldon's. 
251, line 5, read (Thomas) Browne's. 
251, delete note 3. A kind of wine was called ' langoon.' 
265, line 7, the work was edited in chief by John Ogilby. 

275, middle, read Dr. (William) Lloyd, Mr. (William) Harris, Sir (William) 
Rich. 

278, middle, 4 of Queen's Coll.' is in error for ' of Trin. Coll.* 
283, note 1, for John read Joseph Glanvill ; and note 4, read Mr. (Richard) 
Pleydell. 

286, line 2 from foot, for Peter read John Priaulx. 
294, top, William Hodges is the father's name. 
304, note 1, for Lent read Easter. 

325, line 3 and note 2, for Richard read George Doleswell (Dowdeswell). 
327, middle, read (John) Trenchard. 

329, towards foot, for (John) read (William) Washborne. 

331, towards top, for (William) read (John) Hall. 

336, top, read (George) Cole. 

342, towards middle, for Grif(fith) read Grif(fin). 

356, towards top, read (Philippa) Petty. 

377, foot of pedigree, ... Finmore of S. Edm. H. was William Finmore. 

379, line 2 from foot, read (Robert) Newlin, son of parson (Thomas) Newlin. 

414, note 2, delete two first lines and sitbstittite Elizabeth Capel. 

447, note 6, for Do(rothy) read Do(minic). 

456, towards middle, read (filius) baronis Berkley. 

463, middle, for (chosen) read (took his place as). 

464, first line, for Thomas read John Mayow. 
469, middle, for Robert read George Langton. 
469, last line, read wood (and) pipes. 

489, line 6 from foot, for 1676 read 1686. 
509, middle, for i860 read 1680. 

511, middle, read Mr. (John) Rogers. 

512, towards foot, read Elector was here (see ii. 495). 

513, middle, read (Robert) Matthew. 

514, towards foot, for (William) read (Thomas) Ashton. 
521, towards foot, read (George) Vernon. 

538, line 4 from foot, possibly (Edward) Bosvile. 

539, towards middle, read son of (William) Yate. 

542, in notes 1 and 2, read F 4 ; and in note 7, read 'partiality.' 
551, line 3, the high-sheriff is probably Edmund Gregory. 
558, line 6 from foot, read of (William) Howell. 



xiv 



ERRATA AND ADDENDA. 



IN VOLUME III. 

3, the names seem to be (John) Wallis, son of Dr. John ; (John) Smith, son 

of Dr. John ; (Elizabeth) Hopkyns, daughter of (George) Gale. 
5, middle, for Beeson read Beeston. 
7, line 13, read wife (Susan). 

10, lines 5 and 10, read Mr. (William) Ward. 

11, towards middle, read (Roger) Puliston. 

15, line 6 from foot, read Mr. (Richard) Knight. 

16, line 3, read (Walter) Combes. 

24, line 6 from foot, John Collins was the author. 
27, line 3, read (John) Gardiner. 
29, line 2 from foot, probably (Humphrey) Prideaux. 
35, line 6 from foot, for Wallery read Waller. 

37, last line, for (Samuel) read (George) Benson. 

38, end of note 5, read and the godmother was Anne. 
46, middle, for eldest read second son of Heneage. 
57, line 10 from foot, read they (say). 

60, towards foot, for Eedes read Eeles. 

64, towards middle, for pr(otestant) read pr(esbyterian). 

68, note 2, delete the first line. 

71, note, for 1684 read 1664. 

94, towards end, ... Wood a chirurgion was possibly Thomas ; and in note 3, 

... wife of Basil Wood was Jane. 
102, in col. 2 of note, for MS. F 11 readMS. F 8. 
106, middle, Mris Sheldon is Mary Anne. 

115, middle, the heralds are (Henry) Dethick and (Robert) Denis, i.e. Devenish ; 
the pursuivants are (Gregory) King and (Henry) Ball. 

119, in first column of note, read Mr. (James) Hearne's, and at foot of 2nd 

column, for (John) read (Will.) Washbourne. 

120, foot, for Ch(arles) read Gilbert Sheringdon. 
145, middle, read (John) Philipps, of Oxon. 

147, note, the ' pile or' is probably an error here and in the diagram on p, 146. 

A better guess is that it is a crown, partly cut off by the canton. 
165, towards foot, for Sir Thomas read Sir John Trevor. 

173, foot, read (Samuel) Masters, minister of Bridew(ell). 

1 74, the inquiry of May 3 is for ' deanes and canons (of Bristol)' ; and in July, 

for (John) read (Walter) Chetwind. 

175, in Nov. 7, read Mr. (Joshua) Walker. 

177, top and note 1, 3 March, 1686, if correct, seems to be i68f, an unusual 

thing with Wood. But it is possibly a slip for 30 March. 
182, middle, read (Michael) Wells. 
189, about middle, for 1586 read 1686. 

192, towards foot, os. lod. is probably in error for 15J. lod. : see p. 197. 

194, after 10 Aug., T., 1686, insert 1 S. Laurence day, at a little before one in 

the morning ' ; and, at the end, add, ' sine prole.' In the next sentence, 
read(S\x Compton) Read, baronet. In note 2, read (Francis) Haywood. 

195, middle, i.e. Katherine Jackson, widow of Henry, B.D. 
198, middle, read (Court day at) Haliwell. 



ERRATA AND ADDENDA. 



xv 



205, middle, read Mr. (Edward) Coxson. 

206, under date Nov. 27, note that the Sheldons were not only Romanists but 

connected with Sir Thomas More's family. 
221, towards foot, read (William) Wright, son of. 
224, note 5, for (Henry) read (Harvey). 
240, middle, read (John) Low, of Fisherton. 

245, note 4, Wood's informant would be Ch(ristopher) W(ase), the bedell. 

251, under Jan. 22, read Newhaven in (New) England. 

252, line 4, read (Matthew) Turner : delete note 4 : Henry Birkhead is meant. 
258, towards foot, read alderman (Thomas) Eustace. 

264, top, read (William) Finmore, (Philip) Leigh. 
267, towards foot, read Cudworth of Kidlyngton. 
279, towards foot, read Ellis for the king. 
283, line 10, for (Thomas) read (Richard) Savage. 
294, middle, for Charles II's read Charles I's. 

294, foot, and 295, top, Dr. ... Vaughan is Henry Vaughan. 

295, first line, read G(eorge) Passmere ; and, middle, r^afMore of Loseley. 
297, note 4, Joshua Walker is the one. 

305, foot, for (Edward) read (Robert Rich). 

308, towards foot, 'father-in-law' means 'step-father,' see p. 242. In Essex 
I find ' mother-in-law ' still in use for ' step-mother.' 

310, line 4 from foot, for S. Mary's read S. Martin's. 

311, last line, read Charles II ; a letter has dropped. 
317, last line, read (Philip} Burton, (Richard) Graham. 
328, note 5, for Oxon read Exon. 

331, foot, lord Cornbury was Edward Hyde. 

334, first line, read 12 July, Act Saturday, 1690, (John) Mayot, son of (John) 

Mayot, (was) borne. 
33 7 j top, read colonel (Francis) Lutterel's. 
344, towards middle, read mccccc decimo octavo. 

347, middle, for Killalow read Killala. 

348, first line, possibly Inglis is the name. 

349, middle, for (? Robert) read (John) Hook ; and foot, read Mr, (Joshua) 

Walker of Billing. 
358, middle, read pillow-beere, i.e. pillow-case. 
360, note 7, for 3rd read 5th earl. 
370, note 2, for second read first viscount. 
372, towards middle, for Cherlton read Cheriton. 
377, foot, read Mr. (Richard) Graham. 
390, note 2, for twelfth read thirteenth baron. 
398, top, the author was James Tyrrell. 

402, top, read Flanders ; note 7, for George read Robert, earl of Cardigan. 
404, note 4, read Charles Pawlet, marquis of Winchester, succeeded in 1699 as 

2nd duke of Bolton. 
413, top, read (Matthew) Bryan. 

425, towards middle, for Richard read William Paynter. 

446, note 2, for 1797 read 1697. 

450, middle, the town-clerk was Job Slatford. 

458, note 2, read know (your) unworthiness. 

459, top, read (Philip) Burton, (Richard) Graham ; and in note 4, for second 

read third earl. 



XVI 



ERRATA AND ADDENDA. 



463, top, read (William) Standish ; and in note IX, for third read second 

baron. 

464, note II, for Sir John read Sir William Walter. 

467, delete note 5 : the person meant is Henry Maynard, son of William, 2nd 
baron Maynard of Easton. 

474, top, read (Edward) Stanley. 

475, foot, read (Job) Slatford, (Samuel) Thurston. 

480, top, read (Robert) Newlin, steward. 

481, foot, for (William) read (Edward) Joyner. 

482, top, read (Edward) Gee. 

486, top, Wood's correction to Shrewsbury is wrong; in note 1, for Thomas 

Brudenell, 1st earl, read Robert Brudenell, 2nd earl. 
492, middle, for jli. os. read jli. \os. : see p. 491. 
529, foot, for John read Joseph Harwar. 
531, line 2, for Dr. read Ds. 



IN VOLUME IV. 

69, line 5 from foot, Mr. Walker is probably Obadiah Walker ; and so also 

p. 70, middle. 

70, line 6, Mr. Wheeler is Geo. Wheler of Lincoln College. 
89, middle, read (George) Bury of Culham. 

138, line 2 from foot, for Dr. (? Richard) read Dr. (Edward) James. 

145, middle, read Elizabeth, 1566 Aug., and Charles I, 1636. 

172, middle, read 1609-163 2. 

176, towards middle, read Mr. (Robert) Bowyer. 

193, add to the notice of Aubrey : — 

(xv) 26 letters by John Aubrey to Edward Lhuyd, 169 1-4 : see Mr. 
Madan's Summary Catalogue, No. 25184. 
213, foot, read 1642. 

233, add :— 

G. 10 is MS. Aubr. 8, fol. 69. 
P. 3 is Wood MS. F 49, fol. 129. 

234, add :— 

J J. 19 is Wood MS. F 49, fol. 100. 

^ 12 is Wood MS. F 49, fol. 127. 
^£ 14 is Wood MS. F 39, fol. 116. 
0 10 is Wood MS. F 39, fol. 427. 
264, foot, for ? Edward Sackville, fourth earl, read Thomas Sackville, first earl. 
Twyne's visit to Knole was paid while he was composing his Apologia 
Antiq. Oxon., i.e. before 1608. 



WOODS LIFE AND TIMES. 



WOOD'S REGISTER OF HIS OWN FAMILY. 

(This very interesting MS., formerly MS. no. 7018 in the library 
of Sir Thomas Phillipps. has now happily been acquired by the 
Bodleian, and placed beside our author's other writings : press-mark 
MS. Wood 26, no. 32,447 in Mr. Madan's Summary Catalogue. 

It was originally a small vellum book, into which Wood placed 
loosely several slips of paper germane to it. When, in modern 
times, the book was rebound, these slips were bound in at the end, 
and are now pp. 54-80 of the MS. 

For practical purposes we may say that the MS., as now made up, 
consists of four parts. 

(A). The vellum portion. On pp. 1-14 of this, Wood, in 1663, 
wrote the history of his family up to that year, and afterwards, on 
pp. 15-19, from time to time, brought the narrative down to 1684. 
— The date 1663 is fixed by the statement on p. 12 of the MS., and 
also by this note on p. ii v — 



' For the vellam of this book, 4s. 
To John Barnes for the binding 1 of it, 6d. 




This first portion of the MS. is here printed in full. 

(B). Of the paper sheets, pp. 54-56 represent the first draft of the 
first portion of the history. Some parts 2 of this are here printed, 
since they show, better than the later draft, how much of Wood's 
information was guess-work. With these I have printed two papers 
of notes (pp. 57-59, 79-80), which Wood obtained in aid of his first 
sketch. 

1 ' Russian ' is written by Wood on seded by the later (i. e. vellum) draft 
p. ii, probably a direction for the binding. I have left out. 

2 Those portions which are super- 
VOL. V. B 



2 WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 

(C) . A second part of the paper sheets, pp. 67-72, contains Wood's 
notes for the continuation of his history from 1663 to 1684. These 
are not printed here. Most of them are superseded by the second 
draft (pp. 15-19) of the MS. The few which are of independent 
value have already been printed in this edition, see, e. g., vol. ii. 
p. 100. 

(D) . The remaining portions of the paper slips, pp. 61-66, 74, 
77-78, are notes for a continuation of the history from 1684 to 1694. 
These have, however, been printed, in order of time, in vol. iii, almost 
verbatim, and are therefore here omitted.) 



A 1 genealogicall table to the book following. 



... a Wood (or Atwood), m. 
p. 1. I 



Emme, married 
to G. Makyne, 
afterwards to 
W. Yate, 
p. 1. 



I 

Alice, m. to 
John Beare, 
afterwards to 
John Bolton, 
p. 1. 



Mary, m. to 
John Barncot, 
p. 2. 



Richard, m. Elizabeth Jackson, 
p. 2. 



(1) Margaret, 
his first 
wife, p. 5. 



. Thomas, n Mari< 
PP. 2, 5, r 



Roderick, 
P- 5- 



P- 7- 



I 

3 M 



o P 



I I 



Robert, m. Mary 



pp.6, 10. 



T3 T) 



00 



Drope, 
p. 10. 



I 

> (1) Elizabeth 

g, Seymour, 

§ PP- 9, 



. Christopher, 
PP- 7» 9, r 7- 



. (2) Margerie ^ 
Hanks, g 

P- J 7- « 



tr o 
o a* 

B g. 

w "* 

- -d 
T3 ' 



I I I 



w > 

I s 



1 — 1 n 



l l 1 

w > o 



I I 



£ N 3 2 
>T3 "t3 00 ^ M 



1 Pp. v v and vi of the MS. : the references are to the pages of the MS., 
given in the text in angular brackets. 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



3 



{ Wood's great-grandfather and his issue.} 

(p. 1). [Richard *] a Wood, or at Wood, of the parish of 
Croston neare Preston in com. Lane., died in the Castle at Lancaster 
about the latter end of the year 1568, xi of 2 Queen Elizabeth, and 
was buried within the precincts (the churchyard, as I suppose) of the 
church at Lancaster. 

It hath been reported by antient people of our familie that, after he 
had buried his wife at Croston, he took upon him priestlie orders in 
the beginning of Queen Marie, and continued in them and the 
Catholic religion so zealously, that, when religion was changed in 
the beginning of Queen Elizabeth, he refused to acknowledge the said 
Queen's supreamacy over the Church of England. For which being 
questioned, was committed a prisoner to the said Castle, where he 
remained seven yeares or more, not eating a bit of flesh, as 'tis said, 
in all that time. 

(I) ix May anno 1568, Emme Wod, or a Wod, daughter of the 
said [Richard s ], was married in the church of Einsham in com. Oxon. 
to George Makyne, an inhabitant therof ; but he dying the ix of 
March anno 1587 4 , shee took to her second husband William Yate, 
of the same place 5 (descended from his name at Witney) on the vii of 
November anno 1588. Shee 6 was buried in Einsham churchyard 
1 April anno 1603 (1 Regis Jacobi), leaving no issue behind her by 
either. 

(II) Anno 1577, or therabouts, Alice a Wood, another daughter, 
was married to John Beare of Einsham, a native of 7 Bucknell in 
com. . . ., by whom she had issue: but burying him at Einsham, 
v Sept. 1595, shee took to her second husband John Bolton, of that 
Einston by Chippingnorton called Neat-Einston, but shee had no 
issue by him. She died a verie old woman on the xxix of April, 1634, 
and was buried in Einston churchyard. This woman would tell my 
father (Thomas Wood) severall stories of her father, and other 
relations before him, all which are lost. Her daughter Elizabeth 

1 'Richard' is in pencil, being only 5 The earlier draft on p. 55 of the 
a guess. MS. says ' taylor.' 

2 In this vellum part of the Register 6 The earlier draft says : ' She lived 
Wood favours the Latin numerals, but, and died a church papist,' i. e., probably, 
it may be noted, he everywhere writes a Romanist who outwardly conformed 
xi instead of 11, probably to avoid to the English church. Contrast a 
confusion with II and ii. 'strong' papist, p. 4, note 1. 

3 ' Richard,' in pencil only. 7 Marginal note : — ' Bickenhill in 

4 i.e. I58-|- com. Warwick.' 

B 2 



4 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Bcare, who was twice married at Einston, and who died anno 1668, 
aged 80, hath told me some (as shee had them from her mother), 
which I shall remember in another book. 

(p. 2). (Ill) xi July 1587, Mary Wood, a third daughter, was 
married in Einsham church to John Barncot of Einsham, by whom 
shee 1 had severall children, the eldest of which was named Thomas, 
whom I remember well. He was tall and proper, a freemason by 
trade; and died at Einsham in the 77 year of his age, anno 1665, 
13 June. 

Note that the aforesaid three daughters, Emme, Alice, and Mary, 
were borne in the parish of Croston, and, being meniall servants in 
the familie of the earl of Derbie, to whome their father had been 
tenant, removed with him to Einsham to his seate there on the site of 
the abbey : where remaining some yeares, were married to his tenants 
there. 

((IV) (V)) Tis also to be noted that there were two or more 
brothers. 

One is said to succeed in the father's estate in the parish of Croston, 
but of him and his issue I know nothing as yet. 

The other was Richard a Wood, my grandfather, who being a boy 
was taken thence and brought neare London by Robert Wood, gent., 
his godfather and kinsman, which Robert, having newlie setled himselfe 
at Islingdon neare London brought up Richard, his godson, in his 
familie ; and when he was at man's estate, he married and became 
tenant to Robert there, by holding of him a house and land, now 
knowne by the name of the Whyte Lyon. 

( Wood's grandfather and his issue?) 

In the beginning of the year 1575 2 , the said Richard a Wood, 
an inhabitant of Islingdon in that end of the towne which is in the 
parish of Clarkenwell, was wedded to Elizabeth Jackson, sister to 
Henry Jackson of S. Marie's parish Oxon, draper : which Elizabeth 
and Henry came from Preston in Lancashire. 

(I) xv Januar. 1575 3 , Robert, son of the (said) Richard a Wood, 
was baptized at Islingdon. Borne also there, but died yong. 

(II) 1 Nov. 1577, Anne Wood, daughter of the said Richard, 
baptized at Islingdon. Buried there 7 December following. 

1 The earlier draft on p. 55 of the 2 The year beginning March 25. 
MS. says : 'This Mary Barncot lived 3 i.e. 157I. 
and died a strong papist.' 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



5 



(III) iv Januar. 1579 \ Richard, son of the said Richard a Wood 2 , 
baptized there also. Lived to man's estate, and died without issue. 

(IV) xxix Januar. 1580 3 , Thomas, another son of the said Richard 
a Wood, was baptized at Islingdon. He was afterwards bred a 
scholar in Corpus Christi college in Oxon, where taking the degree 
of Bachelaure of (p. 3) Arts, translated himselfe to Broadgates hall, 
now Pembroke college, where he took the degree of Bachelaur of 
Civill Lawe. He was tall and bigge, and in his yonger dayes verie 
strong and active in manlie sports and recreations, as foot-ball, 
wrestling, ringing i , etc. See more of him in pages 5 and 8. 

(V) xxii Aprill 1582, James a Wood, another son of the said 
Richard by Elizabeth his wife, was baptized at Islingdon. He had 
no education but what the grammar schoole afforded, yet being 
handsome and gay, obtained the affections of a gentleman's daughter 
of Surrey called Cole, whome he marrying by stealth because of her 
great portion, were presently parted, so that, as I have heard, he did 
not so much as bed her. With the portion left him by his father and 
mother, he bought a copiehold of the lord Norris at Wytham in 
Berks neare Oxon, worth now (upon my enquirie) fortie pound per 
annum. See more in page 6. 

(VI) iv October, anno 1584, Myles Wood, another son of the said 
Richard, was baptized at Islingdon. Buried there xxix August 
1588. 

(VII) vii July, anno 1588, Elizabeth a Wood, another daughter of 
the said Richard, was baptized at Islingdon. Married at xvii yeares 
of age from her uncle's house (Henry Jackson) in S. Marie's parish, 
Oxon. Shee died iv of Julie 1627, and was buried in St. George's 
chappell in the Castle at Wyndsoure. She was a fat comlie woman. 
See more in page 5. 

xv Aprill 1594, Richard a. Wood, father of the seaven sons and 
daughters just mentioned before, died at Islingdon in his house 
(afterward called the White Lyon), aged 58 or therabouts, and was, 
the next day, buried in Islingdon church. — He was a person tall and 
proper (as his three sisters beforementioned were); prudent and 
frugall ; and in latter yeares inclining to corpu(p. 4)lency. A loving 

1 15!$. used to tell how when he was curate 

2 The earlier draft on p. 58 says of Long-Combe, near Woodstock, his 
' borne at S. James Clarkenwell.' parishioners, mostly masons, spent their 

3 1 58^. days of enforced idleness by frost in 

4 i.e. bell-ringing: see i. 219. The ringing the church bells, 
late Washbourne West of Line. Coll. 



6 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



neighbour, charitable to the poore, and a compromiser of differences 
in the place where he lived. In these qualities he was imitated by 
his son Thomas, of Oxon. — His will I have sought after in the 
Prerogative office, and Register's office belonging to the bishop of 
London ; but as yet I can find none. 

xxviii December 1 1596, Elizabeth, widdow of the said Richard 
a Wood, died in her house in Islingdon in the parish of Clerkenwell, 
and was the next day buried by her husband in Islingdon church. 
She was of a middle size and fat, of large eyes and Roman nose ; and 
so good, charitable, and loving to the neighbourhood, that, for 
distinction from those of Robert's race (her husband's godfather), shee 
was called by some ' loving Mris. Wood,' and by others ' good Mris. 
Wood.' — The children living at her death were, Richard, Thomas, 
James, and Elizabeth, the last of which had given to her by her 
mother by will five hundred pounds ; and the three sons being 
executors to their mother were left worth at least, as I have heard it 
often reported, 500 pounds a-piece, but cosened of much of it by 
their uncle, Henry Jackson of Oxon, their overseer or guardian till 
they came of age. — In the will of the said Elizabeth, dated xxi day of 
December, 39 Queen Elizabeth, Domini 1596, proved ult. Dec. eodem 
anno, shee gives and bequeaths 5 pounds to her mother, and to her 
sister Joane Glastenborow (or Glasenborow) one cloth gowne, etc. 
The former was, as I conceive, her owne mother, Jackson, that 
then lived with her ; and the other, her owne sister, married to one 
Glasenborow, but of what place I cannot tell, or where then shee 
lived. I remember when I was a boy I heard much talke of that 
name. — Shee also bequeathed to 'her cozen' Thomas Wood, 
servant to Mr. Solam, ten pounds. Who that Thomas was, in truth, 
I cannot tell, unless her husband's eldest brother's son (but, if it were 
so, then shee would call him nephew). It seemes he lived at or neare 
Islingdon, if not haply in her house there. In Islingdon register 
I find one Thomas Wood to be buried there xiii August 1589, and 
another Thomas Wood to be buried (from Holloway neare Islingdon) 
xiii September 1593; but what kin these two Toms were to the 
former, or whether kin to Robert, I cannot yet tell — quaere. 

( Wood's father s first match.) 

(p. 5). a. d. 1603, Thomas a Woode, second son of Richard 
a Wood before-mentioned, was married to his wife Margaret Wood, 

1 'November' in the earlier draft on p. 57 of the MS. wrongly. 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



7 



daughter of Hugh Wood, of the countie of Kent, at Woodeaton, co. 
Oxon. 

By her the said Thomas a Woode had issue a sonne, borne in the 
parish of St. Marie's in Oxon, and baptized there by the name of 
Rodericke, Aprill v, anno 1604, assuming that name from one of his 
godfathers that then stood, viz. Rodericke Lloyd, Bac. of the Civill 
Law and one of the fellows of Allsowles college in Oxon; but the 
said Roderick a Woode died, and was buried the xiv of the same 
mounth of Aprill in S. Marie's church. 

[Januar. xxix, anno Domini 1605 *, Elizabeth a Woode, the only 
daughter of Richard Woode beforementioned, was joyned in wedlocke 
in S. Marie's church, Oxon, to Thomas Frith, Master of Arts and 
fellowe of Allsowles college. He was a Kentish man, and afterwards 
Bac. of Divinity and one of the praebends of the churche of Wynd- 
soure, in which praeferment he abode to the day of his death.] 

xiiii July, in festo S. Bonaventurae 2 , a. d. 1621, the said Margaret, 
wife of Thomas a Woode, departed this mortall lyfe in her howse in 
Tetsworth, com. Oxon, and was buried in the bodie of the church 
there, dedicated to the memory of S. Giles. — She had other children 
by her husband, but never received baptisme. 

( Wood's father s second match and z'ssue.} 

x October, in festo S. Paulini Eboracensis archiepiscopi, anno 
Domini 1622, Thomas a Woode, aforesaid, was wedded to his 
second wife, Mary, at Wytney, comit. Oxon., he being at Candlemas 
folio wyng of the age of xxxxii, and she at Chrystmas folio wyng of the 
age of xxi. 

She was the sole dawghter of Robert Pettie of Wiefold and 
Cottsford, com. Oxon., gentleman, by his wife Penelope Taverner, in 
whose brother's howse (Richard Taverner, esquyre), viz., in the 
mannour-place of Wood-eaton, com. Oxon., she was borne. 

(p. 6). (I) xxiv May, being Munday, a.d. 1624, Thomas a Woode, 
the eldest sonne of Thomas Woode of the parish of S. John Baptyst, 
Oxon, gent., was borne at Tetsworth, at his father's, betweene eight 
and nine of the clock at night. — His godfathers were Charnell 
Pettie of Tetsworth, esquire, his kinsman, and Master Michael 
Sanders of Adwell, com. Oxon., gent. ; and his godmother was Mrs. 
Jone Brookes, the wife of Master John Brookes of Postcombe in the 
said county, gent. 

1 i6of. 2 ' Bonaventuri' in MS. 



8 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



(II) iii September a. d. 1627, being Munday and the feast of 
S. Gregory, Edward Woode, seconde sonnc of Thomas Woode, gent., 
by his wife Mary, was bom at his father's howsc, in S. John Baptist 
parish Oxon, called of old time Portionists' or Postmasters' hawle, 
opposite to the forefront of Merton Colledge, circa horam quintam 
matutini. — His godfathers were Mr. Edward 1 Carpender, sometimes 
fellowe of Merton college and then counsellour of Lyncolne's Ynne, 
and Master Thomas Blagrave of S. Ebb's parish, gent. ; and his god- 
mother, Mrs. Jane Dewey, wife of Master William Dewey, A.M. of the 
Universitye of Oxon. 

[In the mounth of September anno Domini 1629, James Woode, 
third sonne of Richard Woode aforesaid and Elizabeth his wyfe, 
departed this mortall lyfe at Portionysts' hawle, and was buried in the 
north isle of the collegiate parishe churche of S. John Baptyst de 
Merton, Oxon.] 

(III) xiii June, anno Domini 1630, being Sunday and the day of 
S. Anthony of Padua, Robert Wood, third son of Thomas Woode 
aforesaid and Mary his wyfe, was borne at Portionysts' (hall) in 
S. John Baptist's parish, circa horam quartam matutini. — His god- 
fathers were John Doughtye, A.M. and fellow of Merton colledge, and 
Master I. 2 Thymble, esquyre-bedell in Divinitye ; and his godmother 
was Mrs. Margery Blagrave of (p. 7) S. Gyleses in Oxon, the wife of 
John Blagrave, A.M. of the Universitye therof. 

(IV) xvii December, anno Domini 1632, being then Munday and 
the day of S. Lazarus, Anthony a Woode, the fowrth sonne of Thomas 
Woode and Mary his wife, was borne at Portionists' or Postmasters' 
haule in S. John Baptist's parish, Oxon, circa horam quartam 
matutini. — His godfathers were Anthony Clopton, Bachelour of 
Divinity and fellowe of the college call'd Corpus Christi Colledge, 
and Edwarde Dawson, A.M. and a practicioner in physycke 3 ; and 
his godmother was Mistris Katherine Seamore, wife to Master William 
Seamore of Oxon, gentleman. 

(V) ii July, anno Domini 1635, being Thursday and the day of 
S. Marcelline, Christopher a Woode, the fift sonne of Thomas Woode 



1 There are several exceptions, e.g. 
Thomas just mentioned and Robert 
infra, but, as a rule, children at this 
time took their baptismal name from 
a godparent, and their name-godparent 
was expected to take a special interest 
in them. 



2 'John.' 

3 Marginal note : — ' D.M. of Lyncoln 
college, 1633.' A member of Lincoln 
College may be pardoned noting with 
pleasure this early association of his 
College with the historian of Oxford. 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



9 



and Mary his wife, was borne at Portionysts' hawle, betweene 6 and 
7 of the clocke in the morning. — His godfathers were Master 
Christopher Petty, gent., the eldest sonne of Charnell Petty, esquire, 
aforesaid, and Master Harcourt Petty, gent., uncle by the mother's 
side to the party baptized ; and his godmother was Mistrys Eleanor 
Davis, of Milton, com. Oxon., the daughter of the said Charnell 
Petty, but now the wife of John Cave, clerk, and parson of Milton 
aforesaid. 

(VI) ix Aprill, anno Domini 1638, being then Munday and the day 
of the VII Virgins, John Woode, the sixth sonne of Thomas Woode 
and Mary his wife, was borne betweene the howres of twelve and one in 
the night. — His godfathers were John Bainbridge, Doctor of Phisicke 
and Astronomy professor of Oxon, and Master Alexander Fisher, 
A.M. and then subwarden of Merton colledge; his godmother was 
Mistris Martha lies, wife of Dr. Thomas lies, Doctor (p. 8) of 
Divinity and one of the cannons of the Cathedrall of Christ 
Church in Oxon. — viii March, anno Domini 1639 l , the said John 
Woode departed this mortall life at Portionysts' haule, where he was 
borne, and was buried in the north isle of the collegiate parish church 
of S. John Baptyst de Merton. 

xix of January, anno Domini 1642 2 , being then Thursday, Thomas 
Woode before-mentioned, sonne of Richard a Woode, departed this 
mortall life at his howse in S. John Baptist parysh Oxon, about iv of 
the clock in the morning, being then of the age of lxii ; and was 
buried the same day at night in the parish church by the graves 
of James his brother and John Woode his sonn. He left behind 
him v sonns living, viz. Thomas, a student of Christ Church ; 
Edward, a scholler of Trinity college; Robert, then a sojournour 
at Bloys in France ; Anthony ; and Christopher. 

(Deaths of Wood's brothers Thomas and Edward.} 

Anno Domini 1651, Thomas a Woode 3 , the eldest sonne of 
Thomas Woode aforesaid, resigned up his last breath at Tredagh, or 
Drog(h)eda, in Ireland. He was then a captaine-leiutenant under 



1 i6f$. 

2 164$. On p. 67 of the MS. is 
a note (of which Wood says ' By whom 
written unless Edward Wood I cannot 
tell'), to this effect: — 'January the 19 
in the yeare of our Lord God 1642, 
Thomas Wood, gent., in the University 
of Oxon, departed this life, being one 



(i.e. on) Thursday, about 4 of the clocke 
in the morning.' A second note follows, 
in a different hand : — ' paid for his 
funerall, 13/z. i\s. 10^.' 

3 Marginal note : — 1 He was one of 
the students of Christ Church : created 
Bac. of Arts, Nov. 2, 1642.' 



)() 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



colloncll Henry Ingolsby, in his owne (or his senior) company, 
against the rebells there. He was one that had alwaies behaved 
himselfe with great valour and courage in all battles and skirmishes 
that he had engaged himselfe in, and would have rose to a consider- 
able degree of honnour in a short time (to the credit of his poore 
family) if life had bin a little longer spared : but, being overtaken 
with the country desease that then raged (viz., the bloody flyx), 
all hopes were in a trice blasted, and was at the same place in 
the church of Drogeda laid in the bed of honour by the chiefest 
of the officers of his regiment (which were of foot), being then in 
the xxvii yeare of his age. 

(p. 9). xxii of May, anno Domini 1655, being then Tuesday 
and the day of S. Julia the Virgin, Edward Woode, A.M. and 
second sonne of Thomas Woode, departed this mortall lyfe at 
Portionysts' haule, about the xxviii year of his age. He was first 
a student in Merton college, afterwards a scholler in Trinity, then 
of Merton againe anno Domini 1648; where, having bin freely 1 
elected proctour of the University of Oxon to serve for the yeare 
1655, was immaturely deprived of his lyfe after he had enjoyed 
it v weeks. He was buryed the Thursday followyng, being then 
Holy Thursday, in the collegiate parish church of S. John Baptyst 
de Merton, accompanied by the cheife magistrates and all degrees 
of the University, with great solemnity, to his grave. 

{Matches and issue of Wood's hr others Christopher and Robert.) 

xiii of Aprill, anno Domini 1658, being then Tuesday in Easter 
weeke, Christopher Woode, the fift son of Thomas Woode by 
Mary his seconde wife, was joyned in wedlocke to Elizabethe 
Seymoure, in Queen's Colledge chappell, Oxon, by Master John 
Beby, fellowe of the same colledge. She was the youngest of the 
two daughters of Master William Seymoure, gentleman, attorney in 
the common pleas, and Katherine Fisher his wife, and borne in 
Lumbard (or Slaying) lane in S. Aldat's parishe, Oxon, about 
Midsommer-tyde anno Domini 1632 and baptized there the first 
of July followyng : soe that at her marriage she was of the age of 
xxvi compleat lackyng two mounths or therabouts, and he (her 
husband) at the age of xxiii, lackyng 10 weekes. 

(I) Mary, daughter of Christopher, vii June, a.d. 1659, being 

1 Wood specially notes this, because were dictated by the Parliamentary 
many College appointments at this time Visitors. 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



ii 



then Tuesday, Mary Woode, the first begotten childe of Christopher 
Woode by Elizabeth his wife, (p. 10) was borne at one of the 
clock in the afternoone at his house in S. Peter's the Bailive, Oxon, 
in the old Bocherew, being the utmost house in that parysh next 
to S. Martyn's on the south side of the street. — Her godfather 
was Master John Longford, vicar of Comner com. Berks; and her 
godmothers were Mastris Mary Woode, her father's mother, and 
Mastris Katherine Rowney, her mother's mother. — xxii February 
a. d. 1659 \ being then Wednesday, the said Mary Woode, daughter 
of Christopher Woode, departed this mortall life at the said howse 
of her father, being then about viii mounths old, and was buried 
by the grave of her grandfather Thomas Woode in the collegiat 
parish church of S. John Baptist de Merton. 

xxix of September anno Domini 1659, being then the feast of 
S. Michaell the archangel!, and then Thursday, Robert Woode, 
the third sonne of Thomas Woode beforementioned, gent., was 
joyned in wedlocke to Mary Drope at South Hynxsey, com. Berks, 
by Master John Longford, vicar of Comnor. She was the only 
dawghter of Thomas Drope, Bachelour of Divinity, somtimes 
chapleine of Magdalen colledge, afterwards vicar of Comnore, com. 
Berks., rector of Ardley, com. Oxon. [and 2 rector of Ainoe com. 
Northampton], by Anne Peacocke, one of the dawghters of Master 
John Peacocke of Chawley in the parish of Comnor. She, the said 
Mary Drope, was borne in the vicaridge howse of Comnor the viii 
of March, anno Domini 1637 3 : soe that when she <p. 11) was 
married she was of the age of xxii the March followyng, and he 
(her husband) of the age of xxix (years), iii mounths, and 
odde dayes. 

(I) Mary, daughter of Robert, iv of July, anno Domini 1660, 
being then Wednesday and the day of S. Ulriche 4 , Mary Wood, 
the first begotten childe of Robert Woode and Mary his wife, was 
borne at Portyonysts' haule in S. John Baptist's parish, Oxon, 
a little before xii of the clocke at night. — Her godfather was 
Master John Longford, A.M. and vicar of Comnore ; and her god- 
mothers were Mastrys Mary Peacocke, widdow of Master John 

1 i6-£#. of Saints' days, we must observe certainly 

2 These words are scored out in Wood's antiquarian tastes. Are we also 
pencil, Wood perhaps having found out to infer Romanist sympathies, or at 
that the statement was wrong. least the influence of association with 

3 i.e. 163I. Romanist friends ? 

4 In these exceptionally minute notices 



12 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Peacocke of Chawley, her great-grandmother by her mother's side, 
and Mastrys Mary Woode, her grandmother by her father's side. 

(II) Thomas, son of Christopher, v of September, anno Domini 
1660, being then Wednesday, and the day of S. JBertine, Thomas 
Woode, the second begotten childe and first sonne of Christopher 
Woode by Elizabeth his wife, was borne at his father's howse in 
the Bocherew in the parish of S. Peter's in the Baylie, Oxon, before- 
mentioned, a little before foure of the clocke in the morning 1 . — 
His godfathers were Master Thomas Seymoure of Grandpont in 
Oxon, his mother's uncle, and Master Thomas Rowney of S. Peter's 
parish in the Bayly, the second husband of his mother's mother : 
and his godmother was Mastrys Mary Wood, his grandmother by 
his father's side and widdow of Thomas Woode of the parysh of 
St. John Baptist in Oxon, gentleman. 

(p. 12). (II) Thomas, son of Robert, xx of September, anno 
Domini 1661, being then Friday and the day (of) S. Fausta, Thomas 
Woode, the second begotten child and the first sonne of Robert 
Woode by Mary his wife, was borne at Portionysts' haul in S. John 
Baptyst's parysh, Oxon, about a quarter or halfe an howre past one 
in the mornyng. — His godfathers were Edward Drope, Doctour in 
Divinity, one of the seniour fellowes of Magdglen 2 colledge and great- 
uncle to the said Thomas Woode by his mother's syde, and Edmund 
Dickenson, Doctour of Physicke and one of the seniour fellowes of 
Merton colledge. His godmother was Mastrys Anne Drope, his 
grandmother by his mother's side. 

(III) Ann, daughter of Christopher, xxvii of December, anno 
Domini 1661, being then Friday and the day of S. John the 
Evangelist, Anne Woode, the third begotten childe of Christopher 
Woode by Elizabeth his wife, was borne about the third houre in 
the mornyng at her father's howse in the parish of S. Peter's in 
the Bayly, being the corner howse belonging to S. Michaell's church 
at the south end of Bullock's lane. — Her godfather was Henry 
Davis, one of the yeoman-bedles of the University of Oxon ; and her 
godmothers were Mastrys Anne Harris, wife of John Harris of 
S. Michaell's parish, Oxon, somtimes baylive, and now this yeare 
(1663) mayor of Oxon, and Mastrys Dorothy Lovedy, wyfe of Master 
(Matthew) Lovedy of the Blewbore in the parish of S. Aldate, 
Oxon, inholder. 



1 The exactness of the hour, here and elsewhere, is due to astrological con- 
siderations. 2 sic. 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



13 



(III) Robert, son of Robert, ii day of January in the yeare of owre 
Lord God 1662(f), being then Friday and with (p. 13) some the 
day of Abel and Seth, or the morrow after the Circumcision, Robert 
Woode, the third begotten childe and second sonne of Robert Woode 
by Mary Drope his wife, was borne about a quarter past fowre of the 
clocke in the afternoone in the howse which his father then lived in 
neare the east end of S. John Baptyst's street in the parish of 
S. Peter's in East in Oxon. — His godfathers at his baptizing in 
S. John Baptyst's church were Master John Beby, Bachelour of 
Divinity and one of the senior fellows of Queen's colledge, and Master 
William Ford, A.M. and one of the senior fellows likewise of Corpus 
Christi colledge. His godmother was Mastrys Katheryne Jackson, 
the widdow of Master Henry Jackson, Bachelour of Divinity and 
later rector of Meiseyhampton com. Gloucester. 

(IV) Elizabeth, daughter' of Christopher, x day of January, anno 
Domini 1662(f), being then Saturday and with some the day of 
S. Sethrid the Virgin, Elizabeth Woode, the fourth begotten childe 
and daughter of Christopher Woode by Elizabeth Seymoure his wife, 
was borne, betweene 9 and ten of the clocke in the morning, at her 
fathers howse aforesaid turning up on the right hand into Bulloke's 
lane in the parish of S. Peter's in the Baylye Oxon. — Her godfather 
was Master Francis Drope, A.M. and fellowe of Magdalen colledge ; 
and her godmothers were Mastrys Anne Peedle, (p. 14) widdow of 
Georg Pedle, aunt by the mother's side to the said Elizabeth, and 
Mastrys Elizabeth Seymoure, daughter of Master Thomas Seymoure 
of Grandpont, her cozen. — xxviii of November, being Saturday, 
anno Domini 1663, tne sa ^ Elizabeth Woode, the 4th childe and 
third daughter of Christopher Woode, deceased at her father's house 
in Saint Peter's in the Baylye, and was buried in St. John Baptist's 
church Oxon by the grave of her grandfather, the Mooneday fol- 
lowyng, the 30 of the mounth aforesaid. 

xviii of May, being the eve of Holy Thursday, anno Domini 1664, 
Anne Woode, the third begotten childe of Christopher Woode afore- 
said, deceased, and was buried the xx of the same mounth by the 
grave of her grandfather Thomas Wood in St. John Baptist's church 
Oxon. 

(IV) fohn, son of Robert, xv August, anno Domini 1664, being 
then Munday and the day of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, 
John Woode, the third sonne of Robert Woode and Mary his wife, 
was borne between the houres of 2 and 3 in the morning at his 
father's house in St. John's parish Oxon opposite to Merton colledge. 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



— His godfa(p. 15)thcrs were Mr. John Peacock of Denman's 
farme in the parish of Cumnore in Berks, gent., commonly called 
coloncll Peacocke, and John Drope, Master of Arts, fellow of 
Magdalen college in Oxon. The former is his mother's uncle ; the 
other, her brother. His godmother was Mris. Susan Holt, wife of 
Thomas Holt, esquier, recorder of Abendon in Berks, aunt to the 
mother of the said John Woode. 

(V) Seymour, son of Christopher. First day of January, anno 
1664 1 , being Sunday and the day of Circumsision, commonlie called 
New Yeares day, Seymoure a Wood, the son of Christopher a Wood, 
commonlie call'd Wood, by Elizabeth his wife, was borne about the 
houre of 1 2 at night in the parish of St. Peter the Balye. — His god- 
fathers at the Christening (Jan. 8), were Thomas Tuder, of Magdalen 
parish in Oxon, gent., and John Boat, of Woodend in Cumnore 
parish, gent. His godmother was Mris. Margerie Coxeter, widdow 
of Georg Coxeter of Bampton in Oxfordshire, gent., afterwards his 
mother-in-law 2 . 

(VI) Catherine, daughter of Christopher. The 24 day of December 
1665, being then Sunday and the eve of Christ's nativity, Katherine a 
Wood, daughter of Christopher a Wood by Elizabeth his wife, was 
borne between the hours of 8 and 9 at night at her father's house in 
St. Peter's the Baylie Oxon, neare the south end of Bullock's lane. — 
Her godfather at her Christening (Jan. 2) was Robert a Wood, gent., 
her father's eldest brother ; and her godmothers were Mris. Grace 
Asteyne, wife of Edward (p. 16) Asteyne, an attorney living in 
St. Martin's parish Oxon, and Mris. Katherine Bateman, wife of 
Thomas Rowney, gent., an attorney living in S. Giles' parish Oxon. 

(V) Ann, daughter of Robert. The 5 day of August, anno 1666, 
being then Sunday, Anne a Wood, daughter of Robert a Wood, 
gent., and Mary his wife, was borne at 3 her father's house in S. John 
Baptist's in Oxon, at five of the clock in the afternoone. — At her 
Christening, on the 12 day of the same monthe, stood for her god- 
father, Thomas Drope, gent., her mother's eldest brother. Her 
godmothers were Mris. Anne Drope of Cumnore, her mother's 
mother, and Edith Finche, wife of Barthelmew Finche, of Magdalen 
parish Oxon, cooke 4 . — Shee, the said Anne Woode, died the 15 day 

1 i66f . 4 In the earlier draft on p. 69, there 

2 i.e. step-mother. follows 1 Mr. John Powell, senior, fellow 

3 In the earlier draft on p. 69 of the of Merton College,' the name of the 
MS., 'at Porstmrs' hall,' a fusion of clergyman officiating at the baptism. 
Portionists' and Postmasters'. 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



15 



of the said monthe, and was buried the day following in Merton 
College church in the north part or ile 1 . 

(VII) Christopher, son of Christopher. The 15 day of December, 
anno 1666, Christopher, son of Christopher a. Wood, gent., by Eliza- 
beth his wife, was borne at his father's house 2 in the parish of 
St. Peter's in the Baylie, Oxon, between 4 and 5 of the clock in 
the afternoone. — His godfathers at his Christening, 21 Dec, were 
Anthony Hall 3 , of St. Martin's parish, vintner, and William Cole, of 
S. Michael's parish, glasier, both at that time ballives of the citie 
of Oxon. His godmother was Mris. . . . Johnson, wife of John 
Johnson, of St. Martin's parish, confectioner. — The said Christopher 
Wood died at Cumnore neare Oxon, being there at nourse, on the 
4 of August 1667, and was buried in the chancell there. 

The 20 of February 1666 4 , being then Ashwednesday according 
to the English accompt, Elizabeth a, Wood, wife of Christopher a 
Wood, departed this life at her house neare the south end of Bullock's 
(p. 17) lane in the parish of St. Peter in the Baylie Oxon, between 
9 and 10 of the clock in the morning, aged 34 and a little more, 
having been a married wife neare 9 yeares. Shee was buried in 
Merton College church, in the north part or ile, on the 22 day of the 
same monthe: at what time Mr. (Christopher) Flower of Merton 
college preached her funerall sermon. 

[February 28, Thursday, Marie, widdow of Thomas a Wood, gent., 
departed this mortall life at her house in St. John Baptist's parish 
Oxon about a quarter past 9 of the clock in the morning, anno 1666 5 
(English accompt), aged 65 yeares and two months, having been 
a widdow 24 years and upwards. Shee was buried March 1, by the 
grave of her somtimes husband.] 

August 28, Tuesday, anno 1667, Christopher a Wood of the parish 
of St. Peter in the Baylie Oxon, gent., tooke to his second wife — 
married by Dionis Huntingdon of S. Alban's hall in Wotton chappell 
neare Cumnore — Margerie, daughter of Tomson Hanks 6 of Aston 
neare Bampton, widdow of George Coxeter of the said towne of 



1 ' under the canopy,' is added in the 
earlier draft. 

2 'next Bullock's lane,' is added in 
the earlier draft. 

3 ' at the Meermaid,' is added in the 
earlier draft. 

4 l66f 

5 i66f 

6 Note at p. 63 of the MS. :— < Thom- 



son Hanks of Bampton and Margerie 
Coxeter were married in St. Martin's 
church Oxon, 25 June 1631. Which 
Thomson having a daughter called 
Margerie, was first married to Georg 
Coxeter, nephew to Margerie before- 
mentioned, and afterwards to Christo- 
pher Wood of Oxon.' 



.6 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Bampton in com. Oxon., gent., shee having then three children by 
her first husband, namclie Gcorg, Margeric, and Anne Coxcter. 

(VI) Edward, son of Robert. Sept. 17, anno 1667, being then 
Tuesday and the day of St. Stephen and Socrates, martyrs, Edward, 
son of Robert a Wood, was borne at his father's house against 
Merton college in the parish of St. John Baptist, Oxon, at halfe an 
houre past seaven of the clock at night. — His godfathers were Anthony 
a Wood, Master of Arts of Merton college, his father's brother, and 
Edward Drope of Cumnore, his mother's brother. His godmother 
was Mris. Ellen Pettie, daughter of Christopher Pettie of Tetsworth, 
esq., since the wife of Georg Cave, a yonger son of John Cave, 
impropriator and vicar of Great Milton in com. Oxon. 

(p. 18). May 13 1 , anno 1668, being Wednesday in Whitson 
week, Benjamin and Elizabeth, twinns, son and daughter of Christopher 
a Wood by Margerie, his second wife, were borne at Marriage-hill in 
the parish of Ufton neare Reading in Berks (a farme that then their 
father did owne, but since sold), about 3 or 4 of the clock in the 
morning. — Their godfathers were Marmaduke Goode, rector of 
Ufton, and Mr. Dennis Huntingdon, of St. Alban's hall in Oxon. 
Their godmothers were Mris. .... Goode, widdow, mother to Marma- 
duke Good, and Mris. Mary Hanks, sister to their mother. 

((VII)). April 5, Munday, anno 1669, Anne, daughter of Robert a 
Wood, was borne at her fathers house against Merton college in Oxon 
at 10 of the clock at night. — Godfather was Dr. Edward Drope, fellow 
of Magdalen College, her mothers uncle. The godmothers were 
Margerie, wife of Christopher Wood, her father's 2 brother, and 
Catherine, wife of her mother's brother, William Drope of London. 

Sept. 20, St. Mathew's eve, anno 1669, Anne, daughter of Christopher 
a Wood, was borne at Marriage-hill beforementioned. — Godfather, 
Robert a Wood, her father's brother : godmothers, Margaret Howson, 
wife of the parson of Stanford neare Marriage-hill, and Mris. Mary 
Hanks, sister to the mother. 

Aug. 31, anno 1670, Christopher, son of Christopher a Wood, borne 
at Marriage-hill. Died at his father's house in Halywell in the 
suburbs of Oxon, 29 Nov. 1672, and was buried in Merton college 
church by the grave of his father's first wife. 

((VIII)). Feb. 26, Munday, 167^, Fraunces, daughter of Robert 
a Wood, was borne at her father's house against Merton college at 8 

1 In the earlier draft on p. 72 of the and from that was so given, ii. 133. 
MS. the date is given as 'May 12': 2 'husband's' in MS. 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



»7 



of the clock at night. — Godfather was Christopher a Wood, her father's 
brother : godmothers were Anne, wife of Dr. John Luffe, and . . . 
wife of Amos Curteyne, of S. Marie's parish Oxon, stationer. 

(p. 19). Oct. 7, Tuesday, anno 1673, Peter, son of Christopher a 
Wood, was borne at his father's house in Halywell in the suburbs of 
Oxon about 4 of the clock in the afternoone. — Godfathers were Peter 
Eliot, Doctor of Physick, living in S. Peter's parish in the East, and 
Edward Feteplace, Mr. of Arts and senior student of Christ Church in 
Oxon : godmother was Anne, the wife of Dr. John Luffe, a phisitian. 

Sept. 6, Thursday, anno 1677, Charles, (son} of Christopher a 
Wood and Margerie his wife, was borne at his father's house in Haly- 
well about 1 1 and 1 2 of the clock in the morning. — Godfathers were 
Charles Porter, esq., councellour of the Middle Temple, and Thomas 
Philipps, an attorney living at Ickford in Bucks. His godmother was 
Marie, wife of William Wright, alderman of Oxon. 

Sept. 24, Wednesday, anno 1684, Christopher a, Wood, gent., an 
attorney in the common pleas, and who had been under-sheriff of 
Oxfordshire for about [22 *] years, died at his house in Halywell in 
the north suburbs of Oxon, about 10 of the clock at night. His 
body, adorned with escocheons (viz. his, impaling those of his second 
— Margerie Hanks — consort), was buried on Friday night following 
in the north part or ile of Merton college church neare to the grave 
of Elizabeth, his first wife 2 . 

<p. 62). 16 July 1686, Robert a Wood, gent., died at half-an- 
hour past 8 at night. Buried the next day by his father and mother, 
aged . . . 

( Wood's great-grandfather 

. . . Woode (his Christian name, as I thinke, was Richard). He 
was a native and an inhabitant of, or near Croston, com. Lanes., or 
within three miles of Latham, and particularly there where the earle 
of Darby had land. He was one of a religious life and conversation, 
and a strong Romanist, and ingaged in some businesses or affaires 
concerning religion in Queen Marie's dayes; and afterwards, when 
Queen Elizabeth came to the crowne, did, among thousands, deny 
her supremacy over the church of England. For which reasons he 
continued 7 years a prisoner in Lancaster goale, as I have heard some 

1 ' 22 ' is in pencil, as doubtful. of the MS. written on vellum ends here. 

2 Here follows in the MS. an account 3 From the earlier draft, pp. 54, 55 
of the accident that caused his death : of the MS. 

already printed in iii. 109. The portion 
VOL. V. C 



[8 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



of my anlicnt kindred often say ; and did not goe to see his children 
all that time but once, and then, having leave, he went with his keper 
on foot as farre as Einsham in Oxfordshire, where one or tow of 
them were then married, as shall be shewed anon. All the time 
of his imprisonment and durance he eat not one bit of flesh (soe 
zealous was he in his way). He had, as I have often heard say, 
taken a religious vow, in which he would live and dye, having before 
buried his wife, or else upon that account parted from her. He 
macerated and pined his body extreame much, and greived and vexed 
himselfe with the care he had to religion, which he, good man, 
thought then, when reforming, to lay a gaspyng. He departed this 
mortall life in the same prison of Lancaster about the year, as 
I guesse, 1568. 

ran- consult the register belonging to the parish church wherin the 
prison is, at Lancaster, after that, if it be found and his Christen 
name thereby discovered. His marriage with his wife might possibly 
be found in the bishop's register of that diocesse or else in the parish 
register wherin the said . . . Woode lived. 

The said . . . Woode had severall children, but what number they 
were I know not, but those that I have from tradition were one son 
and three daughters, all whome when their father suffered soe much 
losse and he himselfe became a Queen's prisoner, they came into 
these parts of Oxfordshire, with the earl of Derby, lord of the manor 
of Latham, to Einsham, with whome before one or two or all the 
daughters lived but the son went to London after. 

( Wood's grandfather. ) 

The said son of . . . Woode, named Richard Woode, lived som- 
times in this county of Oxon also. Then he went to a godfather that 
he had, living at Islington by London, where by his honest endeavors 
under him raised a reasonable and competent fortune, and afterwards 
married Elizabeth Jackson, sister to Henry Jackson of S. Marie's 
parish in Oxon, draper, and both of the same county of Lancashire 
and, as I thinke, neighbours, if not of the same parish (Preston), who 
likewise came into these parts about the beginning of Queen Eliza- 
beth to live in. The said Richard Woode and his wife raised a 
fortune betweene them worth 3000//. They were owners of a fair 
messuage at 1 Islington called the White Lyon, as also the Axe-inne 
in Aldermanburie in London, besides divers rich goods and moneys. 



1 substituted for 1 at Clarkenwell by Islington.' 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



19 



as- note that these things writ here in this paper I intend, God 
willing, to insert in this book, namely in the two first leaves therof 
which are left for that purpose, but before I write them therin I expect 
to have more plenary satisfaction concerning the places of their births 
and burialls and a farther ascent, if I can, of them in the county of 
Lancaster, by those severall meanes and wayes which I have in my 
mind. Which I hope in due time will soe come to passe that wee 
may not be numbred among the ignorant who scarce or perhaps not 
(at) all like meere brutes know nothing of their fathers and mothers. 
And I intend, in the paper here foregoing that is folded up, to draw 
therin the pedigree with the number of the page under every name to 
direct us how to find out the births, weddings, and burialls of each. 



Notes 1 taken out of Croston register concerning the name of Wood. 



1544 Thomas Wood, 18 Nov. 
1 545 2 Edward Wood, 1 March. 

1546 An Wood, 8 Jan. 

1547 Elen Wood, 7 Aug. 

1545 Robert Wood, 6 Dec. 
Richard Wood, 13 Jan. 
Elen Wood, 26 Feb. 



Christenings. 

1549 

1551 

1552 
J 553 
1554 



John Wood, 22 Aug. 
Roger Wood, 24 Feb. 
William Wood, 23 Apr. 
Mary Wood, 1 Febr. 
Jenet Wood, 17 Dec. 
John Wood, 20 Dec. 
Jane Wood, 23 June. 



Buriats: 1538 



1542 Alis Wood, 3 Jan. 
1545 Richard Wood, 14 June. 
1547 Amer Wood, 12 March. 



J 549 
!55 2 
1553 



Laurence Wood, 14 May. 
Isabel Wood. 12 Nov. 
Thurstan Wood, 29 Aug. 



Weddings. 

16 Sept. 1543 Richard Monck, Alis Woods. 
27 Jan. 1543 John Woods, Jane Maudesley. 
10 Sept. 1570 Cecily Woods, Roger Willis. 
8 Jan. 157^ Richard Tomson, Elen Woods. 



1 The heading (on p. 79) is in Wood's 
hand ; the rest (beginning on p. 80) is 
in a stranger's, possibly Dr. Richard 
Keurden's : see ii. 484. I omit an epi- 
taph, in Standish church, to William 



Leigh, B.D., obiit 26 Nov. 1639, aet. 89. 

2 i.e. 154!-; and so throughout this 
paper. 

3 The date at which the register of 
burials begins. 



C 2 



20 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Woods de Ormschurch 1 . 
Henry [about earl Henry 2 dayesl. 

I j 

W. Richard m 

[left he Orms- 
church about 
earl Ferdindo 3 
daye]. 

Henry m. Jane Blackston of Croston. 

L_ 

Robert, m. Mary Birchall. Richard m. Emlin Ropitonn. 

of Latham. I 

| Charles. 

i j 

Thomas. Richard. 

{Extracts 4, from Einsham registers.') 

Memorandum that the 24 Dec. 1674 I perused Ensham register at 
the Fleur de luce by the favour of Mr. (John) Rogers, vicar of that 
place, and find these things therin. 

Georg Makyne of Ensham and Emme Wod were married 9 May 
1568. [This Em. Wod was my grandfather's eldest sister — A. W.] 

Georg Makyne buried in the churchyard, 10 March 1587 5 . [They 
had a son between them named John Makyne bapt. 15 May 1578: 
buried 25 Sept. following.] 

William Yates and Em. Makyne married 7 Nov. 1588. [Whether 
they had issue I know not. One Georg Makyns was christened 
6 Jan. 1 588 6 : but 7 he is too soon.] 

Emme Yates, the wife of William Yates, was buried 1 Apr. 1603. 
[The said Yates was a taylor, and kin to the Yates of Witney, etc.] 



John Barncote was married to Mary Woodd xi July 1587. [This 
Mary was the yonger sister of my grandfather.] 

Thomas Barncot, son of John Barncot, bapt. 17 Apr. 1588. [He 



1 This pedigree is by the same hand 
which made the extracts from the 
Croston registers. 

2 Henry Stanley, succeeded as fourth 
earl of Derby, 1574, ob. 1592. 

3 Ferdinando Stanley, succeeded as 
fifth earl 1592, ob. 1594. 

4 p P- 57-58 of the MS. On p. 59 
are notes of coats of arms of Hopkyns 



and several Woods ; not in Wood's 
hand. 

3 i.e. 158I. 

6 i- e. 158I . 

7 Wood afterwards scored out these 
words, seeing he was following the 
wrong name ; and then added ' none,' 
i. e. there are no children christened of 
William and Emme Yates. 



HISTORY OF WOOD'S FAMILY. 



21 



died about the 13 of June 1665; buried in Einsham churchyard: 
a freemason by trade.] 

Elizabeth Barncot, daughter of John Barncot, bapt. xi Aug. 1589. 

John Barncot, Alius Johannis Barncot, bapt. 10 May 1592. 

John Barncot, sen., sepult. 25 Feb. 1596 \ [Quaere 2 .] 



[John Beere of Einsham, a native of Bucknell, married another 
sister of my grandfather's, called Alis : but when, it appeares not in 
Einsham register.] 

Georg Beer, son of John, bapt. 21 Sept. 1578 [so that perhaps 
they were married the year before]. 

William Beare buried 22 May 1586. 

Elizabeth Beare, daughter of John Beare, christened 25 June 1588. 
[Died 1668 latter end of May at Gasingwell in the parish of Einston ; 
buried in Einston churchyard by her mother.] 

John Beere [who married the said Alice] was buried in Einsham 
churchyard 5 Sept. 1595. [He left issue Georg, Robert, and Eliza- 
beth : quaere the extract of his will which I have.] The said Alice 
afterward married John Bolton, of Neate Enston, and had issue 3 
John, who married Elizabeth Beare before mentioned. Alice died 
there (at Enstone) a very old woman, 1634 or therabouts. 

1 i.e. ispf 

2 i. e. ask whether he was John, husband of Mary, supra. 

3 but see i. 24, note 4. 



INDEX I 



BIOGRAPHICAL 

Note. — Partly for the sake of clearness, partly to avoid the extreme disproportion 
which would be brought into the general index of names by the inclusion of these 
long notices, I have put here in a separate index the references to those persons 
who are most frequently mentioned by Wood, from reasons of official position, 
personal friendship, or family connexion. Cross-references in the general index 
will prevent the possibility of these names being overlooked. 



Abingdon, Jame3 Bertie, first earl 
of:— 

— styled lord Norreys of Rycote, ii. 241, 
313; iii. 16, 26. His marriage, ii. 
117, 241 ; iii. 362. 

— 1674-87, lord lieutenant of Oxford- 
shire, ii. 283, 299, 512, 524-5; iii. 
47-8, 54, 96-7, 127-8. As lord 
lieutenant calls out the county militia 
during Monmouth's invasion, iii. 145- 

— 1682, created earl of Abingdon, iii. 
3i-3, 54- 

— in Charles II's time belongs to the 
court party, iii. 31, 57, 86, 89, 112- 
14; and is hated by the popular 
party, iii. 156. 

— patronizes the City of Oxford, iii. 
65, 86, 89, 112, 135, and is hostile 
to the University, iii. 89. 

— 1687, high steward of Oxford City, 
iii. 219, 225, 281, 462; iv. Si. 

— detaches himself from James I, iii. 
171, and joins the prince of Orange, 
iii. 282-3 ; and is consequently de- 
tested by the Romanists, iii. 286-7. 

— 1693, is made justice in eyre, iii. 
434-5- 

— relatives of his mentioned, iii. 59, 
I35> H8-9> 277, 325, 425. 

Adams, Fitzherbert, rector of Lin- 
coln : — 

— 1685, rector of Lincoln, iii. 142-3, 
150, 249, 389. 



Adams, Fitzherbert {continued') : — 

— 1689, takes the oaths to William 
and Mary, iii. 305. 

— 1695, vice-chancellor, iii. 490, 492, 
494-5; iv. 125. 

Aldrieh, Henry, dean of Christ 
Church : — 

— student of Christ Church, ii. 460 ; 
iii. 5 : composes the music for the 
Encaenia, 1672, ii. 248; 1674, 2 88; 
and 1675, ii. 319. 

— canon of Christ Church, 1682, iii. 
4-6, 19, 39, 106, and D.D., iii. 6; 
and sub-dean, 1686, iii. 201. 

— 1683, composes the music for the 
reception of the duke and duchess 
of York, iii. 52 : joins the Oxford 
Philosophical society, iii. 76-8. 

— 1685, edits the University verses on 
death of Charles II, iii. 133. 

— 1687, curator of the Sheldonian, iii. 
207 : pamphlet by him, iii. 220. 

— 1689, dean of Christ Church, iii. 
301, 304, 315..363, 4 6 °- 

— 1 69 1, entertains Elias Ashmole, iii. 

334- 

— 1693-5, vice-chancellor, iii. 404, 
407, 423, 427-8, 432, 442, 444, 446, 

449~5°> 469, 477-8, 4 8 7> 49°; iv - 
22, 50. As vice-chancellor, by his 
assessor, in 1693, condemns Anthony 
Wood in the libel case, iii. 438 ; iv. 
3, 44-6 ; and, in 1695, presents to 
William III the University verses 



2 4 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Aldrich, Henry {continued) : — 

on the death of queen Mary, iii. 

477- . , , 

— 1695, entertains the chancellor (Or- 
mond), iii. 495. 

— he was a good speaker, iii. 432. 

— Greek editions by him, iii. 475. 
Aldworth, Charles, vice-president of 

Magd. C. :— 

— 1672, fellow of Magd. C, iii. 41. 

— 1687, as vice-president opposes 
James II and is expelled by the 
Ecclesiastical Commissioners, iii. 246- 

9> 5!9> 5 2 4, 5 2 9-3o- 

— 1688, stands for the Camden pro- 
fessorship of History, iii. 262-3. 

— 1691, is elected Camden professor, 
iii. 375, 382. 

Allam, Andrew, Wood's friend : — 

— 1655, birth and parentage, ii. 509. 

— 1 681, his brother and sisters, ii. 544, 
546 ; iii; 4. 

— 1682, gets White Kennet to make 
inquiries for Wood, iii. 7, 39. 

— 1683, vice-principal of S. Edmund 
Hall, iii. 67, 106 ; iv. 190. 

— 1685, May, visits London, iii. 138 ; 
June, death, iii. 144. 

— he gave Wood much information, 
oral and written, about contemporary 
events, iv. 225. 

— his 'notes' are often cited by Wood 
as in his own possession, but, with 
the exception of some fragments, their 
whereabouts, if they still exist, is un- 
known. They fell into these sec- 
tions: — 

(i) ' Cathedral papers,' i.e. notes 

about the appointment of bishops, 
deans, canons, i. 351; ii. 510, 512, 
561, 565; iii. 25, 95, 115, 118, 120, 
138. 

(ii) a journal of events in Oxford, 

elections, sermons, riots, epidemics, 
&c, from 1666 onward, ii. 78, 212, 
254, 258, 270, 274, 288, 311, 323, 
338, 401, 403, 416, 429, 447, 458, 
463; iii. 10-11, 77, 112, 167; iv. 
190. A few of these are preserved 
and printed, ii. 502, 511 ; iii. 125-6. 

(iii) notes about contemporary 

writers, ii. 1, 166; iii. 167; iv. 190. 

(iv) a collection of contemporary 

verses, &c, ii. 534. 

— — (v) a record of events connected 
with his own hall, S. Edmund hall, 
iii. 12, 116 ; iv. 1 70. 

(vi) various University lists, e. g. 

of Terrae filii, ii. 489; iii. 106; and 
of University preachers, iv. plate i. 

— he wrote letters to Wood about 



Allam, Andrew {continued) : — 

matters in Oxford during Wood's 
absences, i. 380; ii. 495-500; iv. 
190. Wood also, after his death, ac- 
quired other portions of his corre- 
spondence, iv. 190. 

— his diaries, from 1680, came into 
Wood's hands, ii. 486; iv. 190, who 
cut out pieces from them to paste into 
his own diaries. These pieces are 
printed, ii. 509, 515, 540-2, 544, 546, 
54 8 -50, 552, 555-8, 562 ; iii. 1, 4-9, 
H~ 6 , 25, 35, 43, 67, 105-6, 122, 167 ; 
iv. 190. 

— he had a good collection of books, 
especially pamphlets, i. 385; ii. 312, 
435; iii. 9; iv. 235. In his books 
he made a note of the price, book- 
seller, and date of purchase, iii. 167 : 
cp. Wood's City, iii. 142. Several of 
these books he presented to Wood, i. 
19; iii. 167, and after his death Wood 
acquired others, iii. 167 ; iv. 190. 

— his peculiar handwriting makes his 
notes easy of identification, iii. 12, 
67, 116, 167 ; iv. p. xi. 

— Wood's Athenae notice of him, iii. 
200. 

Allen, Thomas, of Gloucester hall: — 

— left his fellowship in Trinity college 
to avoid the oath to queen Elizabeth, 
i. 419. 

— died in Gloucester hall, 1632, i. 
249, 342 ; and was buried in Trinity 
college chapel, iv. plate iv; was a 
benefactor to Trinity college library, 
iv. plate iv, and p. 171. 

— MS. in his handwriting, iv. 252 : 
notes about antiquities, MSS., Sec, 
by him, i. 342, 344, 424; iv. 191, 
201, 253. 

— correspondence, ii. p. vii, 198. 

— his watch, iv. plate iv : Aubrey's 
Brief Lives, i. 28. 

— Wood's Athenae notice of him, iii. 
357- 

— his great library of MSS., i. 249, 
424 ; iv. 190, 198-9, 201, 203, 207, 
223, 250-1, 253, 258, 260-1, 265-6, 
272, 275, 277, 280, 283, 289, 294, 
304. 

catalogue of it, i. 249 ; ii. 309 ; 

iv. 191, 222. 

its fate, i. 249. 

history of individual MSS., i. 

315; iv. 103, 105-6, 127, 130, 220, 

255-6, 274: other references, iv. 91, 

102, 109, 120, 138, 172. 
Allestree, Richard, Regius professor 

of Divinity : — 

— student of Christ Church, iv. 58 : in 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



25 



Allestree, Richard {continued) : — 
arms 1 for Charles I, 1643, iii. 234: 
pamphlet by him, 1647, i. 143. 

— a pronounced High Churchman, i. 
348. 

— 1660, canon of Christ Church, i. 
390, 392, 484; ii. 2, 454, 517. 

— 1663-80, Regius professor of Divinity, 
ii. 93 ; iii. 486. 

— 1665-81, provost of Eton, ii. 42, 
289, 518. 

— 1674, presented, on behalf of the 
University, Wood's Hist, et Antiq. 
Oxon. to Charles II, ii. 289. 

— 1681, death, ii. 514. 

— personal appearance, ii. 26. 

— incidental mention, ii. 60, 90, 167, 
224, 258, 286, 296, 395, 556; iv. 
75- 

Anne (Hyde), duchess of York : — 

— 1663, visits Oxford with her husband 
and the court, i. 491-8; iv. 67. 

— 1665, Oct., comes to the court at 
Oxford, is lodged in Christ Church, 
and formally welcomed by the Uni- 
versity, ii. 48, 60-1 ; is personally 
unpopular, ii. 61, 219; present at the 
opening of Parliament, ii. 60. 

— — Dec, pregnant, ii. 67 ; affects 
piety by setting up a Sunday afternoon 
lecture, ii. 53, 67; ambitious schemes 
attributed to her, i. 440 ; ii. 67 ; 
alleged intrigue with Henry Sydney, 

53- 

— 1666, Febr., returns to London, ii. 
68, 72. 

— 1670, embraces Romanism, ii. 219, 
221. 

— 1671, death, ii. 219-20: obituary 
verses by Oxford University, iv. 73. 

— her household : — chaplain, ii. 67 : 
master of the horse, ii. 53. 

Anne, queen • — 

— the lady Anne : — 

— 1680, negociations for her marriage, 

ii. 518. 

— 1683, May, visits Oxford with her 
father, iii. 46-54 ; iv. 78 : attends the 
cathedral service, iii. 48 ; visits Corn- 
bury, the Bodleian, the Schools, &c, 

iii. 51 ; is present at the formal 
opening of the Ashmolean, iii. 51, 
55 ; visits Rycote, iii. 54. 

— — June, projected marriage with 
prince George of Denmark, iii. 57. 

— her chaplain, iii. 56. 

— the mention on iii. 173 seems in error 
for her sister Mary, cp. ii. 338. 



Anne, queen {continued) : — 

— the princess of Denmark : — 

— 1683, July, married to prince George 
of Denmark, iii. 67. 

— 1685, receives the honours of a prin- 
cess, iii. 129, 132-3, 141. 

— 1686, birth of a daughter, iii. 185. 

— 1687, sermons before her in the 
Chapel Royal, iii. 215, 244. 

— 1688, June, absent at Bath when the 
prince of Wales was born, iii. 268. 

Nov., deserts her father and joins 

the prince of Orange, iii. 285. 

— — Dec, enters Oxford with the 
partisans of Orange and is entertained 
at Christ Church, iv. 82. 

— 1689, birth of a son, iii. 305-6. 

— 1691, iii. 358. 

— 1692, her friendship with Sarah, 
countess of Marlborough, puts her 
out of court favour, iii. 381, 402, 
405. 

— queen Anne : — 

— master of the horse, iii. 41 7 ; officer 
in her army, iii. 148. 

Ashmole, Elias, antiquary : — 

— of the Middle Temple, ii. 109. 

— 'Windsor' herald, i. 482; ii. 317, 
405 ; iii. 189. As Windsor herald, 
1663, attends bp. Juxon's funeral at 
Oxford, i. 482 ; and, 1664, visits 
Berkshire, ii. 405 ; iii. 189. 

— 1669, is at Oxford in July to see 
' the great Act ' (opening of the 
Sheldonian), ii. 164 ; iii. 505 ; and in 
Nov. is made hon. M.D., iii. 173-4- 

— 1670, his collection of curios, ii. 
191 ; and of MSS., ii. 191 ; iii. 115, 
252 ; iv. 83, I2i. 

— 1677, proposes to give his curios and 
MSS. to Oxford, ii. 391. 

— 1679, i° ses n i s fossils, &c, coins and 
medals, and some MSS. by fire, ii. 
435- 

— 1681, building of the Ashmolean to 
receive his gift, ii. 530 ; iii. 54-5 ; iv. 
78. 

— 1683, actual gift of the curios, hi. 
39> 55' 57 5 an d f° rmai opening of 
the Ashmolean, iii. 52, 55-6. 

— 1684, statutes for the Ashmolean, 
iii. 109. 

— 1690, May- July, is at Bath, iii. 334. 
July? is entertained in the Ash- 
molean and elsewhere, iii. 334 ; iv. 83. 

— 1692, death, iii. 335, 440. 

or 1693, actual receipt of the 

MSS., iv. 83. 



1 This may mean only that he served in the University militia raised to garrison 
Oxford. And so in other cases, 



26 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Ashmolo, Elias {continued) : - 
- Ashmolc ^ivcs information to Wood, 
i. 302 ; ii. 33I ; is asked for informa- 
tion by Wood, iii. 171, 174, 252, 
295 ; his correspondence with Wood, 
iv. 229-30. 

— Ashmole's diary, ii. 317, 461 ; en- 
graved portrait of him, i. 238. 

— his works — Theatrum Britannicum, 

i. 308 ; Antiquities of Berkshire, i. 
308 ; Order of the Garter, ii. 248. 

— Ashmole's collection of printed books 
and MSS., i. 6-7, 9-11 ; ii. 64; iv. 
83- 

Aubrey, John, Wood's chief literary 
helper : — 

— 1667, makes Wood's acquaintance, 

ii. 115-6; iv. 191 ; and is afterwards 
a boon companion of his, ii. 126 ; iii. 
269, 372, 483. 

— 1 671, has muddled away his estate, 
and is- in poverty, ii. 117, 420, 545 : 
cp. Aubrey's Brief Lives, i. 41. 

— 1672, thinks of writing part of John 
Ogilby's Britannia, ii. 265 : cp. Brief 
Lives, ii. 105. 

— 1693, proposes to print Monumenta 
Britannica, iii. 420. 

— Wood was constantly asking informa- 
tion from him, ii. 31 t, 468, 474; iii. 
174, 205-6, 252, 294-5, 319-20, 350, 
439-40, 476. 

— he constantly sent Wood notes about 
authors, books, and antiquities, i. 283 ; 
ii. 117, 192 ; iii. 175, 351, 409, 484; 
iv. 191, 193. 

— his numerous letters were of great 
value to Wood, i. 122, 283, 308 ; ii. 
117, 264, 286, 365, 415, 435, 475, 
501 ; iii. 14, 115 ; iv. 192-3, 229-30. 

— his Brief Lives were of immense 
service to Wood, ii. 490, 509 ; iii. 91 , 
162 ; iv. 8, 47, 191-2, 312, plate. iv. 
As also his Life of Hobbes, ii. 
291-4, 480, 508; iv. 192: and his 
Collections for Wiltshire, ii. 407 ; 
iv. 192. 

— Wood uses most ungrateful language 
about his help, ii. 117: having got 
into the libel action by copying an 
expression of Aubrey's, iv. 8, 47. 

— Aubrey's handwriting, iv. p. xi. 

— Aubrey at one time had a grand 
collection of rare books and MSS., 
afterwards sold : he gave books to 
Wood, i. 14, 144, 230; ii. 237,472, 
485, 500; iv. 51 : a MS. to the Bod- 
leian, iv. 270 : and to the Ashmolean 
library, books, i. 170, and MSS., 
especially those of his own com- 
position, iv. 51, 191, 239, 249. 



Barlow, Thomas, bishop of Lincoln : — 

— his parentage, ii. 300. 

— 1648, issued a pamphlet against the 
Parliamentary visitors, i. 143; but 
submitted, i. 364; ii. 484. 

— 1652-60, Bodlcy's librarian, i. 189, 
319, 334-5; ii. 508; in particular, 
receiving and arranging John Selden's 
library, i. 282, in 1659. 

— 1654 onwards, showed W T ood much 
kindness, i. 189, 282; ii. 109, III, 
202, 249, 316, 336, 404 : in particular, 
giving Wood books, MSS., and docu- 
ments, i. 142, 249 ; ii. 283, 312 ; iv. 
J 44-5 ; as also much information 
about books, &c, i. 50, 144, 189-90; 
ii. 148 ; iii. 174, 252 ; iv. 94, 189. 

— Wood's ill- tempered and ungrateful 
language about him, i. 364-5. 

— 1657, provost of Queen's, i. 435 : 
would not allow Wood access to the 
college archives, ii. 78, 80. 

— 1660, one of Charles II's commis- 
sioners, i. 325, 364; and D.D., i. 
329- 

— 1660-75, Lady Margaret professor 
of Divinity, i. 364 ; ii. 166 : esteemed 
a pronounced Calvinist, i. 364 ; ii. 
166, 258, 312, 428 ; iii. 261 ; iv. 94. 

— 166 1, active in getting Sir Thomas 
Clayton made warden of Merton, i. 

383, 394-5 > 47 1- 
■ — 1664, archdeacon of Oxford, ii. 6-7, 
14, 121. 

— 1 667, introduces Wood to Sir William 
Dugdale, ii. 109. 

— 1668, sells a Greek marble to the 
University, iv. 69. 

— 1669, a delegate of the Press, ii. 
172. 

— 1671-3, pro-vice-chancellor, ii. 224, 

258. 

— 1675, bishop of Lincoln, i. 329, 364; 
ii. 312, 316-7, 354, 374, 428, 431, 
435, 438, 45 8 > 5°°> 5°5 > 69, 121, 
220, 324. 

nicknamed 'bishop of Bugden,' 

ii. 438. 

— 1690, active for W T illiam III, iii. 324. 

— 1691, death, iii. 372. 

— Barlow had a considerable collection 
of MSS. and documents, of which 
Wood took a catalogue, ii. 174-5, 
225; iii. 35; iv. 98, 160, 189, 236, 
260, 266, 271, 274, 277 : also of 
printed books, iii. 405 ; iv. 235. 

— Barlow gave MSS. and printed books 
to the Bodleian, i. 319, 461 ; iii. 405, 
426 ; iv. 84, 160 : and to Queen's 
college library, ii. 225; and a piece 
of plate to the University, iv. 84. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



27 



Barlow, Thomas {continued) : — 

— Barlow's published works, i. 143; 

ii. 239, 283, 431, 435, 438, 458. 
Barret, John,citizen friend of Wood's: — 

— Barret was a milliner, from whose 
shop Wood made purchases, i. 220, 
416, 444, 467, 477; ii. 33, 77, 82, 
I2 6, 191,350,455,479; iii. 119, 144, 
165, 3i9> 353- 

• - Barret was a companion of Wood's 
at cookshop and tavern, i. 281, 310, 
401, 428; ii. 27, 126-7, 130-1, I 3d, 
139, 141, 146; iii. 336. 

— Barret let lodgings, ii. 309, 396 ; 

iii. 256. 

— at Barret's house Wood paid for 
refreshments, i. 463, 471 ; ii. 30, 34-5, 
69, 133, 140, 145-6; iii. 165. 

— Barret's death, 1695, is noted as that 
of an old friend, iii. 487. 

— Barret's wife is mentioned, ii. 127; 
iii- 334- 

Bathurst, Ralph, president of Trin- 
ity :- 

— 1640, fellow of Trinity, i. 158, 363. 

— 1648, submits to the Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 329, 365 ; but is chaplain 
to Robert Skinner, bp. of Oxford, i. 
365- 

— 1650, practises physic, i. 165, 365. 

— 1658, interested in antiquities, &c, 

i. 271, 307 ; ii. 1S6, 349. 

— 1659-63, studies chemistry, i. 290, 
473- 

— 1660 onwards, shows great kindness 
to Wood, and gives Wood informa- 
tion, i. 326, 378, 424; ii. 74, 118, 
123, 211, 258-9, 266, 281, 288, 358; 
iii. 136, 295, 326, 331, 530: but 
Wood uses ungrateful language of 
him,i. 365 ; ii. 186; iii. 358. 

— 1664, president of Trinity, i. 365 ; 

ii. 21, 186, 261, 263,408,490,531, 
556; iii. 135, 291, 346, 449-50. 

— 1664-90, marriage and married life, 
i. 306-7; ii. 21, 26, 151, 192, 25S, 
271, 281 ; iii. 329. 

— 1670, dean of Wells, i. 365 ; ii. 192, 
2 7!> 327-8; iii. 78. 

— 1673-6, vice-chancellor, i. 133 ; ii. 
271, 274, 277-8, 281, 283, 286, 288, 
295, 298-9, 300, 313, 315, 322-3, 
327-8, 343. 348, 35°> 356-8, 395. 

— 1676, gives marble for repaving 
S. Mary's, ii. 358 ; iv. 75-6. 

— 1 68 1, preacher before Parliament, ii. 
53i- 

— 1683, joins the Oxford Philosophical 
society, iii. 76-8. 

— 1689, submits to William and Mary, 

iii. 305. 



Bathurst, Balph {continued) : — 

— 1690, keeps up his interest in chemis- 
try, iii. 333. 

— 1691, refuses the bishopric of Bristol, 
iii. 360 : frankly criticizes Wood's 
Athenae, iii. 357-8, 365, 368: his 
new buildings at Trinity, iii. 364, 
449-50. 

— 1693, is summoned as a witness 
against Wood in the libel case, iv. 16, 
22-3. 

— Warton's Life of him, ii. 172. 
Bayly, Richard, president of S. 

John's : — ' 

— 1632-48, president of S. John's, i. 
80, 84, 94 : expelled by Parliamentary 
visitors. 

— 1635, dean of Salisbury, ii. 66, 114, 
3 J 3, 34°- 

— 1636-7, vice-chancellor, i. 407-8 ; 

ii. 238; iv. 56. 

— 1642-3, is stout for Charles I, i. 75. 

— 1660, declares for Charles II, i. 313. 
restored to his presidentship of 

S. John's, i. 328, 372, 482, 485 ; ii. 
6(1), 83, 114, 118. 

— 1661-2, vice-chancellor, i. 407-8, 
41 1-6, 439, 445, 454-5, 4 6 4 : his 
chief duties being the reception of 
Clarendon, the chancellor, and the 
ejection of nonconformists on ' Black 
Bartholomew.' 

— 1 66 1, refuses the bishopric of Lich- 
field, i. 422. 

— 1663, attends the state funeral of bp. 
Juxon, i. 482-3. 

reception of Charles II, i. 498. 

— 1665, attends the state funeral of bp. 
Earles, ii. 66. 

— 1666, refuses Wood access to the 
archives of S. John's college, ii. 83-4. 

— 1667, death, ii. 114. 

— his marriage and issue, ii. 115, 144, 
'340 ; iii. 23. 

Beeston, Henry, warden of New col- 
lege : — 

— 1649, fellow of New college, submitted 
to the Parliamentary visitors, ii. 460. 

— 1658, master of Winchester school, 

iii. 74. 

— 1 679, warden of New college, ii. 460 ; 
iii. 5, 74, 76-8, 142, 249, 260, 329. 

Bernard, John Augustine, Brasenose 
college : — 

— his parentage, iii. 171. 

— 1682, fellow of Brasenose, and an 
acquaintance of Wood's, iii. 30, 77. 

— 1685-6, shows Romanist leanings, 
iii. 171, 177, 183. 

— 1687, is an acknowledged Romanist, 
and under James IPs protection, iii. 



26 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Bernard, John A. (continued) : — 
183-4, J 86, 207, 213-5, 2 45 : i s styled 
'John Augustine ' (? having formerly 
been plain 'John'), iii. 217; by 
James II's mandate is Whyte's pro- 
fessor of Moral Philosophy, iii. 207, 
217, 219, 287, 296. 

— 1690, reports about him, iii. 340, 
35°- 

Blandford, Walter, bishop of Ox- 
ford :— 

— 1648, fellow of Wadham, submitted 
to Parliamentary visitors, i. 366. 

— 1659, warden of Wadham: 1660, one 
of Charles IPs commissioners, i. 325, 
390, and D.D., i. 329. 

— 1662-4, vice-chancellor, i. 455-7, 
484-5, 488-500, 502; ii. 3, 19-20; 
iv. 67. His severity in his office, not 
uncalled for, i. 455; ii. 262. Plis chief 
duty, the reception of Charles II, i. 
49°-5> ;499 ; iv. 67. 

— 1665, bishop of Oxford, ii. 48, 50, 
66, 74, 108, 121, 196, 209, 502. 

— 1671, bishop of Worcester, i. 329; 

ii. 209, 277, 501. 

— 1675, death, ii. 318. 

Blount, Thomas, Romanist friend of 
Wood's : — 

— of Orleton, Herefordshire, and the 
Inner Temple; his marriage, i. 317. 

— correspondence with Wood, ii. 13, 
175, 236, 297, 299, 301, 333, 379; 

iii. 260 ; iv. 229. 

— gifts of books to Wood, ii. 191, 204, 
273, 286, 314, 441. 

— writings, i. 13, 134, 317, 331; ii. 
204, 235-6, 241, 262, 441 : iii. 176. 

— 1679, death, iii. 205-6. 

Bodley, sir Thomas, ' unus qui nobis 
restituit rem ' : — 

— 1545, DOrn at Exeter, i. 427. 

— 1597, begins to restore the University 
library, i. 259, 426-7. 

— 1599, gives statutes for the library, 

iv. 147. 

— 1 61 3, buried in Merton college 
chapel, i. 427 : monument there, ii. 
235- 

— memorial verses on, by the University 
(' Justa Funebria'), i. 424 : by Merton 
college (' Bodleiomnema '), i. 18, 426 ; 
iii. 272. 

— life of, i. 424: autograph of, i. 
4 2 5- 

— verses in praise of, 1677, ii. 384. 

— annual speech in honour of (dr. John 
Morris's foundation), iii. 29, 79, 116, 
169, 199, 319* 345, 365, 375, 406, 
434, 472, 496 : delivered in the School 
of Languages. 



Bouchier, Thomas, Regius professor 

of Civil Law : — 
— 1 661, deputy-professor of Civil Law, 

i. 402 ; ii. 2 jo. 

— 1672, Regius professor of Civil Law, 

ii. 383 ; iii. 15-6. 

— J 674, 1679, stands for M.P. Univ. 
Oxon., ii. 279, 442. 

— 1679, principal of S. Alban Hall, ii. 
440, 468; iii. 15-6, 488. 

— 1687, a candidate for the wardenship 
of All Souls, iii. 208. 

— 1693, employed by Clarendon to 
prosecute Wood, iii. 428 ; iv. 9, 25-6. 

Boys, Nathaniel, Romanist convert : — 

— 1673, fellow of Univ., ii. 276. 

— 1683, studies chemistry, iii. 75, but 
does not join the Oxford Philosophical 
society, iii. 77. 

— 1685, preaches a Romanist sermon, for 
which he is censured by the University 
authorities, iii. 152, 155-6, but com- 
mended by James II, iii. 165. 

— 1686, is a declared Romanist, iii. 
176, 183, 213-4, and under James II's 
protection, iii. 184. 

— 1689, ejected from his fellowship, iii. 
297-8. 

Brent, sir Nathaniel, warden of 
Merton : — 

— 1621, warden of Merton, i. 396-7. 

— 1648, the chief of the Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 141, 143, 147. 

— 1648-9, shows especial kindness to 
Anthony Wood, i. 144, 162. 

— members of his family, i. 105, 135, 
162, 180, 235, 369, 554. 

Buckingham, George Villiers, second 
duke of : — 

— 1 65 1, in Charles II's Scottish army, 

i. 156. 

— 1660, high steward of Oxford City, 

ii. 242, 391-2, 493, 516, 522-3; op- 
poses Oxford University, ii. 391. 

— favours the Presbyterian party in the 
church, i. 363 ; ii. 297, and the anti- 
court party in the state, ii. 366, 396, 
516, 522-3 ; iii. 155. 

— 1687, death, iii. 218. 

— his writings, ii. 43, 265 ; iii. 218. 

— incidental mention, i. 496; ii. 265, 
297> 473- 

Burnet,Gilbert, bishop of Salisbury : — 

— 1679, his History of the Reformation, 
i. 344; ii. 455, 468, 505. 

criticisms of Wood's Hist, et 

Antiq. Oxon., ii. 449, 456. 

— 1680, suggested for a Scottish bishop- 
ric, ii. 483 ; a clergyman of note, ii. 
492, 499, 505, 562 ; iii. 5. 

— 1681, his Life of Sir Matthew Hale, 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



29 



Burnet, Gilbert {continued) : — 

ii. 359, and account of the earl of 
Rochester's death, ii. 492. 

— 1683, a leader of the anti-court party, 

iii. 67. 

— 1684, attends lord William Russell 
on the scaffold, iii. 118. 

— 1688-9, a writer for, and in favour 
with, the prince of Orange, iii. 293, 

297> 3°o> 3 r 3-4- 

— 1689, made bishop of Salisbury, iii. 
60, 294, 301, 339, 366, 371, 380, 400, 
414, 417, 419, 473, 483. 

— 1689-94, maintains students at Hart 
hall, iii. 443. 

— 1692, proscribed by James II, iii. 
388 : speaks unfavourably of Wood's 
Athenae, iii. 400. 

Burnham, Thomas, citizen friend of 
Wood's : — 

— 1625-70, an inhabitant of S. John 
Baptist's parish, ii. 224, 349; during 
part of which time he was a servant 
to Wood's father, i. 53, 447 ; ii. 349, 
and a tenant to the Wood family, i. 
69, 447 : a friend of the Wood family, 

i. 220 ; ii. 31. 

— 1656 onwards, had on loan ;£ioo 
from Wood (probably a bequest from 
his father), paying £6 'rent' (i.e. 
interest) yearly, i. 215, 222, 238, 258, 
310, 378, 388, 464, 471, 477, 502, 
507 ; ii. 206. The bond for this was 
renewed in the joint names of Thomas 
Burnham and John his son, on his 
going into S. Aldate's parish, ii. 194. 
After his death in 1676 the loan was 
continued to his widow, ii. 376,452, 

47 1 , 5Q3> 544> 5 61 5 i"- 2I > 33, 37, 
56. Wood took it up in 1683, iii. 
56. 

— he kept an ale-house, to which Wood 
gave a share of his custom, i. 301, 
378, 457 : generally calling it by the 
wife's name, Mrs. Burnham, i. 215, 
220 ('Burnet,' in error), 221, 229, 
266, 271, 281, 288, 331, 349, 380, 
382, 388, 401, 416, 418, 420, 427, 
430, 441, 452, 458, 468-9, 474, 477, 
487, 501 ; ii. 2, 4, 6, 8, 18, 24, 127. 

— 1664, moved into a ' new house,' ii. 
23- 

— 1665, was bailiff of Oxford City, i. 
427. 

— 1670, moved into S. Aldate's parish, 

ii. 224. 

— 1676, died, ii. 349. 
Burt,William, Anthony Wood's school- 
master : — 

— 1 63 1, master of Thame school, i. 
108-9, 11 4, I2 4, I2 9> i 7 i j 4°9« 



Burt, "William {continued) : — 

— 1647, master of Winchester school, 

i. 108. 

— 1658, warden of Winchester, i. 35, 
108-9; 455~6 ; iii. 74. 

— 1679, death, ii. 455. 

Bury, Arthur, rector of Exeter col- 
lege:— 

— 1666, rector of Exeter, i. 456 ; ii. 
78, 195 ; iii. 53, 68, 329, 440 ; iv. 78. 

— 1680, regarded as a decided Pro- 
testant, ii. 78, 488, 491 ; iii. 53. 

— 1690, expels James Colmer from his 
fellowship, i. 16; iii. 325. 

his Naked Gospel condemned as 

heretical, iii. 329-30, 337-41. 

is expelled by the Visitor and 

begins along law-suit, iii. 334, 337-8, 

34°, 345, 364, 425, 452, 474, 479- 

— his coat of arms, i. 41 : personal 
appearance, ii. 195: his marriages, 

ii. 78 ; iii. 68, 329. 

Cartwright, Thomas, bishop of Ches- 
ter :— 

— 1676, dean of Ripon, ii. 337-8 ; iii. 
66. 

— 1686, bishop of Chester, iii. 193, 195, 
198, 220, 241, 244, 274, 313-4, 349, 
359- 

serves on James H's ecclesiastical 

commission, iii. 193. 

— 1687, suspected of toying with 
Romanism, iii. 219, 266. 

the moving spirit of the eccle- 
siastical commission in the visita- 
tion of Magdalen college, iii. 248-9, 

5L5-9, 524-5' 529- 

— 16S9, death in Ireland, iii. 302. 
Catherine of Braganza, consort of 

Charles II : — 

— the queen. 

— 1662, her marriage, i. 440-1 ; Oxford 
verses on her marriage, i. 440 ; child- 
lessness, i. 440; iii. 125. 

— 1663, visits Oxford, i. 241, 490-9; 
iv. 66. 

— 1664, at Whitehall, ii. 25. 

— 1665, Sept., comes to Oxford, ii. 46, 
58-60. 

— 1665, Sept. -1666, Feb., keeps her 
court in Merton college, i. 396, 510 ; 
ii. 45, 49, 59-60, 67-8, 70, 72-3. 

— 1665, Oct., is present at the opening 
of Parliament, ii. 60. 

— 1666, Jan., is godmother to her 
physician's child, ii. 70 

Feb., miscarriage, ii. 67, 72 : re- 
turns to London, ii. 68, 73. 

— 1667 (?), correspondence with the 
pope, ii. 181. 



3o 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Catherine of Braganza (cont.) : — 

— 1675, sends a gift to cardinal I Toward, 
ii. 314. 

— 1677, illness, ii. 372, 375. 

— 1681, March, comes to Oxford, ii. 
520, 524-8; iv. 77, and keeps court 
in Merton college, ii. 514, 519, 523: 
return to London, ii. 532. 

Sept., visits Cambridge, ii. 555. 

— the queen dowager. 

— 1685, Oxford verses on her husband's 
death presented to her, iii. 133: 
present at sermon in James II's 
Romanist Chapel Royal, iii. 181. 

— 1686, asks James II to abate the 
brutality of some sentences, iii. 
189. 

— 1688, libels upon her in connexion 
with the expected biith of the Prince 
of Wales, iii. 255 ; is godmother to 
the prince of Wales, iii. 279; is re- 
sident in Somerset House, iii. 266, 
289. ' 

— her household: — almoner, ii. 182, 
314; chaplain, ii. 168 ; confessor, ii. 
169; equerry, iii. 91; maids of honour, 

i. 396, 510; ii. 510, 548 ; iii. 29, 34, 
101, 103, 106, 206: mother of the 
maids of honour, iii. 3 : organist, ii. 
401 : physician, ii. 70, 539; iii. 31. 

— incidental mention : — her picture in 
glass at Queen's college, Oxford, iii. 
50 ; her chapel in Somerset House, ii. 
487 ; iii. 266 : bonfires on her birth- 
day, 15 Nov., iii. 30 ; book dedicated 
to her, ii. 510; drinking her health, 

ii. 466. 
Charles I : — 

— 1625, his coronation brought the 
plague, i. 185. 

— 1629, forbids sermons on the disputed 
points between Arminians and Cal- 
vinists, ii. 66. 

— 1630, revives knighthood fines, i. 79. 

— 1631, at Woodstock, iv. 51. 

— 1633, in Scotland, iv. 52 ; his illness, 
iv. 52 ; at Woodstock, i. 116; issues 
the great Carta Carolina to Oxford 
University, i. 77, 128; iv. 52, 145, 
212, 218-9. 

— 1634, a ^ Woodstock, iv. 52. 

— 1635, at Woodstock, iv. 55. 

— 1 636, at Woodstock, and visitsOxford, 
i. 46 ; iv. 56, 145, 213. 

— 1638, at Woodstock, iv. 56. 

— 1641, receives and answers Oxford 
University petition in favour of Epis- 
copacy, i. 51 ; iv. 57-8 : orders a 
collection in Oxford University for 
a Greek, iv. 58. 

— 1 641-3, issues numerous manifestoes, 



Charles I {continued) : — 

but leaves the University to pay for 
the printing of them, iv. 57, 59. 

— 1642, March, goes to York, i. 69; 
and sends officers to raise the Oxford- 
shire militia, i. 54, 61. 

July, from York, borrows money 

from Oxford University, i. 58 ; iv. 58. 

Aug., at York declares war, i. 

52-4; his declaration of war is read 
at Oxford, i. 52, 54 ; sends a troop 
of horse to occupy Oxford, i. 56, 58-9, 
and troops to Aylesbury, i. 59; the 
feeling in Oxford City is against him, 
i. 59, 67. 

— — Oct., fights at Edgehill, i. 67-8 : 
enters Oxford, and is received in state 
by the University and City, i. 67-8 ; 
iv. 58 ; discovery of a plot against 
him, i. 70. 

Nov., leaves a garrison in Oxford 

and marches against London, i. 70-2 ; 
orders the disarming of the militia 
and yeomanry of Oxford City and 
County, i. 70-1 ; has a success at 
Brentford, i. 71 ; receives the Danish 
ambassador at Reading, i. 71 ; re- 
turns to Oxford, i. 72 ; sends the 
University down and goes into winter 
quarters in Oxford, i. 69 ; requisitions 
stabling, iv. 58. 

Dec, requisitions horses, i. 72 ; 

orders Oxford to be fortified, i. 72-4 ; 
requisitions arms and ammunition, i. 
73 ; reviews his troops, i. 74 ; visits 
the tennis-court, i. 75 ; receives from 
the Parliament proposals to negotiate, 
i. 75, 80 ; receives the Spanish am- 
bassador, i. 77, 80. 

— 1642, Nov-1643, Feb., orders degrees 
for his followers, i. 69-70, 81, 86. 

— 1642, Nov.- 1643, July, has his 
magazines and the head quarters of 
his army in Oxford, i. 69-71, 74, 83-4, 
98-9, 103; iv. 123. 

— 1642, N0V.-1644, May, keeps his 
court in Oxford at Christ Church, i. 
68, 72-4, 80-1, 85-8, 90-2, 96, 98- 
100, 103, 107, 112, 120, 129, 146, 
274,411. 

— 1643-4, has his mint in Oxford, i. 
80-1, 94. 

— 1643, Jan.- Apr., fruitless negotia- 
tions with Parliament, i. 79-83, 85-8, 
90-2, 97. 

— — Jan. , orders early closing of Oxford 
public-houses, i. 80 ; seizes on the 
plate of the colleges and halls and 
private individuals, i. 81 , 94; borrows 
more money from Oxford University, 
i. 81 ; reviews his troops, i. 81-2 ; 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



3* 



Charles I {continued') : — 

commutes a death sentence on a 
soldier, i. 82 ; causes the Law Courts 
to keep Term in Oxford, i. 83 ; re- 
clothes his army, i. 83. 

— 1643, Febr., orders a thanksgiving for 
capture of Cirencester, i. 87 ; en- 
lists prisoners of the parliamentary- 
army, i. 88 ; dispenses with the keep- 
ing of Lent, i. 89 ; is petitioned by 
the University against ordering degrees 
for his followers, i. 89 ; urges on the 
fortification of Oxford, i. 89, 96-7 ; 
his personal feeling against John 
Hampden, i. 90. 

Feb.-Apr., fruitless negotiations 

with the commissioners from Scotland, 

i. 88-9, 92, 98. 
March, requisitions the grass of 

Port Meadow, i. 92. 
Apr., reviews his troops, i. 95-7 ; 

orders Oxford City and County to 

provide a garrison to hold Oxford, i. 

95-6,99, 102; fails to relieve Reading, 

i. 97-9. 

May, orders collections for his 

wounded, i. 105. 

June, demands further loans from 

Oxford University and City, i. 100-1 ; 
is petitioned by the University against 
disregarding its privileges, i. 102. 

July, orders a thanksgiving for 

victory in Yorkshire (Adwalton Moor, 
30 June), i. 102 ; meets the queen at 
Edgehill and escorts her to Oxford, 
i. 103 ; reclothes his army, i. 103. 

Oct., ejects the Chancellor of the 

University, iv. 60. 

— 1644, Apr., orders Oxford to be held 
by a militia garrison raised by the 
University and City, i. 106. 

May, reviews this militia garrison, 

i. 107. 

..... issues a mandate to Magdalen 

college to elect his nominee president, 
iii. 518. 

... , holds a parliament in Oxford, 

i. 112, 411. 

— 1645, special forms of prayer for 
him, i. 107. 

orders the fortification of Oxford 

to be completed, i. 120. 
sends a mandate to Lincoln college 

to elect his nominee fellow, i. 453. 
is crushed at Naseby (June 14), 

i. 1 28, and his correspondence captured 

and deciphered, i. 335 ; ii. 507. 

— 1646, orders the surrender of Oxford, 
i. 128. 

— 1647, is given up by the Scots army, 
iii. 442; at Holmby House, i. 227; 



Charles I {continued) : — 

iv. 60; at Hampton Court, i. 227; 
escapes to the Isle of Wight, i. 227 ; 
imprisoned at Carisbrooke castle, i. 
227. 

— 1648, negotiations, i. 228. 

— 1649, his trial and execution, i. 153, 
289 ; ii. 137, 192, 356 ; iii. 63, 84. * 

— 1650 sqq., defacing of the royal 
arms and emblems of monarchy, i. 

313-4; P- viii- 

— 1660, beginning of the cult of ' the 
Royal Martyr,' i. 370. 

— 166 1, the anniversary of his beheading 
is appointed for a Church holy-day, 

i. 401 : see infra. 

— 1669, his name is added to the roll 
of benefactors of Oxford University, 

ii. 163. 

— 1686, James II appoints a new form 
of service for his anniversary, iii. 177. 

— his bust at New college, i. 64, and 
in the Bodleian, iv. 57. His statue 
at S. John's, ii. 211, and at the Botanic 
garden, iv. 50. His statue at Charing 
Cross, London, ii. 330, 480, and at 
Windsor, iii. 447. 

— his engraved portrait, i. 381; his 
picture in glass at Queen's college, 

iii. 50. 

— pamphlets relating to him, i. 16, 22, 
77-8, 82, 105, 234, 289, 321, 473; 
ii. 101, 120, 171 ; iii. 294 (' Charles 
II ' in error), 377, 398, 427. 

— ballads and verses relating to him, 
i. 289 ; ii. 171, 361. 

— lives of him, i. 410 ; ii. 270. 

— a copy of his Works was for a time 
the formal present of Oxford Uni- 
versity, i. 457; ii. 161, 209-10; iv. 
66, 71, 73. The Elicchi' BaoikiKT] con- 
troversy, i. 16 ; iii. 377, 384, 398, 
427. 

— observance of his coronation-day, 
2 Feb., in 1637 an( ^ I 639, iv. 56. 

— ' The King's fast/ King Charles I's 
day,' ' King's day,' i. e. 30 January, 
was kept as a Church holy-day with 
a University sermon in S. Mary's 
church. Wood notes its institution, 
in i66r, i. 401, and its first observance 
in Oxford, i. 357, 360. He then omits 
all mention oi it till i67i~3,in which 
years the vice-chancellor and mayor 
ordered its observance, ii. 215, 241. 
He next mentions it in 1681, because 
of a violent sermon, ii. 514; and so 
again in 1683, iii. 35. Afterwards 
Wood took interest in it, for purposes 
of the Athenae and Fasti, and notes 
the preachers on the day from 1685 to 



3= 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Charles I (continued) : — 

1695 (with the solitary exception of 
1688) : — iii. 124, 178, 208, 297, 324, 
353, 382, 415, 442, 478. 

— his execution : — books justifying jt, 

iii. 63-4, 70 : severe penalties against 
speaking in defence of it, ii. 512 ; iii. 
20, 177 : fortunes of the regicides, i. 
16, 338, 361, 37 8 > 39 8 > 4 2I > 4 62 5 
481,507. 

— his household : — almoner, i. 93 ; 
lord chamberlain, iv. 52; clerk-con- 
troller, i. 99 ; clerk of the kitchen, 

iv. 51-2, 56; clerk of the wardrobe, 

iii. 31; controller, iv. 53-4; con- 
troller of the household, i. 105 ; 
gentleman of the bedchamber, i. 91 ; 
groom of the bedchamber, i. 70, 227 ; 
musician, i. 242; organist, i. 274; 
ii. 5: pensioner, i. 119; sergeant of 
the counting-house, i. 95 ; trumpeter, 

iv. 52, 56; yeoman of the guard, i. 
114; yeoman of the robes, i. 112; 
yeoman of the wardrobe, i. 103. 

— his army: — 1642, Aug., troops of 
horse to Oxford, i. 56-60, and 
Aylesbury, i. 58 : Oct., battle of 
Edgehill, i. 67-8 : advance through 
Oxford to Brentford, i. 68, 70-1 : 
Nov., in winter-quarters in Oxford, i. 
72-5, 80-3, 85, 88-91, 93, 95-7. _ 

— — 1643, Jan. -March, expeditions 
against towns held for the Parliament, 
i. 87-93 : Apr., failure to relieve 
Reading, i. 98—9 ; victory at Glouces- 
ter, i. 98 : May- June, operations in 
the field, i. 99-101, but the council 
of war at Oxford, i. 99, 100, 102 : 
July, victories in the North and West, 
i. 102-3. 

1644-6, Oxford held by a garrison, 

i. 106-7, I2 5- 
1645, skirmishes around Oxford, 

i. 1 13-5, 1 1 7-9, 124-4: crushing 
defeat at Naseby, i. 128. 

1646, surrender of Oxfordshire 

garrisons and of Oxford, i. 127-9. 

1648, the siege of Colchester, i. 

146 ; iii. 31. 

— standards of his army, i. 66, 68, 98 : 
the royal standard, i. 98. Officers of 
his army, i. 186, 195, 216, 259; ii. 
171, 214, 231, 284, 345, 449 ; iii. 94. 

— Oxford men who ' bore arms ' in his 
service, i. 59-60, 68-9, 105, 134, 145, 
171, 313; iii. 234; iv. 150, 168; v. 
25, note. 

— sufferers in his cause, i. 16, 94, 116 ; 

ii. 183, 449 ; iii. 94. Romanist 
sufferers in his cause, i. 317. Post- 
Restoration grievances of sufferers in 



Charles I {continued) : — 

his cause, (i) that they were neglected, 
'67, 335, 337 ; (ii) lnat those who 
had suffered nothing were rewarded, i. 
328, 330-1 ; ii. ] 1 ; (iii) that the 
court was venal, i. 167. 

— knights dubbed by him, iii. 102 ; 
drinking his health, i. 167; incidental 
mention, i. 196; ii. 61, 118; iii. 8, 
20, 239, 363. 

Charles II : — 

— Charles, Prince of Wales : — 

— 1630, Oxford verses on his birth, iv. 
52. 

— 1642, March, created M.A. at Cam- 
bridge, i. 69. 

Oct., enters Oxford, i. 68 ; plot to 

kidnap him is discovered, i. 70. 

Nov., incorporated M. A. at Oxford, 

i. 69 ; iv. 58 : accompanies the king 
in his march on London, i. 70; has 
the measles at Reading, i. 72 ; returns 
to Oxford, i. 72. 

— 1643, Jan., present at a review in 
Oxford, i. 82. 

March, begs the pardon of some 

deserters, i. 93. 

— — Apr., accompanies the king 
towards Reading, i. 99. 

— — July? accompanies the king to 
Edgehill, to escort the queen to 
Oxford, i. 103. 

— Charles Stuart : — 

— ... (?), his library plundered, i. 425 
(where for ' I ' read ' II '). 

— 1649, intrigue with Lucy Barlow, 
and birth of James, afterwards duke 
of Monmouth, i. 208 ; styles himself 
king and sends an envoy to the East, 
i. 168. 

— 1650, sails from the Hague for 
Scotland, i. 156. 

— Charles, king of Scotland : — 

— 1 65 1, Jan., crowned at Scone, i. 
156. 

Apr., collects an army at Stirling, 

i. 156. 

Aug., invades England, i. 156, 

167, 170. 

— — Sept., is routed at Worcester, i. 
156, 170; but escapes to France, i. 
327, 352; ii. 225-6, 241, 492: his 
exile, ii. 315. 

— 1655, at Cologne pensions Lucy 
Barlow, i. 208 ; his plans for a descent 
on England are betrayed, i. 194; is 
proclaimed king at Blandford, in 
Dorset, but the rising is stamped out, 
i. 195-6. 

— 1658, story of his being privy to the 
poisoning of Oliver Cromwell, i. 475. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



33 



Charles II (continued) : — 
— - 1659, risings for him in Cheshire and 
Gloucestershire are crushed, i. 280-1. 

— 1659-60, intrigues for his recall, i. 
328 ; ii. 16, 183, 498. 

— 1660, Apr., reported plot against 
him, i. 153. 

Charles II. 

— 1660, Apr., agitation in his favour, 
i. 313, 328; ii. 16, 183. 

May, emblems of monarchy are 

replaced, i. 313-4. 

— — — , he is proclaimed king at 
Oxford, i. 314 ; rejoicings at Oxford 
on account of his entry into London, 
i. 316-7. 

— — June, receives congratulatory 
addresses from the Universities of 
Oxford and Cambridge, the City of 
Oxford, &c, i. 318-20; iv. 64. 

' July, is entertained by the City of 

London, i. 321 : sends a mandate to 
Merton college to elect his nominee 
warden, i. 322. 

July-Oct, king's commissioners 

4 visit ' the University and Colleges of 
Oxford, i. 204, 310, 318, 323-8, 330, 

334> 336, 362-5, 39°, 392-3, 453, 
464; ii. 50, 95, 398, 499; iv. 64, 

J45- 

Aug., oath of allegiance to him 

is imposed on the University of 
Oxford, i. 328; ii. 507; his birth- 
and restoration-day (May 29) is ap- 
pointed a Church holy-day, i. 401 ; 
v. 36. 

— — Aug.-Nov., issues a deluge of 
mandates to Oxford University to 
confer degrees on his nominees, i. 
328-9, 332-4, 337? 34 6 - 8 ; 23 1 - 

Sept., is petitioned by Oxford 

University to favour the faculty of 
Civil Law, i. 332 : during the vacancy 
of the see of Lincoln claims the 
bishop's patronage in Lincoln college, 
i. 434,472; gives a confiscated estate 
to the duke of York, i. 398 ; is ex- 
pected at Oxford, iv. 66. 

... , revives the Laudian edict (v. 

30), about preaching against the 
Arminian tenets, ii. 66, 448. 

... , bitter complaints by neglected 

cavaliers of the venality of the court, 

i. 167, 310, 335, 337, 367, 465-6; 
iv. 5, 8. 

— 1 66 1, Jan., Thomas Venner's plot, 
i. 510. 

March, is petitioned by Oxford 

University to defend its privileges 
against the City, i. 372 ; arranges for 
the Savoy conference, i. 384. 



Charles II (continued) : — 

— 1 66 1, Apr., presides over the Privy 
Council which gives judgement in the 
dispute between Oxford University 
and City, i. 372 : his coronation, i. 372, 
389,399-400; ii. 319 ; iv. 65, when he 
knights the mayor of Oxford, iii. 11 1 : 
coronation-day festivities at Oxford, 
i. 399, and at Bath, ii. 407 : issues 
mandates to Oxford University for 
degrees for his nominees, i. 399. 

May, meets Parliament, i. 400: 

4 restoration-day ' is observed as a 
Church holy-day, i. 401. 

Nov., issues a mandate to Mag- 
dalen college to elect his nominee 
president, i. 418, 460, 489, 

. . . , the Puritan press is active in 

its efforts to alarm the people, i. 
387-8. 

— 1662, Apr., Robert South preaches 
before him, i. 437. 

May, the Act of Uniformity is 

passed, i. 510: marriage to Catherine 

of Braganza, i. 440-1. 
June, birth of a bastard son by 

lady Castlemaine, ii. 46, 345. 
Sept., orders Oxford University to 

entertain the prince of Denmark, i. 

456. 

Dec, issues a Declaration of 

Indulgence, i. 510: Parliament settles 
'chimney-money' on him, i. 431: 
popular expression of contempt for 
him, i. 466 : the freedom of the Press 
is taken away, iv. 1 7. 

— 1663, Sept., with his queen and 
court visits Oxford, i. 241, 489-99, 
508-9; ii. 16, 213; iv. 66-7, 145: 
brings lady Castlemaine with him, i. 
494, by whom he has a second 
bastard, ii. 46 ; accepts a present 
of money from Oxford City, i. 490-1, 
493 : views the remains of the fortifi- 
cations of Oxford, i. 494, 497 : visits 
Cornbury and Woodstock, i. 492, 495 ; 
fox-hunts, i.495 ; attends the cathedral 
service, i. 495 ; touches for the king's 
evil, i. 496-7 ; visits the Bodleian and 
is banqueted by the University, i. 
496-7; ii. 16; visits some colleges, 
i. 497-8 ; leaves a gift for the poor of 
Oxford, i. 499 ; gives satisfaction by 
not issuing mandates for degrees for 
residents, i. 501. 

Nov., presides over the Privy 

Council which judges the Magdalen 
college dispute, i. 507. 

— 1664, Dec, at Whitehall, ii. 25. 

— 1665, Sept., issues proclamations 
about the plague, ii. 44, 48 ; Oxford 



VOL. V. 



D 



34 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Charles II {continued) : — 

is prepared for his residence, ii. 45, 
57-8; a proposal to have special 
University preachers during his visit 
is rejected, ii. 47, 58 ; arrival in 
Oxford, ii. 46, 58-9; receives a gift of 
money from Oxford City, ii. 60 ; orders 
the Law Courts to keep term in 
Oxford, ii. 48, 51, 62, 65-7, 73. 

— 1665, Oct., holds a Parliament in 
Oxford, ii. 48-9, 58, 60, 66-7, 73, 
which passes the Five-Mile Act, ii. 61 . 

Dec, birth of a third bastard by 

lady Castlemaine, ii. 53, 67 ; iii. 64. 

— 1665, Sept-1666, Jan., his court is 
at Christ Church in Oxford, i. 396 ; 
ii. 46-9, 58-9, 66-8, 73 ; iii. 111. 

— 1666, Jan., returns to London, ii, 67, 
7°, 73- 

Oct., his vest, ii. 90; sends a 

mandamus to Magdalen college to 
elect his nominee demy, ii. 494. 

— 1667, is granted the poll-tax, ii. 95, 
103. 

— 1668, March, presides at the Privy 
Council which judges in the dispute 
between Oxford University and City, 
ii. 131-2. 

— 1669, sends to claim his mother's 
jewels, ii. 177 ; iii. 158, 163. 

Aug., presides at the Privy Council, 

ii. 168. 

... , the Pope has a good opinion 

of him, ii. 170. 

— 1670, May, birth of a bastard by 
Nell Gwynne, ii. 193 : his sister comes 
from France, bringing with her Louise 
de Querouaille, ii. 330, 345 ; iii. 8. 

June, death of his sister, ii. 195-6. 

— — Dec, sneers in the House of 
Commons about his frequenting ac- 
tresses, ii. 206 : he orders Oxford to 
entertain the prince of Orange, ii. 
206. 

— 1 67 1, May, Thomas Blood tries to 
steal the crown, ii. 222. 

Oct., visits Cambridge, ii. 231 ; 

sends a mandate to Oxford University 
to elect his nominee bedell, ii. 232. 

Dec, birth of a second bastard by 

Nell Gwynne, ii. 237 : popular con- 
tempt for him, ii. 237 : intrigue with 
Elizabeth Ramsden, ii. 238. 

— 1672, March, issues a Declaration of 
Toleration, ii. 244. 

July, birth of a bastard by Louise 

de Querouaille, iii. 8, 413. 

— 1673, dispute with Parliament, ii. 
274. 

— 1673-5, negotiations to restore peace 
on the continent, iii. 159, 163. 



Charles II {continued) : — 

— 1674, continued opposition in Parlia- 
ment, ii. 279. 

July, at Windsor, ii. 288, where 

Oxford University presents him with 
Wood's Hist, et Antiq. Oxon., ii. 289 : 
Thomas Ilobbes complains to him 
about Dr. John Fell's erasing an en- 
comium on him, ii. 291, 293. 

Oct., at Newmarket, ii. 297-8. 

Nov., Oxford University sends 

him Catal. Libr. Impress, in Bibl. 
Bodl., iv. 74. 

— 1675, Feb., allows his concubine to 
nominate a bishop, ii. 309. 

Apr., dislikes Dr. Thomas Bar- 
low, ii. 312. 

— — May, sends a gift to cardinal 
Howard, ii. 314. 

June, orders Oxford University to 

entertain the prince of Neuburg, ii. 
315 ; goes to the seaside, ii. 319. 

Oct.-Nov., growing unpopularity, 

ii. 324, 330. 

Nov., one of his bastards enters 

Oxford University, ii. 329 : the duchess 
Mazarin comes to his court, ii. 330. 

— 1677, May, calls a Parliament, ii. 
375 : expresses displeasure at the 
freedom of elections in Oxford Uni- 
versity, ii. 395. 

— 1678, raises a standing army, iii. 
157, part of which (sir John Talbot's 
regiment of dragoons) is quartered in 
Oxford, ii. 404, 407-8, 412, 416, 422, 
424, 426, 429-30, 433, 470 ; iv. 76-7. 

March, the poll-tax, ii. 401. 

Apr., grants a fair at Charlbury, 

ii. 404. 

Sept., alleged 'popish plot' to 

assassinate him, ii. 416, 418-9. 

Oct., at Newmarket, ii. 420 : said 

to be going to sell an earldom to 
contribute to Christ Church new 
buildings, ii. 421. 

Dec, prorogues Parliament, ii. 

432- 

— 1679, Feb., alleged plots to assas- 
sinate him, ii. 441 : orders the duke 
of York to leave England, ii. 444. 

Apr., hostility of Parliament, ii. 

448. 

May, believed popularly to be in 

danger of assassination by Romanists, 
ii. 451. 

June, remonstrances from abroad 

at his allowing the butchery of 
Romanists, ii. 452. 

July, dissolves Parliament to pre- 
vent the passing of the Exclusion bill, 
ii. 456. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



35 



Charles II (continued) : — 

— 1679, Aug., illness, ii. 448, 461-2. 

Sept., congratulations on his re- 
covery, ii. 461-3 : welcomes back the 
duke of York, ii. 462-3 : orders the 
duke of Monmouth to leave England, 
ii. 462 : at Newmarket, ii. 463. 

Oct., expressions of loyalty by the 

City of London, ii. 466 : discovery of 
the 'Presbyterian' plot, ii. 465; iii. 
i9> 32. 

Nov., at last ventures to pardon 

Romanists, ii. 437, 467. 

Dec, deprives the duke of Mon- 
mouth of his places, ii. 470: removes 
' Presbyterians ' from the Commission 
of the Peace, iii. 111. 

— 1680, Jan. -June, repeatedly contra- 
dicts the reported legitimacy of the 
duke of Monmouth, ii. 476, 482, 485, 
487, 493- 

— — Jan., his friends leave him, ii. 
478 : recalls the duke of York, ii. 
478. 

May, illness, ii. 486. 

Dec, hostility of Parliament, ii. 

5°5- 

— 1681, Jan., dissolves Parliament to 
prevent the passing of the Exclusion 
bill, ii. 510-1, 513: calls a new 
Parliament to meet at Oxford and 
sends the University down to make 
room for the Court and Parliament, 
ii. 511, 513-4, 519, 522-4 : his de- 
position is suggested, ii. 515. 

Feb., special University preachers 

are appointed for his visit, ii. 48, 
515, 522, 531-2 : Oxford City returns 
members hostile to the court, ii. 523, 
529: he sends a mandate to Eton 
college to elect his nominee provost 
ii. 518. 

March, he comes to Oxford and 

holds his court in Christ Church, ii. 
5«i 5 I 4» 519-20, 5 26 > 529; is en- 
thusiastically received, ii. 521, 524-8; 
visits the Schools, Theatre, Bodleian, 
ii. 528-9; Oxford University makes 
him a present of books, iv. 77 ; visits 
Burford horse-race and Cornbury, ii. 
529-30; attends the cathedral service, 
ii. 531-2 ; opens Parliament, ii. 531 ; 
touches for the king's evil, ii. 532 ; 
suddenly dissolves Parliament, ii. 521, 
532-4 ; expresses his sense of absolute 
power, iii. 238 ; leaves Oxford, ii. 
53 1 - 2 - 

Apr., issues a justification of his 

dissolution of the last three Parlia- 
ments, ii. 537 : verses for and against 
his action, ii. 533-4. 



Charles II (continued) : — 

— 1 68 1, Apr. -May, receives addresses 
in connexion with the dissolution, ii. 
537> 541- 

— — Aug., appoints ecclesiastical 
commissioners, ii. 549, 554; iii. 4, 
45, 65. 

Sept., goes to Newmarket, ii. 229; 

and visits Cambridge, ii. 555. 

— — Nov., proceeds against lord 
Shaftesbury, ii. 560. 

— — Dec.^sij^^lj:Qny|Mjd£s,' ii. 

561. XoopUi&Q t . 

— 1682-3, the court party are active 
in the Press, ii. 26, 44, 82-3. 

— 1682, Jan.-July, visit of the Morocco 
ambassador, iii. 2, 5, 16-8, 427. 

Feb., murder of Thomas Thynne, 

iii. 5 ; foundation of Chelsea hospital, 
iii. 5 ; expectation of a Parliament, 
iii. 7 ; growing unpopularity, iii. 7, 
155- 

June, doctrine of passive obe- 
dience, iii. 20. 

Nov., popular with Oxford Tories, 

iii. 31. 

— 1682-4, cancels and remodels the 
borough charters with a view to pack- 
ing a Parliament, iii. 4, 25, 57, 67, 
70, 86, 89, 112-4. 

— 1683, May, hostility of the Whigs, 
iii. 155. 

June, discovery of the Rye-house 

plot, iii. 58 : search all over England 
for arms, iii. 59, 62, 156. 

— — July-Dec, he proceeds with 
severity against political opponents, 
iii. 66-7, 76, 82, 118. 

July, suicide of the earl of Essex 

at the time of the king's visit to the 
Tower, iii. 60-1, 117, 294, 452 : the 
king is restored to popularity through 
indignation at the plot, iii. 62-3, 
71-2. 

Aug., Oxford University congratu- 
lates him on his escape, iii. 64-5, 70, 

— — Sept., official thanksgiving for his 
escape, iii. 72 : the doctrine of passive 
obedience is argued, iii. 69-70. 

Nov., he abandons Tangier, iii. 

79- 

Dec, hostility of the ' Protestant 

party, iii. 33. 

— 1 684, Apr., sends a mandate to Merton 
college to elect his nominee fellow, 
iii. 93 ; prosecutes the Whigs, iii. 
93-4> 97- 

Aug., death of Charlotte, one of 

his bastard daughters, iii. 106. 

— — Oct., issues a new charter to 



D 2 



36 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Charles II {continued) ; — 

Oxford City, iii. 112, 114: sends a 
mandate to Eton college to elect his 
nominee fellow, iii. 116. 

— 1684, Nov., report of his reconcilia- 
tion to the duke of Monmouth, iii. 
118. 

— 1685, Jan., has an attack of gout, 
iii. 124 ; appoints a Lieutenant of the 
Tower, iii. 125. 

■ Feb. , sharp illness, profession of 

Romanism, and death, ii. 226, 504; 

iii. 125-7,130, 134: burial, iii. 125-6: 
formal tributes to his memory, iii. 97, 
125, 129, 133 ; iv. 80. 

— — Feb.-March, the report of his 
deathbed-profession of Romanism 
is industriously spread abroad, iii. 
134- 

— statues at the Stock Market and the 
Exchange, London, ii. 330 ; iii. 56 : 
and a,t the Botanic Garden, Oxford, 

iv. 50. 

— his engraved portrait by David 
Loggan, ii. 158, 160 ; his picture in 
glass at Queen's college, iii. 50. 

— pamphlets relating to him, i. 17, 
I5 6 > 3 2 °, 327» 400; iii. 58. 

— ballads and verses relating to him, i. 

3 2I > 35 2 , 3 8 9- 4°°, 44°; 7 6 , 361, 
533-4; iii. 125. 

— 'King Charles II 's day,' 'restora- 
tion day,' i. e. May 29, was kept as a 
Church holy-day with a University 
sermon in S. Mary's church. Wood 
notes its unofficial observance in 1660, 
i. 317, and its appointment to be a 
Church holy-day (and, by implica- 
tion, its first official observance) in 
1661, i. 401. His next notes are in 
1680, when it was kept in Oxford but 
forbidden in London, ii. 487 ; and in 
1682, when he mentions the rapid 
falling-off in bonfires and other tokens 
of popular joy, iii. 16. Afterwards, 
for purposes of the Athenae and Fasti, 
he became interested in the names of 
the University preachers, and records 
them without break from 1685 to 
1695 :— iii. 143, 187, 220, 267, 303, 
33 1 , 362, 391, 424, 454, 485. 

— his personal tastes : dislikes the 
grave English music and prefers the 
French mode, i. 212; ii. 69. Favours 
indecent plays, i. 353; and memoriter 
preaching, ii. 298 ; iii. 238. Dislikes 
parsons in long whigs, ii. 297-8 ; but 
views 'freaks,' ii. 378,445. Appre- 
ciates good speaking, ii. 16. Is fond 
of walking, ii. 529; iii. 67. His 
water-fowl, ii. 414. 



Charles II {continued') : — 

— general character of his court, ii. 68. 

— his household- lord high chamber- 
lain, i. 372, 494: chaplains, i. 328, 
365; ii. 298, 455, 510, 546: choir, 
ii. 66 : clerk of the closet, ii. 494 : 
closet-keeper, iii. 376 : cofferer, ii. 
471: cup-bearer, ii. 395: gentleman 
of the bed-chamber, ii. 72 : governess 
to his illegitimate children, iii. 296 : 
groom of the bed-chamber, i. 216-7 > 

ii. 449; iii. 38: jester, iii. 38, 120: 
Latin secretary, ii. 563 : librarian, ii. 
268 : mace-bearer, i. 494 : master of 
the ceremonies, i. 395, 456 ; ii. 146-7 ; 

iii. 57, 245 : master of the jewel- 
house, iii. 13 : musician, i. 242, 485 ; 
ii.69: organist, ii. 5 : page of honour, 
ii. 561 : pensioner, iii. 243 : physician, 
ii. 539 : sergeant of the pastry, ii. 70 : 
lord steward, ii. 166 : treasurer of 
the household, ii. 196 : valet de 
chambre, iii. 114: yeoman of the 
guard, i. 114 ; iii. 38. 

— his army : 1651, in Scotland, ii. 156 : 
1660, the garrison of Oxford, i. 334 : 
1670, in Ireland, i. 180. 

1677, raises a standing army, iii. 

157: of which sir John Talbot's 
dragoon regiment is quartered in 
Oxford, 1678 May-1679 Ap r -5 v - 
34- 

his life-guards, i. 494, 509 ; ii. 88, 

5 2 5, 53° j iii- 4> 48 : captain of the 
king's troop, iii. 120. 

— peers of his creation, ii. 7, 16, 345 : 
his chapel royal, ii. 67, 363, 505 : his 
company of players, ii. 193, 206,490: 
drinking his health, i. 3T6; ii. 466, 
490, 527; iii. 31 : drinking a health to 
his memory, iii. 129 : revenue, ii. 283, 
397' 5°9 : prediction of his brother's 
speedy fall attributed to him, iii. 
261 : incidental mention, ii. 212, 251, 
327, 332, 335, 3H 395, 4°7> 439, 
4 6 5, 477, 54 6 , 552-3 5 i". 8, 20, 26, 
28, 31, 87, 311 (where for 'I' read 

'II'), 363, 365, 383, 4 X 3- 
Charlet, Arthur, Master of Univ. 
coll. :— 

— Fellow of Trinity, iii. 136 ; drew up 
a list of members of that college, 
i. 158 ; iv. 171. 

— 1682-3, pro-proctor, iii. 40-2, 510-2. 

— 1683 onwards, communicated papers 
to Wood, iii. 44, 60, 339. 

— 1683-4, junior proctor, iii. 40, 44, 
55' 57, 86, 90. 

— 1684 onwards, gave Wood pamphlets, 
i. 354; iii. 86, 302, 322, 453: corre- 
sponded with Wood, iii. 86, 319, 378 ; 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



37 



Charlet, Arthur (continued) : — 

iv. 230 : and gave Wood informa- 
tion about contemporary churchmen, 
writers, &c, ii. 498; iii. 118, 186, 
222, 253, 291, 301, 307, 316, 330, 
337-8, 347-8, 372, 399, 408, 426, 
482. 

— 1686, possessed a considerable collec- 
tion of books and pamphlets to which 
he gave Wood access, iii. 195, 321, 
355 ; iv. 235. 

— 168 7, was a champion of Protestantism 
in the University, iii. 209, 245. 

— 1688, was a companion of Wood at 
the tavern, iii. 253, 311, 352, 364-5, 
369, and the coffee-house, iii. 254, 
357- 

— 1689, entertained Wood in his rooms 
in Trinity, iii. 3!4-5> 3«> 355 5 as 
afterwards, 1692, in his lodgings in 
Univ., iii. 398-9, 436, 490 ; iv. 85. 

— 1690, was engaged in defending the 
proctorial privileges of the University, 
iii. 322: sent out letters of inquiry 
on Wood's behalf, iii. 320 : received 
numerous inquiries from Wood to- 
wards the Athenae, iii. 320, 349, 355, 
440 ; patronized the Athenae, iii. 342, 
357, 4^9, 487, and canvassed for 
subscribers to it, iii. 353, 369. 

— 1691, entertained the deputation of 
the Scottish Episcopal Church, iii. 
355 : held a great correspondence, 
iii. 360-1, 369, 482, 501-2, now partly 
among the Ballard MSS. in the 
Bodleian. 

— 1692, elected Master of University 
college, iii. 393, 395, 474. 

— 1695, visited Wood in his last illness 
and advised him as to the disposal of 
his papers, iii. 497-500, 504. 

Charnock, Kobert, Romanist con- 
vert : — 

— 1687, fellow of Magd. coll., pro- 
fesses Romanism, iii. 214, 517 : sub- 
mits to the king's mandate about the 
presidentship, iii. 233 ; and to the 
visitation by the ecclesiastical com- 
missioners, iii. 250, 520, 524, 528-9. 

— 1688, vice-president of Magd. coll., 
tries to begin Romanist services in 
the college chapel, iii. 253-4, 262, 
265: has to complain of insolence 
from the demies, iii. 256, 531 : is 
expelled by the Visitor, iii. 533. 

— 1690, in James II's Irish army, iii. 
337- 

Cheynell, Francis, Puritan preacher : — 

— 1629, fellow of Merton, i. 130 ; ii. 47. 

— 1646, sent by Parliament to preach 
at Oxford, i. 130-1. 



Cheynell, Francis {continued) : — 

— 1647, a leader of the Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 143 ; ii. 47 ; iv. 60-2. 

— 1648, intruded President of S. John's, 

i. 130, 147. 

— 1665, death, i. 282 ; ii. 47 
Clarendon, Edward Hyde, first earl 

of :— 

— 162 1, of Magdalen college, i. 41S. 

— 1660, styled sir Edward Hyde, i. 324, 
346, 37 2 - 

— 1661, created earl of Clarendon, i. 
337, 412. 

— incidental mention, i. 199, 395, 431 ; 

ii. 28, 35,61, 202, 240, 245 ; iii. 377. 

— 1660-67, Lord High Chancellor of 
England, i. 324 ; ii. 117 ; iv. 6 : his 
state as Lord Chancellor, i. 494-5 : 
incidental mention, i. 362, 372, 41 2. 
492-5; ii. 60; iv. 4-5, 8, 19, 28, 
45, 130- 

— 1660, one of Charles IPs com- 
missioners to visit Oxford University, 
i. 324. 

— — elected chancellor of Oxford 
University, i. 337, and installed, 

i. 346 ; iv. 65 : incidental mention as 
chancellor of Oxford University, i. 
362, 398, 407, 435, 437, 456, 464; 

ii. 15, 39, 42, 79, 82, 111-2 ; iv. 130. 

— 1 66 1, is petitioned by Oxford Uni- 
versity against conferring so many 
honorary degrees, i. 381. 

— — pays his state visit to Oxford 
as chancellor of the University, i. 
41 1-5, and shows marked disfavour 
to the Puritans, i. 413, 415. 

— 1663, comes to Oxford to receive 
Charles II on his state visit, i. 490- 
502, and orders the Puritans to leave 
Oxford, i. 499-500. 

— 1664, as Visitor of Pembroke college, 
ejects the Master, ii. 25. 

— 1664 (?), visits Cambridge, ii. 58. 

— 1665-67, builds Clarendon house, 

i. 337 ; ii. in. 

— 1665, comes to Oxford when Charles 
II brings his court, ii. 57-8, 60. 

— 1667, Aug., removed from his lord 
chancellorship, ii. 117. 

Dec, retires to France and resigns 

his chancellorship of the University, 

ii. 122-4 ; iv. 1, 50. 

— 1674, his death, ii. 299 ; iv. 50. 

— his collection of books, i. 337 : a 
saying of his, i. 337. 

— his writings, ii. 219, 221, 472 : allu- 
sion to his autobiography, iv. 39. 

— his chaplain, i. 502 ; iii. 443. 

— his unpopularity with disappointed 
cavaliers, i. 335, 337, who accused 



38 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Clarendon, Edward Hyde, earl of 

[continued) : — 

him of taking bribes, i. 335, 337 ; ii. 
in; iv. I, 5, 8, 47, 50; and of 
intriguing to secure the crown for his 
grandchildren, i. 440; iii. 125. 

— Wood's biography of him in the 
Athenae, iv. 19, 22, 39, 48-9, 240. 

— Wood alludes to the charge of venality 
in the Athenae, and is prosecuted for 
libel, iii. 400,430,438 ; iv. 1, 4-5, 25, 

28, 45, 47, 5°- 
Clarendon, Henry Hyde, second 
earl of: — 

— styled Henry Hyde, created M.A., 
i. 381 ; iv. 65. 

— styled viscount Cornbury, ii. 202, 
274; iv. 65. 

— 1674, succeeds as second earl of 
Clarendon, and sells Clarendon house 
and his father's books, i. 337. 

— 1680, entertains Charles II, ii. 529-30. 

— 1683, entertains the duke of York, 
iii. 51. 

— 1685, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 
iii. 118 ('earl of Rochester,' in error). 

— 1686, entertains the duke of Ormond, 

iii. 179. 

— 1687, high steward of Oxford Uni- 
versity, iii. 207, 323. 

— 1690-2, political intrigues, iii. 333, 

35°-^ 375, 38 1 • 

— 1 691, peruses an advance-sheet of 
W T ood's Athenae, iv. 22, 39, 48-9. 

— 1692, prosecutes Wood for libelling 
his father, i. 335; iii.400,407, 410-11, 
413, 428-9, 440, 450, 496 ; iv. 1-50. 

— 1693, correspondence with W r ood, 

iv. 24-8. 

— 1693, 1695, personal interviews with 
Wood, iii. 420, 490. 

— incidental mention, ii. 202 ; iii. 73, 
436 ; iv. 97, 239. 

Clayton, sir Thomas, warden of 
Merton : — 

— bad repute of, i. 394. 

— 1642, takes the Parliamentary side, 
i- 394- 

— 1647, Regius professor of Medicine, 
i. 132, 361, 394; ii. 35. 

— 1648, submits to the Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 361, 366, 394. 

— 1660, is MP. Univ. Oxon., i. 312^, 
320 ; one of Charles IPs com- 
missioners to visit the University, 
i. 324; and buys 'the Vache,' 
Bucks., i. 361, 398. 

— 1661, is intruded into the warden- 
ship of Merton, i. 361, 383, 385, 389- 
95, 4°o, 47 1 5 and knighted, i. 385 ; 
iii. 251. 



Clayton, sir Thomas [continued) : — 

— 1661-93, incidental mention as 
warden of Merton, i. 435, 443, 446-7, 
450; ii. 58-9, 343, 454; iii'. 93, 95, 

1 10, 149. 

— - 1661-74, complaints of his waste 
and extravagance, i. 395-8. 

— 1662, kept boarders, i. 440 ; and his 
conch, i. 396, 456 ; ii. 140. 

— 1675-7, disputes with the fellows of 
Merton, i. 398 ; ii. 313, 557 ; iv. 
165. 

— 1677-9, quarrels with Wood, ii. 379, 
440. 

— 1679, a justice of peace for Oxford- 
shire, ii. 454 ; iii. 241, 260. 

— 1693, death, iii. 432. 

— members of his family, i. 132, 395-6 ; 

ii- 356, 537 ; iii- *7°, H5- 
Clerke, Henry, president of Magda- 
len : — 

— 1650, practises medicine, i. 165 ; 
ii. 243; iii. 517. 

— 1663, head of a faction in Magdalen 
college, i. 473. 

— 1672, elected president, ii. 243, 259, 

2 75, 4° 8 , 49°, 556; hi- 17, 5°, 8 9. 
521, and afterwards took Holy 
Orders, iii. 517. 

— 1673, tries to recover the founder's 
insignia, i. 131. 

— 1676-7, vice-chancellor, ii. 356, 383- 
7, 502. 

— 1 68 1, prevents the fellows from try- 
ing to recover the patronage of 
Magdalen hall, ii. 540-2. 

— 1687, death, iii. 216, 261, 526. 

— members of his family, iii. 30, 216, 
223. 

Compton, Henry, bishop of London : — 

— 1669, canon of Christ Church, ii. 
154, 162, 208 (mentor to the prince 
of Orange when at the cathedral 
service), 338. 

— 1674, bishop of Oxford, ii. 296, 299. 

— 1675, bishop of London, ii. 337-8, 
412, 555 ; iii. 13, 15, 79, 121, 173, 
184, 186, 190, 301, 307, 341, 370, 

395, 397, 472-3 ; iv- 35- 

— 1676-7, is at feud with the duke of 
York, ii. 397; iii. 173. 

— 1678, is regarded as a Protestant 
champion, ii. 428 ; iii. 172, 190. 

— 1681, is on Charles IPs ecclesiastical 
commission, ii. 549. 

— 1685, James II removes him from 
the Privy Council, iii. 131, 172. 

— 1686, is suspended from his bishopric, 

111. 195-6. 

— 1689, declares for William III, iii. 
298, and for toleration, iii. 315 ; and 



INDEX L BIOGRAPHICAL. 



39 



Compton, Henry {continued) : — 
is on the commission to discharge 
the duties of the archbishop of Canter- 
bury, iii. 309, 312. 

— 1691, report of his marriage, iii. 363. 

— 1692, is proscribed by James II, iii. 
387-8. 

Conant, John, sen., D.D., rector of 
Exeter : — 

— 1649, excellent government of his 
college, ii. 56 ; a leading Presby- 
terian, i. 147, 359 ; his weekly 'lecture' 
in All Saints', Oxford, i. 360, 445. 

— 1654, Regius professor of Divinity, 

i. 221 ; ejected, 1660, i. 326. 

— 1657-60, vice-chancellor, i. 221, 
251, 257, 268, 302, 312, 326, 359, 369, 
489. 

— 1662, proceeded against for Calvin- 
istic preaching, i. 444-5 ; ejected from 
his headship for Nonconformity, i. 
453- 

— 1663, banished by Clarendon from 
Oxford, i. 499. 

— 1671, vicar of All Saints', Northamp- 
ton, iii. 225. 

— 1676, archdeacon of Norwich, ii. 305. 

— 168 j , canon of Worcester, ii. 557. 

— 1694, death, iii. 447. 

— father of the next. 

Conant, John, jun., LL.D., fellow 
of Merton : — 

— son of the preceding. 

— 1680-3, fellow of Merton and 
apparently subwarden, ii. 490, 497 ; 
iii. 15-6, 2i, 34> 49 

— 1684, intrigues to make sure of his 
succession to the wardenship, iii. 95. 

— 1684, 1685, subwarden of Merton, 
iii. 89-90, 93, 96, 129, 141, 149, 154. 

— 1685, senior dean, iii. 172. 

— 1686-7, fellow (? and subwarden), 
iii. 181, 215, 247. 

— 1687, marriage, iii. 225. 

— 1693, one of three nominated for the 
wardenship, iii. 433. 

Cooper, Benjamin, registrar Univ. 
Oxon. : — 

— his family, ii. 459. 

— is a notary public, ii. 442. 

— his house in Holywell, i. 277 ; ii. 
423, 459; iii. 132. 

— lets lodgings, ii. 423, 497 ; iii. 152. 

— 1660, registrar of the University, i. 

77> 3°4> 372, 4 r 6 ; ii- 343> 358, 393 I 
iii. 63, 152 ; iv. 22, 64-5, 72-3, 75, 
81. 

— gives Wood information, &c, i. 302 ; 

ii. 287 ; iv. 14. 

— 1693, is called by Clarendon as a 
witness against Wood, iv. 16, 23, 43. 



Cornish, Henry, sen., Oxford Puri- 
tan : — 

— 1646, of New Inn hall, sent to preach 
the University into submission to 
Parliament, i. 130. 

— 1648, intruded canon of Christ 
Church, i. 155 ; iii. 109. 

— 1649, a champion of the Presby- 
terians, i. 147. 

— 1658, a friend of John Nixon 
and a benefactor to Nixon's School, 
i. 246, 437. 

— 1663, banished by Clarendon from 
Oxford, resides at Stanton Harcourt, 
i. 499-500 ; ii. 96, 131. 

— 1672, a Nonconformist preacher in 
Oxford, during Charles IPs Tolera- 
tion, ii. 244. 

— 1689, again a Nonconformist preacher 
in Oxford, after William Ill's Tolera- 
tion, iii. 299. 

Crewe, Nathaniel, bishop of Dur- 
ham : — 

— his parentage, ii. II, 16. 

— 1652, submits to the Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 268, 332; ii. 11, 16; and 
is reckoned a Presbyterian, i. 268, 

— 1659, agitates for the abolition of 
the Parliamentary visitation, i. 268 ; 
is fond of music, i. 274; and studies 
chemistry, i. 290, 473. 

— 1660, procures the ejection of Inde- 
pendents from fellowships in Lincoln 
college, i. 332, 362. 

— 1661, is subrector of Lincoln col- 
lege, iii. 514, and active in restoring 
Church ceremonies, iii. 514. 

— 1 663, is senior proctor on the occasion 
of Charles IPs visit, i. 490, 496-7, 
500-1 ; ii. 8-10, 15-6. 

— 1664, D.C.L., ii. 16. 

— 1665, subrector of Lincoln, ii. 38, 
121. 

— 1668, rector of Lincoln, i. 333. 

— 1669, dean of Chichester, ii. 255 : 
clerk of the closet, and a friend of the 
duke and duchess of York, ii. 221, 
244. 

— 1671, bishop of Oxford, ii. 257, 333; 
iv. 74. 

— 1674, bishop of Durham, i. 274, 290, 
332, 45°> 47 2 -3; »• i6» 299, 362, 
531 ; iii. 97, 121, 139, 143, 209, 313 
(in error), 332. 

— 1679, popularly supposed to be privy 
to the ' Popish plot,' ii. 447. 

— 1685, dean of the Chapel Royal, iii. 
173. 

— 1686, one of James IPs ecclesiastical 
commission, iii. 193. 



4° 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Crewo, Nathaniel (continued) : — 

— 1 6S7, popularly supposed to be toy- 
ing with Romanism, iii. 217, 219, 
244. 

— 1688-9, contradictory rumours as to 
his attitude towards James II, iii. 
285, 298, 300-1. 

— 1690, excepted from William Ill's 
Act of Indemnity, iii. 331. 

— 1 69 1, succeeds as baron Crewe of 
Stene, iii. 332 ; iv. 232. 

— 1692, marriage, iii. 379. 

— 1694, unpopularity, iii. 448. 

— autograph signature, i. 450 ; Wood's 
animus against him, ii. 16 ; Dr. John 
Smith's memoirs of him, i. 274; ii. 
11, 16, 221, 244; iv. 232, published 
by the Camden Society. 

Cromwell, Oliver, Lord Protector : — 

— 1649, entertained by Oxford Univer- 
sity, iv. 62. 

— 1651,1 elected and installed chan- 
cellor of Oxford University, i. 291, 
441, 489; ii. 91 ; iv. 62-3. 

at Worcester fight, iii. 84 ; iv. 

63. 

— 1653, Dec, made Lord Protector, 
i. 181, 185; iv. 63 : incidental allu- 
sions to his protectorate, i. 185, 190, 
3 J 3, 353-4, 394, 446; ii. 10, 55, 91, 
96, 147, 192, 346, 413, 417, 421, 

45 8 -9» 507; i". 2 7, 58,455- 

— 1654, his protectorate, like a king's 
accession, brought the plague, i. 
185-6 : peace concluded with the 
Dutch, i. 189 ; iv. 63. 

— 1655, the discontent of the extreme 
Independents foments a royalist rising, 
i. 194-6; iii. 40, 58. 

— 1656, orders a state funeral for arch- 
bishop James Usher, i. 203 ; releases 
Lucy Barlow, i. 208. 

— - 1658, the great storm, i. 258; his 
death, i. 259; his death attributed to 
poison, i. 475. 

— 1692, deaths of his son-in-law and 
son, iii. 404, 410. 

— the Protectress, ii. 460 : his sister, 
i. 363. 

— is patron of the Oxford Indepen- 
dents, i. 368, particularly of Dr. John 
Palmer, i. 304, and Dr. John Wilkins, 
i. 363. 

— knights and peers of his creation, i. 
39, 187-8, 312 ; ii. 16 ; iii. 404, 466 ; 
iv. 47. Law-officers of his nomina- 
tion, ii. 112, 215, 421 ; iii. 40, 261 ; 
iv. 47. 

— his surgeon, iii. 84. 

— pamphlets about him, ii. 13; iii. 
455- 



Cromwell, Olivor {continued) : — 

— his army, ii. 231 ; iii. 257-8. 

— his love of music, i. 287. 
Cromwell, Richard : — 

— 1657, elected and installed chan- 
cellor of Oxford University, i. 259 ; 
ii. 91 ; iv. 63. 

— 1658, Sept., proclaimed Protector, 
with all honours, but amidst signs of 
popular disaffection, i. 259 : inci- 
dental allusions to his protectorate, 

i. 394, 44 r > 5 ii- 5°7- 

— 1659, his Parliament, i. 267. 

— 1660, May, resigns his chancellor- 
ship of Oxford University, i. 315-6. 

— 1692, death, iii. 410. 
Curteyne, John, Wood's crony : — 

— 1650, intruded fellow of Lincoln, 

ii. 4. 

— 1657-67, borrows small sums from 
Wood, i. 215, 311, 434, 455, 471 ; 
11. 103. 

— 1658-68, is Wood's constant cook- 
shop and tavern companion, i. 255, 
258-9, 264, 266-8, 271, 275, 279, 
281, 284, 286-8, 301-2, 306, 310, 
3 I 3-4,3 I 8, 321,420-1,427-8,430-1, 
433-4, 436, 439, 44i, 444, 45o, 45 2 , 
454-5, 457, 461, 463-4, 467-72, 
474-5, 477-8, 486-7, 50 1 , 5°3, 5°7 5 
ii. 1-2, 4-6, 8, 12-5, 18-20, 22-4, 

27-35, 37, 39-4o, 43, 45, 47, 50-1, 
69-7 1 , 73-7, 79, 81-2, 85, 88-9, 92, 
94, 98-9, 102, 104, 106, 108, 11 1-2, 
115, 117, 119-20, 122, 129. 

— 1663-68, is Wood's doctor, i. 469 ; 
ii. 95. 

— 1668, marriage, ii. 133. 

— 1669, death, ii. 172. 

Davis, Richard, the chief Oxford 
bookseller of Wood's time : — 

— his shop was ' near Oriel college,' 
1658, i. 266 ; in Schydiard street 
(S. Mary lane), 1662, i. 440: and 
was, I believe, the building shown in 
the Oxford Almanac for 1898 : see 
' Ship hall' in Wood's City, iii. 322. 
The ' Mr. Davis,' who had a shop 
'behind Allhallows,' 1657, i. 211, 
and 1666, ii. 82, is probably a dif- 
ferent person. 

— Wood was possibly on terms of per- 
sonal intimacy with him, if Mrs. 
Davis, 1662, i. 436, be, as is possible, 
his first wife, and Mr. Davis, 1668, 
ii. 139; 1670, ii. 184, (?) 190, be 
himself. 

— his autograph signature, iv. 31. 

— the following purchases of books 
&c. from 'Mr. Davis,' 1657-70, are 



INDEX L BIOGRAPHICAL. 



41 



Davis, Richard {continued) : — 

probably from him, i. 226, 230, 235, 
254, 266, 275, 278-9, 286-7, 3°*> 32i, 
326, 399. 4°°> 4°7> 4 2I > 4 2 7, 433-4, 
436, 439> 44 1 * 47 8 > 50 1 , 5°3> 5°7~8 5 

ii. 1-2, 6, 14-5, 20, 31, 73, 76, 92-3, 
98, 106, 112, 119, 122, 129, 146, 149, 
187 : cp. ii. 512. 

— 161 8, born in Oxford, iv. 30. 

— 1658, issued a ' Catalogue of books,' 

i. 266. 

— 1661, 'Mrs. Davis,' i. 407, 436, is 
perhaps his first wife : cp. i. 509. 

— 1663, leased the Old Congregation 
house for a warehouse, i. 509. 

— 1664-6, Oxford University bought 
books from him, iv. 66, 69. 

— 1672, Wood engaged him to sell 
privately-printed Romanist books for 
Ralph Sheldon of Beoly, ii. 253. 

— 1674, Wood made notes of books in 
his shop, ii. 178 ; iv. 235. 

— 1680, he published a ' Catalogue of 
books printed at the [Sheldonian] 
Theatre, 1 ii. 479. 

— 16S1, Harry Clements, afterwards 
an Oxford bookseller, was his ap- 
prentice, ii. 541. 

— 1685, his second marriage, iii. 157, 
followed by his insolvency, iii. 157, 
resulting in the auction of his stock 
in four great sales, viz. 1686, Apr., 
and Oct.; 1688, June; and 1692, 
Apr., iii. 157, 302. 

— 1693, he was summoned by Claren- 
don as a witness against Wood in the 
libel-suit, iv. 16, 22-3, 30-1, 34-6. 

Deane, Thomas, Romanist convert : — 

— 1686, fellow of Univ., a professed 
Romanist, iii. 176-7, 183-4, 213-4. 

— 1687, an acquaintance of Wood s, 

iii. 240, 256. 

— 1688, quits Oxford, iii. 285. 

— 1689, ejected from his fellowship, iii. 
297-8. 

— 1 691 , said to have been pilloried as 
a Jesuit, iii. 378. 

Devil, the : — 

— autograph shown at Queen's college, 
1663-1710, i. 498. 

— portrait at Magdalen college, i. 161. 

— recognized by his cloven foot, i. 257. 

— agency looked for, in witchcraft, i. 
434; in possession or insanity, i. 
179; ii. 10, 53; iii. 54; in suicide, 

ii. 11 ; in storm, i. 258 ; ii. 88. 

— local activity, 1649, at Woodstock, 
i. 158; at Tid worth, in Wiltshire, i. 
158, 458; ii. 53. 

— in undergraduate pranks, i. 356, 358, 
406, 466. 



Dickenson, Edmund, physician in 
Oxford :— 

— parentage and family, i. 134; ii. 200. 

— 1640, educated at Eton, i. 134. 

— 1642, postmaster ofMerton, i. 134. 

— 1644, served in the militia which 
garrisoned Oxford, i. 134. 

— 1647, Bachelor of Arts, i. 134, 140. 

— 1661, fellow of Merton, i. 390, 392, 

397- 8 » 5°3> 5°7 J ii- 44, 4 2 9- 

— — is godfather to Wood's nephew, 
Thomas, son of Robert, i. 29 ; v. 12. 

— 1664, bursar ofMerton, ii. 9-10. 

— 1667, makes a deadly mistake in his 
prescription for Wood's mother, i. 
397 ; ii. 101. 

Dodwell, Henry, nonjuror : — 

— 1685-8, of Trinity college, Dublin, 
frequents Oxford coffee-houses, iii. 
263. 

— 1687, gives and gets information 
towards Wood's Athenae, iii. 1, 204, 
345 ; iv. 229. 

— 1688, elected Camden professor of 
Ancient History, iii. 263, 267. 

— T689, refuses the oaths to William 
III, iii. 308, 396. 

— 1 691, is ejected from his professor- 
ship, iii. 375. 

— 1692, writes against the government, 
iii. 399, and, 1694, speaks against it, 
iii. 448. 

— 1693, is asked by Wood to effect 
a reconciliation with Henry, earl of 
Clarendon, iv. 9, 25-6; betrays Wood 
to Clarendon, iv. 24, 26-7 ; is a wit- 
ness for Clarendon against Wood, iv. 
2 3, 34-6. 

— 1694, report of his marriage, iii. 463. 
Dolben, John, archbishop of York : — 

— 1625, born in Northamptonshire, ii. 
396 ; iii. 207. 

— 1660, a canon of Christ Church and 
a pronounced High Churchman, i. 

34§> 39°> 392, 43 2 - 

— 1 661, treasurer of Christ Church, i. 
410. 

— 1662, keeps his coach, i. 456 : is 
made dean of Westminster, ii. 66, 93 ; 
iii. 59, 163. 

— 1666, bishop of Rochester, ii. 89, 93, 
414; iii. 3, 64, 66; iv. 74. 

— 1683, archbishop of York, iii. 59, 
64, 66, 97, 121. 

— 1685, as archbishop is Visitor of 
Queen's college, iii. 126-7, acting by 
commissioners. 

— 1686, death, iii. 183-5. 

— his personal appearance, ii. 26 : his 
preaching, iii. 238 : his family, ii. 
44, 200 ; iii. 207. 



42 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Dugdale, sir William, antiquary: — 

— his parentage and family, ii. 1 64, 
494; iii. 2, 335. 

— 1605, birth, ii. 494. 

— 1642, resident in Oxford, ii. 494. 

— 1655, i ssue °f v °l- i °f n * s Monas- 
ticon Anglieanum, i. 254 ; iv. 240, 
243, 266. 

— 1656, issue of his Warwickshire, i. 
5, 209 ; ii. 8, 563. 

— 1667 onwards, is on very friendly 
terms with Wood, to whom he shows 
great kindness, ii. 109, HI, 336, 345, 
371-2, 439-40, 453, 455, 468, 473, 

480, 494, 5°5, 5 r 3 5 i»- 

— 1673, issue of volume iii of his Mo- 
nasticon, ii. 111, 113, 262 : Wood's 
notes for Monasticon, vol. iii, ii. 
113, 262. 

— 1675, issue of volume i of his Baron- 
agium Anglieanum, i. 146; ii. Ill, 
316, 341 : Wood's notes in connexion 
with the Baronagium, ii. 336, 341. 

— 1676, issue of volume ii of his Baron- 
agium, ii. 7, 16, 336, 345: Wood's 
notes in his copy of the Baronagium, 
i. 146; ii. 7, 16, 316, 345, 434, 450, 
471, 492 ; iv. 239. 

— 1677, Garter King of Arms, ii. 367, 
44°, 549- 

— 168 j, political pamphlet by him, ii. 

524> 533- 

— 1686, his death, iii. 174, 180. 

— his autograph, iv. p. xi ; MS. 
notes by him, ii. 87, 345, 434, 505, 
513 : letters written by him to 
Wood, ii. 435 ; iv. 229-30. 

— his MS. collections he bequeathed 
to the Ashmolean Museum, i. 6 ; iii. 
180, 190, 488, 499; iv. 291. 

Edwards, Jonathan, principal of 
Jesus college : — 

— 1662, fellow of Jesus college, ii. 
531 : perhaps also the references, ii. 
262, iii. 175, belong to him. 

— 1686, principal of Jesus college, iii. 
199, 212. 

— 1689, submits to William and Mary, 

iii. 305. 

— 1689-92, vice-chancellor, iii. 311, 
322, 325-6, 334, 337-8, 341-2, 346-7, 
364-5, 368, 372, 373, 375, 393, 404; 

iv. 83. 

— 1 690-1, as vice-chancellor is friendly 
to Wood and his Athenae, iii. 326, 
364-5, 435, 469; iv- 22. 

— 1 69 1, as vice-chancellor under ex- 
press orders from Court proceeds 
against Oxford nonjurors, iii. 373, 
375- 



Edwards, Jonathan (co7ilinucd) : — 

— 1693, writes against Socinianism, iii. 
427- 

— 1694, chaplain to queen Mary, iii. 469. 
Elizabeth, queen : — 

— 1559, abolishes mass, iii. 517, and 
brings back the Book of Common 
Prayer, ii. 305 : oath of supremacy, v. 

3' r 7- . ... 

— 1559, her commissioners 'visit' Ox- 
ford University, i. 419,424; iv. 144, 
209. Papers about Oxford Univer- 
sity during her reign, iv. 220. 

— 1560, her weakness for Robert 
Dudley, earl of Leicester, i. 260. 

— 1 56 1, issues a charter to Cambridge, 
iv. 174. 

— 1564, state visit to Cambridge, iv. 

283. 

— 1 566, first state visit to Oxford, iv. 
145, 202, 227. 

— 1592, second state visit to Oxford, 
i. 454; ii. 239; iv. 145, 150. 

— a godchild of hers, iii. 317 : knights 
dubbed by her, iii. 102. 

— her household : — jester, ii. 333 ; 
lutinist, ii. 352; officer of her jewel- 
house, ii. 147. 

— ' Queen Elizabeth's day,' i. e. her 
accession-day, 17 Nov., observed as 
a Protestant holiday, ii. 468, 500, 
559; iii. 30 (in 1682). 

— histories, &c. of her reign, i. 235, 
242; ii. 118, 145 : book dedicated to 
her, iv. 266 : her army, i. 269. 

Ellis, William, Oxford musician : — 

— 1649, ejected from his place as 
organist of S. John's by the Parlia- 
mentary visitors, i. 204-5. 

— 1 68 1, his death, ii. 476. 

— he occurs once with Wood at the 
tavern, ii. 230. 

— his wife is mentioned, i. 378 ; ii. 
476. 

— his weekly music-meeting, at first on 
Thursdays, afterwards on Tuesdays, 

i. 2 7 5, is mentioned regularly 1656-61, 
and afterwards occasionally down to 
June 1669, i. 204-5, 2 °9> 273-5, 454; 

ii. 163. 

— — at this meeting those present paid 
6d. each, the only exceptions I have 
noted being 8d., i. 238 ; 2d., i. 475 ; 
and id., ii. 133. 

the regular entries for Tuesday 

are as follows, i. 213, 215, 218, 220, 
222, 226, 229-31, 235, 237-8, 249, 
254-6, 264, 267, 271, 278-9, 281, 
284, 287-8, 310, 314, 318, 321, 331, 
335-6, 338, 38o 5 382, 400, 405, 418, 
433, 439, 469, 47 *, 474-5, 478; 11. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



43 



Ellis, William {continued') : — 

14, 18, 24, 33, 43, 47, 112, 122, 126, 
133, 163. 

— notices of musicians from outside 
Oxford taking part in these music- 
meetings are 1658, on Wedn., i. 255 ; 
1658, on Sat., i. 256-7 ; 1664, Tuesd., 
ii. 18 ; and 1665, Tuesd., ii. 43. 

— the servant-maid at the house had, 
according to the then custom of tips, 
a ' box ' to which about Christmas- 
time the frequenters of the meeting 
gave a small sum, i. 230 (in 1657 s ), 
378. 

— Wood mentions a music-meeting on 
Monday, payment I J. 6d., i. 238 ; on 
Tuesd., payment 8d., i. 237 ; on 
Thursd., payment gd., i. 237 ; on 
Friday, payment is., i. 242 : these 
may, or may not, have been at 
Ellis's. 

— Wood also went to the house on 
other days, possibly to music-meet- 
ings arranged for an unusual day, 
possibly simply as to an ale-house 
(cp. i. 258); e.g. Monday, i. 218, 
226, 235, 258, 264, 266,306; Wedn., 
i. 218, 249, 401 ; Thursday, i. 212, 
231, 255, 457 ; Friday, i. 218, 220, 
2 3 8 > 37 8 ; Saturday, i. 220, 255. 

Feil, John, the great dean of Christ 
Church :— 

— his parentage and kindred, i. 272, 
330; ii. 127; iii. 37, 81, 192: his 
personal appearance, ii. 26. 

— educated at Thame school, i. 109. 

— 1644, student of Christ Church, 
'bore arms' for Charles I, iii. 234; 
v. 25, note. 

— 1647, pamphlet by him, i. 143. 

— 1649, as executor of his father, is 
asked by the Parliamentary visitors 
to give up a bedell's mace, i. 157. 

— 1650, owns Gaunt house, i. 272. 

— 1660, poses as a royalist ' sufferer,' 
i. 313 ; is canon, and, immediately 
after, dean, of Christ Church, and 
active in restoring Church ceremonies, 

i- 347-9, 35 8 ~9- 

— 1 66 1, publishes a life of Henry 
Hammond, i. 313; countenances sir 
Thomas Clayton by half-heartedly 
attending his attempted installation, 
i 39° , 39 2 5 is backward in getting 
Wood access to the Christ Church 
registers, i. 410 ; entertains Edward, 
earl of Clarendon, chancellor of the 
University, i. 415 ; is opposed to the 
Royal Society, i. 354; iii. 224. 

— Incidental mention as dean of Christ 



Fell, John {continued') : — 

Church, ii. 90, 208, 224, 241, 286; 
iii. 94. 

— -1662, entertains the Crown Prince of 
Denmark, i. 457. 

— 1663, Charles II quarters himself in 
his lodgings, i. 494-5, 497. 

— 1663-9, na d charge of the building 
of the Sheldonian, iv. 68, 125 ; and, 
by poetic as well as historical justice, 
was vice-chancellor at its formal 
opening in 1669, ^5; iv. 72. 

— 1664, encouraged Christ Church 
plays by the students of that house, 

ii. 2. 

— 1665, entertained Edward, earl of 
Clarendon, the chancellor, ii. 57 : 
Charles II quarters himself in his 
lodgings, ii. 58. 

— 1666, was commissioner of the poll- 
tax, ii. 89. 

— 1666-9, vice-chancellor, i. 331 ; ii. 
82-5, 91, 93-4, 100, 119-20, 128-9, 
r 32^ 139, M4-5, 153, 155, J 57-6i, 
165, 167-8 ; iv. 72. The chief features 
of his office are, his efforts to restore 
the true old fashion of academic 
dress, i. 149, 356, 359, ii. 83-4; the 
return to the old strictness by which 
undergraduates were not admitted into 
Convocation-house, ii. 34 ; efforts at 
restoring discipline, lost at the Resto- 
ration, ii. 83 ; the abolition (1667) of 
' coursing,' as a custom productive of 
broils between colleges, ii. 83, 129; 

iii. 37 ; his determination, from regard 
for S. Mary's as domus Dei, that 
there shall be no Act till the Shel- 
donian is built, ii. 1 1 1 ; his presiding at 
the formal opening of the Sheldonian, 
ii. 165 ; iv. 72, the gift of which by 
archbishop Gilbert Sheldon was per- 
haps due to Fell's initiative. 

— 1669, he introduced Wood to arch- 
bishop Sheldon, ii. 167-8, a kindness 
which Wood's own temper rendered 
nugatory. 

— 1669-1686 (his death); he was a 
delegate of the University Press (' e 
Theatro Sheldoniano '), but practi- 
cally controlled it, ii. 170, 172, 180, 
204, 290, 292, 331, 376; iii. 133, 198, 
202. 

— 1670, he planted Christ Church 
Broad Walk, ii. 188. 

received the prince of Orange, 

ii. 208. 

— 1670-86, he was a curator of the 
Sheldonian, but practically controlled 
it, ii. 197 ; iii. 207 ; his partiality to 
Christ Church being shown in his 



44 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Fell, John {continued) : — 

granting the use of it for the 1 Music 
speech ' when the praelector was of 
Christ Church, ii. 490, 547-8 ; iii. 59. 

— 1 670-3, he supervised the translation 
of, and altered or omitted passages in 
Wood's Hist, et Antiq. Univ. Oxon., 
and inserted other passages, i. 47 ; ii. 
199-200, 243, 247, 259-60, 272-3, 
290-3, 3 QI 5 iii- 253 ; iv. 189 : he 
paid for the translation, ii. 199, 276, 
322, and printed the whole work at 
his own charge, ii. 204, 243, 301. 

— 1671, was justice of the peace for 
Oxfordshire, ii. 216-7. 

— 1673, Wood's melancholic vanity 
fastened a quarrel on him, ii. 259-60, 

2 73, 2 9 2 -3» 296. 

he tried to get all University 

sermons falling to members of Christ 
Church preached in the cathedral, ii. 

274, 383 : and again, 1679, ii. 441. 
he was regarded as a Protestant 

champion, ii. 275. 
— ■ 1674, j68o, his controversy with 
Thomas Hobbes, ii. 288, 291-3, 472, 
476, 480, 500 ; iii. 395. 

— 1674, he distributed copies of Wood's 
Hist, et Antiq. Univ. Oxon. broadcast 
for the honour of the University, ii. 
289, 376. 

— 1675, he recommended Wood for the 
keepership of the public records, ii. 
3I4- 

— 1676, appointed bishop of Oxford, 
ii- 336, 338, 361 : incidental mention 
of him after conjoining the offices of 
dean and bishop, ii. 374, 376, 397, 
434, 442, 462, 495, 505, 518, 528, 

532, 543^ 553, 556; hi- 4, 29, 45, 55, 
63, 65, 66, 83, 85, 106, 121, 134, 161, 
190, 257 ; iv. 80. 

— 1677, he entertained the duke of 
Ormonde, chancellor of the Univer- 
sity, ii. 385-6. 

— 1677, 1681, 1686, he kept boarders, 
ii. 394, 426 ; iii. 122, 188. 

— 1678, his new buildings at Christ 
Church, ii. 421 : was still regarded as 
a Protestant champion, ii. 428. 

— 1679, t0 °k a firm stand against Titus 
Oates, ii. 465. 

— 1681, Charles II quartered himself in 
his lodgings, ii. 522-3. 

he tried to prevent the fellows 

of Magdalen college recovering the 
patronage of Magdalen hall, ii. 542. 

— 1682, consecrated S. Edmund hall 
chapel, iii. 11-2: entertained the 
Morocco ambassador, iii. 18. 

— 1683, entertained the duke and 



Fell, John {continued) : — 

duchess of York, iii. 45, 47-8, and a 
German prince, iii. 57. 

— 1684, expelled John Locke from his 
studentship, iii. 117. 

— 1686, his death, iii. 191-2. 

— 1694, speech in his honour, iii. 460. 

— miscellaneous points : his opinion of 
Wycliffe, ii. 247, 249, 336-7 ; Latin 
verses by him, ii. 248. 

— MSS. formerly in Fell's ownership, 
ii. 277; iii. 203, 239-40; iv. no, 
189, 196, 200, 31 r. 

— notices of Fell's character and in- 
fluence : — he aimed at strict disci- 
pline in his college, i. 348 ; ii. 82, 
93, and in the University, ii. 83 : he 
was constant in his attendance at 
divine service, i. 348-9 ; ii. 496 ; iii. 
192 : he had a weakness for gossip, 
and consequently for flattery, i. 348, 
500; ii. 83, 93, 232 ; iii. 399; and so 
fell into the hands of favourites, i. 
348 : he caused heart-burnings in the 
University by too patriotically pushing 
Christ Church men, i. 348 ; ii. 83, 
180, 232-3, 263, 332, 443, and by too 
paternally pardoning Christ Church 
men's faults, i. 349 ; ii. 83, 139-40, 
542-3 ; iii. p. vii : he had the Univer- 
sity subject to him, i. 348 ; iii. 165, 
224; and the bench of bishops obe- 
dient to his nod, i. 348 ; ii. 264, 332. 

— even through Wood's most jaundiced 
spectacles we can discern in John 
Fell one of Oxford's greatest and most 
loyal sons. 

Fell, Samuel, dean of Christ Church : — 

— 161 9, canon of Christ Church, iv.no. 

— 1638, dean of Christ Church, i. 73-5, 
77, 84, 86; iv. 156. 

— 1642, plate seized by the Parliament, 

i. 61, 63. 

— 1643, owned Gaunt house, i. 272. 

— 1645-I, vice-chancellor, i. 143, 157 ; 
iv. 60, 145. 

— 1649, death, i. 150 ; iii. 81. 

— his family, i. 157, 272; ii. 326; iii. 
81-2, 192. 

Finch, Heneage, M.P. Univ. Oxon. : — 

— 1678-86, Solicitor-General, ii. 440, 
443 ; iii. 76, 287. 

— 1679, 1688-9, 1690, 1695, M.P. for 
Oxford University, ii. 440-3; iii. 287, 

296, 3i7, 3 2 5-6, 4 2 9, 49 1 - 

— 1 7 14, created earl of Aylesford, iii. 
429. 

Finch, Leopold William, warden of 
All Souls :— 

— 1681, nobleman of Christ Church, 

ii. 509 ; takes part in a riot, ii. 542. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



45 



Finch, Leopold "William (cont.) : — 

— 1683, fellow of All Souls, iii. 49. 

— 1684, edits Cornelius Nepos, iii. 
86. 

— 1685, is captain of the All Souls 
company of the University militia, iii. 
146-7, 149, 151-2. 

— 1687, is warden of All Souls by 
mandate from James II, iii. 208, 217, 
227, 230 ; iv. 81 : keeps the college 
gaudy-day in a manner too festive for 
the times and for decorum, iii. 243. 

— 1687-94, destroys the old windows of 
the warden's lodgihgs, iii. 208, 459. 

— 1688, stands for Camden professor- 
ship of History, iii. 262-3, an ^ expels 
a college chaplain for not voting for 
him, iii. 263, 404, 447. 

— 1693, preaches the Latin sermon, iii. 

4 2 7- 

— 1694, marriage, iii. 459. 

entertains the duke of Ormond, 

chancellor of the University, iii. 

494-5- . ■ ■ 

— 1698, fresh disputes with a chaplain, 
ii. 272. 

Fisher, Alexander, sub ward en of 
Merton : — 

— 1619, fellow of Merton, i. 33, 233, 
296; ii. 183, 233. 

— 1638-61, subwarden of Merton, i. 27, 
383, 3 8 9-93 ; v. 9. 

— 1659, n ' s house in Holywell, i. 277 ; 
ii. 233-4. 

— 1661, one of three named for the 
wardenship, i. 383. 

— — half-hearted resistance to the 
admission of sir Thomas Clayton, i. 
389-93. 

— 1 67 1, death, and benefaction to 
Merton, ii. 233-4. 

— a friend of Anthony Wood and the 
Wood family, i. 27, 233; ii. 183, 233 ; 
v. 9. 

Flexney, William, Oxford musi- 
cian : — 

— 1656, a member of William Ellis's 
music-club, i. 205. 

— 1659, a member of private music- 
clubs, i. 275. 

— 1659 onwards, an occasional tavern- 
companion of Wood's, i. 266, 281, 

327, 439>4<59. 478. 

— 1663, a member of Westcote's catch- 
meeting, i. 467. 

— 1692, death, iii. 406. 

Forest, Edward, father and son, Ox- 
ford booksellers : — 

Edward Forest matriculated in 
1616, aetat. 19, as apprentice to a 
bookseller : his sons Edward, aet. 44, 



Forest, Edward {continued) : — 

and John, aet. 29, matriculated in 
1666, as booksellers : query, whether 
their father then died ? Wood bought 
most of his books from the Forests, 
but it seems impossible from his 
notices to apportion the entries be- 
tween the father and the son, or to 
decide whether the sons carried on 
the business as partners or had separate 
shops. Edward Forest, 1659, is per- 
haps the father, i. 271 : ' Ned ' Forest, 
Edward Forest, 1660-5, 3 2I > 433. 
437> 454. 5> s , 19, 22, 37, is prob- 
ably the son, in his father's shop : 
' Edward and John,' 1661, are the two 
sons, i. 416. Edward Forest, 1667, 
ii. 116, and 'Ned' Forest, 1669, ii. 
151, 153, I take to be the son : John 
Forest is mentioned by himself, 1661, 

i. 416, 458. 

In 1 66 1 John Wilmot, afterwards 
an Oxford bookseller, was apprentice 
to Forest, i. 416 : Wood stood treat 
to Forest in 1657, i. 220. 

The payments to . . . Forest are of 
two kinds: — (i) 'quarteridge,' a quar- 
terly payment for newspapers (see i. 
14), i. 213, 229, 287-8. The payment 
in 1657-8 was 2s. a quarter, i. 220, 
229, 242, 260; in 1659, 15. 6d. a 
quarter, i. 279, 284; and in Dec. 1659, 
2S. bd., when Wood notes that he is 
going to change his newsvendor. i. 
288. Wood notes irregularity in 
supplying his papers, i. 235, 287-8. 

(ii) for books, pamphlets, paper, 
&c, sometimes conjoined with (i), i. 
226, 230-1, 235, 237, 242, 255, 264, 
271, 279, 281 , 301, 310, 331, 335, 338, 
388-9, 400, 416, 427, 430, 436, 452, 

454. 457. 4 6 7; ^ P- viii - 
Foulis, Henry, a companion of 
Wood's : — 

— his parentage, ii. 179. 

— 1660 onwards, an occasional tavern- 
companion of Wood's, i. 302, 436, 
468 ; ii. 82, 85, 126, 151, 153, 174. 

— 1660 onwards, gave Wood informa- 
tion and showed him kindness, i. 327 ; 

ii. 38, 122, 145, 183. 

— his controversial writings, i. 293-5, 
4S6 ; ii. 178. 

— 1669, his death, ii. 178-9, 257, 503; 

iii. 144. 

— after his death Wood had access to 
his diary, i. 486 ; made a catalogue of 
his pamphlets, i. 308; ii. 178; iv. 
270 : and acquired some of his books, 
ii. 178, 191, and of his MSS., ii. 180; 

iv. 270. 



4 6 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Fulman, William, antiquary : — 

— [648, ejected from Corpus Christi by 
the Parliamentary visitors, i. 330. 

— 1 665, vice-president of Corpus Christi, 
ii. 47. 

publishes his Notitia Oxon., ii. 

93, 116 ; iii. 139. 

— 1674, writes notes in correction of 
Wood's Hist, et Antiq. Univ. Oxon., 

ii. 403, 412, 449, 468 ; iv. 193. 

— 1675, issues a new edition of Notitia 
Oxon., iii. 139. 

— 1681, married, ii. 547. 

— 1684, edits Henry Hammond, iii. 
139, and the Annals of Burton, iv. 91. 

— 1685, pays an Oxford visit, iii. 139, 
168. 

— 1688, death, iii. 270. 

— his correspondence with, and informa- 
tion given to Wood, i. 308; ii. 392, 
403, 412, 432, 469, 479, 495-6, 499; 

iii. 32, 44, 139, 204, 408 ; iv. 193-4* 
229-30, 262, 288. 

— his MS. collections at C.C.C., Ox- 
ford, ii. 301 ; iii. 367, 408 ; iv. 90, 
157, 193, 264: his handwriting, iv. 
p. xi. 

George of Denmark, prince : — 

— 1669, visits England, iv. 71. 

— 1683, is married to Anne, daughter 
of the duke of York, iii. 57, 67. 

— 1685, Oxford University compliments 
him as a member of the royal family, 
iii. 133. 

— 1688, Nov., deserts James II for the 
prince of Orange, iii. 285 ; Dec., is 
entertained at Oxford, iv. 82. 

— 1690, accompanies William III to 
Ireland, iii. 331. 

— 1692, is out of court favour, iii. 402, 
405. 

— his household : — master of the horse, 
iii. 124, 331 ; groom of the stole, iii. 

Gifford, Bonaventure, Romanist presi- 
dent of Magdalen : — 

— 1686, a court preacher, iii. 201. 

— 1688, March, installed (in absentia) 
president of Magdalen, iii. 262, 265, 
267. 

Apr., titular bishop of Madaura, 

iii. 264. 

June- Aug., in residence at Mag- 
dalen, iii. 269, 271-4. 

— 1689, a prisoner in Newgate, iii. 299, 
333- 

— 1690, to leave England, iii. 346. 
Goddard, Jonathan, warden of Mer- 

ton : — 

— 1652, warden of Merton, i. 396; iii. 



Goddard, Jonathan {continued) : — 
436 : a leading Independent, i. 148 : 
employed on University business, iv. 
61. 

— 1656, resident in London, i. 200-1, 
212 ; ii. 97. 

— 1675, death, ii. 311. 
Greenwood, Daniel, principal of Brase- 

nose : — 

— his relatives, i. 267 ; ii. 280. 

— 1637, fellow of Brasenosc, ii. 238. 

— 1648, principal of Brasenose, i. 135; 
and a champion of the Presbyterian 
party, i. 147. 

— 1651-2, vice-chancellor, i. 165, 
174-5, 251, 297, 464; ii. 563; iv. 
62. 

— 1659, iv. 64. 

— 1670, ii. 192. 

— 1674, death, ii. 28. 
Greenwood, Nathaniel, personal 

friend of Wood's: — 

— his parentage and kindred, i. 267 ; 

ii. 238, 280. 

— his antiquarian collections, ii. 267 ; 
iv. 189. 

— 1659-1673, the most constant com- 
panion of Wood's at cookshop and 
tavern, i. 266, 268, 271, 310, 318, 
321, 327, 33 1 , 336, 400, 410, 416, 
434. 436, 439, 444> 45°> 45 2 , 454* 
457, 464, 467-9, 471-2, 474, 478, 
486-7, 501 ; ii. 1-2, 4-6, 8, 12, 14-5, 
18, 20, 23-4, 29-33, 35, 37, 39-40, 
43, 45, 47, 50-1, 69-71, 73-7, 79, 
81-2, 85, 88-9, 92, 98-9, 104, 108, 
112, 115, 119, 126, 138-9, 143, 146, 

i5 T » T 53, i55 3 *74, J 77> 184, l8 7> 
189-91, 194, and especially 260. 

— 1 66 1, pro-proctor, i. 347, 406, 466. 

— 1665, ii. 58. 

— 1666, ii. 84. 

— 1670, ii. 192. 

Hall, James, Oxford coffee-house 
keeper : — 

— 1688, keeper of the Turl coffee-house, 

iii. 302, 327. 

— 1688-95, Wood constantly cites the 
' news-letter' at Hall's, ' Hall's letter,' 
iii. 267, 295, 300, 302-15, 323-6, 
329-30, 35i, 354, 361, 364*366, 378, 
409, 476, 479. 

Hall, John, Master of Pembroke : — 

— 1664, master of Pembroke, ii. 25-6 ; 
iii. 140-1, 379, 443. 

— 1664 onwards, a champion of the 
Low Church party, anti-Court, and 
anti-Rome, ii. 26, 422, 553 ; iii. 141, 
273. 379* 443. 474 5 and as such, in 
1678, uncivil to Wood, ii. 428. 



INDEX L BIOGRAPHICAL. 



47 



Hall, John {continued) : — 

— 1676, Lady Margaret professor of 
Divinity, ii. 346; iii. 61, 64, 75. 

— 1685, forward in professing loyalty 
to James II, iii. 137. 

a member of Convocation, iii. 

— 1691, bishop of Bristol, iii. 360, 363, 
37 T > 379.4o6. 

— 1694, suggested for Canterbury, iii. 
474- 

Halton, Timothy, Provost of 
Queen's : — 

— occasionally spelt ' Haughton.' 

— 1675, archdeacon of Oxford, ii. 372, 
438. 

— 1677, provost of Queen's, ii. 372, 
438; iii. 50, 116, 127, 185, 269; iv. 
81. 

— 1679-82, vice-chancellor, ii. 458, 
460, 465, 488-9, 491, 495, 497, 502-3, 
516-7, 520-2, 524, 527-8, 530, 540-2, 
547, 556; iii- 2, 12, 14, 16-8, 21, 

i79» r 93, 457- 

— 1683-5, acting pro- vice-chancellor, 
iii. 72, 86, 96, 132. 

— 1685, vice-chancellor, iii. 165, 177, 
179-80, 185, 191, 193, 269; iv. 80. 

— 1688, 1689, 1693, 1695, pro-vice- 
chancellor, iii. 305, 424, 478. 

Harris, Robert, Puritan preacher : — 

— 1646, sent by Parliament to preach 
at Oxford, i. 130-1. 

— 1648, intruded president of Trinity, 
i. 130, and a leading Presbyterian, 

i. 147. 

— 1658, death, i. 264-5 '■> n - J 86, 261. 

— 1660, his 'Life' published, i. 310. 
Hawkins, Richard, citizen friend of 

Wood's : — 

— 1661, resident in Oxford, iii. 485 ; a 
house-painter, ii. 117; iii. 91; iv. 
56-7, 71, 78, 80; and a herald- 
painter, ii. 178, 325, 455; iii. 242, 
382-3; iv. 31. 

— makes notes of coats of arms, i. 109 ; 

ii. 52. 

— supplies coats of arms at funerals, i. 
2ii ; ii. 310. 

— makes notes of funerals, ii. 229, 396. 

— his friendship with Wood, i. 264, 
421 ; ii. 143, 177. 

— is summoned by Clarendon to give 
evidence against Wood in the libel- 
suit, iv. 16, 23, 31-2, 34-5. 

Hearne, Thomas, the antiquary : — 

— his historical issues, iii. 104. 

— 1710-22, prints Leland's Itineraries, 
i. 222 ; iv. 280. 

— 1 715, prints Leland's Collectanea, iv. 
279. 



Hearne, Thomas {continued) : — 

— 1 716, prints John Rous de Regibus, 
iv. 290. 

— 1 7 2 1 , criticizes Jacob Tonson's edition 
of Wood's Athenae, iv. 232. 

— 1726-7, prints papers concerning 
Wood, iii. 497, 499, 502. 

— 17 2 8, copies and prints miscellaneous 
notes by Wood, i. 112 ; ii. p. vii ; iv. 
231. 

— 1729, prints Tryvytlam de Oxonia, 
iv. 296. 

— 1730, prints Wood's autobiography, 
i. 1-3 ; ii. p. viii, 249. 

— 1 73 1 , prints excerpts from Dr. Thomas 
Gascoigne, iv. 272. 

— 1 733 , prints and annotates Brian 
Twyne's Oxford Musterings, 1642-3 ; 
i- 53, 7o ? 122. 

— books owned by him, i. 209 ; iv. 138, 
227. 

— miscellaneous notes on Oxford history, 
i. 141, 170; ii. 7; iii. 343, 500, 

504-5 ; iv. 50. 

Henrietta Maria : — 

— consort of Charles I. 

— 1636, visits Oxford, i. 46; iv. 56. 

— 1642, in Holland, i. 100. 

— 1643, Feb., lands near Newcastle, i. 
90 ; March, Merton college is pre- 
pared for her, i. 91 ; July, is escorted 
by Charles I from Edgehill to Oxford, 

i. 103. 

— 1643, July- 1 644 (?), keeps her court 
in Merton college, i. 103, 105, no, 
129-30, 146. 

— the Queen Mother : — 

— 1669, death, ii. 171 ; iii. 158: Oxford 
verses on the occasion, iv. 72-3 : 
Charles II claims her jewels, ii. 177 ; 

iii. 158, 163. 

— — her household, i. 105, no: 
almoner, iv. 52 : gentleman-usher, i. 
126, 508. Her brother, i. 89. 

her picture in glass at Queen's 

college, iii. 50. 
Henry VIII : — 

— foundation of Christ Church, Oxford, 

ii. 1 13-4; iv. 155-6; and of Trinity, 
Cambridge, i. 308. 

— dissolution of the monasteries, i. 
217-8 ; ii. 88, 410 ; iv. 107. 

— visit to Oxford, iv. 145 ; visit to 
Cambridge, iv. 270. 

— his charter to Oxford University, ii. 
128 ; iv. 145. 

— his visitation, by commissioners, of 
Oxford University, i. 424; iii. 219; 

iv. 144, 152, 209. 

— his queen, Catharine of Aragon, ii. 
486 ; iii. 343 ; iv. 138, 145, 304. 



48 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Henry VIII {continued) : — 

— his patronage of John Leland, i. 

— his chair, ii. 420 : clerk of the signet, 
iii. 306 ; groom of the privy chamber, 
iii. 208 ; Edward, lord Herbert's, life 
of him, iv. 276. 

— incidental mention, i. 234; ii. 193, 
198, 409 ; iv. 1 1 7. 

Hobbes, Thomas, of Malmesbury : — 

— 1588, born at Malmesbury, ii. 411. 

— educated at Magdalen hall, ii. 
116. 

— 1651, his Leviathan, i. 295; ii. I, 
9 1 , 472-3, 475 5 iii- 6 3; iv. 241. 

— 1664, controversy with John Wallis, 
ii. 15. 

— 1674, his quarrel with John Fell, ii. 
259, 285-6, 288, 291-3, 472, 476, 
480 ; iii. 395. 

— 1679, his Behemoth, or History of 
the Civil War, i. 301 ; ii. 472. 

death, ii. 471. 

— 1680, composition of John Aubrey's 
life of Hobbes, iv. 192. 

— 1680-2, pamphlets of his printed 
and reprinted, ii. 472, 480, 485, 500, 
508 ; iii. 14. 

— writes against Universities, i. 295-6; 
ii. 472. 

Holloway, Charles, senior, Oxford 
lawyer : — 

— his parentage, ii. 220. 

— 1660, serjeant-at-law, i. 212, 397 ; 
ii. 125-6, 397. 

— employed in law business by Oxford 
University, i. 371 ; iv. 57, 59, 62, 
64-5, 67-8, 70, 77-8. 

— his wife and family, i. 141, 191 ; ii. 
402, 469 ; iii. 85, 118. 

Holloway, Charles, junior, Oxford 
lawyer : — 

— 1629 (circiter), born, son of preced- 
ing, ii. 469. 

— 1667, nicknamed ' Necessity,' ii. 
125-6 ; iii. 85, 418, 438, 485, 519. 

Holloway, sir Richard, judge : — 

— his parentage, i. 391 ; ii. 308 ; iii. 

— his wife and family, ii. 250, 554. 

— 1665, a barrister, ii. 155 ; iv. 68, 70; 
and nicknamed 'Barrister,' ii. 125-6. 

— 1666, recorder of Wallingford, iii. 
135. 

— 16 — , under-steward of Oxford Uni- 
versity (resigned 1684), iii. 120. 

— 1677, serjeant-at-law, ii. 127, 391, 
397 ; iii. 122 ; iv. 76-7. 

— 1683, Justice of the King's Bench, 
ii. 397; iii. 85, 134, 179, 190, 260, 
268, 272, 331, 501 ; iv. 79. 



Hood, Paul, rector of Lincoln : — 
- 1620-68, rector of Lincoln, i. 333; 

ii. 121-2, 132. 

— 1660, one of Charles II's commis- 
sioners to visit Oxford University, i. 
324, 362. 

— 1660-1, vice-chancellor, i. 327-8, 
333, 336, 347, 362, 371, 384, 396-1, 
393 ; iv. 64, 66. 

— 1668, death, ii. 141 ; iii. 139. 

— his family, ii. 141-2. 

Hough, John, president of Magdalen: — 

— 1678, fellow of Magd., ii. 424, 

— 168 1, chaplain to the first duke of 
Ormond, ii. 431 ; iii. 178. 

— 1687, Apr., elected president of 
Magdalen, iii. 218, 517, 526. 

June, D.D., iii. 221. 

ejected by James II's eccle- 
siastical commissioners, iii. 247-9, 
258, 515-21, 527-9. 

— 1688, Oct., expecting to be replaced, 

iii. 279. 

replaced, iii. 368, 444, 462, 

496, 532. 

— 1690, bishop of Oxford, iii. 330, 368, 
444, 449, 462, 496. 

Huntingdon, Robert, orientalist : — 

— 1 661, fellow of Merton, i. 390, 469, 
490; ii. 91, 184. 

— 1670-82, chaplain at Aleppo, iii. 24. 

— 1683, subwarden of Merton, iii. 
37-8, 49, 64, 75 : a benefactor to the 
Ashmolean, iii. 56. 

provost of Trinity college, Dublin, 

iii. 42, 66, 77 : starts a natural 
science club in Dublin, iii. 77. 

— 1692, refuses the bishopric of Kil- 
more, iii. 385, 401 ; stands for the 
wardenship of Merton, iii. 433. 

— his collection of Oriental MSS., iv. 
83, 148 : a MS. of his writing, i. 469. 

Hutton, Matthew, antiquarian : — 

— a very frequent companion of Wood's 
at cookshop and tavern, i. 266, 268, 
271, 318, 321, 327, 331, 349, 378, 
380, 382, 388, 400, 416, 420, 434, 
439, 458, 463-4, 467-9, 474-5, 478, 
486; 11. 2, 6, 8, 15, 23-4, 31, 33, 35, 
37, 39, 5o, 69-71, 79, 85, 99, 106, 
119, 139, 153, 155, 163, 190. 

— a musician, i. 274. 

— accompanied Wood on antiquarian 
rambles, ii. 134-5. 

— his MS. collections, i. 387 ; ii. 265 ; 
iii. 120, 252, 349; iv. 196-7. 

Hyde, Thomas, Bodley's librarian : — 

— a friend of Wood's, i. 454, 471 ; ii. 
50, 126, 155, 162. 

— 1 66 1, sub-librarian of the Bodleian, 
i. 382. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



Hyde, Thomas (continued) : — 

— 1665, a notary public, ii. 32. 
Bodley's librarian, i. 200, 335; 

ii. 52, 71-2, 161, 209, 361,483; iii. 
11,18,51,235-7,357. 

— 1674, the catalogue of Bodleian 
printed books is issued in his name, 
ii. 323- 

— 1678, archdeacon of Gloucester, ii. 
427, 434, 510 ; iii. 200. 

— 1682, D.D., iii. 11 ; and recognized 
as an Arabic scholar, iii. 18. 

— 1687, death of his wife, ii. 427 ; iii. 
213-4. 

— 169 1 , professor of Arabic, iii. 373, 
379 : sells to the Bodleian his Oriental 
MSS.,iv. 83: printing of (?) his de 
ludis Orientalibus, iv. 84. 

Ironside, Gilbert, warden of Wad- 
ham : — 

— 1656, fellow of Wadham, i. 282-3 ; 
ii. 52. 

— 1665, warden of Wadham, ii. 52, 
78, an, 217, 258, 296-7; iii. 152, 
358. 

— 1687-9, vice-chancellor, iii. 224, 
227, 229-31, 234, 236-8, 244, 249- 
50, 255-6, 265, 269, 272-3, 275, 
277-8, 305. 309, 311 ; iv. 81-2. 

— 1689, bishop of Bristol, iii. 312, 366, 
454- 

— 1 69 1, bishop of Hereford, iii. 360, 
37 I >454- 

Jackson, Henry, antiquary: — 

— ' cousin ' of Wood, i. 26, 29, 442. 

— gave Wood information about writers, 
i. 323, 442. _ 

— his widow, i. 29, 459 ; ii. 7 ; iii. 195 ; 
v. 13. 

— his writings, i. 441, 460; iii. 343; 
iv. 92, 99, 197, 297. 

— MSS. owned by him, i. 248, 460 ; iii. 
343; iv. 96, 107, 197, 259, 293, 308, 
312. 

— books owned by him, i. 331, 459. 
James I. 

— 1 603, his accession brought the plague, 
i. 185. 

— 1605, Oxford visit, ii. 483 ; iv. 145, 
200. 

— attached mastership of Ewelme 
hospital to the Regius professorship 
of Medicine, ii. 546. 

— his household: — barber, ii. 458 ; em- 
broiderer, ii. 440 ; master of the 
robes, ii. 458 ; servant, i. 239 ; servant 
in the wardrobe, i. 202. 

— a copy of his ' Works ' was the formal 



James I {continued) : — 

present of Oxford University, ii. 352 ; 
iv. 71. 

— books about his reign, i. 242 ; ii. 
118 ; iv. 263, 274. 

— knights dubbed by him, iii. 102. 

— his statue at the Schools, ii. 529; 
iii. 51. 

— his vault at Westminster, iii. 125-6. 

— incidental mention, i. 269, 382 ; ii. 
no ; iv. 208, 220. 

— day observed in his honour, Nov. 5, 
' Gunpowder treason,' ' Powder trea- 
son,' iv. 56, appointed as a Church 
holy-day, and by the Laudian statutes 
directed to be observed by a University 
sermon at S.Mary's. Wood first men- 
tions it in 1676, incidentally (because 
S. Mary's was opened on that day after 
repairs;, ii. 358. He next mentions it 
in 1678 when the alarm of the popish 
plot produced a very bitter sermon 
and profuse fireworks, ii. 422. In 1680 
he mentions it in connexion with an 
incident in London, ii.558. Afterwards 
he becomes interested in the names of 
the University preachers for purposes 
of the Athenae and Fasti, and records 
them in 1682, and from 1684 to 1695, 
iii. 28, 116, 169, 199, 243, 281, 313, 
345, 374' 4° 6 ' 434, 472, 493. He 
notices exceptional zeal in Protestant- 
fireworks in 16S5, iii. 169 ; 1688, iii. 
281 : and 1692, iii. 406. The figure 
burned is not ' the ever- welcome Guy ' 
Fawkes, but the Pope (with attendance 
of some prominent Romanist), the 
day being still a 'religious' fast after 
the polemical way, ii. 422 ; iii. 406. 
He notices also in 1692 the ' collection 
to defray expenses,' iii. 406. 

James II. 

— J ames, duke of York : — 

— 1633, Oxford verses on his birth, iv. 
52. 

— 1642, Oct., comes to Oxford and has 
his name put on the books at Christ 
Church, i. 68; iii. 231, 233; a plot 
against him is discovered, i. 70. 

Nov., is created M.A. of Oxford, 

i. 69 ; iv. 58 ; accompanies the king 
in his march on London, i. 70 ; returns 
to Oxford, i. 72. 

— 1642, N0V.-1643, July, is resident in 
Christ Church under the tuition of 
Brian Duppa, i. 72, 82, 99, 103. 

— 1643, Jan., is present at a review, i. 
82. 

July, goes with the king to Edge- 
hill to meet the queen, i. 103. 

— 1652-8, sees service during his exile, 



VOL. V. 



E 



50 WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Jaraos II {continued} : — 

iii. 211 : in j6S8 requites kindness 
shown him during his exile, iii. 265. 

— 1660, his popularity, i. 316; has 
grants of confisealed estates, i. 398. 

— 1661, sits in the Privy Council, i. 372. 

— 1663, comes with the king on his 
state visit to Oxford, i. 490-7 ; visits 
Cornbury and Woodstock, i. 492, 
495 ; attends services at the cathedral 
and S. John's college, i. 495-6. 

— 1665, serves at sea against the Dutch, 
iii. 189, 211. 

Sept., comes to Oxford, ii. 46, 

58-9. 

Oct., is present in the Oxford 

parliament, ii. 60. 

— 1665, Sept-1666, Jan., is quartered 
in Christ Church, ii. 58, 60, 67, 70. 

— 1670, birth of a bastard by Arabella 
Churchill, iii. 50, 390. 

■ — 1 67 1, death of his wife Anne Hyde, 
ii. 219-20. 

— 167 2, absents himself from the services 
of the Church, ii. 244. 

— 1673, marries Mary Beatrice of 
Modena, ii. 272-3. 

— 1674, receives Hyde's Catal. libr. 
Bibl. Bodl., iv. 74. 

— ■ 1675, birth and death of a daughter, 
ii. 312. 

— ■ 1676, his daughter Mary is confirmed 
by Henry Compton, bishop of London, 
ii. 338; iii. 174 ('Anne' in error): 
he makes open profession of Roman- 
ism, ii. 343, but promises to support 
the Church of England, iii. 211. 

— 1677, project of a French match for 
his daughter Mary, ii. 374 : false 
report of his return to the Church, ii. 
390 : marriage of his daughter Mary 
to the prince of Orange, ii. 391 : birth 
and death of a son to him, ii. 391 : 
his hostilityto HenryCompton, bishop 
of London, ii. 397 ; iii. 172-3, 195, 
388. 

— 1679, false report of his return to 
the Church, ii. 440. 

(? March), is sent abroad by 

Charles II to escape the ill-feeling 
against him, ii. 444; iii. 130, 211. 

May, it is proposed in Parliament 

to exclude him from succession to the 
throne, ii. 451, 456; iii. 130. 

Sept., he returns to England and 

procures the banishment of the duke of 
Monmouth, ii. 461-3 : is not popular, 
ii. 462, but not without a party, ii. 
461, 463. 

Oct., he brings his family from 

abroad, ii. 463-4 : is well received 



James II {continued) • — 

by the City of London, but with 
signs of popular discontent, ii. 466-7 : 
withdraws to Scotland, ii. 464 ; iii. 
31, 130, 324. 

— 1680, Jan., he is recalled, ii. 478. 

— — Feb., is back at court, ii. 480. 
— May-Oct., evidences of his un- 
popularity, ii. 486, 490, 498. 

Oct., again withdraws to Scotland, 

ii. 499. 

Nov., the bill for excluding him 

from the succession passes the Com- 
mons but is thrown out in the Lords, 

ii. 500, 505 ; iii. 130. 

— 168 1, Jan., Parliament is dissolved 
because pressing on the Exclusion 
bill, ii. 510, 513. 

March, the Oxford Parliament 

presses on the Exclusion bill and is 
dissolved, ii. 532-5 ; iii. 7, 1 29-30, 137, 
141, 238. 

— 1682, May, he comes back from 
Scotland, iii. 31. 

, is accused of causing the 

great fire (1666) of London, iii. 31. 

Nov., vindicates his title to the 

revenues of the penny-post, iii. 31, 
33, 310 : prosecutes some detractors, 

iii. 31, 33: is popular with the Tory 
party as shown by health-drinking, 
iii. 31, but bitterly hated by the 
Whigs, iii. 2, 7, 14, 31, 71, 314. 

— 1683, April, in Oxford the University 
is for, the City against, him, ii. 42, 

93-4. 5IO-I-. 

May, visits Oxford, iii. 32, 45-55, 

155 ; iv. 78, and is well received by 
the City, County, and University, iii. 
47-8 : is quartered in Christ Church, 
and pays his own battells, iii. 48, 233, 
but is absent from chapel, iii. 48 : 
views the chapels of Oxford colleges, 
finding fault with the position of the 
altar in Exeter college, iii. 49-54 : 
visits Cornbury, iii. 51 : visits the 
Bodleian and the Schools, iii. 51 : 
formally opens the Ashmolean, iii. 
52, 55 : visits Rycote, iii. 54. 

June, discovery of the Rye house 

plot to assassinate him, iii. 58. 

July, consequent revulsion of feel- 
ing in his favour, iii. 60, 62-3, 71-2, 
130 : Oxford University congratulates 
him on his escape, iii. 64-5, 75. 

Sept., a thanksgiving day is cele- 
brated for his escape, iii. 72. 

— 1685, Feb., is proclaimed king, iii. 
125,127. 

— his household, as duke of York, iii. 
46 : — attorney, iii. 123 ; chaplains, i. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



51 



James II {continued) : — 

328; iii. 155, 234; gentleman of the 
bedchamber, ii. 279; iii. 120; phy- 
sician, ii. 539; sadler, ii. 41, 365; 
secretary, ii. 246; iii. 189; servant, 
i. 305 ; treasurer, iii. 76. 

— pamphlets about him, i. 17 ; ii. 219 ; 
iii. 14T. 

— ballads about him, ii. 461. 

— his life-guard, ii. 467 ; iii. 48 : his 
company of players, ii. 165, 236. 

— his lodgings at Whitehall, iii. 358 : 
his picture in the Guildhall, London, 
iii. 2, 314. 

— his fondness for hunting, i. 495 ; ii. 
358; iii. 67. 

— prediction of his speedy dethrone- 
ment, iii. 261. 

— incidental mention as duke of York, 
ii- 53, 379 5 7°, 80. 

James II : — 

— 1685, Feb., is proclaimed king in 
London, iii. 125, and in Oxford, with 
enthusiasm, iii. 125, 127-30. 

Feb.-March, receives addresses on 

his brother's death and his own ac- 
cession, iii. 97, 130-3, 136; iv. 80. 

Feb., unabated hostility of the 

Whigs, iii. 130, 134: openly attends 
mass, iii. 132 : graciously receives the 
address of Oxford University and 
City, knighting the mayor of Oxford, 
iii. 1 3 1-3 : his creatures breathe 
threats against opponents, iii. 133. 

April, his coronation, and the 

rejoicings at it, iii. 137-8, 140-1 : 
suspicions of his intentions, iii. 141 : 
oath of allegiance, ii. 507. 

— 1685, May-1686, June, he promotes 
proceedings against 'the Popish plot ' 
witnesses, iii. 143, 153, 185, 189. 

— 1685, May, the earl of Argyle invades 
Scotland, iii. 143 : disaffection in the 
West, iii. 143. 

June, the duke of Monmouth in- 
vades England,iii. 19, 58,130,144-52, 
166, 200, 212 : prominent Whigs are 
hurried to prison, iii. 145-6 ; the 
Guards are sent against the invader, 
iii. 145, and the militia called out, 
iii. 130, 145, but distrusted. Oxford 
University raises a volunteer regiment, 
iii. 146-52, 183, 250, 533 : the gentry 
hurry to put down the rising, iii. 
281. 

July, Monmouth is routed, taken, 

and beheaded, iii. 151-2, 154: a 
thanksgiving day is held for the ex- 
tinction of the rebellion, iii. 151, 155 : 
but the nation begins to suspect the 
king because of his standing army 



James II {continued) : — 

under Romanist officers, iii. 130, 154, 

1 57, i7°> J 7 2 > *79> l82 > l8 7, i9°» 
199, 263, 453. 

— 1685, Sept., excessive and impolitic 
severity against Monmouth's followers, 
iii. 155, 159-60, 164, 168, 170, 181, 
188, 294, 299. 

— — Oct., James II champions the 
Oxford Romanists, iii. 165 ; prosecutes 
leading Whigs, iii. 166 : expressions 
of feeling against him, iii. 168. 

Nov., prorogues Parliament be- 
cause of its hostility to the Romanist 
officers of his army, iii. 130-1, 170 : 
deprives Protestant officers of their 
commissions, iii. 131, 170-1 ; and 
removes Protestants from the Privy 
Council, iii. 131, 172 : expressions of 
feeling against him, iii. 170. 

— — Nov.-Dec, receives a nuncio 
from the Pope at his court, iii. 171-2, 
219, 266. 

— — Dec, an edict of toleration is 
expected, iii. 172 : there is a cabal 
of Romanists in session at Somerset 
house, iii. 172, 176. 

— his accession has been the 

signal for many English people to 
profess Romanism, iii. 26, 182-3, 3°3j 
407, for the preaching of Romanist 
doctrines in English pulpits, iii. 152, 
156, 165, and the publication of 
Romanist books, iii. 131, 164-5, I 7^» 

— 1686, Jan., Oxford Romanists are 
pressed to declare themselves, iii. 
176-7, 182-3 • the king repeats his 
declaration that he will protect the 
Church of England, iii. 178. 

Jan.-March, growing fears as to 

the king's ulterior designs, iii. 176-8, 
182, 187. 

Feb., the anniversary of his ac- 
cession is appointed a Church holy- 
day, with special form of service, iii. 
177, 179: he prepares to nullify the 
Test Act, iii. 179. 

March-April, growth of the agita- 
tion against Romanism, iii. 183. 

March-June, ungracious excep- 
tions to the amnesty to Monmouth's 
followers, iii. 181, 188, 212. 

May, he issues protections to the 

Oxford Romanists, iii. 184-5 : sus- 
pends anti-Romanist preachers, iii. 
186: favours the persecuted Quakers 
and gains their support, iii. 233, 279, 
309 : attempts are made to influence 
the army against him, iii. 187. 

June, he issues protections to dis- 
senters, iii. 190. 



E 2 



5a 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



James II {continued') : — 

— 1686, July, a general edict of tolera- 
tion is expected, iii. 191 , 246 : preach- 
ing against Romanism is forbidden in 
Oxford University, iii. 193. 

— — July- Aug., James II expresses 
indignation at the insults offered to 
the Oxford converts to Romanism, iii. 

193, *95> 2 37> 2 39- 

Aug., institutes an ecclesiastical 

commission to curb the Church and 
break down opposition in the Univer- 
sities, iii. 193, 225, 240-1, 246-50, 
279,516,529. 

Oct., appoints John Massey dean 

of Christ Church, iii. 197, 200-1 : 
licenses the printing of Romanist 
books in Oxford, iii. 198, 201. 

Nov., tries to curb Cambridge 

University, iii. 200, and the press, iii. 
200. 

Dec, opens a new Romanist 

chapel at Whitehall, iii. 201, 376 : 
deposes bishops in Scotland for 
opposing him, iii. 209, 213: his 
hostility to Henry Compton, bishop 
of London, iii. 172-3. 

— 1686, May-1688, Sept., a portion 
of his standing army is quartered in 
Oxford, iii. 186, 194, T96, 202, 210, 
220, 223, 241, 243, 245, 249, 251, 
256, 264, 268, 271, 278 ; this was the 
earl of Peterborough's cavalry regi- 
ment, mainly of Romanists, iii. 257, 
264. 

— 1687, Jan., sends mandate to Oxford 
University to elect his Romanist 
nominee to the professorship of Moral 
Philosophy, iii. 207, 216-7 ; sends 
mandate to All Souls to elect his 
nominee warden, iii. 208. 

Feb., his statue is set up at Uni- 
versity college, iii. 209. 

March, sends mandate to have his 

Romanist nominee elected master of 
Queens' college, Cambridge, iii. 214- 
5 : sends mandate to Oxford Uni- 
versity to revive degrees in Canon 
Law, iii. 215 : censures bishop Ken 
and other anti-Romanist preachers, 
iii. 215. 

April, publishes the Declaration 

for Liberty of Conscience, iii. 217, 238, 
246 : sends mandate to Magdalen 
college, Oxford, to elect Anthony 
Farmer president, iii. 217, 246, 517, 
525-6 ; astonishment at the unworthi- 
ness of the objects of the royal favour, 
iii. 217 : Magdalen college shelves 
the mandate and elects John Hough, 
iii. 218, 223, 246-7, 517, 526. 



Jamos II (continued) : — 

— 1687, April-Nov., increasing fears as 
to the king's designs, iii. 218, 222, 243. 

— — May, the clergy of Oxford diocest 
refuse to thank the king for the 
Declaration of Liberty of Conscience, 

iii. 220. 

the vice-chancellor of Cam- 
bridge University is suspended for 
refusing a degree to a Romanist 
priest, iii. 221, 356. 

June, the mandate for Anthony 

Farmer is withdrawn, but John 
Hough's election is declared null and 
void, iii. 223, 248, 258, 527. 

July, Romanists are made justices 

of the peace, iii. 223. 

Aug., James II sends a man- 
date to Magdalen college, Oxford, 
for the admission of bishop Samuel 
Parker to the presidency, iii. 248, 
5 X 5, 517-85 5 2 °> 5 2 7: decides to 
come in person to Oxford to coerce 
Magdalen college, iii. 224, 226, 527. 

Sept., comes to Oxford and lodges 

himself in Christ Church, iii. 212, 
225-39 •* i s vei 7 affable, iii. 229, 231, 
236, 239 : receives a present of money 
from Oxford City, iii. 229 : wishes 
All Souls college to resume prayers 
for the dead, iii. 232 : touches for the 
king's evil, iii. 232 : pays his own 
battells, iii. 233 : attends services in 
the Romanist chapels of John Massey 
and Obadiah Walker, iii. 233 : per- 
sonally orders the fellows of Magdalen 
college to admit bishop Parker to 
the presidency, iii. 233, 248, 527, but 
they set aside the order, iii. 233-4, 
248, 527 : his public entertainment 
by the University, iii. 234-7, 2 5°> 

iv. 81 : makes a progress in hope of 
inducing the nation to consent to the 
repeal of the Test Act, iii. 239, 528. 

Oct., orders the visitation of Mag- 
dalen college by his ecclesiastical 
commission, and pays its expenses, 
iii. 514-23, 525, 528: again requires 
the admission of bishop Parker to the 
presidency, iii. 520-1, 523, 528 : on 
the refusal of the fellows, orders their 
expulsion, iii. 520, 522-3, 528. 

— — Nov., silences anti-Romanist 
preachers, iii. 244 : expulsion of the 
fellows of Magdalen college, Oxford, 
iii. 249-50, 514, 524,530: mandates 
sent for the admission of Romanists 
to vacant fellowships and demyships 
at Magdalen college, iii. 523, 525. 

Dec, sympathy for the expelled 

fellows, iii. 530. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



53 



James II (continued) : — 

— 1688, Jan.-June, James II puts 
Romanists into fellowships and demy- 
ships in Magdalen college, Oxford, 
iii. 253, 258, 262, 267, 530. 

— — Jan., his agents canvass for the 
repeal of the Test Act, iii. 254 : a 
thanksgiving for the queen's preg- 
nancy, iii. 255 : libels are issued 
against the king and court, iii. 254-5. 

March, to pave the way for repeal- 
ing the Test Act Protestants are 
removed from the commission of the 
peace, and the charters of burghs are 
remodelled so as to have partisans of 
the court in office, iii. 260, 270, 278, 
459 : the charter of Oxford City is 
annulled and the town governed by 
royal commissioners, iii. 270-1, 277— 
8 : a Romanist is made president of 
Magdalen college, Oxford, iii. 262. 

June, very few clergy read in 

their churches the Declaration for 
Liberty of Conscience, iii. 267, 278 : 
the Seven Bishops are sent to the 
Tower, ii. 397 ; iii. 267-8, 272, 280, 
434 : the Prince of Wales is born, but 
his birth is not attested by the arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, iii. 268, 270-2, 
280 : general dread of a Romanist 
successor to the crown, iii. 268, 270 : 
the charter of Oxford University is 
attacked, iii. 269, 311. 

— — July? James II removes such 
judges as are not pliant to his will, 
iii. 272; sends mandate to Oxford 
University to elect lord Jeffreys 
chancellor of the University, iii. 273 : 
sends mandate to Oxford University 
to make his nominee D.D., iii. 274. 

Aug., sends mandate to All Souls 

to confer a college living on his 
nominee, iii. 274 : prepares for a Dutch 
invasion, iii. 276, 278, 531. 

Sept., issues to Oxford City a 

new charter, securing crown influence 
in the corporation, iii. 277: hastily 
tries to save his throne by reversing 
his policy, iii. 278, 531 : decides to 
restore to the burghs their former 
charters, to conciliate the justices of 
the peace, and to replace the fellows 
of Magdalen college, Oxford, iii. 
278: draws his troops together at 
London, iii. 278 : listens to the advice 
of the bishops, iii. 279. 

— — Oct., dissolution of the ecclesi- 
astical commission, iii. 279 : christen- 
ing of the prince of Wales, iii. 279 : 
the bishop of Winchester, Visitor of 
Magdalen college, delays to reinstate 



James II {continued): — 

the fellows, and causes doubts of the 
king's sincerity, iii. 279-80, 532 : 
solemn asseveration of the genuineness 
of the prince of Wales, iii. 280 : 
restoration of its charter to Oxford 
City, iii. 280 : re-instating of the 
fellows of Magdalen college, iii. 
532-3. 

— 1688, Nov., the popular enthusiasm on 
Gunpowder Plot day shows the king's 
unpopularity, iii. 281 : the Oxford 
Romanists prepare for flight, iii. 283, 
285 : Romanist gentry take up arms 
to support the king, iii. 281, 285 : 
there is hot activity of the press for 
and against him, iii. 286, 292-4: the 
peers advise him to call a Parliament, 
iii. 283 ; the king goes to Salisbury 
to meet the invader, iii. 283, 285 ; 
but many (e.g. some from Bucking- 
hamshire, iii. 282 ; some from Oxford 
City, iii. 283-4) " se m favour of the 
prince of Orange, iii. 282-5: the 
king, deserted by the nobility and 
his own troops, falls back on London, 
iii. 283, 285. 

Dec, he sends his wife and infant 

son to France, iii. 288 : is himself 
arrested in his flight, iii. 287-9 : 
brought back to London, where he is 
kindly received, iii. 289-90, and is 
attended by Romanists in arms, iii. 
289-91 : the prince of Orange secretly 
helps his flight, iii. 289-91 ; he arrives 
in France, and is graciously received 
by Louis XIV, iii. 290-1, 341 : the 
spuriousness of the prince of Wales 
is assiduously reported, iii. 294. 

— 1689, Jan. -March, there is great 
activity of the press for and against 
the king, iii. 294, 297-300, 439. 

Jan., the king issues manifestoes 

from France, iii. 297. 

Feb., the convention pronounces 

that he has abdicated, and William 
and Mary are proclaimed sovereigns, 
iii. 283, 298-9, 324, 333, 414. 

— his statue at Whitehall, iii. 339 : 
his statue at University college, iii. 
209-10 : his picture in a transparency, 
iii. 271. 

— pamphlets about him, i. 16-7, 19 : 
ballads about him, iii. 140. 

— days observed in his honour : — 

— — his birthday (Oct. 14), 1685, 
enthusiastically, iii. 166 ; 1686, 
slightly, iii. 198 ; 1687, slightly, iii. 
240; 1688, sufficiently, iii. 279. 

his accession-day, inauguration- 
day, Feb. 6, ordered to be a Church 



54 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



James II {continued') : — 

holy-day, iii. 177, and marked by a 
University sermon at S. Mary's, 1686, 
veiy solemnly, iii. 179; 1687, consider- 
ably, iii. 209 ; 1688, solemnly, iii. 256 ; 
1689, the Convention was discussing 
his abdication, iii. 298, cp. iii. 415. 

— — his coronation-day, Apr. 23, 
1685, v. 51 ; 1686, record lost, iii. 
184; 1687, no record, iii. 218 ; 1688, 
slightly, iii. 265 : see iii. 386. 

— his personal tastes : — likes memoriter 
preaching, iii. 237-8 : his favourite 
preachers, iii. 181, 232, 237-8 : likes 
the paintings of Antonio Verrio, iii. 
239 : his dress, iii. 230 

— his household : — lord almoner, iii. 
244 ; lord chamberlain, iii. 166 ; 
chaplain, iii. 182, 234 ; clerk of the 
closet, iii. 173 ; cofferer, iii. 380 ; 
confessor, iii. 406 ; dean of the chapel 
royal, iii. 173; designer, iii. 206-7; 
equerry, iii. 288 ; governess of his 
children, iii. 296 ; physician, iii. 80 ; 
physician to the buckhounds, iii. 275 ; 
yeomen of the guard, iv. 81. 

— his army : a standing army raised in 
1685, v. 51 : one regiment of horse 
(the earl of Peterborough's) was 
quartered in Oxford, 1686-8, v. 52, 
furnished a guard of honour to the 
ecclesiastical commission, iii. 249, 
253, was withdrawn to London, Sept. 
1688, iii. 278. A foot-regiment is 
mentioned, iii. 242 ; and dragoons, 
iii. 284. Officers in his army, v. 51. 

his ' guards ' were Romanists, iii. 

233. Incidental mention, iii. 155, 
289. The foot-guards, iii. 145. 

in Nov., 1688, his troops, being 

led out against the prince of Orange, 
v. 53, show disaffection, iii. 283, 285. 

— he removes the ' lying ' inscription 
from the Monument of London, iii. 
310, cp. iii. 31. Passive obedience 
sermons characteristic of his reign, 
iii. 442. His company of players, 
iii. 192-3. 

— incidental mention, ii. 427; iii. 80, 
126, 179, 264-6, 273, 283, 285, 290, 

2 95> 3 2 o. 39°> 4 8l -2- 

— The late king of England. 

— 1689, March, false reports of his 
death, iii. 301 : the High Church 
party is in his favour, iii. 300, 302-3 ; 
he is expected to fight in Ireland, iii. 
300. 

Apr., fighting in Ireland, iii. 302 : 

the siege of Deny begun, iii. 326. 

July, attainder of those in arms 

for him in Ireland, iii. 305. 



James II {continued) : — 

— 1689, Aug., his correspondence is 
intercepted, iii. 307 : recruits are 
raised for him in England, iii. 323. 

— 1690, Jan.-Sept., expressions of feel- 
ing in his favour, iii. 322, 325, 328, 
33 6 - 34°- 

June, detection of a plot in his 

favour, iii. 333. 

— — July, is defeated at the Boyne, iii. 
327, 333 : publications for and against 
him, iii. 334 : Oxford men in his 
army, iii. 337, 340. 

Dec, detection of Preston's plot 

in his favour, iii. 350, 353 : writings 
in his defence, iii. 353. 

— 1 69 1, March, arrest of agents of his 
in London, iii. 356. 

April-May, several of the clergy 

are in his favour, iii. 361 : his English 
supporters in France, iii. 371, 388. 

— 1692, Jan., the earl of Marlborough 
is thought to be intriguing for him, 
iii. 381. 

Apr., his manifestoes, with lists 

of persons proscribed, are distributed 
in England, iii. 387-8 : he threatens 
the invasion of England, iii. 387-8. 

May, detection of a plot in his 

favour, iii. 389 : the battle of la Hogue 
averts the threatened invasion, iii. 
39°- 

June, birth of a daughter, iii. 387, 

401. 

Nov.-Dec, an oath of abjuration 

of his claims is suggested, iii. 381, 
409, 411. 

Dec, renewed threats of invasion, 

iii. 411, 413. 

— 1693, Jan., his manifestoes are scat- 
tered about in England, iii. 413. 

March, pamphlets in his favour, 

iii. 419. 

May, his manifestoes are scattered 

about in England, iii. 423. 
June, the printer of his manifestoes 

is detected and executed, iii. 425 : he 

is satirized in France, iii. 425. 
Dec, pamphlets in his favour, 

iii. 438. 

— 1694, Jan., expected to visit Rome, 
iii. 441. 

May, birth of a daughter, iii. 

45 2 - 

July- Aug., the Lancashire plot 

in his favour is detected, iii. 463-72. 

Sept., some of his followers leave 

him, iii. 467. 

Oct., expected to be duke of 

Modena, iii. 469. 

— 1695, Jacobite festivities in Bristol, 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



55 



James II {continued) : — 

Oxford, and London, iii. 476, 486, 

— his household : — captain of his 
guards, iii. 472, 477 ; confessor, iii. 
406. 

— incidental mention, iii. 386, 390, 
459, 462, 467. 

— his birthday (Oct. 14) is religiously 
observed by the Jacobites (1695), iii. 
491. Drinking his health is a poli- 
tical manifesto, iii. 322, 486. 

— creations of peers after his dethrone- 
ment, iii. 390, 421 : ecclesiastical 
nominations after his dethronement, 
iii. 388, 462. 

James Francis Edward. 

— the Prince of Wales : — 

— 1688, Jan., preparations to discredit 
his genuineness, iii. 254-5 : a thanks- 
giving is ordered in expectation of his 
birth, iii. 255. 

June, his birth, iii. 268 : honoured 

by Romanists as a special inter- 
vention of Providence, iii. 255, 271 : 
rejoicings of Oxford Romanists, iii. 
268 : Protestant apprehensions, iii. 
268, 270. 

July, the official thanksgiving for 

his birth is turned by the Whigs into 
a thanksgiving for the acquittal of 
the bishops, iii. 270-1 : Oxford Uni- 
versity publishes verses on his birth, 
iii. 272 ; iv. 81. 

Oct., christening, iii. 279 : the 

reports of his spuriousness are so 
frequent that the king formally gives 
them the lie, iii. 280, 299. 

Dec, he is removed to France, 

iii. 288. 

— 1688, Dec-1689, Feb., the reports 
of his spuriousness are industriously 
spread abroad, iii. 294, 297, 299 ; 
cp. 341-2. 

— the pretended Prince of "Wales : — 

— 1689-95, called 'the sham,' 'the 
pretended,' 'Prince of Wales' by 
the Whigs, iii. 297, 341, 375, 486 ; 
but ' the Prince of Wales ' by the 
Tories, iii. 315, 328, 342, 357, 359, 
386. 

— his governess, iii. 357 ; tutor, iii. 
386. 

— a health to him is a Jacobite test- 
toast, iii. 375 : his birthday (June 10) 
is observed by Jacobites, 1691, iii. 
363 ; 1694, iii. 486. 

James, Richard, antiquary : — 

— 1638, death, iv. 197. 

— his handwriting, iv. p. xi. 

— he collected MSS. for sir Robert 



James, Richard (continued) : — 

Cotton, i. 249 : whose librarian he 
was, iv. 197. 

— MSS. of his writing, i. 248; ii. 124; 
iv. 89-101, 103, 108-10, 118, 120-1, 
131-2, 143, 197-8, 260. (Richard) 
James of iv. 138 is probably an 
error for (Edward). 

James, Thomas, Bodley's librarian : — 

— accused of ' conveying ' MSS. from 
other libraries into the Bodleian, iii. 
368. 

— correspondence, ii. p. vii ; iv. 198, 
301. 

— MS. collections preparatory to the 
Laudian Code, iv. 129, 198, 214. 

— MS. catalogue of admissions to use 
the Bodleian, ii. 483 ; iv. 148, 198. 

— MS. catalogue of printed books in 
the Bodleian, iv. 148. 

— printed catalogue of Oxford and 
Cambridge MSS., i. 22 ; iv. 198-9. 

— printed catalogue of commentaries 
on Scripture, i. 313. 

— printed ' manuduction . . . into di- 
vinity,' iv. 260. 

James (Jeames), Thomas, warden 
of All Souls : — 

— his wife and family, ii. 44 ; iii. 
207. 

— 1665, warden of All Souls, ii. 43, 
75-6, 286, 408, 501, 556; iii. 49, 
127. 

— 1680, treasurer of Sarum, ii. 483, 
5o7- 

— 1687, death, iii. 207. 

Jane, William, Regius professor of 
Divinity : — 

— 1668, student of Christ Church, 
ii. 96. 

— 1678, canon of Christ Church, ii. 
408, 412. 

— 1680, Regius professor of Divinity, 
ii. 486, 488, 498, 532, 555-6 ; iii. 36, 
326, 355, 4 6 9- 

— 1683, asked to draw up a statement 
of High Tory principles for Oxford 
University, iii. 61-3. 

— 1685, asked to draw up Oxford 
University address on James Il's ac- 
cession, iii. 132-3. 

— — dean of Gloucester, iii. 141 : 
censures Obadiah W T alker's book for 
Romanist doctrines, iii. 164. 

— 1687, his Protestantism offends 
James II, iii. 244. 

— 1689, he is chairman of the com- 
mittee for the revision of the Book of 
Common Prayer, iii. 314-5. 

Jeffreys, George, lord : — 

— styled sir George Jeffreys, iii. 31 : 



56 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Jeffreys, George {continued) : — 
recorder of London, ii. 506; iii. 29: 
chief justice of Chester, iii. 123. 

— 1683, Lord Chief Justice of England, 
iii. 19, 45, 93, 133. 

— 1685, tries Titus Oates, iii. 143: 
tries the Monmouth fugitives, iii. 
1 70, 299, whence his name is ac- 
cursed, iii. 302, 317, 331, as seen in 
pamphlets, iii. 294, 298-300. 

created baron Jeffreys, and made 

Lord Chancellor, iii. 124, 165, 193, 
273, 277, 403. 

— 1 686, President of the ecclesiastical 
commission, iii. 193, 223, 526. 

— 1687, judge in the Magdalen college 
case, iii. 247. 

— 1688, James II orders his election to 
the Chancellorship of Oxford Univ., 
iii. 273. 

— 1689, death, iii. 302. 

— his relatives, iii. 184, 403: his 
chaplain, iii. 125. 

Jenkins, sir Leoline, or Llewelyn, 
principal of Jesus : — 

— his parentage and kindred, iii. 43, 
158-9, 162-3. 

— 1 64 1, a student in Jesus college, iii. 
158, 162, 166. 

— 1660, fellow of Jesus, iii. 158, 163. 

— 1661, D.C.L., i. 381 ; iii. 158, 163. 

— 1661-73, principal of Jesus, i. 382; 

ii. 62 ; iii. 158, 163 ; iv. 67, 70. 

— 1668, judge of the Prerogative 
Court and the Admiralty, ii. 243 ; iii. 

158, 163, 190. 

— 1669 onwards, shows kindness to 
Wood, ii. 167-8; iv. 229. 

— 1669, ambassador to France, ii. 176 ; 

iii. 158, 163. 

— 1670, knighted, iii. 158. 

— 1 67 1, a delegate of the press, ii. 
170, 242-3, 398. 

— 1673-5, ambassador, iii. 158, 163. 

— 1679, expected to be Lord Privy 
Seal, ii. 467. 

— 1679-85, M.P. for Oxford Univer- 
sity, ii. 460-1, 515-6, 522; iii. 133, 
135, 168, 171. 

— 1680, Secretary of State, ii. 485, 
527-8; iii. 27, 58-9, 64, 75, 91, 
158-9, 163, 413. 

— 1685, death and state funeral, iii. 
133, 357-8, 161-2, 166, 212. 

— his benefactions to Jesus college, iii. 

159, 163, 183: his life of Francis 
Mansell, ii. 35; iv. 159. 

— John Aubrey's life of him, iv. 159. 
Jones, Edward, fellow of Merton : — 

— 1652, at Westminster school, ii. 
181. 



Jones, Edward [continued) : — 

— 1 66 1, fellow of Merton, and M.D., 

i. 390; ii. 336, 366, 368, 428. 

— 1662 onwards, a tavern-companion 
of Wood's, i. 436, 469, 474, 486; 

ii. 12, 15, 20, 22-3, 30, 35, 98-9, 
102, 104, 106, 112, 115, 119, 122, 
129, 140, 146. 

— "i 664, a correspondent of Wood's, ii. 24. 

— 1665, bursar of Merton, ii. 34, 36. 

— 1666, gives a MS. to Wood, i. 430. 

— 1675, Wood's doctor, ii. 316. 

— 1686, death, iii. 117. 
Joyner, William, Romanist : — 

— 1642, fellow of Magdalen college, 

iii. 259, 525. 

— 1678-9, molested as a Romanist, ii. 
427. 433- 

— 1679-95, an acquaintance of Wood's, 
ii. 432-3 : his correspondence with 
Wood, iii. 205 ; iv. 229. In iii. 481 
(William) Joyner is probably an error 
for (Edward). 

— 1684-95, supported by a subscrip- 
tion among Catholics, apparently 
passing through Wood's hands, iii. 
121, 173-4, 491. 

— 1686, writes Romanist tracts, ii.427. 

— 1687, Romanist fellow of Magdalen 
college, iii. 250, 259, 523, 525. 

— 1688, Romanist bursar of Magdalen 
college, iii. 258, 531. 

Nov., quits Oxford, iii. 285. 

— 1695, living in obscure retirement at 
Ickford, Bucks., iii. 486, 491. 

Ken, Thomas, non-juring bishop of 
Bath and Wells :— 

— 1659, a member of Ellis's music- 
club, i. 274. 

— 1685, bishop of Bath and Wells, iii. 
121, 124, 169. 

— 1687, gives offence to James II, iii. 
215. 

— 1688, one of the Seven Bishops, iii. 
267-8. 

— 1689, refuses the oaths to William 
and Mary, iii. 308, 330, 336, 359. 

— 1691, deprived of his see, iii. 341, 
362, 366, 371, 389, 462. 

Kennet, White, antiquary: — 

— 1681, a member of S. Edmund hall, 
publishes a pamphlet against the 
Oxford Parliament, iii. 520-1, 530, 
534- 

— 168 1-9 1, collects in his native county 
of Kent notes towards Wood's 
Athenae, ii. 519; iii. 7, 39, 118, 124, 
350; iv. 189. 

— 1685 onwards, a correspondent of 
Wood, iii. 141 ; iv. 229. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



57 



Kennet, White {continued') : — 

— 1690-4, gives Wood information, 
presents him with books, iii. 327, 
338, 420, 464, 479. 

— 1692, vice-principal of S. Edmund 
hall, iii. 386, 398, 407. 

— 1692-5, Wood is intimate with him, 
iii. 407,483. 

— 1694, opposition to his B.D. degree, 
iii. 447. 

Lake, John, non-juring bishop of 
Chichester : — 

— 1682, bishop of Man, iii. 15, 33, 95, 
97, 107. 

— 1684, bishop of Bristol, iii. 95, 97, 
107, 121-2, 155-6. 

— 1685, bishop of Chichester, iii. 155- 
6, 169. 

— 1688, one of the Seven Bishops, iii. 
267. 

— 1689, refuses the oaths to William 
and Mary, iii. 308-9, 359. 

Lamphire, John, principal of Hart 
hall :— 

— 1648, ejected by the Parliamentary 
visitors from his fellowship at New 
college, i. 201. 

— 1659, a recognized wit, i. 201 ; 
practises medicine, i. 277. 

— 1660, Camden professor of History, 

i. 329. 

— 1663, principal of Hart hall, i. 

475 5 ii. 5 6 - 

— 1669-84, Wood's doctor, ii. 164, 

2 79> 3°8, 3H5 "i- I21 - 

— 1679, stands for M.P. Univ. Oxon., 

ii. 440, 442-3. 

— 1688, death, iii. 262. 

— a public-spirited man, active in pro- 
moting street-repairs and the like, i. 
475; ii. 50, 119, 216-7, 278, 519; 

iii. 25 ; iv. 67. 

— gives information to Wood, i. 438 ; 
ii. 327, 390, 404, 420, 484, 506; iii. 
45 ; iv. 189 : and shows Wood kind- 
ness, ii. 428, 484, 544; iii. 262. 

— MS. collections by him, iii. 262 ; 

iv. 189. 

— incidental mention, ii. 254, 378, 
452 ; iii. 260. 

Lamplough, Thomas, ecclesiastic : — 

— 1642, fellow of Queen's, i. 365. 

— 1660, one of Charles II' s Visitors of 
Oxford University, i. 325, 334, 365 ; 
iv. 64 : D.D., i. 346. 

— 1664, principal of S. Alban hall, 
i. 447 ; ii. 19, 223. 

marriage, ii. 19, 130. 

— 1673, dean of Rochester, ii. 253. 

— 1676, bishop of Exeter, ii. 21, 352, 



Lamplough, Thomas {continued') : — 
359, 4 2 °, 4 28 « 43 8 ; iii- 121, 205, 
252, 283. 

— 1688, archbishop of York, iii. 283. 

— 1691, death, iii. 361. 

— incidental mention, i. 388; ii. 6, 21, 

48, 13°, 372, 4 8 5- 
Langbaine, Gerard, sen., provost of 
Queen's, Keeper of the Archives : — 

— 1642-51, adviser of Oxford Univer- 
sity in business matters, i. 163-4, 
166 ; iv. 60-1. 

— 1644-58, Keeper of the Archives, 
iii. 23, where he does noble work, 
especially in recovering and arranging 
Brian Twyne's great collections, iv. 
129, 199, 204-19, and in recovering 
and arranging the University muni- 
ments, iv. 123, 199. 

— 1654, pro-vice-chancellor, i. 187. 

— 1658, death, i. 237 -. bequeaths to 
the University Archives some volumes 
of his MS. collections, iv. 63, 199, 
200. 

— MS. collections by him, MSS. owned 
by him,&c, i. 150, 248-9,429, 469 ; 

ii. 21 ; iii. 501; iv. 144, 159, 186, 
199-202, 223, 271. 

— his collection of printed books and 
pamphlets, i. 142, 247-9, 250; ii. 21. 

— pamphlets by him, i. 152, 387. 

— his wife and family, i. 126, 237-8. 

— his handwriting, i. 107, 247 ; iv. 
p. xi. 

— father of the next. 

Langbaine, Gerard, jun., biblio- 
grapher of the English drama : — 

— son of the preceding. 

— 1656, birth, i. 237-8. 

— 16 — , marriage, i. 237-8. 

— 1684, owned a fine collection of old 
English plays, iii. 119; iv. 236. 

— 1688, published a catalogue of Eng- 
lish plays, i. 20. 

— 1690, elected yeoman-bedell of Arts, 

iii. 338. 

— 1 69 1, elected esquire-bedell of Law, 
iii. 351. 

— 1692, death, iii. 391-2. 

Laud, William, archbishop of Canter- 
bury, benefactor of the Bodleian 
Library : — 

— 1603, proctor of the University, ii. 
, 2 34- 

— 161 1, president of S. John's, iii. 367. 

— 1630, chancellor of Oxford Uni- 
versity, iv. 58 ; favours Arminianism, 
and silences Calvinism in the Uni- 
versity, i. 348, 370, 407 ; ii. 66, 238 ; 
iii. 22-3 ; iv. 52 : codifies the statutes 
(1636) in the direction of oligarchical 



58 



WOODS LIFE AND TIMES. 



Laud, William (continued) : — 

government, iv. 127-31, 198 : desires 
the foundation of a University press, 
ii. 231 : his history of his chancellor- 
ship, ii. 214 ; iv. 144. 

— 1635, projects an archiepiscopal 
visitation of the University, iv. 144, 
209. 

— 1636, entertains Charles I and his 
queen at S. John's, i. 46 ; iv. 56. 

— 164^, noble gifts of MSS. to the 
Bodleian library, i. 51 ; iii. 235, 237 ; 
iv- 55» 57 : the new wcst wing of the 
library was called at first ' Laud's 
library,' ii. 214. 

— ■ 1 64 1, resigns his chancellorship of 
Oxford University, i. 7, 51. 

beheaded, and buried at Bark- 
ing, i. 485; ii. 507; iii. 442; iv. 
47- 

— 1663, re-buried in S. John's, Oxford, 

i. 476, 484-5, 498. 

— 1669, placed on the roll of bene- 
factors of Oxford University, ii. 163. 

— pamphlets about him, i. 16 : William 
Prynne's books against him, i. 319, 

444, 481 5 5o7- 

— incidental mention, i. 267, 418; ii. 
52, 115, 234. 

— his successive sees, i. 485. 

Leeds, Thomas Osborne, first duke 
of :— 

— 1673 viscount Latimer, 1674 earl 
of Danby, Lord Treasurer under 
Charles II, ii. 371, 375, 432, 434, 
444-6, 448, 461, 465, 475 ; iv. 74, 
85: incidental mention, iii. 275, 299, 
327, 388, 488. 

— 1689, turns against James II, and in 
1692 is proscribed by him, iii. 387. 

created marquess of Carmarthen, 

ii. 445 ; iii. 311, 363, 446. 

— 1694, created duke of Leeds, iii. 446, 

455, 484> 494-5- 
Leland, John, antiquary : — 

— his printed books, i. 247-8, 260, 271, 
278, 307; ii. 38, 139. 

— his MS. collections, i. 222 ; ii. 264; 
iv. 212, 252, 268, 279-80, 312. 

— Wood's admiration of, and use of, 
Leland's collections, i. 5, 222, 225-6, 

3*4-5, 34 2 5 4°4- 6 > 4 10 - 1 ; iv - 9 2 > 
94, 103, 279. 

— William Huddesford's life of, i. 3. 
Leopold I, emperor of Germany : — 

— 1653, archduke, admires English 
music, i. 321. 

— 1658, becomes emperor, i. 321-2. 

— 1664, war with Turkey, ii. 54. 

■ — 1673-8, war with France, ii. 307, 
414; iii. 101, 159, 163. 



Leopold I (continued) : — 

— 1686, war with Turkey, iii. 200. 

— incidental mention, ii. 498 ; iii. 443, 
471 : his musical compositions, i. 
322 : his poet-laureate, ii. 401. 

Levet, William, principal of Mag- 
dalen hall : — 

— 1681-94, principal of Magdalen hall, 

ii. 540-2 ; iii. 78, 106, 127, 172, 204, 

443-4, 457- 

— 1692, lord Clarendon's agent in 
getting up the case against Wood, 

iii. 407, 420; iv. 2, 16, 20, 22-3, 25, 
49. 

Levinz, William, president of S. 
John's : — 

— 1641, fellow of S. John's, i. 290, 
314, 316, 414, 483 ('Rich.' in error) ; 
ii. 563 ; iii. 44. 

— 1665, professor of Greek, i. 361, 
427 ; iii. 131. 

— 1673, president of S. John's, ii. 214, 
271-2; iii. 3, 51, 135, 165, 357, 
416. 

— 1698, death, ii. 272. 

Lichfield, Leonard I, University 
printer : — 

— 1635-6, esquire-bedell of Theology, 
makes journeys on University business, 

iv. 56 bis. 

— 1636-54, payments to him as Uni- 
versity printer occur, iv. 52 (unnamed), 
56 bis, 57 bis, 58, 59 quinquies, 60, 
63 bis, 69. After his death his widow 
Anne (i. 462) had an interest in the 
printing business, 1659, iv. 64, and 
1665, iv. 69. 

— 1657, death, i. 215. 

Lichfield, Leonard II, University 
printer : — 

— payments to him as University printer 
occur, 1660-4, iv- 64, 65 bis, 66-7, 
69, and in 1667, i y - 7° (unnamed). 
He is mentioned also in 1664 when 
Wood goes to him, perhaps at the 
instigation of Ralph Bathurst, and 
perhaps to ask the cost of printing 
Wood's Oxford collections, ii. 26 ; 
and again in 1675, ii. 313 (see iv. 
74)- 

— 1686, death, ii. 329, 474, 476; iii. 
180. 

Lichfield, Leonard III, University 
printer : — 

— iii. 198, 209, 329, 435. 
Lichfield, Solodell, bedell :— 

— 1635, yeoman-bedell of Law, i. 76, 
84. 

— 1666, esquire-bedell of Arts, ii. 95, 
128. 

— 167 1, death, ii. 218-9. 



INDEX I. B 

Lloyd, John, principal of Jesus col- 
lege :— 

— 1673-86, principal of Jesus college, 
ii. 262 ; iii. 163, 199; iv. 145. 

— 1680, pro- vice-chancellor, ii. 476. 

— 1682-5, vice-chancellor, iii. 27, 29, 

4i-3, 45, 47-8, 5 1 , 53, 55, 57, 61-3, 
^5> 75, 83, 90, 94, 106, 108, 116, 
125-6, 128, 132-3, 152, 161-2, 164-5, 
427, 512. 

— 1686, bishop of S. David's, iii. 181, 
198-9, 200. 

— 1687, death, iii. 212. 

— Wood's dislike to him, iii. 27, 132, 
165, 168, 427. 

Lloyd, "William, bishop of Lichfield, 
and Worcester : — 

— 1659, resident in Wadham college, i. 
283. 

— 1668, vicar of S. Mary's, Reading, 
ii. 275. 

— 1680, bishop of S. Asaph, i. 283 ; ii. 
489, 497; iii. 121, 152, 205, 251, 
267, 312, 327, 349, 363, 366, 397, 
405, 414. 

— 1688, one of the Seven Bishops, iii. 
267. 

— 1692, bishop of Lichfield, iii. 392, 

397, 4°5, 4 T 4, 4 X 7, 4 J 9> 449- 

— 1699, bishop of Worcester, iii. 449. 
Lloyd, William, non-juring bishop of 

Norwich : — 

— 1675, bishop of Llandaff, ii. 311, 
3H, 444-. 

— 1679, bishop of Peterborough, ii. 
444, 494 ; iii. 121, 144. 

— 1685, bishop of Norwich, iii. 144, 
168. 

— 1689, refuses the oaths to William 
and Mary, iii. 308, 336, 359. 

Locke, John : — 

— 1663, a student of chemistry, i. 472, 
474- 

— 1680, reputed a Whig, ii. 431. 

— 1684, ejected from his studentship in 
Christ Church, iii. 117, 316, 319. 

— incidental mention, iii. 117, 316, 

319, 327, 367, 47<5. 
Lockey, Thomas, Bodley's librarian : — 

— 162 1, student of Christ Church, ii. 
19. 

— 1660, D.D., i. 347. 

— 1660-5, Bodley's librarian, i. 335, 
402 ; ii. 57, 60. 

— 1665, canon of Christ Church, ii. 
408, 412, 456. 

— 1679, death, ii. 454-5. 

— his collection of books, i. 295 ; ii. 

455, 47 1 - 
Loggan, David, engraver : — 

— 1665, occasionally in Oxford, ii. 47, 



JGKAFHICAL. 59 

Loggan, David {continued) : — 

49; so also in 1666 (?), ii. 71, 75; 
and 1667, ii. 98. 

— 1669, resident in Oxford, ii. 160-1, 
and appointed University engraver, ii. 
153- 

— 1673, his plan of Oxford, i. 447 ; iii. 
313. 

— 1675, publication of his Oxonia 
Illustrata, i. 496-7 ; iii. 235, 237, 304, 
313: which Wood often calls 'the 
cuts ' to his own Hist, et Antiq. Univ. 
Oxon. This book was the formal 
present of Oxford University, 1675- 
95, ^ 315-6, 323, 5 I 8, 528; iii. 54, 
495 ; iv. 7 1 , 74-5, 77, 82. 

— 1692, death, iii. 394. 

— incidental mention, ii. 267 ; iv. 68, 
83- 

Louis XIV, king of France : — 

— 1643, regency of Anne Marie of 
Austria, i. 230. 

— 1648, Englishmen serving towards 
end of the Thirty Years' War, ii. 296. 

— 1673-8, war with the emperor, ii. 
307, 414 ; iii. 157, 159, 163 : English- 
men in his service, i. 194 ; iii. 98, 
101. 

— 1678, hostility of the English nation, 

ii. 401, 403: fear of his invading 
England, ii. 426 : hostile tariffs, iii. 
401, 452, 466. 

— 1 68 1, believed to have English 
courtiers in his pay, ii. 513. 

— 1688, is godfather to James Francis 
Edward, iii. 279. 

— 1688 onwards, kindness to James II, 

iii. 291, 315, 387, 423, 462. 

— 1690-4, at war with England, iii. 
336-7, 346, 352, 39°, 4 I °> 4*7, 445, 
453, 455, 459, 462, 465 : is helped 
by English traitors, iii. 435, 459. 

— 1692, is godfather to James II's 
daughter Louisa, iii. 401. 

— his almoner, iii. 401 : secretary, ii. 
376 : quoted as the type of absolute 
monarchy, iii. 70. 

— incidental mention, ii. 59; iii. 334, 
406. 

Low, Edward, organist of Christ 
Church : — 

— 1649, ejected from his organist's 
place by the Parliamentary visitors, 
i. 151. 

— 1658, a member of the musical club, 
i. 205, 256-7, 314. 

— 1660, deputy -professor of Music, i. 
316. 

restored to his place as organist 

of Christ Church, i. 316, 359 ; iii. 
p. vii, 4, 514. 



6o 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Low, Edward (continued) : — 

— ]66i, professor of Music, i. 420, 427 : 

11. 225, 315 : has charge of the music 
at the Encaenia, iv. 71, 73, 76. 

— 1682, death, iii. 24. 
Lower, Richard, physician : — 

— 1657-65, an inseparable companion 
of Wood's at cookshop and tavern, 

i. 230, 259, 266-7, 279, 284, 286, 
313. 3 l8 > ?> 2 h 327, 4°5, 4'°, 4 2S > 
43o, 444> 45°> 45 2 > 47 1 - 2 , 474, 477, 
486-7, 501, 503, 507; ii. 1, 4-6, 8, 

12, 14-5, 23-4, 27-8, 31, 33, 35, 37, 
40, 43 ; and in other ways a friend 
and associate of Wood's, i. 278, 473 ; 

ii. 2, 4, 10, 13, 42, 44, 50-1, 71-2, 
77. 9 2 - 

— 1659, studies chemistry, i. 290. 

— 1662-5, is Wood's doctor, i. 428 ; ii. 
172. 

— 1664, discovers Astrop wells, ii. 12. 

— 1665, experiments on transfusion of 
blood, ii. 30. 

August, begins practice in London, 

ii. 43. 

— 1666, visits Oxford, ii. 71, 73, 76-7. 

— 1667, visits Oxford, ii. 99. 

— 1691, died, iii. 351. 

Lydall, Richard, warden of Merton : — 

— 1661, suggested for the wardenship 
of Merton, i. 383. 

— 1666-93, practises medicine in Ox- 
ford, i. 229, 233, 447, 449-50 ; ii. 43, 
205, 320: iii. 39, 133, 170; iv. 16, 
22-3. 

■ — 1693, elected warden of Merton, iii. 
432-3, 435- 6 ' 43 8 - 



Marlborough, John Churchill, first 
duke of : — 

— styled John Churchill, ii. 462. 

— 1683, created baron Churchill of 
Eyemouth, iii. 32, 46, 50, 54, 116, 
120. 

— 1688, betrays James II, ii. 462 ; iii. 

285, 388. 

— 1689, created earl of Marlborough, 
iii. 347. 

— 1690, serves in Ireland, iii. 347. 

— 1692, is in disgrace because of 
political intrigues, iii. 381, 389. 

— 1695, again employed by William III, 
iii. 482. 

Marsh, Narcissus, principal of S. Alban 
hall :— 

— 1658, fellow of Exeter, i. 274-5. 

— ID 73> principal of S. Alban hall, i. 

2 75> 447 ; ii- 2 ^4> 4 68 ; ni - 359- 

— 1678, provost of Trinity college, 
Dublin, i. 275; ii. 432, 550, 558. 



Marsh, Narcissus (continued) : — 

— 1682, bishop of Ferns, iii. 42, 77, 
295- 

— 1690, archbishop of Cashell, i. 275 
(' Tuam ' in error) ; iii. 347. 

— 1693, archbishop of Dublin, iii. 435, 
449. 

Marshall, Thomas, rector of Lin- 
coln : — 

— 1649, chaplain at Dordrecht, ii. 315. 

— 1672, rector of Lincoln, ii. 251, 315, 
403, 55 r > 553- 55 6 ; "i- 53, 69, 72. ' 

— 1675 onwards, shows Wood kind- 
ness and gives him information, ii. 

22 5, 3*7> 35°» 3 81 ; "I- 36, 3 2 6, 359- 

— 1676, attracts Lrancis Junius to Ox- 
ford, ii. 358 ; iv. 75. 

— 1 68 1, dean of Gloucester, ii. 225, 
5*o, 539- 

— 1685, death, iii. 138. 

— his collection of books and pamph- 
lets, ii. 316; iv. 235: his MSS., ii. 
64, 316 ; iv. 74. 

— his benefactions to Lincoln college 
and to the Bodleian library, ii. 316 ; 
iv. 74, 147. 

Mary (Tudor), queen : — 

— 1553, suppresses the Book of Com- 
mon Prayer, ii. 305. 

— 1556, visitation of Oxford University 
by (Cardinal Pole's) commissioners, 

iv. 129-31, 144, 209: papers about 
Oxford University in her reign, iv. 
220. 

— 1558, change of religion on her death, 

v. 3, 17- 

— life of her mother by her chaplain, 
ii. 485-6 ; iii. 343. 

Mary Beatrice, queen : — 

— the princess of Modena, ii. 273, 
39 1 - 

— Mary Beatrice, duchess of York. 

— 1673, her marriage, ii. 273. 

— 1675, birth and death of a daughter, 
ii. 312. 

— 1677, birth and death of a son, ii. 
391-2. 

— 1678, her secretary is executed on 
account of the popish plot, ii. 418-9, 
426. 

— 1679, comes to London with her 
husband and withdraws with him to 
Scotland, ii. 464. 

— 1680, again withdraws to Scotland, 
ii. 499. 

— 1682, comes back to England, iii. 31. 

— 1683, visits Oxford, iii. 46-54; iv. 
78 ; and is greeted by an Italian 
speech at Magdalen college, iii. 50 : 
visits Cornbury, iii. 51 ; visits the 
Bodleian and the Schools, iii. 51 ; is 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



6 1 



Mary Beatrice {continued') : — 

present at the formal opening of the 
Ashmolean, iii. 51, 55 ; visits Rycote, 
iii. 54. 

— her household : — secretary, ii. 418 : 
master of the horse, iii. 123-4. 

— Mary Beatrice, queen. 

— 1685, becomes queen -consort, iii. 
129, 141 ; publicly attends mass, iii. 
132 ; is congratulated by Oxford 
University, iii. 133; iv. 80. 

— 1686, is appealed to as patroness of 
Queen's college, Oxford, iii. 185: see 
Dr. Magrath's Queen's College, in 
The Colleges of Oxford, p. 126. 

— 1687, Aug., visits Bath, iii. 255, 268. 

— 1688, Jan., libels issued in connexion 
with her pregnancy, iii. 254-5. 

June, birth of the prince of Wales, 

iii. 268, 271, 280; v. 52, 55. 

Dec, withdraws to France, iii. 

288, 290. 

— her household : — chaplain, iii. 101 : 
gentleman- usher, iii. 170 : maids of 
honour, iii. 188: treasurer, iii. 350, 
353- 

— her mother, iii. 255 : her brother, iii. 
313 : her picture in a transparency, 
iii. 271. 

— incidental mention, iii. 181, 266, 285. 

— the late queen of England. 

— 1689-95, called ' late queen of Eng- 
land,' ' the late queen,' by the Whigs, 
iii- 3 J 3> 35°, 387; but 'the queen,' 
' queen Mary,' by the Tories, iii. 328, 

— 1692, April, her pregnancy, iii. 387. 
June, birth of a daughter, iii. 391 : 

christening, iii. 401. 

— 1694, May, birth of a daughter, iii. 
45 2 - 

— — Oct., expected to succeed as 
duchess of Modena, iii. 469. 

Mary II, queen : — 

— the lady Mary : — 

— 1676, confirmed by Henry Compton, 
bishop of London, ii. 338; iii. 173 
(' Anne ' in error). 

— 1677, Apr., project of marriage with 
the Dauphin, ii. 374. 

Oct., betrothal to the prince of 

Orange, ii. 391. 
Nov., marriage, ii. 391. 

— the princess of Orange : — 

— 1685, her health is drunk as heir pre- 
sumptive of the throne, iii. 129, 141. 

— 1686, declaration of Protestantism, 
iii. 187. 

— 1689, Jan., thanksgiving for her 
arrival, iii. 298 ; iv. 82. 

Feb., her father having, accord- 



Mary II {continued) : — 

ing to Parliament, ' abdicated,' Wil- 
liam III and Mary II are proclaimed 
sovereigns, iii. 298-9. 

Mary, queen : — 

— 1689, Feb., proclaimed, iii. 299. 

— — Apr., coronation-day, iii. 301, 
304, 313-4; iv. 82 : Oxford Univer- 
sity verses on the occasion, iv. 82. 

July, oath of allegiance imposed, 

iii. 302-3, 305, 321, 330, 401, 414. 

Dec, popularity in London, iii. 

3i7- 

— 1690, March, hostility of the clergy, 
iii. 328. 

May, Act of Indemnity, iii. 331. 

— 1 69 1, Apr., fire at Whitehall, iii. 
358. 

May, continued hostility of the 

clergy, iii. 361. 
May-Oct., acts as regent, iii. 361, 

3 6 3, 37 2 -3- 

— 1691, June-1693, Aug., proceedings 
against non-jurors at Oxford and 
Cambridge, iii. 363, 373-4, 377, 
380-2, 384, 397, 430. 

— 1692, Sept., acts as regent, iii. 401. 

— 1693, Jan., at the play, iii. 413 : 
indignation at the statement that her 
crown is by conquest, iii. 414. 

March, popularity with dissenters, 

iii. 417: oath of allegiance, iii. 418. 

June, acts as regent, iii. 424, 426. 

Aug., loyal address by the City 

of London, iii. 431. 

— 1694, Feb., the oath of allegiance is 
enforced in the Universities, iii. 443, 
445- 

July-Oct., acts as regent, iii. 462, 

465, 467, 471. 
Dec, smallpox, and death, iii. 475. 

— 1695, J an 'j indecent Jacobite re- 
joicings, iii. 476 : formal Oxford Uni- 
versity tribute to her memory, iii. 477, 
479- 

Feb., church-bells ordered to be 

tolled for her funeral, iii. 480. 

— pamphlets about her, iii. 301 : ballads 
about her, iii. 299. 

— her household: — chaplain, iii. 301, 
361, 411, 469: clerk of the closet, 
iii. 469, 474 : gentleman-usher, iii. 
397 : lady of the bedchamber, iii. 
370, 405 : maid of honour, iii. 306, 
41 7 1 physician, iii. 445 : sub-al- 
moner, iii. 389 : treasurer, iii. 419, 
421 : vice-chamberlain, iii. 317, 344. 

— her picture in crockery, iii. 375 : a 
sturgeon presented to her, as ' the 
royal fish,' iii. 423 : queen's bounty to 
triplets, iii. 469-70 : sends a present 



62 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Mary II {continued') : — 

of venison to Oxford, iii. 426 : the 
queen's brief (i. e. letter ordering 
collections in churches), iii. 467. 

— days observed in her honour : — her 
birthday, 30 April, 1691, slightly, 
iii. 360; 1693, slightly, iii. 421 : ac- 
cession-day, coronation-day, see infra 
under William III. 

— incidental mention, iii. 318,327, 353, 

3 6l > 37 2 ? 39°> 397, 4° 2 - 
Massey, John, Romanist convert : — 

— 1669, servitor of Obadiah Walker, 
iii. 198. 

— 1672, fellow of Merton, ii. 351, 458 ; 
iii. 9, 152 ('Meysey'), 173, 181, 
197. 

— 1683, studies chemistry, iii. 75, 77-8. 

— 1684-5, is proctor, iii. 89, 92-4, 
106, 132, 141. 

— 1686, Jan.-June, suspected of Ro- 
manism, iii. 177, 189-90. 

Oct., a declared Romanist, made 

dean of Christ Church, iii. 197-8, 
200-2, 214-5, 219, 239, 241, 250, 
255> 268, 300, 304. 

— 1687, Feb., active in the Romanist 
propaganda, iii. 213. 

March, opens a Romanist chapel 

in Christ Church, iii. 215, 224, 232, 
244, 260, 264, 278, 285, 334. 

July, is J. P., iii. 223, 274. 

Sept., receives James II, iii. 

230-1. 

— 1688, Nov., quits Oxford, iii. 283, 
285, 287. 

Mews, Peter, president of S. John's : — 

— 1667, president of S. John's, ii. 118, 
214. 

— 1668, shows kindness to Wood, ii. 
84, 118, 172, 214. 

— 1669-73, vice-chancellor, ii. 172, 
189, 194-6, 204, 206-11, 215, 219- 
20, 225, 236, 241-2, 244-6, 249-50, 
252, 258, 265-6, 270-1. 

— 1672, bishop of Bath and Wells, ii. 
115, 214, 252-3, 258, 271, 397, 447. 

— 1684, bishop of Winton, iii. 116, 
121, 177, 215, 310, 372, 464. 

— 1687-8, Visitor of Magdalen college 
at the time of the visitation by James 
II's commissioners, iii. 279, 526, 
532-3; iv. 82. 

— 1694, acts as Visitor of Trinity 
college, Oxford, iii. 449. 

Mill, John, principal of S. Edmund 
hall :— 

— 1669, M.A., Queen's, ii. 158, 161, 
343, 361 ('Mills'), 448. 

— 1681, D.D., Queen's, iii. 12, 18, 24, 
50 : rector of Bletchington, iii. 137. 



Mill, John {continued) ; — 

— 1685, principal of S. Edmund hall, 
iii. 142, 263, 399. 

Monk, George, restorer of the mo- 
narchy : — 

— 1660, declares for monarchy, i. 303 : 
ballads and verses about him, i. 18 ; 
ii. 152, 285; iii. 160: incidental 
mention, i. 31 1-2, 316, 398. 

created duke of Albemarle, ii. 

184 ; iii. 483 : incidental mention, ii. 

6, 51, 116, 285, 496, 498. 
Monmouth, James, duke of : — 

— 1656, styled James Crofts, a prisoner 
in the Tower, i. 208. 

— 1663, duke of Monmouth, created 
M.A. at Cambridge, i. 496 : married 
to Anne Scott, countess of Buc- 
cleuch, i. 472 ; ii. 58, 353 ; iii. 438 : 
incorporated M.A. at Oxford, i. 489, 
496. 

— 1665, comes with the king to Oxford, 

ii. 46, 58. 

— 1665, Sept.-i666, Jan., is lodged in 
Corpus Christi college and has his 
name on the books there, ii. 58, 66 ; 

iii. 64. 

— 1674, chancellor of Cambridge Uni- 
versity, ii. 298, 444. 

— 1679, sees service in Scotland, ii. 
459 : patronizes Titus Oates, ii. 444. 

Sept., puts forward pretensions to 

the succession to the crown, ii. 462, 
and is banished, ii. 462-3. 

Nov., returns to England, ii. 

470, where some popular feeling is 
shown in his favour, ii. 470. 

Dec, is dismissed by the king 

from his places at court, ii. 470. 

— 1680, Jan. -Aug., the popular belief 
in his legitimacy is formally denied 
by the king, ii. 476, 482, 487, 493. 

— 1680, Apr., legend of 'the black 
box,' said to contain the evidence of 
his legitimacy, ii. 485 ; iii. 137, 141. 

Sept., visits Oxford and is well 

received by the town, ii. 496 ; iii. 
506-10, and hailed as soon to be 
f King James II,' iii. 142, 509. 

— 1681, March, is coldly received when 
he comes to the Oxford Parliament, 

".525,531- 
April, pamphlets for and against 

his legitimacy, ii. 531 ; iii. 509. 
June, struck off the commission 

of the peace, ii. 544. 

— 1682, Feb., iii. 4. 

Sep., arrested at Stafford, iii. 

27. 

— 1683, April, popularity in Oxford 
City, iii. 42, 510. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



63 



Monmouth {continued) : — 

— 1683, June, discovery of the plot to 
assassinate the king and crown Mon- 
mouth, iii. 58. 

July, his name struck out of the 

buttery-book at C.C.C., iii. 64. 

— 1684, Nov., visits Charles II se- 
cretly, iii. 118. 

— 1685, June, invades England, iii. 19, 
58, 130, 144-52, 157, 166, 168, 200, 
212, 440: is attainted, iii. 438: his 
family is imprisoned in the Tower, 

iii. 157 : he is proclaimed king, iii. 
145 : the guards are sent against 
him and the militia called out, iii. 
145; many suspected persons are 
thrown into prison, iii. 145 : Oxford 
University raises a volunteer regiment 
against him, iii. 146-52, 183, 250, 
533 : the gentry are forward against 
him, iii. 281. 

July, defeated, iii. 151-2: be- 
headed and buried in the Tower, iii. 
1 B4, 302. 

— — Sept.-Oct., excessive and im- 
politic severity against his western 
followers, iii. 155,159-60, 164, 168, 
170, 173, 181, 188, 294. 

— 1689, the remembrance of this se- 
verity helps to hurl James II from 
his throne, iii. 294, 299. 

— pamphlets about him, i. 17 ; ii. 493, 
496, 531; iii. 154, 168: ballads 
about him, ii. 462 ; iii. 294, 506. 

— his sister, ii. 531 : his duchess, i. 
47 2 5 »• 5 8 > 353 5 iii- 43 8 : his chil- 
dren, iii. 157, 402, 438. 

— he touches for the king's evil, ii. 
531 : his French regiment, iii. 101 : 
Wood's notice of him, ii. 237 : in- 
trigue with Henrietta Wentworth, iii. 
184. 

— his sadler, ii. 399 : secretary, iii. 
274 : servant, i. 126. 

More, sir Thomas : — 

— pedigree of, iii. 206. 

— descendants of, ii. 362. 

— portrait of, ii. 300. 

— lives of, i.454 ; iv. 284 : William Ful- 
man's notes on, ii. 449, 468 : Wood's 
collections for, iv. 240. 

— letters of Oxford University to him, 

iv. 132. 

— his Utopia, iii. 167 : his life of 
Richard III, iv. 284. 

Morley, George, bishop of Winches- 
ter :— 

— 1660, dean of Christ Church, i. 347. 
bishop of Worcester, i. 347, 411, 

4H> 435- 

— 1662, bishop of Winchester, i. 467, 



Morley, George {continued) : — 
474; ii. 16, 112, 338, 454, 512, 540, 
542, 559; iii. 526. 

— 1664, holds a visitation of C. C. C, 

ii. 16-8. 

— 1684, death, iii. 115. 
Muddiman, Henry, London journal- 
ist :— 

— 1659 (?)-i663, tne official writer of 
news, i. 14; and again, 1665-7, ii. 
5°- 

— a newspaper called Muddiman's is 
mentioned, 1679, ii- 45 2 '■> iii . 
38, 42; 1685, iii. 124, 156; 1686, 

iii. 180, as coming to Oxford coffee- 
houses : discontinued because con- 
demned by the judge of assize. It is 
mentioned again in 1689, iii. 298. 

Nicholas, John, warden of New col- 
lege :— 

— 1675, warden of New coll., ii. 390, 
456. 

— 1677-9, vice-chancellor, ii. 270, 390, 

39 2 , 395. 4°8, 4 r 4> 4 2 6, 4 2 9> 44 I "3, 

458; iv. 76. 

strict in discipline, ii. 390. 

of Sabbatarian leanings, ii. 396, 

active in proceedings against 

Romanists, ii. 414, 424-5, 427, 433, 
440. 

— 1679, warden of Winchester, ii. 456. 
Nicholls, Peter, fellow of Merton :— 

— 1649 onwards, fellow of Merton, i. 

167, 39°> 395 ; ii- 45, 77- 

— 1661 onwards, an inseparable com- 
panion of Wood on his walks, at 
tavern and cookshop, &c, i. 407, 
410, 441, 486; ii. 4, 6, 12, 19-20, 
23-4> 2 7> 29-33, 35, 37, 43, 45, 47, 
50-1, 69-71, 73, 75, 79, 81-2, 85, 
88-9, 92, 104, 106, 108, 112, 115-7, 
119-20, 122, 126-31, 133, 138-41, 
143-6, 149, 151, 153, 155, 163, 177, 
187, 189-91, 194, 333. 

— 1659-62, sub-warden of Merton, i. 
288, 446. 

— 1663, bursar of Merton, i. 474. 

— 1678, died, ii. 401 : left a legacy to 
Wood, ii. 413, and a bequest to Mer- 
ton college, ii. 401, 500. 

Norfolk, Henry Howard, fifth duke 
of:— 

— styled ' lord Henry Howard ' up to 
1669, i. 320; ii. 119-20; iv. 69. 

— created earl of Norwich, 167 2, 11. 
37 2 - 

— succeeded as 5th duke of Norfolk, 
1677, ii. 417, 435 ; iii. 86, 108, 232. 

— gave the Arundel marbles to Oxford 



6 4 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Norfolk, Henry, duke of (cont.) : — 
University, i. 320; ii. 119-20; iv. 
69. 

Nottingham, Heneage Finch, 1st 
earl of: — 

— 1 66 1 , styled sir Heneage Finch, 
Solicitor- General, and M.P. for Ox- 
ford University, i. 398, 431, 433; 
ii. 61-2. 

— 1665, created D.C.L., ii. 62. 

— 1673, styled baron Finch, lord 
chancellor, ii. 220, 279, 366, 440, 

443, 465, 4 6 7> 5° 6 > 533- 

— 1681, created earl of Nottingham, 

ii. 467; iii. 30, 424, 429. 

— 1682, death, ii. 467 ; iii. 34, 360. 

Oliver, John, president of Magda- 
len : — 

— demy, i. 418, and fellow, i. 98, of 
Magdalen. 

— 1644, president of Magdalen by 
mandate from Charles I, iii. 518 : 
ejected by the Parliamentary visitors. 

— 1660, restored, i. 131, 316, 413,420. 

— — one of Charles II's commis- 
sioners, i. 324. 

— 1661, death, i. 303 (dated a year 
wrong), 417, 420. 

Orange, the prince of : see William 
III. 

Ormonde, James Butler, first duke 
of:— 

— 1630, marries Elizabeth Preston, ii. 
385; iii. 106. 

— 1644, lord lieutenant of Ireland, ii. 
222. 

— 1649, K.G., ii. 205 ; iii. 278. 

— 1649-50, fighting in Ireland as lord- 
lieutenant for Charles II, i. 156. 

— 1660, lord steward of the household 
to Charles II and James II, ii. 166, 
386 ; iii. 179. 

— 1669, elected and installed chan- 
cellor of Oxford University, ii. 166-8 ; 
iv. 72. 

incidental mention as chancellor 

of Oxford University, ii. 520, 527; 

iii. 93. 

sends frequent letters to Oxford 

University, recommending foreigners 
for honorary degrees, dispensations 
from statutable requirements, omit- 
ting the Act, trying to influence 
elections of M.P.s for the University, 
ii. 194-6, 209, 217, 252, 262-3, 286, 
327-8, 340, 343, 357, 390, 440, 
460-1, 496; 111. 79, 87, 90, 95, 124, 
190, 215, 270; iv. 74, 79. 

his chancellorship is executed by 

commissioners in his absence out of 



Ormonde, James, duke of (cont.) : — 
England : — 1674, u - 285-6, 295 ; 
1677-82, ii. 381, 390, 408, 498, 542, 
546, 556; iii. 6; 1684, iii. 107-8, 
120. 

— 1669, his patronage, &c. as chancel- 
lor : — 1677, state visit to the Univer- 
sity, ii. 380-7 ; iv. 76 ; 1681, ap- 
points a principal of Magdalen hall, 
ii. 540-1 ; 1683, presents Oxford 
University declaration of High Tory 
principles to the king, iii. 62-5 ; 

1687, nominates a high steward of 
the University, iii. 207. 

— 1670, attempt to kidnap him, ii. 
205-6, 222. 

— 1674, journey into Ireland, ii. 285, 
295, 319- 

— 1675, journey into Ireland, ii. 319. 

— 1677-82, resident in Ireland as lord- 
lieutenant, ii. 381, 385, 387, 390, 
431, 440, 460, 498, 542, 546. 

— 1682, created a duke in the peerage 
of England, iii. 32-3. 

— 1683, at Whitehall, iii. 62-5. 

— 1684, at North Aston, iii. 106-7 5 1V - 
79- 

lord-lieutenant of Ireland, iii. 108. 

— 1686, at Cornbury, iii. 179-80; iv. 
80. 

— 1687, at Cornbury, iii. 214; iv. 81. 

— 1688, death, iii. 272. 

— his pedigree, ii. 392, 468 : members 
of his family, ii. 99, 385, 387, 493, 
495, 560; iii. 106, 178-9: chaplain, 

ii. 431 ; iii. 218, 221. 
Ormonde, James Butler, second 

duke of : — 

— styled earl of Ossory, ii. 560 : his 
chaplain, iii. 1, 194. 

— 1680, created M.A. at Oxford, ii. 
495- 

— 1683, offered D.C.L., iii. 46, 54. 

— succeeded as second duke of Ormonde, 

1688, iii. 272 : incidental mention, iii. 
278, 441, 444 : his chaplain, iii. 418. 

— 1688, elected and installed chan- 
cellor of Oxford University, iii. 272, 
275 ; iv. 81. 

incidental mention as chancellor, 

iii. 304, 323, 407 ; iv. 3. 

his chancellorship during his ab- 
sence abroad discharged by commis- 
sioners, 1689, iii. 304 ; 1690, iii. 332 ; 
1691, iii. 354; 1692, iii. 389. 

patronage, &c. as chancellor : — 

1694, suit against Magdalen college 
as to patronage of Magdalen hall, 
iii. 444, 456-7 : 1695, presents to 
William III Oxford University ad- 
dress on the queen's death, iii. 478 : 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



65 



Ormonde, James, duke of (font.) : — 
accompanies William III to Oxford, 
iii. 494-6 ; iv. 85. 

— 1688, Sept., K.G., iii. 278. 

Nov., joins the prince of Orange, 

iii. 285. 

— 1689, in Holland, iii. 304. 

— 1690, abroad, iii. 332. 

— 1692, in Flanders, iii. 381, 389. 

— — proscribed by James II, iii. 
387. 

Owen, John, puritan dean of Christ 
Church : — 

— 1 65 1, the leader of the Independents 
in Oxford, intruded dean of Christ 
Church, i. 148, 268, 283, 300, 364, 
368, 370 ; ii. 247 ; iv. 61. 

— 1652-7, vice-chancellor, i. 359, 420, 
427 ; iv. 61. 

— 1657, gaily dressed, i. 221. 

— 1660, ejected from Christ Church, i. 
307- 

— 1662, lived atStadham(pton),Oxon., 
i. 499 ; ii. 96. 

— 1683, death, iii. 66-7. 

— his library of books, iii. 470 : books 
published by him, i. 230; ii. 513 ; 
iii. 63 : books written against him, ii. 
212. 

Owen, Thankful, puritan president of 
S. John's : — 

— 1642, fellow of Lincoln, i. 155; ii. 
17- 

— 1649, active in the puritan interest, 

i. 157. 

— 1650, intruded president of S. John's, 

ii. 17, 97, 537 ; iv. 61 : a leading In- 
dependent, i. 148. 

— 1652, one of the Parliamentary 
visitors, ii. 17 ; iv, 61. 

— 1660, resident in London, ii. 97, 513. 

— 1681, death, ii. 537; auction of his 
library, i. 286. 

Parker, Samuel, bishop of Oxford : — 

— 1667, chaplain to the archbishop of 
Canterbury, ii. 242. 

— 1670, archdeacon of Canterbury, iii. 
260-1. 

— 1686, bishop of Oxford, iii. 195, 198- 
200, 220, 260. 

— 1687, named by James II president 
of Magdalen college, iii. 224, 233, 
245, 248-9, 515, 518, 520-1, 523, 
527-9- 

— 1687-8, president of Magdalen col- 
lege, iii. 245, 254-6, 262, 530-1. 

— 1688, March, death, iii. 261-2. 
Peers, Richard, bedell : — 

— his birth and school, ii. 507 : his 
bad handwriting, ii. 226. 



Peers, Richard {continued) : — 

— 1668, B.A, Ch. Ch., ii. 199. 

— 1670, translated part of Wood's Hist, 
et Antiq. Univ. Oxon., ii. 162, 199- 
200, 226, 260-1, 264, 266-7, 2 7 2 > 
279, 292, 322. 

— 1675, esquire bedell of Arts, ii. 322, 
454; iii. 44, 227, 272. 

— 1689, published the first catalogue of 
Oxford graduates, ii. 92 ; iii. 215, 
221 ; iv. 22. 

— 1690, death, iii. 337, 376. 
Peirce, Thomas, president of Mag- 
dalen : — 

— 1648, pamphlet by him, i. 143. 

— 1660, D.D., i. 328-9. 

— 1 66 1, president of Magdalen college, 
and in frequent quarrels with fellows 
of the college, i. 420, 435, 460, 

465 3 473~4> 487-9. 49 1 . 497. 507 ; 
ii. 17, 58, 66, 78, 208, 243; iii. 

5 2 5- 

— 1675, dean of Salisbury, i. 363 ; ii. 
313 ; iii. 122. 

— 1 691, death, iii. 357. 

Pelham, Herbert, fellow of Mag- 
dalen : — 

— 1634, proctor, i. 377. 

— 1644, saves from perishing Miles 
Windsore's collections and a volume 
of Brian Twyne's collections, i. 429 ; 
iv. 203, 214. 

— 1661-71, a close companion of 
Wood's, especially at supper at the 
cookshop, i. 378, 418, 420-1, 428, 
433-4. 436, 439. 44 1 . 444. 452, 454, 
457. 461, 464. 4 6 7~9> 47i> 474; »• 
115. 

gives Wood information about 

Oxford men, &c, i. 377, 422, 424, 
463 ; ii. 89, 215. 

— 1671, death, ii. 215. 
Pembroke, Philip Herbert, fourth 

earl of, first earl of Mont- 
gomery : — 

— 1625-40, lord chamberlain, i. 239; 
iv. 52. 

— 1630, marriage, ii. 341. 

— 1641-3, chancellor of Oxford Uni- 
versity, i. 77, 84 ; iv. 57-8. 

— 1643, Feb., an envoy of Parliament 
to Charles I, i. 86-7. 

Oct., removed by Charles I from 

his chancellorship, i. 104; iv. 60. 

— 1648, Feb., restored by Parliament to 
his chancellorship, i. 154; ii. 91 ; iv. 
61. 

— — April, comes to Oxford to set 
going the Parliamentary visitors, i. 
142-3. 

— 1650, death, i. 164; ii. 341. 



VOL. V. 



F 



66 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Pinke, Bobert, warden of New col- 
lege :— 

— 161 7, warden of New college, i. 53, 
64, 133, 382 ; ii. 183, 469 ; iv. 51-2. 

— 1634-6, vice-chancellor, iv. 52, 209. 

— 1642, pro-vice-chancellor, and very 
active for Charles I, i. 52-4, 56-7, 
77 : imprisoned by Parliament, i. 59, 
64. 

— 1644-6, vice-chancellor, i. 133; iv. 
144, 203, 219. 

— 1647, death, i. 133. 

Plot, Bobert, Oxford scientist : — 

— 1676-87, his antiquarian and natural 
history collections, ii. 346 ; iii. 232 ; 
iv. 291. 

— — information given by Wood to 
him, i. 264, 266, 463 ; information 
given by him to Wood, ii. 398 ; iii. 
204, 295, 320 : correspondence with 
Wood, iv. 209 : a tavern companion 
of Wood's, iii. 225, 269, 311. 

— 1677, publishes his Natural History 
of Oxfordshire, ii. 374, 376 : this was 
sometimes part of the formal present 
of Oxford University, iii. 54 : cited, 
and occasionally corrected, by Wood, 

i. 158, 250-1, 343-4, 433, 474; ii. 
7°, 77, 359, 435, 5 11 5 iv. 241. 

— 1 68 1, proposals to publish his Natural 
History of Staffordshire, ii. 511 ; iii. 
251. 

— 1682, as LL.D., acts as deputy for 
the professor of Law, iii. 108. 

— 1683, secretary of the Royal Society 
of London, iii. 78, 119 : a founder of 
the Oxford Philosophical society, iii. 
75-8. 

— 1683-89, first keeper of the Ashmo- 
lean, iii. 39, 52, 55, 190, 334 ; iv. 79. 

professor of Chemistry, iii. 55, 78, 

314, 333- 

— 1686, bought Wood's set of Philo- 
sophical Transactions, iii. 181. 

— 1687, stands for the wardenship of 
All Souls, iii. 208. 

Poeock, Edward, Oxford Orientalist : — 

— educated at Thame school, i. 109. 

— 1636, professor of Arabic, ii. 2 ; iii. 

17, 373, 379- 

— 1648, canon of Christ Church, i. 432 ; 

ii. 256; iii. 199; iv. 74, 285. 

— 1660, D.D., i. 333; iii. 231, 234. 

— 1670, a delegate of the press, ii. 204. 

— 1691, death, iii. 371, 386, 404. 

— his library of books, iii. 157 : his 
collection of MSS., iii. 83, 148 : his 
published works, i. 316. 

Pont, Biehard, the leading Oxford 
vintner of Wood's time : — 

— his premises were in High-street, ad- 



Pont, Biehard (continued) :— 
joining All Souls college, ii. 202-3 : 
he began in 1666, in succession to 
Bodicote, ii. 74-5. 

— he died before 1687, ii. 40, 45, 251 ; 
iii. 42, 243 ; but the name continued 
attached to the business, e.g. 1695, 
iii. 487. 

— his ' tavern ' was much frequented by 
Wood, ii. 74-7, 79, 81, 85, 88-9, 99, 
108, 117, 133, 139, 141, 144, 146, 
149,151, 153, 155, 183,187, 189-91, 
202 (' tavern against All Souls '), 
203, 216, 545 ; iii. 9, 240, 253, 487. 

Powell, John, senior, fellow of 
Merton : — 

— 1649, fellow of Merton, i. 167, 240, 
35°, 507 ; ii- 44, 47-8, 83 ; iii. 442 ; 
v. 14 : a wit, i. 140, 144. 

— 1661-5, a friend of Wood's, i. 407, 
441, 469; ii. 43. 

— 1662, gives Wood information, i. 
435- 

— 1666, rector of Lapworth, Warw., ii. 
48. 

— 1680, death, ii. 501. 

Powell, John, junior, fellow of 
Merton : — 

— 1658, fellow of Merton, i. 390. 

— 1670, bursar of Merton, ii. 190. 

— 1673, death, ii. 257. 

— a tavern companion of Wood's, ii. 
184, 216. 

Prideaux, John, rector of Exeter : — 

— 1612, rector of Exeter, i. 154, 426; 
ii. 399. 

— 1615, Regius professor of Divinity, ii. 
5 1 - 

— 1 64 1, vice-chancellor, i. 52, 75-6, 

84-5 ; iv- 58. 

bishop of Worcester, i. 52, 54, 

426 ; ii. 292. 

— 1650, death, ii. 174 ; iv. 256. 
Pudsey, sir George, recorder of 

Oxford :— 

— his family, ii. 499 ; iii. 298. 

— 1679-81 , unsuccessful Tory candidate 
for M.P. for Oxford City, ii. 439, 460, 
5!6, 523. 

— 168 1-3, deputy-lieutenant of Oxford- 
shire, ii. 512 ; iii. 59. 

— 1 68 1, knighted, ii. 529. 

— 1683, recorder of Oxford, iii. 73, 85, 
114, 221, 228-9. 

— 1685, M.P. for Oxford City, iii. 135. 

Beeves, Biehard, Oxford Romanist : — 

— 1662, of Trinity college, Oxford, i. 
460. 

— 1673, master of Magdalen college 
school, ii. 275 ; iii. 253-4: part-trans- 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



67 



Reeves, Richard (continued*) : — 
lator of Wood's Hist, et Antiq. Univ. 
Oxon., ii. 264, 268, 273, 276, 292. 

— 1673, being discovered to be a 
Romanist, he quits Oxford, ii. 269-70, 
275, 280, 401. 

— 1688, expected to return to Oxford, 

iii. 253, 266, 295, 320, 350. 

— his correspondence with Wood, ii. 
314 ; iv. 229. 

Reynolds, Edward, warden of 
Merton : — 

— 1646, one of the Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 130-1, 136. 

— 1648-50, 1660, dean of Christ Church, 

»• H7> 2 95> 3°7 5 322, 369.. 

— 1648-50, vice-chancellor, i. 452. 

— 1660-1, warden of Merton college, i. 
322, 379, 38i- 

— 1661, bishop of Norwich, i. 379, 381. 

— 1676, death, ii. 329, 351. 
Robinson, Thomas, Oxford book- 
seller : — 

— he died in 1663, i. 353, 472, 504 ; 

iv. 63. 

— 1659-63, Wood made many purchases 
at his shop, i. 266, 279, 281, 284, 
310, 321, 337-85 378, 380, 382, 401, 
407, 410, 418, 421, 428, 430, 433, 

444, 454> 457, 4 6l > 467, 477- 

— beginning in 1660, to his death in 

1663, Wood paidhim 2s. ' quarteridge,' 
i. e. 2s. a quarter for newspapers, i. 
310, 318, 335, 378, 388, 405, 416, 
427> 439, 444, 457, 4^7, 47*, 477- 

— the business seems to have been for 
a little time carried on by his widow (i. 
504), from whom in 1664 Wood made 
purchases, ii. 1 9 ; and to whom in 1 664- 
5 he paid 'quarteridge,' ii. 23, 31. I 
cannot say whether 'Mr. Robinson,' 

1664, ii. 4-5, 14, 19, 23, and to whom 
Wood paid ' quarteridge,' 1664, ii. 4, 
8, 15, is merely the name of the 
business, or of a son in that business. 

Rochester, Laurence Hyde, first 
earl of : — 

— styled the hon. Laurence Hyde — 

— — 1 66 1, created M.A. Oxford, i. 
381 ; iv. 65. 

M.P. Oxf. Univ., i. 398 ; ii. 61, 

539- 

1679, one °f the commissioners 

for lord treasurer, ii. 467. 

— 1 68 1, created viscount Hyde of 
Kenilworth (' Killingworth '), ii. 539 ; 
iii. 32. 

one of Charles II's Ecclesiastical 

Commissioners, ii. 549. 

— 1682, created earl of Rochester, iii. 
32, 60. 



Rochester, Laur., earl of (cont.) : — 

— 1684, lord president of the council, 
iii. 107. 

spoken of as lord-lieutenant of 

Ireland, iii. 118, in error for Henry, 
earl of Clarendon. 

— 1685, K.G., iii. 275. 

— 1686, one of James II's Ecclesi- 
astical Commissioners, iii. 193. 

— 1687, removed from thelord treasurer- 
ship, because a Protestant, iii. 206. 

— 1690-4, incidental mention, iii. 333, 
383, 387, 402, 419, 438, 451. 

Rogers, William, Romanist, of Pains- 
wick, Glouc. : — 

— 1663, a member of University college, 

iii. 212. 

— 1668 onwards, a friend of Wood's, ii. 
145, 151, 168-9, 191, 283, 312, 314, 
337, 343 5 iii- 225, 234, 236. 

— 1669, of Lincoln's Inn, ii. 168, 312, 
37 2 - 

— 1677 onwards, a correspondent of 
Wood's, ii. 372, 400 ; iii. 205, 251-2 ; 

iv. 229. 

— 1687, accompanies James II on his 
Oxford visit, iii. 234, 236, 238. 

Rupert, prince, called often 'prince 
Robert ' :— 

— 1636, Oxford visit, i. 46 ; iv. 56 
(brother of the Palsgrave). 

— 1642, in command in the Civil War, 
i. 60, 63, 65, 67. 

comes with the army to Oxford, i. 

68, 72-5, 80. 

— 1643, operations in the field, i. 81, 
83, 87-93, 97, 99, 101, 122. 

— 1644, in the field, i. 120. 

— 1682, death, iii. 32-3. 

— incidental mention, i. 205 ; ii. 285, 
495 5 iii- 32, 295, 320. 

Sancroft, William, archbishop of 
Canterbury : — 

— 1 65 1, issued 'Fur predestinatus,' i. 
230. 

— 1677, archbishop of Canterbury, ii. 
396, 400, 488, 521; iii. 66, 79, 90, 

I2T, 481. 

— 168 1, named on James II's Ecclesi- 
astical Commission, ii. 549; iii. 193-4. 

— 1685, shows kindness to Wood, iii. 
I 59- 

— 1688, one of the Seven Bishops, iii. 
267-8, 272, 279-80. 

— 1689, refuses the oaths to William 
and Mary, iii. 308-9, 336, 359, 396. 

— 1691, deposed, iii. 362-3, 365-6. 

— 1693, death, iii. 434, 439. 

— Visitor of Merton college, iii. 93 ; and 
of All Souls college, iii. 208. 

2 



68 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Sancta Clara, Franciscus a, Ro- 
manist priest : — 

— called also Francis Davenport, or 
Francis Hunt. 

— 1669 onwards, an acquaintance of 
Wood's, ii. 168-9, 191-2, 203, 223 ; 
iv. 268 : and a correspondent of 
Wood's, ii. 198, 400 ; iv. 229. 

— 1680, death, ii. 432, 487. 
Savage, Henry, master of Iialliol : — 

— 1651, master of Balliol, i. 362; ii. 
46, 132 ; iii. 314. 

— 1660, writes a history of his college, 

i. 3 14-5 , 336; ii- 136; iv. 154- 

— 1672, death, ii. 246-7. 

Say, Robert, provost of Oriel college : — 

— 1653, provost of Oriel, i. 142, 366 ; 

ii- 37> 9 1 * IIO > 263-4, 296, 537 5 iii- 
39, 49, 86, 241-2, 376. 

— 1660, one of Charles II's com- 
missioners for the visitation of Oxford 
University, i. 142, 325. 

— 1663, pro-vice-chancellor, i. 492. 

— 1664-6, vice-chancellor, ii. 20, 30, 
32-4, 40, 44, 46, 48, 57-8, 60-2, 66, 
68, 71-2, 80 ; iv. 67. 

— 1691, death, iii. 376. 
Selden, John : — 

— 1584, his birth, i. 425 ; ii. 256. 

— 1640, M.P. for Oxford University, 
i. 143 ; iv. 219. 

— 1654, borrows MSS. from the Bod- 
leian, i. 187. 

— 1656, efforts to secure his library for 
the Bodleian, i. 209-10. 

— 1659, his library transferred to the 
Bodleian, to the 'Selden end,' i. 282, 
335> 4 J 5> 432 ; ii- 65 ; iii. 237; iv. 
53-5. 220. 

references to ' Selden's library/ 

i.e. this room, i. 456, 497 ; iii. 234-5. 

— 1660, his Greek marbles transferred 
to Oxford, i. 320, 351 ; iv. 69. 

— MSS. formerly in his ownership, 
i- 343 5 iv. 136, 161, 191, 220, 252, 
257- 

— his published works, i. 23, 380; ii. 
119; iii. 167, 296; iv. 262, 270. 

Shaftesbury, Anthony Ashley 
Cooper, first earl of : — 

— 1637, °f Exeter college, i. 134; ii. 
75- 

— 1672, lord chancellor, ii. 253, 459. 

— 1677, sent to the Tower, ii. 366. 

— 1681, sent to the Tower, ii. 560. 

— 1682, a ' true bill' found against him, 

iii- 33- 

flight into Holland, iii. 32, 34: 

false rumour of his death, iii. 33. 

— 1683, death, iii. 35, 434. 

— pamphlets attributed to him, ii. 330, 



Shaftesbury, Anth., earl of (cotit.) : — 
33*5, 503 ; iii. 32 : pamphlets and 
verses for and against him, iii. 36. 

— his secretary, iii. 33 : the ' Associa- 
tion ' in his favour, iii. 33, 63, 70 : 
Wood's Athcnae notice of him, ii. 
256, 258. 

Sheldon, Gilbert, archbishop of 
Canterbury, benefactor of Oxford 
University :■ — 

— 1598, birth, ii. 380, 398. 

— 1635, warden of All Souls, ejected 
in 1648 by Parliamentary visitors, 
i. 304; iii. 162: restored in 1660, 
i. 380. 

— 1660, bishop of London, i. 131, 347, 
435> 438 ; iv. 130. 

— 1663, archbishop of Canterbury, i. 
348, 364; ii. 67, 238, 294, 308, 322, 

336, 55°;. iii- l6 3, 2 °7> 261 : ex ~ 
officio Visitor of Merton college, i. 
397 ; ii. 313 ; and of All Souls college, 
i- 348. 

— 1664-9, builds and endows the Shel- 
donian Theatre, ii. 14, 163, 165, 192, 
i 94- 6 j456; iv. 68, 72, 125, 149. 

— 1667-9, i s chancellor-elect of Oxford 
University, but never installed, ii. 
124, 144-5, 166-8. 

■ — 1669-72, shows kindness to Wood, 
i. 142 ; ii. 167-8, 242-3 ; iv. 144. 

— 1677, death, ii. 380, 392. 

— his coat of arms, ii. 380 : engraved 
portrait, ii. 380. 

Sheldon, Ralph, senior, of Beoly 
and Weston, Romanist, Wood's chief 
patron : — 

— 1623, birth and parentage, iii. 98-9 : 
his family connexions, ii. 450 ; iii. 
99-101. 

— 1642-6, Italian tour, iii. 98. 

— 1647, marriage, iii. 98-9, 102. 

— 1667-9, second Italian tour, ii. 170; 
iii. 102, 104 ; iv. 292. 

— 1671, July, beginning of his acquaint- 
ance with Wood, ii. 227-8; iii. 505. 
The explanation of the later friction 
between Sheldon and Wood is as 
follows. First, Sheldon, in off-hand 
generosity, asked Wood to arrange 
his library, with a handsome but 
indefinite promise that his work 
would not be unrewarded. Wood 
did the work minutely, overlooked 
both the saving to his own pocket in 
the many months of residence at 
Weston and his own pleasure and 
profit in the library, and expected 
substantial payment in money. Shel- 
don's nephews and nieces, and great- 
nephews and great-nieces, did not like 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



60 



Sheldon, Kalph, senior (cont.) : — 
their uncle's liberality to a mere 
scholar, and a Protestant. Next, 
Sheldon promised to pay for printing 
Wood's Athenae, and afterwards 
regretted his promise. Wood was 
ungrateful in seeking to keep him 
to it. 

— 1671-2, asks Wood to get an Oxford 
bookseller to sell his uncle's Romanist 
book, ii. 234, 253. 

— 1 674-8 j, has Wood as his guest, 
partly employed in his library, as 
follows : — 

1674, Aug., ii. 294. 

1675, Ang.-Oct., ii. 319-21. 

1676, Jan.-March, ii. 341-2. 

Sept.-Nov., ii. 355, 364. 

1677, Jan.-Apr., ii. 365-6, 368, 

392, 475- 

May-June, ii. 376. 

— Aug.-Nov., ii. 388-9, 392. 

1678, Feb.- Apr., ii. 401, 403-4. 

Aug.-Nov., i. 477 ; ii. 414-5, 

4 2 3-4> 475- 

1679, March-Apr., ii. 445. 

July-Nov., ii. 455, 465, 467, 

475- 

1680, May, ii. 486. 

Aug.-Nov., ii. 475, 493-4, 

496. 

1681, May- June, ii. 543. 

— 1678, is molested as a Catholic, ii. 
420, 423-4. 

— 1680, buys additional property in 
Warwickshire, ii. 484. 

— 1681, May, visits Oxford, ii. 541. 
June, is dunned by Wood for an 

annuity, ii. 543 : cp. supra p. 68. 
July, tries to shake Wood off, 

ii. 548. 

Oct., tries to buy Wood off by 

a gift of £20, ii. 556, 561. 
Nov., in Oxford, ii. 559. 

— 1682, Sept., avoids a visit from Wood, 

iii. 26. 

Nov., in Oxford, iii. 29. 

Dec, having in an unguarded 

moment promised to pay for printing 
Wood's Athenae, he tries to buy 
Wood off by a gift of ten guineas, 
iii. 34. 

— 1683, July, in Oxford, iii. 62. 
Aug., is dunned by Wood to print 

the Athenae, iii. 66. 
Dec, overcome by Wood's im- 
portunity and the recollection of his 
own promise, he undertakes to pay 
jCioo towards printing the Athenae, 
iii. 82. 

— 1684, J une > sends for Wood on a 



Sheldon, Ralph, senior {cont.) : — 
last visit, iii. 95, being then on his 
death- bed. 

— 1684, June 24, death, iii. 96. 
June 27-July 6, Wood is asked 

by Sheldon's executor to superintend 
an ornate funeral, iii. 97. 

July, state funeral, Wood acting 

as master of the ceremonies, iii. 97-8, 
108. 

— provisions of his will, iii. 98 : in 
particular a bequest of £40 to Wood 
on condition of overseeing the execu- 
tion of his gift to the College of Arms, 
iii. 98, 118: but no provision for 
printing the Athenae. 

— his 'almanacs,' i.e. pocket-diaries, 
iii. 82, 121. 

— information given by him to Wood, 
i- 399 5 33i, 334, 337, 344, 398, 
445, 498, 559 ; iii. 28, 308 : his corre- 
spondence with Wood, i. 310; ii. 
227, 262, 424-6; iii. 480; iv. 229- 
30. 

— his collection of old English plays, 

iii. 119; iv. 236, 292: his collection 
of pictures and curios, ii. 475 ; iii. 
103, 342 ; his old tapestry-map of 
England, now partly in the Bodleian. 

i. 477 : his copies of church-inscrip- 
tions, i. 215; ii. 227, 364; iii. 104; 

iv. 292 : his collection of pedigrees. 
&c, ii. 314, 364; iii. 98, 102-4, IQ 6> 
115; iv. 178, 292-3. 

— his splendid library of printed books, 

ii. 222, 316, 337-8, 444,474-5; iii. 

102, 119, 124; iv. 235, 242, 292. 
Wood's catalogue of this library, ii. 
319, 321, 475; iii. 103. — His gifts 
of books to Wood, i. 452 ; ii. 252, 
34i> 345, 455, .464, 562; iii. 34, 
104-5 : other gifts and kindness to 
Wood, ii. 310, 359, 401. 

— his fine collection of MSS., ii. 445, 
475, 4 86 ; iii- 9§, 102-4, 342-3 ; iv. 
95, 119, 179, 292. Wood's catalogue 
of these MSS., ii. 319, 321, 475 ; iii. 

103, 115 ; iv. 236. Gifts of MSS. to 
Wood, i. 431, 476 ; ii. 89, 489, 545 ; 

iii. 102, 104, 106, 342-3; iv. 95, 119. 
His bequest of MSS. to the College 
of Arms, iii. 98, 103, 115. 

— his bookplate, ii. 28, 475 ; iii. 104 : 
his coat of" arms, ii. 475 ; iii. 104 

— great-uncle of the next. 
Sheldon, Ralph, junior, of Barton, 

great-nephew, and heir of the pre- 
ceding, patron of Wood : — 

— incidental mention, iii. 98, 100, 103. 
118 : gift of books to W T ood, ii. 446. 

— 168 1, is his great-uncle's agent in 



7 ( > 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Sheldon, Ralph, junior (conl.) : — 
trying to settle Wood's claims, ii. 
55 6 < 

— 1684, asks Wood to superintend his 
great-uncle's funeral, iii. 97 ; v. 69. 

— 1685, Jan., takes upon him his great- 
uncle's promise (v. 69) of £100 
towards printing the Athenae, is after- 
wards minded to draw back, and 
therefore much dunned by Wood, iii. 
123, 221, 269. 

— 1685-8, has Wood as his guest as 
follows, partly employed in his 
library — 

— — 1685, Jan. -Feb., iii. 124. 

1687, June, iii. 221. 

1688, June, iii. 269. 

— 1688, Nov., goes up to London to 
stand by James II, iii. 285. 

Dec, is molested as a Catholic, 

iii. 291. 

— reduces his promise towards 

the Athenae to £50, iii. 316. 

— 1690, March, pays the £50, iii. 320, 
327. 

Oct., Wood asks an annuity from 

him, iii. 320. 

— 1693, July- Aug., Wood takes refuge 
with him, to escape the triumph of 
his envious contemporaries in his 
condemnation in the libel-suit, iii. 
429. 

— 1695, Aug.-Sept, has Wood as his 
(? self-invited) guest, iii. 487-8. 

Sheldrake, a MS. of Wood's composi- 
tion, cited up to its 48th page, con- 
taining notes of contemporary events, 
unidentified (if it still exists), i. 313 ; 
ii. 28, 338, 343, 346, 351, 366, 368, 
391-2, 487 ; iv. 241 : so called prob- 
ably from' having, pasted into it, 
Ralph Sheldon's bookplate, ii. 28, 
510, and perhaps compiled from 
pamphlets in his library. 

Sherburne, sir Edward : — 

— 1676-80, Wood collected for him 
materials for a family history, ii. 349, 
479- 

— 1683, knighted, iii. 35. 

— 1684-8, occasionally met Wood, iii. 
115, 276. 

— gave Wood books, i. 14 ; ii. 400, 
477 : g ave Wood information, i. 302 ; 
ii. 477; iii. 174, 206, 251-2, 440, 
476 : correspondence with Wood, iv. 
229. 

Short, Thomas, Oxford coffee-house 
keeper : — 

— 1662 onwards, he had a coffee-house, 
occasionally frequented by Wood, i. 
436,467-8, 478; ii. 15, 27, 34, 69. 



Short, Thomas {continued) : — 

In 1668 there was a library of chained 
books there, of light literature, ii. 
147. In 1670 the situation of the 
house is given as in Cat-street, ii. 
192. Thomas Short is mentioned in 
1689, iii. 306. 

— 1683-92, the house is mentioned as 
taking in a news-letter, iii. 38, 44-5, 
155- 6 ' 302, 321, 326, 331, 339, 344, 
353-4, 358, 361-6, 369, 372, 375-6, 
378-80, 382, 384-7, 392, 397. In 
1683 this news-letter is said to. be by 
Muddiman, iii. 38 : see v. 63. In 
1689 Wood bought the old letters 
from Thomas Short, iii. 306 : but 
I have not come across any of them 
in the present Wood collection. 

Smith, Thomas, non-juring fellow of 
Magdalen : — 

— 1681-91, a friendly acquaintance of 
Wood's, ii. 545 ; iii. 257 ; and a 
correspondent of his, iii. 206, 350 ; 
iv. 229. 

— 1683, a student of chemistry, iii. 
76-7. 

— 1686, a collector of MS. papers, iii. 
190. 

— 1687-8, his fidelity to the doctrine 
of passive obedience makes him sub- 
mit to James II' s visitation of Magda- 
len college, iii. 250, 520, 523-4, 528- 
30 : but in 1688 he is ejected by the 
new Romanist head, iii. 273-4. 

— 1689, refuses the oaths to William 
and Mary, iii. 307. 

— 1 69 1, edits Camden's Remains, iv. 
263. 

— 1692, ejected as a non-juror from his 
fellowship, iii. 397. 

Somerset, William Seymour, second 
duke of : — 

— 1640, styled marquis of Hertford, 
i. 81. 

— 1643, raises forces in Wales for 
Charles I, i. 81, 102. 

■ Oct., elected and admitted chan- 
cellor of Oxford University, iv. 60. 

— 1660, May, restored to his chan- 
cellorship of Oxford University, i. 
317-8. 

— acts as chancellor : — nominates 

Charles II's commission to visit the 
University, i. 318 : letters to the Uni- 
versity for omitting the Act, granting 
honorary degrees, &c, i. 320, 327-30. 

July, one of" Charles II's com- 
missioners, i. 324. 

Sept., becomes duke of Somer- 
set, i. 318, 337. 

Oct., death, i. 337. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



South Robert, public orator : — 

— 1633, born at Hackney, ii. 512. 

— 1648, submits to the Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 368. 

— 1659-60, preaches bitter sermons, 
first against the Independents and 
then against the Presbyterians, i. 280, 
298, 368-9, 481. 

— 1 660-77, public orator, i. 329, 41 1-4, 
481, 495; ii. 57-8, 60-2, 66, 68, 93, 
119. 1 57, I 59> 160-1, 194, 210, 323, 
385-7> 39 2 , 395, 446. 

— 1662, a court preacher, i. 437 ; iii. 
238. 

— 1663, D.D., i. 500, 502. 

— 1680, benefactions at Islip, i. 403. 

— incidental mention, ii. 254, 259, 272, 
276; iii. 195, 231, 279, 492 : Wood's 
poor opinion of him, i. 329 ; iii. 
497- 

Sprigg, William, puritan fellow of 
Lincoln : — 

— 1659, intruded into a fellowship at 
Lincoln, i. 288. 

— 1660, an acquaintance of Wood's, 

i- 301-2, 337, 378, 454 5 ji- J 8, 191- 

— 1676, settled in Ireland, i. 177. 

— his correspondence with Wood, i. 
380 ; iii. 514; iv. 229. 

— his books, and gifts of books to 
Wood, i. 295, 331, 501 ; iii. 343. 

Stubbes, Henry, writer against the 
Royal Society : — 

— 1658, an acquaintance of Wood's, 

i. 238. 

— 1660, an ardent royalist, i. 313. 

— 1676, death, ii. 344, 353. 

— pamphlets by him, i. 242, 287, 295, 
303, 354, 378, 461; 30, 212, 
273- 

— incidental mention, i. 288, 400, 460 ; 

ii. 54, 272. 

Tanner, Thomas, antiquary: — 

— 1694, of Queen's college, issues the 
prospectus of his Notitia Monastica, 

iii. 452-3 : makes an inadequate cata- 
logue of Richard James' MS. collec- 
tions, iv. 197 : is an acquaintance of 
Wood's, iii. 474. 

— 1695, chaplain of All Souls, iii. 477 : 
publishes his Notitia Monastica and 
presents a copy to Wood, iii. 452, 
482 : continues his acquaintance with 
Wood, iii. 483, 487, 491. 

on Arthur Charlett's recommenda- 
tion, Wood selects him to have charge 
of his papers, i. 8, 28 ; iii. 497-502, 
504, 506 ; iv. 232. 

— his correspondence with Wood, iv. 
230. 



Tanner, Thomas {continued') : — 

— among his MSS. he has many papers 
of Wood's writing, ii. 32, 290; iii. 
p. vii, 514; iv. 8, 47-9, in, 113-4, 
228, 230-1, 238, 250. 

— incidental mention of his MSS., iv. 
166. 

Tenison, Thomas, archbishop of Can- 
terbury : — 

— 1691, rector of S. Martin's in the 
fields, iii. 354, 395, 397. 

— 1692, bishop of Lincoln, iii. 380, 395, 
397, 474, 476. 

— 1694, archbishop of Canterbury, iii. 

474-5, 477, 481, 483-4, 497- 

— catalogue of his MSS. (169 2), iii. 488, 
now partly in Lambeth library. 

Theyer, John, antiquary : — 

— 1645, an attorney, proposal to ap- 
prentice Wood to him, i. 130. 

— 1663, Wood's personal acquaintance 
with him, i. 404, 467, 474; ii. 143, 
146. 

— 1673, death, ii. 268. 

— his collection of MSS., ii. 143, 268, 
485-6; iv. 74 ('Thayr'), 109, 298. 

Thorne, Edmund, Oxford bookseller 
and bookbinder : — 

— 1 66 1 -9, Wood generally employed 
him to bind his books, i. 420, 436, 
470, 477, 503; 75,. 138, 146, 163. 

— 1663, Wood occasionally bought 
books from him, i. 471, 503 ; ii. 98. 

discommoned, i. 488. 

— 1665, Wood for a short time took 
his news-books from him, ii. 33, 39. 

— 1665-6, a personal acquaintance of 
Wood's, ii. 35, 87. 

Tilliard, Arthur, apothecary, Oxford 
coffee-house keeper : — 

— 1615, born: died, 1693, i. 203, 244; 
iii. 28, 382. 

— 1656, opens a coffee-house in Oxford, 

i. 201,466; ii. 212: which Wood in 
1663 occasionally goes to, i. 477. 

— 1660-85, takes in sick people to 
lodge, i. 350; iii. 134. 

— 1660-2, the chemistry class meets on 
his premises, i. 473. 

— 1 67 1, an acquaintance of Wood's, 

ii. 229. 

Tillotson, John, archbishop of Canter- 
bury : — 

— 1672, dean of Canterbury, ii. 251; 
iii- 23, 45, J 38, 3 r o, 388. 

— 1683, attends lord William Russell 
on the scaffold, iii. 118. 

— 1689, clerk of the closet to William 
III, iii. 304. 

dean of S. Paul's, iii. 310. 

— 1691, archbishop of Canterbury, iii. 



7 2 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Tillotson, John (continued) : — 

360, 362-4, 366, 370, 380, 404, 415, 
444, 462-3, 466; iv. 18. 

— 1693, ex-officio Visitor of Mcrton 
college, iii. 435-6. 

— 1694, death, iii. 473. 
Tolson, John, provost of Oriel : — 

— 1621, provost of Oriel, i. 84, 102; 
iv. 51. 

— 164^, pro-vice-chancellor, i. 84-6; 
iv. 58. 

— 1643, vice-chancellor, i. 86-7, 89, 
102; iv. 213 (where for 1842 read 
164I). 

Trelawney, Jonathan, bishop of 
Exeter : — 

— 1683-5, expectation of his promo- 
tion, iii. 66, 144. 

— 1685, bishop of Bristol, iii. 156, 169. 

— 1687, one of the Seven Bishops, iii. 
267. 

— 1689, bishop of Exeter, iii. 474. 

— 1690^ acts as Visitor of Exeter college, 

iii. 328, 332, 334, 337, 340, 346, 360, 

4 2 5, 474, 479- 
Turner, Francis, non-juring bishop of 
Ely:— 

— his relatives, ii. 251 ; iii. T39, 345. 

— 1655, fellow of New college, i. 490, 
498. 

— 1659-63, a student of chemistry, i. 
290, 472. 

— 1670, master of S. John's, Cambridge, 
i. 290; ii. 251. 

— 1683, dean of Windsor, iii. 62, 65 : 
bishop of Rochester, iii. 65, 79-80, 83. 

— 1684, bishop of Ely, i. 472 ; iii. 106, 
121, 139, 184, 244, 490; iv. 85. 

— 1688, one of the Seven Bishops, iii. 
267. 

— 1689, refuses the oaths to William 
and Mary, iii. 308-9, 330, 336, 345, 
359- 

— 1 69 1, is an object of suspicion to the 
government, iii. 351-4, 373, 37 8 - 

Twyne, Brian, the greatest of Oxford 
antiquaries : — 

— 1608, publishes his Antiq. Acad. 
Oxon. Apologia, i. 247 ; ii. 139 ; iv. 
202. 

— 1634, keeper of the archives, i. 75 ; 

iv. 55» I2 3, I99> 203-4: 1640, re- 
arranges and calendars the University 
muniments, iv. 122-4: 1642, owing 
to the Civil War, fails to get his 
salary, i. 75, 84. 

— 1642-3, writes a narrative of events 
in Oxford, i. 53-68, 69-77, 79-93, 
95-!°3- 

— 1644, death, iv. 59, 202, 219, 296: 
provisions of his will, iv. 203. 



Twyne, Brian {continued) : — 

— 1646, his MSS. and MS. papers are 
arranged by Dr. Gerard Langbaine, 
iv. 199-200, 204-16. 

— his handwriting, iv. p. xi. 

— Wood's debt to Twyne, iv. 223-6. 

— his MS. notes and collections, and 
MSS. owned by him, i. 234, 247, 249, 

315, 343-4, 3 8 5>429-30>" 460; ii- 35, 
174, 480; iii. 35 (probably Godwin's 
de praesulibus) ; iv. 89-121, 127-33, 
138-82, 191, 193-9, 203-23. 

Walker, Obadiah, Romanist con- 
vert : — 

— 1667, fellow of Univ., is employed 
on University business, ii. 120; iv. 

69-7 1 , 75- 

becomes acquainted with Wood, 

ii. 109; and from that time onwards 
shows Wood kindness, and gives him 
information, ii. 118, 124, 380, 449, 

474, 479, 499 5 *3 6 > I 7 1 > ^7, 204, 
320 ; iv. 253. 

— 1669, i s a delegate of the press and 
helps on the publication of Wood's 
Hist et Antiq. Univ. Oxon., ii. 172-3, 
204. 

— 1673, sticks up for f Lewis de 
Chapyrnay,' ii. 261. 

— 1676, is a reputed Romanist, ii. 346 : 
but is elected master of Univ. coll., 

ii. 350. _ 

— 1678, his edition of Spelman's Alfred 
confirms the suspicions of his Romanist 
sympathies, ii. 421-2, 449. 

— 1679, he disclaims Romanism, ii. 
440. 

— 1680, is still under suspicion of 
Romanism, ii. 488-9, 491. 

— 1685, his life of Christ is censured as 
Romanist, iii. 164-5, but praised by 
James II, iii. 165. 

— 1686, Jan., is expected to declare him- 
self a Romanist, iii. 176 : a Romanist 
propaganda meets in his lodgings, iii. 
177. 

— — March-Apr., is a declared Ro- 
manist, iii. 182-3, 202, 214: and is 
consequently much spoken against, 

iii. 183, 192, 195-6, 208, 237, 239, 
246, 311. 

May- July, is under James II's 

protection, iii. 184, 192. 

May-Dec, is looked on as the 

king's agent for repressing Protes- 
tantism in the University and advanc- 
ing Romanism, iii. 189, 197-8, 201. 
208-9, 219, 291. 

Aug. -Sept., brings several Ro- 
manists into residence at Univ. coll., 



INDEX I BIOGRAPHICAL. 



73 



Walker, Obadiah {continued} : — 
has a Romanist chapel, and Jesuits as 
chaplains, i. 152; iii. 194, 196, 213, 
223-4, 233, 245, 264, 273-4, 276, 
285. 

— 1686, Oct., licensed to print Romanist 
books, iii. 198. 

Dec, obtains control of the Uni- 
versity press, iii. 201-2. 

— 16S7-8, a Romanist propaganda 
meets at his lodgings, iii. 213, 255. 

— 1687, Jan.-May, issues Romanist 
books from the Oxford press, which 
get known before publication, and 
are at once answered, iii. 209, 220. 

Apr., starts a private printing- 
press at Univ. coll., iii. 209, 218, 
221. 

July, is made a J.P., iii. 223, 255. 

Oct., appears as head of Univ. 

coll. before the Ecclesiastical Com- 
missioners, iii. 240. 

— 1688, Sept., withdraws to London, 
iii. 278. 

Nov., his press stops and he quits 

Oxford, iii. 282, 285. 
Dec. is imprisoned in the Tower, 

iii. 287-8. 

— 1689, his mastership of Univ. coll. is 
declared vacant, iii. 297-8, and he is 
still in prison, iii. 299, 313, 323. 

— 1690, he is bailed out and resident in 
London, iii. 320, 324, 362, but ex- 
cepted from "William and Mary's Act 
of Indemnity, iii. 331. 

— 1 69 1, he makes his will, iii. 362. 

— his autograph, ii. 479 ; iii. 239. He 
collects coins, ii. 347. Wood's Athenae 
notice of him, iii. 96. His books, iii. 
282. 

— incidental mention, iii. 138, 193, 208, 
210, 239, 246, 250, 264, 276, 311. 

Wallis, John, keeper of the archives : — 

— 1637, B.A. Eman., Cambr., ii. 507. 

— 1645, deciphers Charles I's corre- 
spondence taken at Naseby, i. 335; 
ii. 507. 

— 1649-59, submits to the Parlia- 
mentary visitation, i. 329; ii. 507. 

— 1649, Savilian professor of Geometry, 
i. 242, 366, 407 ; ii. 158, 161, 508. 

— 1654, D.D., ii. 508. 

keeper of the archives, i. 242, 

326, 366, 384 ; ii. 7, 132, 186, 266-7, 
508; iv. 124, 225, and consequently 
much employed on University busi- 
ness, i. 372, 384; ii. 508; iii. 133, 
269, 322 ; iv. 64-5, 76, 79, 81-2. 

— 1659, a student of chemistry, i. 290, 
473. 

— 1660, gives Wood free access to the 



Wallis, John (continued) : — 

archives of the University, i. 326 ; ii. 
30 ; iv. 204. 

— 1 66 1, gives Wood some work in the 
archives, i. 384, and again in 1664, 
ii. 11 ; iv. 124. 

— 1662, teaches a deaf mute, i. 309-10. 

— 1663, acts as deputy of the Regius 
professor of Divinity, i. 502. 

— 1664, re-calendars the muniments of 
the University, ii. 1 1-2 ; iv. 124. 

helps Wood to obtain official per- 
mission to use the archives, ii. 30, 
32-3- 

— 1678, asks Wood to return to the 
archives the volumes he had borrowed 
thence, ii. 424. 

— 1680, a Protestant champion, ii. 488-9, 
491. 

— 1 68 1, deprives Y\ ood of access to the 
archives, ii. 508, 517; iii. 84. 

— 1681 (?), allows William Smith, of 
Univ. coll., free access to the archives, 
iv. 204, 225. 

— 1681, active in defending Stephen 
Colledge, ii. 553; iii. 133. 

— 1683, disliked, as a Whig, iii. 63, 84. 
president of the Oxford Natural 

Science club, iii. 76-8. 

persists in his refusal to allow 

Wood access to the archives, iii. 84. 

— 1686, a J.P., iii. 177. 

— 1689, takes the oaths to William and 
Mary, iii. 308 ; and is employed by 
William III to decipher intercepted 
correspondence, iii. 307, 495. 

— 1690, is still obdurate in refusing 
Wood access to the archives, iii. 326. 

writes against Unitarians and 

Socinians, iii. 340. 

— 1692, is angry with Wood for the 
Athenae references to himself, iii. 

395-6, 39 8 - 

— W ood's animus against him, i. 366, 
502 ; ii. 463, 507-8; iii. 216. 

— his controversy with Thomas Hobbes, 

ii- 15, 472, 5° 8 - 

— books and pamphlets by him, i. 242, 
309-10, 454; ii. 15, 340, 472; iv. 
84. 

— his skill in deciphering, i. 335 ; iii. 
307, 487, 495. 

— his family and relatives, ii. 508 ; iii. 
3> 215-6. 

— incidental mention, i. 296 ; ii. 507, 
553 ; iii. 402. 

Ward, Seth, bishop of Salisbury : — 

— 1640, fellow of Sydney Sussex, Cam- 
bridge, i. 363. 

— 1649, submit to Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 363, 365. 



74 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Ward, Seth (continued) \ — 

— 1 649 , Savilian professor of Astronomy, 
i. 294, 363, 380. 

— ... , stands for the principalship of 
Jesus college, i. 363. 

— 1659, president of Trinity college, 

i. 282, 363. 

— 1662, bishop of Exeter, i. 363, 456 ; 

ii. 67, 106. 

— 1667-89, bishop of Salisbury, i. 363; 

ii. 1 18, 251, 275, 313, 330, 428, 507 ; 

iii. 121, 205, 295. 

— books by him, i. 294-6 ; ii. 472. 

— his MS. collections, iii. 294 : cp. 
Aubrey's Brief Lives, ii. 289. 

Westcote alias Littleton, Gervase, 
Oxford musician : — 

— 1656, plays at concerts, i. 205, 275, 
314. 

— he kept a tavern, i. 215, 454, 457, 
461, at which (on Tuesdays, in 1662) 
there was a meeting to sing catches, 
i. 457-8, 463, 467-8 : each person 
paying 6d. (query, in drink ' for the 
good of the house'), i. 468. 

White, Thomas, non-juring bishop 
of Peterborough : — 

— 1683, D.D. Oxon., iii. 56. 

— 1685, bishop of Peterborough, iii. 
144, 155-6, 167, 169. 

— 1688, one of the Seven Bishops, iii. 
267. 

— 1689, refuses the oaths to William 
and Mary, iii. 308, 330, 336, 352. 

— 1691, is deposed, iii. 359, 362. 
Whitehall, Robert, senior, fellow of 

Merton :— 

— 1648, ejected by the Parliamentary 
visitors from Christ Church, i. 144. 

— 1650, submits to the Parliamentary 
visitors and is made fellow of Merton, 
i. 144, 390, 510; ii. 59, 66, 399. 

— 1659 onwards, a tavern and cook- 
shop associate of Wood's, i. 279, 

436, 474> 5°7; 2 °, 35> 45 > 47> 
50-1, 69, 98-9, 133, 146, 153. 

— 1671, sub-warden of Merton, ii. 
216-7, 223-4. 

— 1672, bursar of Merton, ii. 251. 

— 1685, died, iii. 153. 

— verses by him, i. 144, 198, 259, 337, 
389 ; ii. 59, 94, 164, 300, 563. 

Wight, Nathaniel, fellow of Mer- 
ton : — 

— 1667-70, a tavern companion of 
Wood's, ii. 120, 127, 140-1, 144, 

J 49> I 55> l6 3> 173, i77> l8 7> l8 9 : 
gives information to Wood, ii. 210, 
504 : Wood's notice of, iii. 142. 

— 1670, 1681, bursar of Merton, ii. 
206, 556. 



Wight, Nathaniel (continued) : — 

— 1677, senior proctor, ii. 379, 382, 
388. 

— 1679, sub- warden of Merton, ii. 470, 
478. 

— 1682, vicar of S. Peter's in the East, 

iii. 16. 

death, iii. 24. 

Wilkins, John, warden of Wadham : — 

— his parentage, ii. 231. 

— 1648-59, warden of Wadham, i. 
363; ii. 52; iii. 224: a lover of 
music, i. 257 : a champion of the 
Independents, i. 148, 365 : married, 
i« 363 ; ii. 297 : employed on Uni- 
versity business, i. 155, 166 ; iv. 61, 
63- 

— 1658, master of Trinity, Cambridge, 
i- 363- 

— 1668, dean of Ripon, i. 363 ; ii. 306, 
337- 

bishop of Chester, i. 363 ; ii. 231, 

297> 3°6, 337, 389- 

— 1672, died, ii. 253. 

— books by him, i. 296. 
Wilkins, Timothy, bedell : — 

— 1642, in the Civil War, serves first 
in the Parliamentary, and then in the 
Royal, army, i. 329 ; ii. 231 : and 
afterwards is called ' captain Wil- 
kins,' ii. 185, 187, 231. 

— 1648, brewer in Oxford, ii. 231. 

— 1657, esquire bedell of Divinity, i. 
215, 329; ii. 48. 

— 1662-70, an occasional tavern com- 
panion of Wood's, i. 444; ii. 184, 190. 

— 1669-70, kept a tavern or cookshop, 
which Wood occasionally went to, 
ii. 177, 184, 187, 189-91, 193-4, 
196, 258. 

— 1671, death, ii. 231-2. 
William III :— 

— William Henry, prince of 
Orange. 

— 1660, death of his mother, i. 350 ; 

iv. 65. 

— 1670, visits Cambridge, ii. 205 ; 
visits Oxford, and is done to death 
with speeches, ii. 206-11; iv. 73; 
created D.C.L., Oxford, ii. 210. 

— 1675, illness, ii. 319: asks Oxford 
degrees for some Dutch divines, ii. 
3^8. 

— 1676, invites Stephen Lemoine to a 
professorship at Leyden, ii. 343. 

— 1677, marries Mary, elder daughter 
of the duke of York, ii. 391. 

— 1686, puts himself forward as a 
champion of Protestantism, iii. 187. 

— 1688, Aug.-Sept., prepares to in- 
vade England, iii. 276, 278, 531. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



75 



William III (continued) : — 

— 1688, Oct., his fleet driven back by 
a storm, iii. 532. 

Nov., lands in England, iii. 281 : 

marches from Exeter on London, iii. 
283, 293 : the country begins to rise 
in his favour, iii. 282-5, e - g- Buck- 
inghamshire people, iii. 282, some 
from Oxford City, iii. 282-4 '■> the 
army deserts to him, iii. 283. 

Nov.-Dec, his declaration of the 

reasons for his invasion is spread 
abroad, iii. 285-6, 292 : the press is 
active for and against him, iii. 286, 
292-4. 

— — Dec, skirmish at Reading, iii. 
293 : Oxford is occupied for him, iii. 
286-7 : ne reaches Windsor, iii. 289 : 
his troops occupy Whitehall, iii. 
289-90 : he helps James II to flee to 
France, iii. 289-90, 324 : enters 
London, iii. 290, 293 : receives an 
address of welcome from Oxford 
University, iii. 291. 

— 1689, Jan. -March, activity of the 
press for and against him, iii. 292-4, 
2 97~ 8 > 3oo. 

Jan., calls the 'Convention,' iii. 

296. 

Feb., the Convention pronounces 

James II to have abdicated and pro- 
claims William and Mary, iii. 191, 
298-9. 

— 1689 onwards, the Jacobites still 
style him ' the prince of Orange,' iii. 
342, 455- 

— pamphlets about him, i. 17; iii. 
285-6, 292-4, 297-8, 300-1 : ballads 
about him, i. '18 ; iii. 293-4, 299. 

— his guards, iii. 289-90. 

— William III. 

— 1689, Feb., proclaimed king, iii. 
299. 

— — March, prepares for war in 
Ireland, iii. 300 ; begins to prosecute 
writers against his title, iii. 300. 

— — April, coronation day, iii. 301, 
313-4 : the mayor of Oxford is 
knighted at the coronation, iii. 301 : 
Oxford University verses on the occa- 
sion, iv. 82 : celebration of the day 
at Oxford, iii. 301, 304 ; iv. 82. 

• — May, oath of allegiance to Wil- 
liam and Mary imposed, ii. 507 ; iii. 
302-3, 321-2, 324, 330, 341, 414, 
but is refused by many clergy. 
■ — July, continuance of press pro- 
secutions, iii. 305 : the oath of alle- 
giance is imposed in Oxford, iii. 305 : 
the Jacobites in arms in Ireland are 
attainted, iii. 305 : the king stands 



William III (continued) : — 

godfather to the princess Anne's son, 
iii. 307 : poll-tax is imposed, ii. 103 ; 
iii. 319. 

— 1689, Aug., non-jurors in Oxford Uni- 
versity and among the bishops, iii. 
3°7-9> 33°, 359> 4 QI : tolerance 
shown to the Quakers, iii. 308. 

Oct.-Dec, opposition to the king 

in speech and in print, iii. 311, 313-4, 
316. 

— — Oct., continued press prosecu- 
tions, iii. 313 : visit to Cambridge, iii. 
312- 

Dec, the year-day of his entry 

into London is popularly observed 
there, iii. 317, but the burden of 
taxation causes discontent, iii. 319. 

— 1690, Jan.-Oct, hostile publications, 
iii. 321, 329, 334, 339-40, 342, and 
other expressions of dislike to the 
government, iii. 322, 325, 327-8, 
332, 336, 340, 342. 

Jan., troops are raised, iii. 321. 

Feb., an envoy from Sallee, iii. 

324- 

— — May, exceptions to the Act of 
Indemnity, iii. 331. 

June, the king sets out for Ire- 
land, iii. 331-2 : detection of a plot 
against him, iii. 333. 

— — July, victory at the Boyne, iii. 
3 2 7, 333> 337 : P ress prosecutions, 
iii- 334- 

Sept., return to England, iii. 339, 

344 : Oxford University verses on the 
occasion, iv. 83. 

— — Dec, complaints of the burden 
of taxation, iii. 348, 350 : discovery 
of a plot against the king, iii. 350-1, 
353, 37 8 - 

— 1691, Jan., the episcopal church in 
Scotland appeals to him, iii. 355 : he 
goes to Holland, iii. 347, 351. 

March- Apr., the secret press is 

active against him, iii. 357, 359. 

Apr., he comes back to London, 

iii. 359. 

Apr.-May, disaffection of many 

clergy, iii. 361. 

— — Apr.-june, he fills up the sees 
of the non-juring bishops, iii. 360, 
363- 

— — Oct., he returns from Holland, 
iii- 373- 

Oct.-Nov., non-jurors are ejected 

from their fellowships and professor- 
ships, iii. 373-5> 377- 

— — Dec, plot against the king, iii. 
378. 

— 1692, Jan., his court is at Kensing- 



7 6 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



William III {continued) : — 

ton, iii. 379 : he is petitioned in 
favour of strict Sunday observance, 
iii. 380 : the earl of Marlborough is 
thought to be intriguing against him, 
iii. 381. 

— 1692, Jan. -July, Oxford and Cam- 
bridge non-jurors are ejected, iii.380-2, 
384> 397- 

— — Apr., threatened invasion, iii. 
387-8. 

May, plot against the king, iii. 

389-90 : the victory of La Hogue 
removes the danger of invasion, iii. 
390. 

— — Aug., he is supposed to favour 
the Presbyterian party, iii. 399 : the 
press is gagged, iii. 399. 

• Sept., the king is in the field in 

Flanders, iii. 402 : the sees of non- 
juring bishops in Ireland are filled 
up, iii. 401. 

' Oct., the king returns to England, 

iii. 404-5. 

— — Nov., an oath of abjuration of 
James II is suggested, iii. 381, 409, 
411. 

Dec, threats of French invasion, 

iii. 411, 413. 

— 1693, Jan., preparations for the next 
campaign, iii. 413: at the play, iii. 
413 : is angry at the statement that 
he wears his crown by conquest, iii. 
413-4- 

Feb., popular discontent because 

of the taxes, iii. 415. 

March, prepares to take the field, 

iii. 417 : greater popularity with dis- 
senters than with churchmen, iii. 
417 : pamphlets against the govern- 
ment, iii. 419, 425: the oath of 
allegiance, iii. 418. 

July, severe defeat at Landen, iii. 

448. 

Aug., the Cambridge non-jurors, 

iii. 430. 

Oct., the king returns to Eng- 
land, iii. 432-3. 

— — Dec, his court at Kensington, 
iii. 437 : pamphlets against the go- 
vernment, iii. 438. 

— 1694, Febr., his court at Kensington, 
iii. 444 ; the oath of allegiance is to 
be strictly enforced in the Universi- 
ties, iii. 442-3, 445 : pamphlets 
against the government, iii. 445. 

— — June- Aug., pamphlets against 
the government, iii. 455, 465. 

— — July- Aug., discovery of the 
northern plot, iii. 461-4, 466-7, 
470-2. 



William III {continued) : — 

— 1694, Oct., activity of the secret press 
against the king, iii. 470. 

Nov., he returns to England, iii. 

472. 

— — Dec, his grief at the queen's 
death, iii. 475-7. 

— 1695, Jan., addresses of condolence, 
iii. 477-8 ; iv. 85. 

Apr., Marlborough is pardoned, 

iii. 482. 

— — Apr. -May, ecclesiastical com- 
missioners and custodes regni ap- 
pointed to act during the king's 
absence abroad, iii. 483-4. 

Aug., taking of Namur, iii. 488, 

491. 

Oct., he returns to England, iii. 

491, and is expected at Oxford, iii. 
492 : visits Oxford, iii. 493-6 ; iv. 
85, 145 : hints of a design to poison 
him, iii. 495. 

— his portrait at the Gildhall, Lon- 
don, iii. 314-5, 323: his picture in 
crockery, iii. 375. 

— ballads about him, iii. 299, 313-4. 

— days observed in his honour ; the 
gradual neglect of them shows his 
waning popularity : — 

birthday, Nov. 4: — 1692, slightly, 

iii. 406 : 1693, very slightly, iii. 
434: 1695, slightly, iii. 493. 

accession-day, Feb. 13, procla- 
mation-day, inauguration-day: — 1690, 
hardly noticed, iii. 325 : 1693, 
slightly, iii. 415: 1695, slightly, iii. 
479- 

coronation-day, Apr. n : — 1690, 

considerably, iii. 329 : 1691, hardly 
at all, iii. 359 : 1692, slightly, iii. 
386: 1693, very slightly, iii. 420: 
1694, very slightly, iii. 449 : 1695, 
very slightly, iii. 483. 

— fondness for hunting, iii. 304. 

— his household : — captain of the pen- 
sioners, iii. 431, 437 : chaplain, iii. 

3°4> 332, 361, 397> 4 I]C > 4 2 4> 477> 
482, 484, 493 : clerk of the closet, 
i". 3°4> 376, 4 2 4> 49 1 * 493 : comp- 
troller of the household, iii. 431 : 
gentleman of the bedchamber, iii. 
381, 482 : gentleman-usher, iii. 383 : 
groom of the stole, iii. 358 : historio- 
grapher, iii. 409, 421 : jester, iii. 472 : 
marsh all of the archers, iii. 371 : 
master of the ceremonies, iii. 379 : 
master of the horse, iii. 417 : master 
of the jewel-house, iii. 488 : phy- 
sician, iii. 445 : poet laureate, iii. 
409, 421 : usher of the black rod, iii. 
451 : deputy usher of the black rod, 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



11 



William III (continued) : — 
iii. 397 : vice-chamberlain, iii. 344, 
383, 444, 484. 

— his army: — guards, iii. 381, 459, 
487 : horse-guards, iii. 308 : foot- 
guards, iii. 433 : horse, iii. 351, 381, 

444, 447 : fusileers, iii. 381. 

1689-90, his army in Ireland, iii. 

3°°, 302, 305, 309-10, 313-4, 316, 

3*9> 332, 368, 377, 38o- 
1692, a regiment of foot quartered 

in Oxford, iii. 380 : a regiment of 

horse quartered in Oxford, iii. 407. 
1694-5, campaigns in Flanders, 

iii. 447, 482, 487. 
1695, a regiment of foot in Oxford, 

iii. 487. 

— incidental mention: — ii. 330; iii. 
312, 330, 339» 347- 8 > 359, 3<5i, 37 2 , 
379, 383, 399, 4", 4*7, 437~8, 44°, 
473- 

Wood, Anthony : — 

— The outlines of Wood's life are 
sufficiently indicated in the analyses 
given in i. p. xiii ; ii. p. xxiii ; iii. 
p, xxvi ; and iv. p. vii. Opportunity 
is here taken to bring together some 
minutiae which illustrate his way of 
life. 

— his income. This may be put down 
as never as much as £40 a year. 
The notices are fragmentary, and in 
places irreconcilable with each other, 
but the main points are distinct. 

(1), his interest in the property 

leased from Merton college. This 
consisted of two portions : (A) the 
property in Merton street; (B) the 
property in S. Aldate's and Queen- 
street. 

(A) = the house in which 

Wood's brother Robert lived, and 
the adjoining tennis-court, managed 
successively by the said Robert (v. 
81) and his son (v. 82). Anthony 
received for his third share of this 
£8 6s. 8d. half-yearly, ii. 359, 395, 

445, 541 ; iii. 34, 118. He had, how- 
ever, to pay £1 half-yearly as his share 
of the reserved rent to Merton college, 
ii. 248, 360, 395, leaving a net annual 
income of £14 13J. ^d. But this was 
further reduced by liabilities for his 
share of repairs, ii. 270-1, and minor 
charges, v. 81. 

An earlier notice, of date 1667, 
shows a nominally larger yearly in- 
come from the property, ii. 111 ; but 
Robert Wood was never able to pay 
this amount in full, ii. 121, 217, 248. 
When Wood's mother was alive, his 



Wood, Anthony {continued) : — 
share of the reserved rent was 15$. 
half-yearly, i. 388. 

(B) = the Fleur-de-luce inn, 

the lease of which was managed by 
Wood's brother Christopher (v. 80) 
and afterwards by his sons Thomas 
(v. 82) and Seymour (v. 82). An- 
thony's share of this was £4 $s. 
a quarter, ii. 358, 485, 503, 545 ; iii. 
1, 109. Variations such as £4 3^., 
iii. 34; £4 \s. 6d., ii. 344; iii. 138; 
£4 5s. 6d., iii. 114, 197; £4 8s., ii. 
484; £4 10s., ii. 434: so far as they 
are not mere clerical errors may be 
accounted for by the subtraction of 
small charges in some cases, or the 
inclusion of minor casualties. This 
gives £17 as Wood's gross annual 
income from this part of the property, 
but £1 half-yearly has to be deducted 
as his share of the reserved rent to 
Merton college. He was also liable 
for his share of repairs, iii. 138, and 
minor expenses, v. 80, col. I. 

The Fleur-de-luce was much injured 
in the fire of 1644, i. in, 151; and 
two tenements in this holding were 
afterwards sublet at a nominal rent, 
the under-lessee rebuilding. Wood's 
share of the tenement occupied by 
one Wildgoose was is. <\d. a year, 
i. 242, 436 ; ii. 36, 413 : iii. 35, 122; 
and his share of the other tenement 
was probably 8s. 8^/. a year, cp. i. 
238, 467. That tenement was occu- 
pied by one Ely, a tallow-chandler, 
and Wood took out his rent in 
candles, i. 237-8, 428, 464, 467. One 
of these tenements was afterwards 
occupied by one Alder, ii. 1, 273; 
iii. 35. The fines on these sub-leases 
were a trivial source of income, i. 
311, 319, and probably, ii. 273. 

So that, putting everything together, 
Wood's income from the second half 
of the family property does not exceed 
£15 10s. a year. 

Note that from 1686 onwards the 
Fleur-de-luce cottages after the expiry 
of the building-lease yielded a sub- 
stantial rent, Wood's third share 
being, from Hanks' cottage £4 ^d. 
a year, and from Dollive's, £3 3s. \d., 
iii. 192, 197, 320, 393. 

In an earlier (1663) notice of the 
Fleur-de-luce property, i. 502-3, it 
appears that Wood's fourth share 
(his mother then being alive), less 
his fourth share of the reserved rent, 
was £3 2s. 8d. 



7 8 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Wood, Anthony {continued) : — 

The whole properly, (A) and (B) 
together, was, however, subject to 
a fine each thirteenth or fourteenth 
year, on the renewal of the lease, e.g., 
I( >35, £30, i. 45 ; 1651, £30, i. 169; 
1664, £70, ii. 9 ; 1678, £70, ii. 403; 
1692, £88, iii. 392-3. 

From the net rents mentioned above 
we have to abate probably £5 per 
annum for Wood's share of the fine, 
of repairs, and of incidental expenses. 
This yields £25 a year as Wood's 
income from the family property. 

(II) interest on money lent. 

(A) £100 at six per cent, lent 

to the Burnhams from 1656 to 1683, 
v. 29 ; from the date we may assume 
that this was a legacy from Anthony's 
father. What was done with it after 
its being taken up in 1683, I cannot 
trace. 

7— (B) in 1670 W T ood received 

£100 from the University press for 
his Hist, et Antiq. Univ. Oxon., ii. 
189, and invested it with his brother 
Christopher. This was perhaps lent 
at one time to Stonor of Stonor, iii. 
87, 92, 1 14-5. At Wood's death 
Christopher's executors owed him 
£100, iii. 503, on which interest (at 
five per cent.) had been paid, iii. 87, 
114, 138, till neglected by Seymour 
Wood, iii, 440, 503. This is, perhaps, 
the sum in question. 

(C) in 1674 Wood received an 

additional sum of £50 for his Hist, et 
Antiq. Univ. Oxon., ii. 296-7, which 
he lent to his brother Christopher. 
On this interest was paid at first at 
the rate of six per cent., ii. 344, 358, 
393-4, 485, 497, 503, 556; iii. 11, 
27, 75 : afterwards at the rate of five 
percent., ii. 556; iii. 92, 114, 138, 
197 : but Seymour Wood neglected 
payment, iii. 320, 440. This is not 
mentioned in his will, iii. 503, unless 
indeed *it is there wrongly attributed 
to Robert Wood : see infra. It was 
at one time (1677) invested in the 
excise-office, ii. 393. 

Possibly only part of this was for 
part of the time in Christopher's 
hands, since in 1678-9 we hear of 
a £25 loan to him, ii. 416, 450, 467, 
bearing interest at six per cent. 

(D) partly by gifts from Ralph 

Sheldon (20 pounds, ii. 556 ; ten 
guineas, iii. 34), Wood in 1683 had 
£50 which he lent to his brother 
Robert at five per cent., ii. 56, 80, 



Wood, Anthony {continued) : — 
95-6, 118, 144, 175-6. This is men- 
tioned in his will, iii. 503, with a 
second sum of £50, which I cannot 
explain except by supposing it in 
error for the £50 loan to Christopher: 
see supra. 

A smaller earlier loan of £20 is 
mentioned, ii. 561. 

Wood's income from this source 
may therefore be taken as not exceed- 
ing £15 a year. 

His entire annual income was thus 
under £40. 

In the year of his death he made 
other arrangements, parting with his 
interest in the Fleur-de-luce to Thomas 
Rowney for an annuity of £30, iii. 
491-2, and giving 80 guineas to 
Daniel Porter for an annuity of £12, 
iii. 483, 492, 506 : so that he died 
just when he was in a position to have 
more comfort than he had ever had. 

He had received in 1684 £40 from 
Ralph Sheldon's legacy, iii. 98, 118 : 
in 1690 £50 from Ralph Sheldon, 
junior, iii. 327: in 1691-2, various 
small tips on account of the Athenae, 
iii. 378, 435: in 1692, £25 from his 
publisher, iii. 386. Part of these 
sums, no doubt, were sunk in the 
Athenae: the 80 guineas to Daniel 
Porter probably account for the rest. 

— his expenditure : — 

for room-rent he paid 10s. a 

quarter for his attics in Robert Wood's 
house, ii. 11 1, 121, 248, 360, 445, 
506, 541 ; iii. 31, 34. 

for his board in 1661 he paid £7 

per annum, i. 388 ; in 1662, 6s. a 
week, i. 464; in 1663, £10, and 
afterwards £12 per annum, i. 471 ; 
and in 1667, £12, ii. 111, 121 : cp. 
ii. 100, 163. 

he has numerous entries of small 

sums, is. to is. yd. a week, paid for 
1 commons,' i. 486-7, 501, 503, 507 ; 
ii. 1, 5-6, 8, 12, 14-5, 19-20, 23-4, 
28, 30, 32, 34-5. 4°, 43. 47. 5°-i> 
69. 7 1 , 74-5, 77. 79, 81, 85, 94, 102 ; 
on the whole showing an annual ex- 
penditure of about £4 1 os. 

his bedmaker was paid 5s. a 

quarter; his laundress, from 1680 
onwards, 4^. a quarter ; and his barber, 
3-r. to 4-y. 6d. a quarter. 

his battells. From 1659 to 1686 

Wood has numerous notes of small 
sums paid for battells, irregular in 
amount but roughly averaging a 
guinea a year, i. 288, 310, 331, 349, 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



79 



Wood, Anthony {continued) : — 
388, 407, 428, 454, 467, 471, 487; 
ii. 1, 8, 27, 34, 78, 94, 126, 146, 171, 
177, 190, 198, 206, 251, 299, 336, 
447, 556; iii- 68, 94, 109, 144, 168, 
180. 

his common-room account, i. e. 

his share of firewood, candles, tobacco- 
pipes, ii. 34, 237, 299, 337, 344, 447, 
469, 485, 521, 556, 561 ; iii. 34, 144, 
184. The heaviest of these payments 
is the last in 1686, £1 is. 6d. : so 
15J. is a fair average, including the 
tip to the common-room man, ii. 8. 





£ 


s. 


Rooms 


2 


0 


Board 


12 


0 


Commons 


4 


10 


Bed maker 




0 


Laundress 


0 


16 


Barber 


0 


16 


Battells 


1 




Common-room 


0 


15 




£22 


iS 







the items for dress, books and 

newspapers, fuel and candles in his 
rooms, doctor and apothecary, refresh- 
ments atcookshopand tavern, journeys 
to London, taxes, are difficult to sum- 
marize, but it is plain that Wood in 
any year can have had little over out 
of the balance of £17 2s. of his 
income. 

— his rooms : these were two attics 
in the family house, in which he had 
paid for building a fireplace, and an 
additional window, i. 304. In them 
he provided shelving for his books, 

i. 380, 400, 416, 454, 469, 503. He 
himself paid for repairs to these 
rooms, ii. 98, 122, 126-7; for the 
furnishing of them, ii. 75, 117; and 
for sweeping the chimney, ii. 104, 
452 ; iii. 89. He had his own keys, 

ii. 45 ; and never asked any one to 
his rooms, iii. 498, 506. He bought 
his own fuel, i. 467; ii. 31, 37, 98, 

i5!> 155. 2or > 2 9 6 , 404, 45 T > .539, 
556; iii. 143; generally faggots ; but 
in 1665-6 also coal, ii. 31, 82. 

— his lisp, i. 148; ii. 8, 202; iii. 347, 
460, 476. 

— his deafness, ii. 350; iii. 9, 13, 65, 
80, 152, 295, 308, 458 ; iv. 40. 

— his timidity, iii. 484, 498. 

— engraved portrait of, by Michael 
Burghers, 1691, iii. 436; iv. 13-4, 
19, 21, 28, 30, 40. Pen-and-ink 
drawing, 1677, by . . . Rose, ii. 389 : 



Wood, Anthony {continued) : — 
the date shows this to be the one 
given, ii. 364. In 1662 he speaks of 
a portrait of himself, i. 455. 

— his collection of medals, i. 238 ; of 
coins, i. 223, 238, 241-2, 249, 264, 
271, 281, 433 ; iii. 181, 506. 

— his seal, iii. 480. 

— his collection of MSS. and printed 
books, i. 6-21, 271, 278, 399, 426, 
429-30, 460; ii. 64, 231, 519; iii. 
102-4, 167, 181, 342, 344, 404, 440, 
499, 5 OI > 5°3 ; iv. 9, 25, 85, 87, 96, 
107, 109, 118-9, 131, 228-50. 

— his London journeys : — 

— — 1667, June, to verify Twyne's 
references for the Hist, et Antiq. 
Univ. Oxon., ii. 109-11 : cost £3 5J. 

1669, Apr.-May, same purpose, 

ii. 155 : cost £2 18s. 

Aug.-Sept., chiefly same pur- 
pose, ii. 166-9 : cost £4. 

1670, Apr.-May, to obtain more 

exact transcripts of documents for 
the Hist, et Antiq., ii. 186, 191-2 : 
cost £3 10s. 

1672, Feb., same purpose, ii. 

242-3 : was put up by sir Leoline 
Jenkins. 

1675, May, to canvass for keeper- 
ship of the public records, ii. 314: 
cost £1 §s. 

1684, Oct., to convey Ralph Shel- 
don's MSS. to the College of Arms, 

iii. 98, 115 : cost £2 ijs. 

1685, Aug.-Sept., to collect mate- 
rials for the Athenae, iii. 157-8, 160, 
163 : cost £5. 

1687, Aug.-Sept., same purpose, 

iii. 224, 226. 

1688, Aug.-Sept., same purpose, 

iii. 273-7. 

1690, Nov., to arrange for print- 
ing the Athenae, iii. 345 : cost £5 $s. 

1 691, May, probably same pur- 
pose, iii. 35, 362 : cost £2 ijs. 

1694, June, to give evidence for 

Magdalen college in the suit about 
Magdalen hall, iii. 455-6, 458. 

Wood, Christopher, Anthony's 
brother : — 

— generally called < Kit.' 

— 1635, born, i. 27, 108 ; v. 2, 8-9. 

— 1644-6, at Thame school, i. 107, 
114, 129. 

— 1646, at school in Oxford, i. 129. 

— 1649, at Cassington, i. 151. 

— 1657 onwards, joint-owner of the 
family property, i. 28, Hi, 21 1-2, 
284, 311, 447; ii. 9-10, 248, 332; 
iii. 136: in 1659 Anthony Wood 



8o 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Wood, Christopher {continued) : — 
gave up his contingent interest in 
Christopher's share, i. 284. 

— 1658, first marriage, i. 28, 30, 243 ; 

ii. 180; iii. 110; v. 2, 10, 17: takes 
a house in what is now Queen-street, 
i. 28, 279 ; v. 11-2. 

— 1659 onwards, is a tavern and cook- 
shop companion of Anthony's, i. 284, 
388, 439, 4 8 <5; ii. 15, 18, 22-4, 27, 
31, 43, 45, 69, 73, 75, 85, 99, 104, 
108, 117, 143, 189-90. 

— 1660 onwards, the arrangement as 
regards the property is that C hristopher 
should collect the rent of the Fleur- 
de-luce property, and pay their shares 
to his brothers, i. 388, 502 ; ii. 36, 
198 (paid through Robert), 214, 271, 
2 73, 344, 353, 365, 393-4, 41 3, 434, 
445, 45°, 467, 4 8 4-5> 49 2 , 502-3, 
5io, 545, 556; iii- 1, 11, 27, 34, 75, 
87, 92, 109, 1 14-5 : they sharing the 
expenses, e.g. (i) the reserved college 
rent,' i. 502 ; ii. 445, 450, 484-5, 503, 
510, 556; iii. 1 14-5; (ii) minor ex- 
penses (and (iii) repairs), i. 388, 502 ; 

iii. 484-5, 503, 510; iii. 27, 115.— 
This arrangement was continued under 
his son Thomas, infra, e. g. (i) college 
rent, iii. 138, 197 ; (ii) minor ex- 
penses, iii. 138, 197; (iii) repairs, iii. 
138. 

— 1660, takes a house in what is now 
Bulwarks Alley, i. 28; v. 12. 

is under-sheriff of Oxfordshire, 

i. 421. 

— 1 66 1 onwards, is under-sheriff of Ox- 
fordshire, i. 422 ; iii. 110 ; iv.31 ; v. 17. 

— 1666 onwards, being often in London 
on law business (ii. 420), he brought 
Wood bundles of gazettes, bought 
by some friend in London (perhaps 
Richard Huggins), so saving carriage, 

ii. 92, 99, 108, 120, 122, 128, 146, 

151, i7 8 , 397, 483-5, 49 2 , 5°3, 545 5 

iii. 11, 75. 

— 1667, death of his first wife, ii. 100 ; 
v. 15, 17. 

— ■ — second marriage, i. 28, 31, 42; 
ii. 116, 146, 190, 251; iii. no; 
v. 2, 15-7 : takes a house at Marston, 
ii. 112 ; but soon moves to Marriage- 
hill, Berks., i. 28 ; v. 16. 

— 1670, he settles in Holywell, Oxford, 
i. 28 ; iii. 45, no ; v. 16-7. 

he borrows £100 from Anthony, 

v. 78, probably to invest it for him. 

— 1674, h e borrows £50 from Anthony, 
v. 78. 

— 1678, pays interest on £25 borrowed 
from Anthony, v. 78. 



Wood, Christopher {continued) : — 

— 16S0-3, buys land at Tetsworth, 

i. 36. 

— 1684, death, iii. 109-10; v. 17. 

— incidental mention, i. 93, 271, 311, 
5°3 5 ii- S^, 7°, i°o» 103, 107, 154, 
185, 243, 265, 275, 314, 317, 438, 
478, 483, 503, 508 ; iii. 1, 503 ; iv. 
281 ; v. 9, 16-7. 

— notices of his children, i. 28, 30-1, 
279, 284, 405, 436; ii. 28, 95, 133, 
258, 271; iii. no, 240, 310, 468; 
v. 2, 10-7. 

— Anthony pays for entertainment at 
his house, ii. 12, 20, 23, 70, 112. 

Wood, Edward, Anthony's brother : — 

— 1627, birth, i. 27 ; v. 2, 8. 

— 1640, at Thame school, i. 108, 110. 

— 1642, postmaster of Merton, i. 52, 
J 34- 

— 1643, scholar of Trinity, i. 93, 129; 

ii. 116 ; v. 9. 

— 1646-50, tutor to Anthony, i. 129, 
131, 133, 162. 

— 1648, submits to the Parliamentary 
visitors, i. 144, and is made fellow 
and tutor of Merton, i. 147. 

— 1 65 1, is censured by the Parlia- 
mentary visitors for conviviality, i. 
166-7. 

— 1655, elected proctor, but dies soon 
after, i. 197-8 ; v. 10. 

— at his death he left a number of MS. 
sermons, some of which Anthony 
Wood published (edit. I, 1656 ; edit. 

11, 1674), i. no, 200, 418, 450 ; ii. 1, 

12, and made presents of the book 
among his relatives, i. 470, 477 : 
others Anthony lent in MS. to clerical 
friends, i. 402, 503; ii. 36, 441. 

— his autograph, i. 22, 69, 78; v. 9: 
incidental mention, i. 170, 183, 198. 

Wood, Mary, Anthony's mother : — 

— 1601, born, Mary Petty, i. 26-7, v. 
7 : her parentage and kin, i. 26-7, 
40, 50-1, 107-8, 197, 263, 319; ii. 
26, 100; v. 7, 9. 

— 1622, her marriage, i. 27-8, 79; 
v. 7. 

— 1643, on her husband's death (i. 78), 
becomes joint-owner with her sons of 
the family property, i. 28, 69, n 1, 
151,211-2, 284,311,447; ii. 5,9-10, 
332. 

— 1644, sends Anthony to Thame 
school, i. 107. 

— 1646, recalls Anthony from school 
and wishes to apprentice him, i. 129- 
30 : cp. i. 399. 

— 1648, prevails on Anthony to submit 
to the Parliamentary visitors, i. 144. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



Si 



Wood, Mary (continued} :— 

— 1649, lives economically at Cassing- 
ton, i. 151-2. 

— 1659, makes a tour among her rela- 
tives in Oxfordshire, i. 276. 

— 1667, death, i. 397 ; ii. 100-2, 104-5 ; 
v. 15. 

— incidental mention, i. 29. 30, 44, 46, 
69, 279, 381, 385, 475, 484, 503, 508 ; 
ii. 5, 26, 33, 44, 49, 299 ; iii. 14, 503 ; 
v. 1 1-2, 15, 17. 

— her autograph, i. 21-2, 69 ; ii. 101-2. 

— incidental mention of her children, 

i. 27, 197-8; ii. 100; iii. no; v. 2, 
7-11, 17. 

Wood, Mary, wife of Anthony s brother 
Robert, cited sometimes as 'my sister,' 
or as ' monsieur's wife.' 

— 1638, born, v. II : her parentage and 
kin, i. 284-5 5 ii; I 54;. iii - 43 5 v - II - 

— 1659, her marriage, i. 29, 284; v. 

2 » I]E - 

resident in Postmasters' hall with 

her mother-in-law, i. 28, 450 ; v. 
1 1-2 : where in t66i Anthony Wood 
partly boards with her, i. 388, 464. 

— 1662, resident in S. Peter's East 
parish, i. 28, 461 ; v. 13. 

— 1663, again resident in Postmasters' 
hall, i. 28, 475; v. 13-4, 16; where, 
1663-7, Anthony Wood is partly 
boarded with her, i. 28, 471 ; ii. 100, 
in, 121. 

— 1667, Anthony stands godfather to 
her fourth son, ii. 117, 127 ; v. 16. 

— 1668, she shows marked coldness to 
Anthony, i. 28 ; ii. 129-30, 140. 

— 1669, has a final quarrel with him, 

ii. 163-4; which is only made up in 
1695 when he is dying, i. 28 ; iii. 502. 

— incidental mention, ii. 31, 85, 94, 
104, in, 127, 130, 271 ; iii. 175, 196, 
220, 240. 

— incidental mention of her children, 
i. 29; ii. 83, 117, 154; v. 2, 11-6. 

Wood, Robert, Anthony's brother : — 

— nicknamed ' monsieur,' i. 5 2, 2 1 3, 441 , 
&c, iv. 33, from his boyhood in 
France : and by this nickname he is 
generally cited. 

— 1630, born, i. 27 ; v. 2, 8. 

— 1640, at Thame school, i. 50, 108. 

— 1642-7, in France, i. 51-2, 93 ; v. 9. 

— 1643 onwards, joint-owner of the 
family property, i. 28, in, 21 1-2, 
284-5, 3 11 , 447 5 ii- 9-10. In 1659 
Anthony Wood gave up to him his 
contingent interest in his third share, 
i. 284. 

— 1657 onwards, the arrangement is 
. that Robert shall manage the house 



Wood, Robert (continued} : — 

and tennis-court, paying his brothers 
their shares, i. 213, 388, 464, 471, 
477, 502; ii. in, 121, 217, 257-8, 
261, 270-1, 311, 323, 331, 359, 375, 
395, 424, 433, 445, 451, 474, 485, 
494, 506, 541, 561 ; iii. 30, 34, 95, 
118, 136, 144, 170, 179: deducting 
their shares of the reserved rent to 
Merton college, i. 388 ; ii. 248, 258, 
360, 395 5 iii- 34; their shares of 
repairs, i. 444, 477; ii. 270-1, 273; 
and of minor expenses, i. 465 ; ii. 248, 
506, 561. The references to payment 
of the Fleur-de-luce rent by him, i. 
237, 444; ii. 198, probably mean 
only that he had received it from 
Christopher to pay it to Anthony. 

— Robert Wood seems to have been 
a poor manager, and was perhaps 
dragged down by a shiftless family. 
He was generally in arrears or debt 
to Anthony, e.g. 1662, i. 465; 1667, 
ii. 121 ; 1668, ii. 126 ; 1671, ii. 217 ; 
1675, ii. 311, 314, 317, 331; 1676, 

ii. 341, 360; 1678, ii. 424; 1679, »• 

433, 45 1 , 45 6 > 474 5 l68o > ii- 4 8 5, 
494; 1681, ii. 561; 1684, iii. 118; 
1685, iii. 170, 179. 

— 1659 onwards, he is a tavern and 
cookshop companion of Anthony's, 
i. 279, 388, 405, 436, 441; ii. 14-5, 
18, 20, 27, 30-1, 33, 39-40,43,45, 
47, 50-1, 69, 76, 79, 81-2, 85, 92, 94, 
104, 108, in, 115, 126-7, I2 9> I 43, 
190. 

— 1659, his marriage, i. 29, 284; iii. 
43 5 v. 2, 11. 

— 1660, resident in Postmasters' hall, 
i. 28,450; v. 11-2; where, in 1661, 
Anthony is partly boarded with him, 

i. 388, 464. 

— 1662-3, resident in S. Peter's in the 
East parish, i. 28, 461 : v. 13. 

■ — 1663 onwards, resident in Post- 
masters' hall, i. 28,471, 475 ; ii. 356 ; 

iii. 20, 38 ; iv. 33 ; v. 13-4, 16 : where, 
1663-7, Anthony is partly boarded 
with him, i. 28, 471 ; ii. 100, in, 
121, 126, 163. 

— 1667 onwards, Anthony pays him 
rent for his attics, ii. 11 1, 121, 246, 
360, 395. 445, 5o6, 541 ; iii. 31, 34: 
v. 79. 

— 1667, Anthony stands as godfather 
to his fourth son, ii. 117, 264; v. 16. 

— 1681, he borrows £20 from Anthony, 

ii. 561. 

— 1683-5, borrows £50 from Anthony, 
v. 78. 

— 1686, death, iii. 175; v. 17. 



VOL. V. 



G 



82 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Wood, Bobert {continued) : — 

— his autograph, i. 22, 255. 

— incidental mention, i. 30-1, 179, 289 ; 
ii- 5> 44> 73. 2 3o. 265, 314, 356,480, 
490; iii. 1, 240; v. 14, 16. 

— Wood pays for refreshments at his 
house, i. 503; ii. 119, 144, 146. 

— incidental mention of his children, 
i. 29, 284 ; ii. 83, 154, 243, 320, 332 ; 
iii. 14, 21, 38, 170, 220,483; v. 2, 
n -6. 

Wood, Seymour, Anthony's nephew, 
son of Christopher : — 

— 1665, born, i. 30; ii. 28; iii. 110; 
v. 2, 14. 

— 1686, on his elder brother's (Thomas) 
death, he succeeds to his father's 
estate, iii. 206, 350 ; and (1) with- 
holds from Anthony some deeds re- 
ferring to the family property, iii. 320; 
(ii) withholds principal and interest 
of his money, iii. 197, 320 bis, 440, 
503 ; v. 78 ; (iii) withholds his third 
share of the Fleur-de-luce rent, i. 284 ; 
iii. 197, 320. 

— 1690, his marriage, iii. 341, 348. 

— 1 69 1, he breaks off all connexion 
with Oxford, iii. 362. 

— 1693, is an oilman in London, iii. 431, 
5°3- 

— 1694, a bankrupt, iii. 469, 503. 
Wood, Thomas, Anthony's father : — 

— 1581, born, i. 26, 78 ; v. 2, 5 : his 
parentage and kin, i. 4, 25, 45, 79; 
v. 2, 3, 6. 

— 1600-19, a member of Oxford Uni- 
versity, i. 26, 78-9; v. 5. 

— 1603, first marriage, i. 26-7, 78 ; 
v. 2, 6. 

— 1622, second marriage, i. 26-7, 40, 
51, 79; v. 2, 7. 

— 1630, refuses knighthood, i. 79. 

— 1642, his family is unsettled by the 
outbreak of the Civil War, i. 53, 69. 

— 1643, death, i. 77-8, 93 ; v. 9. 

— provisions of his will, i. 284. 

— his personal appearance, i. 26, 78 ; 

— his autograph, i. 21, 78. 

— incidental mention, i. 44, 46, 51, 131, 
2 4 2 , 447 5 101-2, 104-5, 349 ; iv. 
14; 32, 34> 40 ; v. 6, 1 1-3, 15. 

— incidental mention of his children, 
i. 27, 43, 134-5, 197; »• 100; iii. 
no ; v. 2, 7-1 1. 

Wood, Thomas, Anthony's brother : — 

— 1624, born, i. 27, 171 ; v. 2, 7. 

— 1636, educated at Thame school, i. 
108, 171. 

— 1638-50, student of Christ Church, 
i. 47, 53, 145, 171-2; v. 9. 



Wood, Thomas {continued) : — 

— 1642, joins Charles Ps army, i. 68, 
93, I7i- . 

— 1648, being involved in the Oxford 
cavalier plot, he goes to the Common- 
wealth army in Ireland, i. 145-6, 
171. 

— 1649, takes pnrt in the storming of 
Drogheda, i. 172. 

— 1650, is in Oxford, i. 172. 

— 1 65 1 , dies in Ireland, i. 171, 173 ; 
v. 9-10. 

— his personal appearance, i. 173: 
his autograph, i. 22, 69. 

Wood, Thomas, Anthony's nephew, 
son of Christopher : — 

— 1660, bom, i. 30, 405 ; v. 2, 12. 

— 1673, Anthony Wood's present to 
him, ii. 258. 

— 1683, on his father's death, he suc- 
ceeds him as under-sheriff of Oxford- 
shire, iii. 1 10 : and in the manage- 
ment of the Fleur-de-luce, iii. 114, 
136 ; paying Anthony his third share 
of the rent, iii. 114, 138, 192, and 
interest on his loan of £100, iii. 114, 
138, 5°3- 

— 1686, death, iii. 194. 

Wood, Thomas, Anthony's nephew, 
son of Robert, fellow of New col- 
lege :— 

— 1661, born, i. 29 ; v. 2, 12. 

— 1667, Anthony's present to ' little 
Tom,' ii. 120. 

— 1675, at Winchester school, ii. 320. 

— 1679, fellow of New college, i. 351 ; 

ii. 461 ; iii. 9, 196, 419, 440, 452, 
468, 485, 503. 

— 1692-3, is Anthony's counsel in the 
libel action, iii. 410-1, 413, 417,420, 
428 ; iv. 6-8, 10-2, 15-6, 20, 23, 34-8, 
41-4. 

— 1694, is present at the trial of the 
Magdalen hall patronage case, iii. 
456, 458. 

— 1695, draws up Anthony s tombstone 
inscription, iii. 505 : and blunders in 
it, iii. 499. 

— 1705, marriage, iii. 506. 

— 1722, death, iii. 506. 

— his portrait and personal appearance, 

iii. 506. 

Woodroffe, Benjamin, principal of 
Gloucester hall : — 

— 1638, born, ii. 193, 255. 

— 1656, student of Christ Church, i. 
472, 484; ii. 129, 132-3, 193, 255. 

— 1672, canon of Christ Church, iii. 
142, 199, 231, 234, 350, 378. 

— 1692, principal of Gloucester hall, 
iii. 398-9, 426, 440. 



INDEX I. BIOGRAPHICAL. 



83 



Woodroffe, Benjamin {continued) : — 

— 1692, his projected college for 
Greeks, iii. 399, 426. 

Woodward, Michael, warden of New 
college : — 

— 1649, fellow of New coll., submits to 
the Parliamentary visitors, i. 362. 

— 1658, warden of New coll., is helpful 
to Wood's Hist, et Antiq. Univ. Oxon., 
i. 324, 362, 390,414, 458; 18, 59, 
67, 80-1, 103, 296. 

— 1660, one of Charles II's commis- 
sioners, i. 324, 362. 

— 1675, death, ii. 317. 

— his MS. collections for the history of 
New coll., i. 459 ; iv. 146, 167. 

Wren, sir Christopher : — 

— his kindred, ii. 282. 

— 1656, a reputed wit, i. 201. 

— 1659, a student of chemistry, i. 290, 
473- 

— 1 66 1, Savilian professor of Astronomy, 

i. 380. 

— 1664, architect of the Sheldonian, 

ii. 279; iv. 68, 71-2, 239. 

— 1667, employed about the Arundel 
marbles, ii. 120. 

— 1669, reports on Salisbury cathedral, 
ii. 275. 

— 1670, a curator of the Sheldonian, 
ii. 197. 

— 1673, knighted, ii. 274. 

— 1674, stands for M.P. Univ. Oxon., 

ii. 279, 441. 

— 168 1, arranges for the accommoda- 
tion of the Oxford Parliament, ii. 514. 

Wright, Martin, goldsmith, and alder- 
man of Oxford : — 

— mentioned, ii. 12, 239; iv. 56, 62, 
71 ('alderman, senior'). 

— mention of members of his family, 

i. 196, 198, 211; ii. 127, 240, 415; 

iii. 40. 

Wright, William, senior, M.P., and 
alderman of Oxford : — 

— son of Martin, supra : known distinc- 
tively as ' alderman Wright,' in dis- 
tinction from his son, infra : see 
Wood's City, iii. 474. 

— 1677-82, the leading civic authority, 

ii. 384 ; iii. 4. 

— 1679-81, M.P. for Oxford City, ii. 
2 56, 439> 4 6 o, 476, 512, 516, 523; 

iii. 507-8. 

— 1680-4, a prominent Whig, and 
obnoxious to the court, ii. 496, 544 ; 
iii. 93-4, 507-8. 

— 1683, suspected of being privy to the 
Ryehouse plot, iii. 59, 62, 156. 

— 1693, death, iii. 433. 

— his house and land attached to it 



Wright, William (continued) : — 
stood on the City wall, in the precincts 
now of Exeter college, ii. 516, 522, 
531 ; iii. 433 ; iv. 71 (' alderman, 
junior'). His son William, infra, 
also lived there, iii. 479. 

— members of his family, i. 31 ; ii. 29 ; 
iii. 85, in, 185, 221, 284, 370; v. 
19. 

— father of the next. 

Wright, William, junior, recorder 
of Oxford : — 

— son of the preceding : known in 
Wood's time as ' counsellor Wright,' 
in distinction from his father. 

— 1674, a member of Trinity college, 
iii. 85. 

— 1679, obtains a grant of arms, i. 200 ; 
iii. 186. 

— 1684, is a barrister resident in Oxford, 
iii. 85 ; perhaps ' lame,' iii. 94. 

— 1686, death of his wife, iii. 185. 

— 1687, deputy-recorder of Oxford, iii. 
221 ; iv. 81. 

— 1688, elected into the City council, 
iii. 256, 280. 

— 1688 (? 1690), recorder of Oxford, 
iii. 280, 325, 489, 492. 

— 1695, alderman of Oxford, iii. 479. 

— his house, iii. 479 : see supra. 
Wyatt, William, public orator : — 

— 1660, student of Christ Church, iii. 
19. 

— 1675, deputy of the public orator, 
ii. 315, 446. 

— 1679, public orator, ii. 446, 495, 518, 
527; iii. 6, 17, 48, 52, 141, 161, 180, 
234, 291. 

— 1689, principal of S. Mary Hall, iii. 
317, 322-3, 33°, 442. 



Yate, Thomas, principal of Brase- 
nose : — 

— 1649, practises law, ii. 62. 

— 1660, principal of Brasenose, i. 390 ; 
ii. 51, 57, 62, 232, 545 ; iii. 395. 

— 1 661 onwards, often employed on 
University business, i. 372; ii. 167-8, 
286, 556; iv. 65, 67. 

— 1666 onwards, very kind to Wood, 
ii. 84, 259, 480. 

— 1667, accused of nepotism, ii. 107. 

■ — 1 67 1, a delegate of the press, ii. 170, 
172, 204. 

— 1680, a curator of the theatre, ii. 
490. 

— 1681, death, ii. 539. 

— his marriage, ii. 289, 539. 

— his relatives, ii. 107, 176, 467, 514, 
539 5 2. 



G 2 



84 



WOODS LIFE AND TIMES. 



Yate, Thomas {continued) ; — 

— his calendar of the muniments of 
Brasenose college, ii. 84; iv. 154. 

York, Anne, duchess of, v. 25. 

— Mary Beatrice, duchess of, v. 60. 

— James, duke of, v. 49-51. 

Zouch, Richard, Regius professor of 
Civil Law : — 

— 1647-50, employed on University 
business, i. 164 ; ii. 50. 

— 1654, a candidate for the keepership 
of the archives, ii. 7, 508. 

— 1658, assessor of the vice-chancellor's 
court, i. 256, 273. 



Zouch, Richard {continued) : — 

— 1 660, Regius professor of Civil Law, 
i. 320, 361, 366. 

one of Charles IPs commission 

for the visitation of Oxford University, 
i. 324. 

principal of S. Alban Hall, i. 

328. 

— 1661, death, i. 383. 

— members of his family, i. 383, 411 ; 
iii. 39, 242. 

— his notes about Oxford University 
statutes and privileges, ii. 7, 8 ; iv. 
131. 



INDEX II 



TOPOGRAPHICAL 

Wood's numerous references to localities contain, as a rule, nothing of positive 
value. I have, therefore, arranged them not alphabetically, but in sets, so as to 
get whatever additional interest can be derived from juxtaposition. Few persons, 
except compilers of county histories, are likely to find these references of use. It 
will be readily understood that in the references to ' natives ' of a county, &c, only 
those persons are given who are not connected by Wood with any definite place. 



The foreign continents. 

Africa, description of, ii. 475 : coffee 
from, i. 168, 201. 

— Algiers, redemption of captives, iii. 
190. 

— Egypt, i- 2or. 

— Fez, iii. 16, 18. 

— Guinea, a negro prince from, ex- 
hibited, ii. 425. 

— Morocco, 1682, envoy from, iii. 2, 5, 
11, 16-8, 427; iv. 77. 

— Neumon, ii. 425. 

— Sallee, diplomatic correspondence 
with, iii. 324. 

— Sus, iii. 17. 

— Tangier, in English occupation, ii. 
513; iii. 15, 45; abandoned, 1683, 
iii. 79. Plan of, iii. 207. Pamphlets 
about, ii. 23. Inscription from, iv. 
70. 

America: chocolate from, i. 169, 201 : 
the north-west passage, iii. 235. 

— Brazil, i. 402. 

— Greenland, iii. 113. 

— New England, i. 6 ; iii. 480. 
Newhaven, iii. 251. 

— Pennsylvania, iii. 462-3, 465. 

— West Indies, ii. 5, 560 ; iii. 95. 
Barbadoes, iii. 14, 90, 245. 

— — Jamaica, i. 460 ; ii. 425 ; iii. 183, 
260, 279, 306, 339, 388, 391. 

Nevis, iii. 79, 87. 

Asia : coffee from, i. 168. 

— Aleppo, iii. 24. 

— Amboyna, ii. 131. 



The foreign continents (cont.) : — 
Asia : Anatolia, i. 168. 

— Antioch, iii. 399. 

— Armenia, iv. 74. 

— Bengal, iii. 6. 

— China, i. 498 ; iii. 235, 237, 464. 
A Chinese visits Oxford, iii. 236. 
Sinenses, ii. 429. 

— East Indies, ii, 5, 23, 171. 

— Jacobites, i. 188 ; ii. 212. 

— 'Jerusalem, king of,' i. 270. 

— Jews, i. 168, 188, 353, 407, 422 ; ii. 
212 ; iii. 2, 324, 449. 

— Mount Libanus, i. 188 ; ii. 212. 

— Mount Nebo, i. 234. 

— Palestine, i. 234. 

— Persia, iii. 219: titular archbishop 
of Amasia, iii. 219, 222. 

— Smyrna, i. 168. 

— Syria, i. 188 ; iii. 95. 

— Tartars, iii. 236. 

The continent of Europe. 
Austria : — 

— Bohemia, iv. 52. 

— Transylvania, i. 417 ; iv. 74. 

— Vienna, i. 377 ; iii. 105, 121, 400. 
Denmark, i. 39 ; ii. 201 ; iii* 441. 

— Cimbericus, ii. 280. 

— Iceland, ii. 349. 

— Schleswig, duke of, ii. 378. 

— king of, Frederick III, i. 456. 

— crown-prince, and king, Christian V, 
i. 456 ; iii. 307 ; iv. 66. 

— prince George of, v. 46 ; princess 
of, v. 25. 



86 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The continent of Europe (font.) : — 
Denmark: ambassador from, i. 71 ; iii. 
441. 

— Danes, i. 461 ; iv. 307 : Danish 
students in Oxford, ii. 200-1, 203, 
280-1, 286; iv. 74. 

France : — 

— Alanzon, iii. 386. 

— Aquitaine, i. 457, 470. 

— Avignon, iv. 252. 

— Azenby, iii. 291. 
— ■ Barfleur, iii. 390. 

— Baroune, iii. 82. 

— Becco-Helvini, iv. 120. 

— Blois, i. 51-2 ; iii. 493 ; v. 9. 

— Bomy, i. 408. 

— Boulogne, iii. 290-1, 353. 

— Bourbon, due de, iii. 291. 

— Brest, iii. 459. 

— Burgundy, Louis, due de, died 171 2, 
iii. 315. 

— Calais, i. 409 ; ii. 123, 221 ; iii. 291. 

— Cambrai, ii. 453 ; iii. 99. 

— Charenton, iii. 304. 

— Douai, i. 194; ii. 192, 203, 223, 
269, 314, 321; iii. 99, 181, 252, 
295 ; iv. 120. 

— Dunkirk, ii. 374. 

— Havre de Grace, iii. 398. 

— La Hogue, iii. 390, 419. 

— Liege, iii. 451. 

— Longueville, due de, i. 408. 

— Louvain, iii. 101 ; iv. 118. 

— Lyons, i. 52. 

— Montillet, i. 51. 

— Montpellier, ii. 148, 389 ; iii. 265. 

— Normandy, i. 337 ; iv. 120, 305. 

— Orleans, Louis d', 1513, i. 408. 

— Orleans, due d', Philip, iii. 8 ; and 
Henriette, his duchess, died 1670, ii. 
195-6, 198, 330; iii. 8; iv. 73 
(' Madam '). 

— Paris, i. 216 ; ii. 91, 193, 392, 555, 
559-60, 562-3; iii. 30, 138, 164, 
225, 244, 287, 291, 315, 337, 357, 
406, 421, 450, 463, 469. 

books printed at Paris, i. 436, 

459; ii. 8, 91, 179-81, 191, 291. 

Romanist books printed in fact 

at London often professed to be 
printed at Paris, ii. 252, 464. 

University of Paris, ii. 268 ; iv. 

120, 151, 175, 269. 

the Sorbonne, doctors of, iii. 190, 

264, 271, 386, 443; iv. 52. 

the Louvre (' lover'), ii. 236. 

the Paris Gazette, ii. 272. 

— Picardy, i. 269. 

— Picqueny, i. 269. 

— Rheims, archbishop of, ii. 374-6 ; 
iii. 315. 



The continent of Europe {cont.) : — 
France: Richelieu, due de, ii. 151. 

— Roan (? Rouen), bishop of, iii. 354. 

— Rothomagum, iv. 1 20-1. 

— Rotuelin, marquis de, i. 408. 

— Rouen, i. 337 ; ii. 286, 299. 

— S. Denis, i. 269. 

— S. Germains, iii. 297, 357, 371, 387, 
401, 421, 423, 452, 477. 

— S. Omer's, i. 194 ; ii. 418, 456, 550 ; 
iii. 100, 214. 

— S. Valery, i. 269. 

— Terouanne, i. 408. 

— Vandome, due de, i. 89. 1 

— Vernville, due de, ii. 59. 

— Versailles, iii. 475. 

— Vicque, baro de, ii. 287. 

— Wallen, ii. 550. 

— Frenchmen travelling in England, 
ii. 179, 291. 

— natives of France, ii. 43, 93, 267, 
337-8; iii. 68, 189, 256, 258, 263: 
general character of, ii. 376. 

— immigration of French Protestants, 

337-8. 549 5 ™- 2> 6 > l8 5> l8 9~ 
91, 215, 265, 304, 351 ; iv. 77 ; 
Huguenots, ii. 437; iii. 215. 

— French residents in London, i. 423 : 
the French church in London, ii. 338 ; 
French merchants in London, ii. 423. 

— ambassadors from France, ii. 46, 59, 
66 ; iii. 126. 

— ambassadors to France, i. 269 ; ii. 
176, 432, 559 5 iii- 158, 163. 

— English lads sent or taken to France 
for education, i. 51-2,93 ; iii. 8, 30, 115. 

— English (Romanist) gentry educated 
in French convents, iii. 214. 

— English students in French colleges, 

ii. 148, 164. 

— Englishmen travel in France, ii. 1 26, 
181, 193, 369, 389, 555, 559; hi. 
104, 287 ; iv. 292. 

— English children under French tutors 
at home, i. 422 : French teachers in 
Oxford, ii. 150: French teachers in 
London, iii. 482. 

— English immured in French con- 
vents, iii. 98-101. 

— English in the king of France's 
service, i. 194 ; iii. 98, 101. 

— English political and Romanist re- 
fugees in France, ii. 123; iii. 253, 
290, 301, 35°> 3§3> 466-7, 533- 

— English imitation of France, i. 422. 

— pamphlets about French history, i. 
230, 302, 434; ii. 151, 179-81. 

— books translated from the French, 
i- 20, 331, 380; ii. 149, 252, 510; 

iii. 167. 

— war with France, v. 59. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



8? 



The continent of Europe (cont.) : — 
France : grammar of the French language, 

ii. 150 : MSS. in French, iii. 343 ; iv. 

181, 307 : incidental mention of the 

language, ii. 266; iii. 273. 
. — French coins, i. 241 ; iii. 181 : 

French lute, ii. 43 : the French 

Gazette, iii. 182, 250, 524: constables 

of, i. 216 : a 'child of France,' iii. 

315 : Louis, the dauphin, died 1711, 

ii. 374: 'the Fr(ench) king,' i.e. 
James II in exile, iii. 423 : French 
music, i. 212. 

— kings of France : — 

Charles IX, i. 434 : massacre at 

Paris, iii. 244. 

Henry IV, i. 89, 380 ; ii. 59. 

Anne Marie of Austria, regent, 

i. 230. 
Louis XIV, v. 59. 

— incidental mention of France, i. 89, 
128, 278, 292, 399; ii. 68, 291, 
374-6 ; iii. 33, 138, 287, 356, 391, 

443- 

Germany : — 

— Baden - Baden, Ludwig Wilhelm, 
margrave of, iii. 438, 441-2. 

— Bavaria, ii. 315; iii. 57-8. 

— Brandenburg, Friedrich Wilhelm, 
elector of, envoy from, 1674, & 
287-8 : Friedrich, 1695, iii. 487. 

— Bremen, ii. 148. 

— Brunswick, ii. 478 : Georg Ludwig, 
duke of, 1681, ii. 518. 

— Cleves, i. 402 ; ii. 315. 

— Cologne, Colen, i. 194, 208 ; iii. 
159, 163, 167; iv. 301: bishop of, 

iii. 266. 

— Consarbrick, iii. 101. 

— Dantzic, Gedanum, i. 165 ; ii. 378 ; 

iii. 394. 

— Dusseldorf, iii. 451. 

— Edingen, ii. 495. 

— Einsheim, iii. 101. 

— Frankendale, ii. 495. 

— Frankfort, i. 248 ; ii. 394. 

— Frankfort-on-Oder, i. 426. 

— Gedanum (Dantzic), i. 165. 

— Hanover, i. 210 : Ernst August and 
Sophia, duke and duchess of, ii. 
524 : Georg Ludwig, duke of, ii. 518, 
524; iv. 77. 

— Heidelberg, ii. 117, 307. 

— Hesse, Christian, landgrave of, 1636, 

iv. 56. 

— Hildensiensis, ii. 21. 

— Itenheim, iii. 101. 

— Johannitarum equitum ordo, ii. 287. 

— Julia, ii. 315. 

— Lambspring, ii. 545. 

— Lawach, iii. 357. 



The continent of Europe (cont.) : — 
Germany : Lippe, iii. 58. 

— Lubeck, i. 256, 486 ; ii. 213. 

— Luneburg, i. 426. 

— Lunenberg, ii. 518. 

— Mannheim, ii. 495. 

— March, ii. 315. 

— Moers, ii. 315. 

— Moguntia (Mainz), i. 287. 

— Montes, ii. 315. 

— Neuburg, prince of, ii. 286, 315: 
Philip Wilhelm, duke of, 1675, ii. 
315- 

— Nurnberg, iv. 298. 

— Oppenheim, i. 44 t. 

— Palatinate, the, ii. 307, 315; iii. 
57-8. 

the elector Palatine (Palsgrave) : — 

Frederic V, iv. 272. 

— Charles Louis, i. 115 ; ii. 495 ; 

iv. 56. 

— — — Charles II, his son, ii. 495, 
497, 512 ; iii. 32; iv. 77. 

— Prussia, i. 165 ; ii. 174, 497. 

— Royal Prussia, i. 290, 472. 

— Ratisbon, iii. 68, 120. 

— Ravenberg and Ravenstein, ii. 315. 

— Ruppe, ii. 287. 

— Saxe-Gotha-Altenberg, Friedrich II, 
f 1732, and Friedrich III, dukes of, 
iii. 422. 

— Saxony, Johann Georg III, duke of, 
iii. 188. 

— Schwerin, ii. 287. 

— Spinheim, ii. 315. 

— Strasburg, i. 290, 472. 

— Swecia, ii. 158. 

— Teutonic order, iii. 451. 

— Treves, Trier, i. 460; iii. ior. 

— Veldentria, ii. 315. 

— Westphalia, iii. 236. 

— the emperor of Germany : — 

Ferdinand III, f 1658, i. 321 ; ii. 

492. 

Leopold I, f 1705, v. 58. 

— German language, ii. 158. 

— natives of Germany, iii. 5, 58, 145, 
167, 423 : reputation for drinking, 
iii. 441 : quacks and mountebanks in 
England, i. 377 (' High Dutch ') ; iii. 
59> 2 75 ('High German'): the 
German giant, ii. 140, 548. 

— incidental mention of Germany, i. 
115 (the Thirty Years' war), 292, 
404 (' High Germany') ; iii. 32. 

Greece : — 

— Athens, iv. 60. 

— Mount Athos, ii. 379. 

— Cephalonia, i. 154-5 > 

— Mitylene, i. 168. 

— Nicaria, ii. 379. 



88 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The continont of Europe (cont.) : — 
Greece : Patmos, ii. 379. 

— Samos, ii. 379 : archbishop of, ii. 

379 J iv - 7 6 - 

— Greeks visiting Oxford, i. 76, 154-5 ; 

ii. 334 ; iii. 143, 156 ; iv. 58, 74, 76 : 
Greek church in London, ii. 379. 

' — modern Greek language, i. 154-5. 
— proposed college for Greeks in 
Oxford, iii. 379, 399. 

Greeks in the Oxford University 
legend, ii. 406. 
Holland and the Low Countries, the 
Netherlands : — 

— Amsterdam, i. 12, 210 ; ii. 467, 475 ; 

iii. 34-5, 74, 117, 256, 316, 318; iv. 
30. ' Amsterdam ' put on the titles 
of London -printed books, iii. 120. 

— Antwerp, Anvers, i. 12, 208, 292, 
507 ; ii. 180 ; iii. 101 ; iv. 64. 

— Batavi, iii. 337. 

— Belgium Hispanicum, ii. 287. 

— Breda, ii. 1 1 2. 

— Brill, iii. 35. 

— Bruges, ii. 183. 

— Brussels, ii. 444, 463 ; iii. 101, 373, 
460. 

— Charleroi, iii. 405. 

— Dordrecht, ii. 315. 

— Flanders, i. 208, 462 ; ii. 418, 452 ; 
iii- 5, 157, 3o8, 392, 401, 403, 405, 
472, 482, 491. 

— Grammen, iii. 402. 

— the Hague, Haag, La Haye, i. 12, 
156, 269 ; ii. 296, 307, 328, 444; iii. 
117; iv. 64. 

— Harlem, iii. 250. 

— Home, ii. 131. 

— Landen, iii. 448. 

— Leyden, i. 229; ii. 218, 343; iii. 
403. 

— the Low Countries, i. 462 ; ii. 284 ; 
iii. 123. 

— Mons, iii. 403. 

— Namur, iii. 99, 487-8, 491. 

— Nassau, prince John Maurice of, 
1661, i. 402. 

— Nimeguen, iii. 163. 

— Rotterdam, i. 507. 

— Steenkirk, iii. 454. 

— the Texel, ii. 37-8, 194. 

— Utrecht, ii. 462. 

— the Dutch republic — 

1652-3, at war with England, i. 

189; iv. 63. 
1664-7, at war with England, 

ii. 24, 37-8, 40, 54-5, 89, 96, 103, 
417 ; iii. 158, 163 ; iv. 68-9. 

1683, refuge of extreme Whigs, 

iii. 19, 32-5, 70, 74, 117. 

1688, refuge of Whigs, iii. 266. 



The continent of Europe (cont.) : — 
Holland: the Dutch republic : 1688, 
invasion of England, iii. 27^, 293. 

— — 1690-2, war with France, iii. 
337. 39°- 

ambassador to, ii. 296 ; iii. 117, 

302. 

— Dutchmen, i. 122; ii. 112,174, 223, 
422 ; iii. 318, 336, 465. 

— weaving trade, i. 477 : Dutch paper, 
i. 222, 249, 259 ; ii. 131. 

— Dutch language, ii. 208, 315 : books 
in, i. 12, 507 ; iv. 64. 

— Holland, incidental mention of, i. 
39, 100, 327; ii. 86, 174; iii. 275, 

3°4> 347, 35 1 , 354> 373. 378~9> 4i7> 
465, 472. 
Hungary, iii. 473, 481. 

— Buda, iii. 32, 196, 200. 

— king of, 1687, Joseph I, iii. 253. 

— ambassador to, iii. 253. 

— Hungarians, i. 452 ; ii. 74, 225 ; iv. 
66. 

Italy :— 

— Ancona, ii. 193. 

— Assisi, iv. 311. 

— Bologna, Bononia, ii. 15S, 160, 182, 
193- 

— Florence, ii. 161, 193, 262 : the 
Floriac library, ii. 159, 161. 

duke of, iv. 71. 

— Leghorn, ii. 262. 

— Loretto, iii. 255. 

— Marsaglia, iii. 432. 

— Mediterranean, iii. 95. 

— Modena, duchy of, iii. 313, 469-70. 

— Naples, iii. 239. 

— Padua, ii. 118, 158, 160; iii. 182. 

— Parma, duke of, Ranuccio II, died 
1694, iii. 474 : princess-dowager of, 
iii. 471. 

— Pavia, i. 498. 

— Piedmont, iii. 432. 

— Pisa, ii. 158 ; iv. 118. 

— Rome, i. 224, 425 ; ii. 8, 38, 87, 145, 
166, 170, 181, 193, 314, 401, 476; 
iii. 98, 102, 251, 307, 354, 356, 401, 
423, 440-1, 460 ; iv. 120, 294. 

the Pantheon, ii. 401 : the Vati- 
can, iii. 343; iv. 133: the English 
college at, ii. 182. 

books printed at, i. 425 ; ii. 182, 

227, 341. 

— — the popes, ii. 145; iv. 133: 
burning the pope's effigy, ii. 500, 
558-9, iii. 406 ; v. 49. 

bishops in parti bus : Amasia, iii. 

219, 222 : Atremetum, iii. 179, 193, 
244 : Chalcedon, iii. 461 : Madaura, 

iii. 171, 264, 269, 272-3 : Prusia, 

iv. 311. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



£9 



The continent of Europe {cont.) : — 
Italy : Salerno, iii. 343. 

— Savoy, i. 198 : duke of, Victor 
Amadeus II, iii. 432. 

— Spalato, archbishop of, ii. 185. 

— Turin, ii. 193 ; iii. 432. 

— Tuscany, grand duke of, Ferdinand 
II, ii. 156: prince of, ii. 155-62; 
iv. 71. 

— Venice, i. 377 ; iii. 156, 376. 

— Englishmen travelling in, ii. 170, 
181, 193, 262, 455 ; iii. 98, 102, 104 ; 
iv. 292. 

— natives of Italy, i. 377 ; ii. 160, 
182; iii. 31, 273, 387. 

— Italian language, ii. 160, 181 ; iii. 
50, 273 : books in, ii. 182, 341 : 
books translated from, i. 386 ; ii. 8, 
20, 151, 180. 

Norway : — 

— Bergen, ii. 200. 

— Feindmarch, ii. 350. 

— Zembla, iii. 113. 
Poland : — 

— natives of, i. 457 ; ii. 158 ; iii. 5, 
142. 

— king of, ii. 279. 

Portugal, i. 269 ; ii. 13, 289, 373. 

— king of, ii. 452 : infanta of, i. 440. 

— ambassador from, ii. 289, 414. 

— Lisbon, i. 305 : archbishop of, iii. 
253- 

— Porto, ii. 373. 

— Villa-vitiosa, iii. 101. 
Russia, ii. 92 ; iii. 281 ; iv. 197. 

— Zembla, iii. 113. 

Spam, i. 80, 302 ; ii. 342 ; iv. 308. 

— Gibraltar, iii. 448-9. 

— Madrid, i. 267 ; ii. 148 ; iii. 377. 

— Palantina, ii. 328. 

— Pamplona, ii. 328, 334. 

— Polencia, ii. 334. 

— Salamanca, ii. 68, 327-8, 334, 342, 
465. 

— Tudela, ii. 334. 

— king of, Philip IV, 1643, i. 80; 
Charles II, ii. 287, 498. 

— ambassador from, i. 77, 80; ii. 46, 
59> 67, 71. 

— ambassador to, i. 267 ; iii. 377. 

— Spanish coin, i. 238; Spanish mer- 
chant, i. 42 ; iii. 218, 448. 

Sweden, Sweedland, i. 39; iii. 38, 57. 

— natives of, i. 475, 486 ; ii. 213, 287 ; 
iii. 5. 76- 

— Agriconius, Croneberg, Daal, Elfs- 
borgthen, Nynas, Penteberg, Tulgarn, 
ii. 287. 

— Stockholm, iii. 462. 

— king of, Gustavus Adolphus, i. 115 : 
Charles XI, ii. 287 ; iii. 38, 57. 



The continent of Europe {cont) : — 
Sweden : queen of, Christina, died 1689, 

i. 115 (' Christianus/ in error); iii. 
441. 

— ambassador from, ii. 287 : ambassa- 
dor to, i. 188; iii. 38, 462. 

Switzerland : — 

— Basel, council of, i. 318; iv. 118, 
280. 

— Constance, council of, iv. 118. 

— Geneva, iii. 318. 

— Lausanne (?), Lauraine(?), iii. 432. 

— Zurich, Turicum, i. 180, 459. 
Turkey, ii. 15, 281, 420. 

— Adrianople, iii. 372. 

— Belgrade, iii. 400-1. 

— Constantinople, i. 168 ; ii. 379, 420; 
iii. 30, 146, 399, 470, 482, 484. 

— the Great Mogul, iii. 156, 218; the 
Great Mogul Turk, i. 168 ; the Turk, 

ii. 54 ; the Great Turk, iii. 401 ; the 
Grand Seigneur, ii. 15; the Ottoman 
Porte, iii. 376 : the Porte, ii. 15. 

— ambassador to, i. 168 ; iii. 30, 372, 
376, 378, 400-1, 470, 482, 484. 

— English interest in the wars against, 
1665 onwards, ii. 54; iii. 68, 105, 
121, 196, 200. 

— native of, i. 255 ; Turks buy kid- 
napped Englishmen, i. 452 ; ii. 222 : 
the Grand Vizier, i. 168 ; iii. 121. 

— the Turkey company, i. 168 ; fleet of 
traders with, iii. 448. 

The British Isles. 

— the Dogger sands, ii. 257. 

— the Channel Islands. 

Guernsey, Garnsey, ii. 345, 542 ; 

iii. 54. 

Jersey, ii. 357, 542 ; iii. 85, 436. 

— Isle of Man, i. 156. 

bishops of, iii. 121, 424. 

called bishops of Sodor, iii. 

135, 416; iv. 283. 

John Merick, 1576-1600, iv. 283. 

Isaac Barrow, 1663-71, ii. 183, 

489. 

Henry Bridgman, 1671-82, i. 329; 

iii. 15. 

John Lake, 1682-4, v. 57. 

Baptist Levinz, iii. 96, 11 1, 135, 

268, 303, 415-6, 424. 
Thomas Wilson, 1698, iii. 424. 

— Isle of Wight, see under Hampshire. 
England, by counties, v. 92. 
Ireland. 

— Achonry, bishop of, iii. 347. 

— Affance, ii. 79. 

— Aghrim, iii. 368. 

— Ardagh, bishop of, iii. 385. 

— Ardfert, bishop of, ii. 334. 

— Armagh, archbishop of, i. 102, 203 ; 



90 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The British. Islos {continued') : — 
iii. 2, 435; iv. 252, 258: Romanist 
archbishop of, ii. 182 : dean of, i. 181. 

Ireland : Boyne, the, iii. 327, 333, 432. 

— Carrickfergus, iii. 332. 

— Cashel, ii. 328, 334, 343 : archbishop 
of, ii. 334 ; iii. 310, 347, 435, 449. 

— Charlemont, i. 41, 50. 

— Clanbrassil, iii. 384. 

— Clogher, bishop of, iii. 347. 

— Clonfert, bishop of, iii. 347. 

— Cloyne, bishop of, iii. 59, 385, 392, 

4 l8 ,449- 

— Coleraine, iii. 302. 

— Connaught, i. 104 ; iii. 440. 

— Cork, iii. 344, 347, 462 : bishop of, 

ii. 469; Romanist bishop of, iii. 423, 
443- 

— Derry, Londonderry, iii. 326-7 ; 
bishop of, ii. 432, 469, 558 ; iii. 309- 

1o > 347. 355- 

— Down and Connor, bishop of,ii. 116; 

iii. 3, 462, 466. 

— Drogheda, Tredagh, i. 27, 17 1-3; 
v. 9-10. 

— Dromore, bishop of, iii. 59. 

— Dublin, i. 177, 180, 203, 274, 287, 
425 5 ii- 73, 94, 253, 5^5 5 iii- 246, 
273, 306, 314, 337, 355, 373. 

Trinity College, i. 275, 347; ii. 

327, 432, 55 8 ; ^ 42, 77, 263, 314, 

385 : library of, i. 203. 
S. Patrick's, i. 380 ; ii. 343, 399, 

403, 432 ; iii. 359, 445. 

— — Christ Church, ii. 328, 334, 399, 
469; iii. 3, 255, 435. 

S. Werburgh's, iii. 355. 

Philosophical society, iii. 77-8,107. 

castle, ii. 440, 460. 

archbishop of, ii. 550; iii. 2, 3, 

435, 449 ; iv. 102 : Romanist bishop 

of, iii. 443-... 

— Dundalk, iii. 309-T0. 

— Dungannon, Duncannon, i, 156. 

— Elphin, bishop of, iii. 347. 

— Emly, iii. 385. 

— Fermanagh, Firmana, i. 349. 

— Ferns and Leighlin, bishop of, iii. 77, 

295, 347- 

— Galway, Galloway, i. 156. 

— Geashill, iii. 178. 

— Kildare, bishop of, iii. 3, 205. 

— Kilkenny, ii. 556. 

— Killala, bishop of, ii. 432 ; iii. 347. 

— Killaloe, bishop of, ii. 479 ; iii. 418 : 
iii. 347, Killalow is in error for Killala. 

— Kilmore, bishop of, iii. 385, 401. 

— Leighlin, bishop of, iii. 347. 

— Limerick, iii. 305, 372-3, 377 ; bishop 
of, iii. 347, 496 ; dean of, ii. 479, 496, 
498 ; iii. 316. 



The British Isles (continued} : — 
Ireland: Lisnygarry, ii. 507. 

— Londonderry, see Derry. 

— Longford, dean of, iii. 347. 

— Meath, bishop of, iii. 2. 

— Ossory, bishop of, ii. 399, 432, 468 ; 
iii. 418; iv. 121 : dean of, iii. 418: 
archdeacon of, iii. 418. 

— Raphoe, bishop of, ii. 558 ; iii. 385 : 
dean of, iii. 59. 

— Ross, dean of, i. 279. 

— Tredagh, see Drogheda. 

— Tuam, archbishop of, i. 275 ; ii. 
469 ; iii. 326. 

— Ulster, red hand of, ii. 309. 

— Waterford, bishop of, ii. 334 ; iii. 
306, 359 : dean of, iii. 306. 

— Youghal, i. 156; ii. 79. 

— law officers, &c, i. 1, 42 ; iii. 2, 123, 
409, 422, 445, 485 : heralds, i. 112 : 
privy council, ii. 94, 288. 

— bishops, i. 380; ii. 73 ; iii. 42, 347 : 
primate of, ii. 175. 

— lords lieutenant, lords deputy : — 
1644, James, 1st duke of Ormonde, 

ii. 222. 

1649, James, 1st duke of Ormonde, 

i. 156. 

1654, Charles Fleetwood, iii. 404. 

1670, John, lord Berkeley of 

Stratton, ii. 224. 
1674, Arthur, earl of Essex, ii. 

334- 

1677-82, James, 1st duke of Or- 
monde, v. 64. 
1684, James, 1st duke of Ormonde, 

iii. 108. 

1685, Henry, earl of Clarendon, 

v. 38. 

1692, Henry, viscount Sydney, 

iii. 398, 418. 

— description of, 1673, ii. 539 ; map of, 
1653, i. 181 ; history of, iv. 263 ; Sir 
James Ware's books about, ii. 5, 73, 
76, 94; pamphlets about, i. 17, 172, 
181, 380, 425 ; iii. 293, 302. 

— Irishmen, i. 50, 162, 166, 287, 305, 
486; ii. 48, 54, 72, 150, 182, 271, 

305, 327, 334, 343, 378, 474, 54 8 5 

iii. 246, 256, 273, 292, 305, 351 ; 

iv. 74. 

— Irish language, ii. 158. 

— Irish peers, i. 41, 50, 104; ii. 461 ; 
iii. 124, 246, 325, 441, 486. 

— wars in Ireland, i. 38, 180 ; iii. 124. 

— the Irish rebellion, 1641, i. 41, 50, 
115, 166 : fast on account of, i. 89. 

— Parliamentary army in Ireland, i. 65, 
115. 

— Commonwealth army in Ireland, 
i. 39. H5> WS, 301 ; v. 9, 10. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



91 



The British Isles {continued} : — 
Ire/and : William Ill's campaign in 
Ireland, v. 75, 77. 

— incidental mention, i. 279 ; ii. 54, 79, 
195, 264, 280, 285, 295, 298, 319, 
3 2 7, 353, 542 ; iii. 27, 66, 106, 108, 
278, 292-3, 3°2, 3!3, 318, 3 2 5» 
331-2, 344, 351, 440, 462. 

Scotland. 

— Abercorn, Abercrombie, iii. 403. 

— Aberdeen, V. 156; iii. 404: New- 
Aberdeen, King's college, i. 351 : 
Old Aberdeen, iii. 9, 225 : Aberdeen- 
shire, iii. 355- ... 

bishop of, iii. 9, 10. 

— Aberlady, iii. 404. 

— Ardmaddie, iii. 442. 

— Aymouth, Eyemouth, iii. 32, 50. 

— Ayrshire, ii. 458-9. 

— Berwick-on-Tweed, i. 119. 

— Bothwell bridge, ii. 454. 

— Brechin, bishop of, i. 331 ; ii. 296 ; 
iii. 10. 

— Carrick, ii. 458. 

— Coldingham, iv. 93. 

— Co(l)monell, ii. 458. 

— Dramclog, ii. 452. 

— Dunblane, bishop of, iii. 10, 209. 

— Dunkeld, bishop of, iii. 10, 209, 213. 

— Edinburgh, books printed at, i. 18, 
426, 501 ; ii. 202. 

University, i. 88 ; ii. 202-3 ; iii. 

382, 386, 442. 
bishop of, iii. 213 ; dean of, iii. 10. 

— ■ — Lady Yester's church, ii. 202 : 
College of Physicians, ii. 562. 

news-letter from, iii. 364, 404, 

443, 445> 454- 

incidental mention, ii. 450, 545 ; 

iii. 373, 403-4, 443, 447-8. 

— Eyemouth, Aymouth, iii. 32, 50. 

— Galloway, bishop of, iii. 209. 

— Glasgow, i. 115. 

University, i. 115 ; ii. 458-9 ; iii. 

201. 

archbishop of, ii. 483 ; iii. 109, 

213, 389, 401, 411. 

— Haddington, iii. 364. 

— Jordanhill, i. 115. 

— Kilburn, i. 115. 

— Leuchars, i. 88. 

— Merchiston, i. 192. 

— Moray, bishop of, iii. 201. 

— Orkneys, iii. 356. 

— Rosky, i. 192. 

— S. Andrews, S. Salvator's church, 
iii. 107. 

University, i. 135 ; ii. 5. 

archbishop of, ii. 450; iii. 107, 

109, 213. 

— Scone, i. 156. 



The British Isles {continued) : — 
Scotland: Stirling, i. 156: Stirling 
castle, iii. 303. 

— admiral of Scotland, iii. 356, 404 ; 
lord advocate, iii. 96. 

— proverbs of, ii. 149; description of, 
1673, 539 5 description of, 1682, 

i. 351 ; the Scottish accent, iii. 50. 

— kirk of, i. 88-9, 98, 300, 331, 367; 
iii. 63, 355 : dress of ministers, i. 
148. 

— the episcopal church in, i. 421, 439; 

ii. 539; iii. 10, 107, 109, 201, 207, 
209, 213, 336, 355. 

— peers of, i. 60, 496 ; iii. 50, 107, 156, 

303, 330-1 > 34 8 , 364. 44 2 > 446, 454- 

— natives of, i. 60, 98, 114-5, 118, 
192; ii. 150, 178, 202, 459-60; iii. 
74, 84, 96, 124, 156, 225, 266, 311, 

332, 348, 355, 37°> 373, 376, 394> 
448, 476 ; iv. 219, 286, 308 : students 
in Oxford, ii. 202-3, 22 6, 459-60; 

iii. 311, 347, 361, 386, 442 : teachers 
in Oxford, ii. 150, 178 ; iii. 225, 382. 

■ — incidental mention, i. 426; ii. 137, 
460, 472, 562 ; iii. 63, 361, 370, 389, 
403; iv. 52, 62. 

— events mentioned : — 

David, king of Scots, iv. 251. 

war of independence, iv. 257. 

1639, war w ^ Charles I, iv. 56, 

1643, commissioners at Oxford to 

treat with Charles I, i. 88-90, 92, 98. 

1644-5, Montrose's campaigns, i. 

288. 

1647, surrender of Charles I, iii. 

442. 

165 1, crowning of Charles II and 

invasion of England, i. 156, 170; 

iv. 63. 

1679-80, the presbyterian rising, 

ii. 450, 452, 454, 545. 
1679-82, the refuge of James, 

duke of York, ii. 464, 499 ; iii. 31, 

13°, 3 2 4- 

1685, Argyle's invasion, iii. 143. 

Wales. 

— Bangor, ii. 275 ; iii. 15 : bishops of, 
ii. 81, 273, 551; iii. 121, 175, 384, 
402; deans of, ii. 489 ; iii. 24, 204-5, 
384 ; archdeacons of, iii. 204. 

— Brecknock, i. 180; ii. 390; iii. 294, 
354 : shire, iii. 166. 

— Cardiff, ii. 457. 

— Cardigan, ii. 125 ; iii. 418. 

— Carnarvon, iii. 204. 

— Cawen, Merion., i. 135. 

— Ceretica Cambria, iii. 429. 

— Chirk castle, Denb., ii. 214. 

— Cowbridge, Glam., iv. 8. 



92 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The British Isles {continued): — 
Wales: Denbighshire, ii. 214; Hi. 345. 

— Dolgelly, ii. 262. 

— Flintshire, ii. 416. 

— Funman, Glam., iii. 403. 

— Glamorganshire, ii. 117, 353, 397; 
iv. 5. 

— Golden Grove, iii. 175. 

— Gwyclir, ii. 414. 

— Haverfordwest, Pemb., ii. 396. 

— Holywell, Flints., iii. 232. 

— Kerrigstone, Glam., iii. 148. 

— Kidwelly, Carm., ii. 191, 475; iii. 
167, 440 ; iv. 94; 

— Llanblethian, Glam., iii. 158, 162. 

■ — Llandaff, bishops of, ii. 311, 314, 444; 
iii. iai, 175, *9°> 3<5i-2, 375, 413, 
472 : officers, &c. of the chapter, 

iii. 190, 212, 361-2, 413. 

— Llandovery, Carm., iii. 73. 

— Llanerch, Denb., iii. 345, 383, 439 ; 

iv. 174. 

— Llahthristid, Glam., iii. 158, 162. 

— Llantrythyd, Glam., iii. 158, 162. 

— Loveslodge, Carm., iii. 166. 

■ — the marches of Wales, i. 262 ; ii. 283. 

— Merionethshire, i. 135, 194; ii. 261. 

— Montgomery, iii. 374. 

— Northop, Flints., ii. 513. 

— North Wales, iii. 486. 

— Panty court, Breckn., ii. 15. 

— Pembrokeshire, i. 137 ; iii. 345 ; iv. 8. 

— Pentayne, Carm., iii. 212. 

— Ruabon, ii. 439. 

— S. Asaph, iii. 345 : bishop of, i. 347 ; 

ii. 447, 489, 497 ; iii. 38, 59, 392, 
502 ; v. 59 : officers, &c. of the 
cathedral, iii. 94 ; deans of, iii. 204- 
20 5> 2 55, 384; archdeacons of, iii. 
204-5. 

— S. Brechin, iii. 166. 

— S. David's, bishops of, i. 226, 329, 
485 ; ii. 389-90, 400, 472; iii. 65-7, 
72, 79, 121, 175, 181, 198-9, 200, 
204, 212, 214, 244, 266, 331, 390, 
462, 465-6 : arms of the see, iii. 212 : 
officers, &c. of the cathedral, ii. 346 ; 

iii. 204, 354. 

— S. Donat's, Glam., iii. 175. 

— Skere, Glam., ii. 562. 

— South Wales, i. 365. 

— Swansea, Glam., iii. 350. 

— Trawscoed, Card., iii. 486. 

— Van, Glam., i. 435-6. 

— Wenvoe, Glam., iii. 465-6. 

— natives of, i. 33, 41, 81, 124, 135, 
137, 406; ii. 75, 220, 344; iii. 131, 
158, 187, 427, 429. 

— the church in, iv. 121. 

— lord president of, iii. 441 : silver in, 
iii. 345- 



Tho British Isles (continued) : — 
Wales: Welsh names, i. 135; Erasmus 

Lewes' Welsh dictionary, i. 8 ; a 

Welsh MS., iv. 307. 

— ballads and pamphlets about, i. 48, 
293 ; iii. 6. 

— incidental mention, i. 39, 50, 137, 

293, 43i ; ii- i9 2 > 2 35, 343, 34<>, 355, 
539 ; iii. 158; iv. 70. 

England, by counties : — 

— maps of England, i. 454. 

— places not traced to their counties, 
Cuffield, iii. 214; Haghmon abbey, 
iv. 97. 

— Mercia, bishop of, ii. 175. 
Bedfordshire: — i. 117, 141, 245, 305. 

— Ampthill, iii. 295. 

— Bedford, archdeacon of, ii. 429. 

— Carlton, i. 305. 

— Cranfield, i. 167. 

— Dunstable priory, iv. 92. 

— Fleetwick, i. 245. 

— Northill, ii. 56a. 

— Odell, ii. 138. 

— Salford, ii. 3 1 7. 

— Tengrith, ii. 200. 

— Warden, iii. 137. 
Berkshire : — 

— archdeacon of, ii. 115 ; iii. 353, 369. 

— registrar of, official of, i. e. of the 
archdeacon, ii. 125, 195, 220, 308, 
331 ; iii. 7, 403. 

— 1665, heralds' visitation, ii. 405 ; iii. 
189. 

— natives of, i. 63, 112, 134, 195, 207; 
ii. p. viii, 3, 42, 367. 

— natives of, in Oxford, ' feast ' of, 
1669, ii. 154. 

— high sheriff of, i. 135 ; iii. 357 ; iv. 
199. 

— assizes, i. 90. 

— Wood's collections for, iv. 238. 

— Abingdon, Abendon, Abington : — 
natives or inhabitants of, i. 42, 

134, 137, i QI > 214, 238, 245, 417, 
447, 469-70; ii. 52, 108, 198, 377, 
469; iii. 29, 36, 83, 143, 194-5, 252 ; 
iv. 28. 

Wood's visits to, i. 454-5, 471, 

478 ; ii. 35, 280; iii. 307. 
incidental mention, i. 231, 269, 

284, 442 ; ii. 15, 41, 52, 133, 374, 

377, 5445 iii- io 9> H5, 5 2 5 5 
iv. 207. 

points in its history: 1279, council 

of Benedictines, iv. 119:. 1642-4, 
events in the civil war, i. 56-7, 63, 
68, 70, 75, 98-100, 107, 113, 270: 
1659, meeting of Independents, i. 279 : 
1662, a centre of the bishop of Salis- 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



93 



England, by counties {continued} : — 
bury's visitation, i. 454-5 : 168 1-5, 
a Whig town, ii. 560 ; iii. 145 : 1683, 
a stage for the post, iii. 59 : 1686, 
pestilence, iii. 194-5 : 1688, the prince 
of Orange there, iv. 82 : 1692, a non- 
conformist centre, iii. 412. 

Berkshire : Abingdon : assizes held at, 
i. 90 ; ii. 152 ; iii. 307. 

market at, i. 261 ; ii. 13, 511. 

M.P. for, ii. 31 1 : mayor of, iii. 

29 ; iv. 89 : bailiff of, iii. 195 : town- 
clerk, iii. 143 : recorder, i. 29, 141 ; 
iii. 264; v. 14. 

Abingdon abbey, iv. 88-90, 107, 

207, 219, 243 : abbots of, i. 339 : ii. 
301, 355; iv. 89-90: estates of, i. 
260 : library of, iv. 260 : ruins of, 
i- 455- 

town-hall, iii. 361 : school, iii. 

480 : Christ's Hospital, iv. 89 : 
S. Helen's church, ii. 52; iii. 84: 
S. Nicholas church, ii. 198. 

— Aldermaston, iii. 335. 

— Anvill, i. 35. 

— Appleton, ii. 200, 481. 

— Ardington, ii. 28. 

— Arnton, i. 124. 

— Bagley wood, i. 268 ; ii. 97 ; iii. 273. 

— Bayworth, i. 269-70; ii. 152, 191; 
iii. 492-3. 

— Benham, in Speen parish, iii. 365. 

— Besselsleigh, ii. 235, 559 ; iii. 243, 471. 

— Binfield, iii. 354, 366. 

— Blagrave, ii. 41, 365, 380. 

— Blake's oak, i. 70. 

— Botley, i. 57, 104, 469 ; ii. 24-5, 36, 

97> !9 8 , 33 2 > 3<59> 377; 4° 2 > 4^4, 503. 

— Bradfield, iii. 335. 

— Brightwell, i. 362 ; ii. 317, 507; iii. 
429. 

— Buckland, ii. 405 ; iii. 281. 

— Burham, ii. 74 : perhaps in error for 
Burnham, Bucks. 

— Charlton, in Wantage parish, ii. 
p. viii. 

— Chawley, i. 29, 284-5, 443; «• 3<5, 
211 ; v. II-2. 

— Childrey, ii. 147 ; iii. 196 ; iv. 188. 

— Chilswell, ii. 242, 245, 257. 

— Cholsey, i. 232; iii. 123. 

— Coleshill, i. 233. 

— Cumnor, Comnore : — 

church, i. 30; ii. 108, 230, 257, 

477 ; v - I 5 '• description of, i. 260-1. 

manor-house, i. 260-1. 

vicarage, i. 284; v. 11. 

feast, i. 457. 

well, ii. 1 1 1-2. 

vicar of, i. 29, 279, 284, 325, 

441 ; ii. 561 ; iii. 44, 119; v. 11. 



England, by counties {continued} : — 
Berkshire : Cumnor, incidental mention, 
i. 36, 104, 317 ; ii. 13, 28, 116, 131, 

242, 245, 268, 284-5 ; v - 1 5- 

natives or inhabitants of, i. 138, 

284-5 > ii- 83, 108, 117,477 ; v. 14, 16. 

Wood's visits to Cumnor, ii. 24, 88. 

The walk to Cumnor was a 

favourite stroll of Wood's, ending in 
a visit to an ale-house called Pin- 
nock's, i. 231, 303, where he often 
met the Dropes and Peacocks, his 
Cumnor friends. The house is called 
' blind Pinnock's,' i. 388 ; and ' mother 
Pinnock's,'i.486. It probably changed 
hands in the winter of 1669-70, when 
Wood calls it ' Pinnock's alias Tay- 
lor's,' ii. 177, 187, 189 ; or simply 
'Taylor's,' ii. 177, 187; but some- 
times also, from old habit, 'Pin- 
nock's,' ii. 177, 184, 189-90. W T ood 
was a constant caller at Pinnock's, 
1661-9, i. 436, 439, 441, 468-9, 
475, 478, 486, 507; ii. 1, 4, 8, 12, 
14-5, 18-20, 23-5, 27-33, 35-7, 43, 
45, 47, 50-1, 69, 71, 73-7, 79, 8i-2, 
85, 88-9, 92, 98, 102, 104, 106, 108, 
112, 115, 119-22, 126-7, 12 9~3 I > J 33> 
138-41, 143-6, 149, 151, 153, 155, 
163, 174. 

— Denman's farm, i. 29 ; ii. 284 ; v. 14. 

— Didcot, i. 203, 229. 

— Drayton, iii. 471. 

— Endeburne, i. 403. 

— Faringdon, i. 189-90, 456 ; ii. 264, 
396, 405-6, 469; iii. 66, 151, 194, 
282. 

— Farmore, ii. 284. 

— Fernham, iii. 223. 

— Fojccombe hill, ii. 225 ; iii. 41. 

— Frilford, ii. 545. 

— Fyfield, ii. 322, 405-6, 510 ; iii. 40, 
188-9. 

— East Garston, iii. no. 

— Greenham, ii. 345. 

— Hagbourne, i. 32 ; ii. 257. 

— Harwell, iii. 466. 

— Hatford, ii. 447. 

— West Hendred, iii. 390. 

— Hinksey, i. 62, 471 ; iii. 273 : North 
Hinksey, i. 214; ii. 13, 36, 325-6, 
376-7 : South Hinksey, i. 277, 284 ; 

V. IT. 

— Hungerford, ii. 554. 

— Hurley, Horley, ii. 202, 512. 

— Hurst, iii. 68. 

— Inglefield, iii. 1 16. 

— Kennington, i. 42, 230; ii. 138-9, 
236, 326 ; iii. 242. 

— Kingston-Bagpuize, i. 189, 273; ii. 
405, 427; iii. 150. 



94 WOOD'S LIFE 

England, by counties (continued) : — 
Berkshire: Kintbury, i. 35. 

— Letcombe Basset, iii. 189. 

— East Lockinge, ii. 544-5; iii. 109, 
114. 

— Longcol, iii. 223. 

— Lyford, iii. 259. 

— Mackney, iii. 259. 

— Maidenhead, iv. 26. 

— Mareham, ii, 447. 

— Marriage-hill, i. 28, 31 ; v. 16. 

— Milton, i. 231, 442 ; iv. 32. 

— Moreton, iii. 243. 

> — Mortimer, iii. 258, 475. 

— Mungwell, i. 134: in error for 
Mongewell, Oxon. 

— Newbridge, i. 272 ; iv. 188. 

— Newbury, i. 73,104; ii. 345, 367; 
iii. 352 ; iv. 188. 

— Norcot, ii. 365. 

— Pangbourne, iv. 108. 

— Philipson's leas, ii. 285. 

— Pusey, Peysey, ii. 405, 412 ; iii. 
185-6,465-6. 

— Radley, ii. 41, 311, 325, 374; iii. 
29, 132. 

— Reading : — 

events at : — 1279, council, iv. 123: 

1642, in the Civil War, i. 70-2, 75, 
85, 90, 97-100: 1688, skirmish at, 
iii, 293. 

incidental mention, i. 28, 277, 

319, 504; ii. 202; iii. 11, 332; iv. 
26, 53 ; v. 16. 

natives or inhabitants of, i. 470, 

504; ii. 377, 469; iii. 349, 480. 

■ vicar of S. Mary's, ii. 275 ; S. Lau- 
rence church, ii. 377. 

Reading abbey, iv. 107-8, 260. 

— S. John's bridge, ii. 406. 

— Sandford, ii. 113 ; iii. 532 ; iv. 99. 

— Sewkesham, iv. 89. 

— Shaw, ii. 367. 

— Shillingford, i. 406. 

— Shippon, Shipton, ii. 52. 

— Sonning, Sunning, ii. 275. 

— Stanford-Dingley, i. 31 ; v. 16. 

— Steventon, ii. 374. 

— Sunninghill, ii. 137. 

— Sunningwell, i. 150, 269; iii. 81-2, 
203, 251. 

— Sutton-Courtney, ii. 380 ; iii. 357. 

— Swallowfield, i. 283 ; ii. 202 ; iv. 24, 
26. 

— Synodune, i. 226. 

— Tubney, i. 285, 500; ii. 1, 97, 
462. 

— Ufton - Nervet, i. 28; ii. 133; v. 
16. 

— Wadley, i. 387 ; ii. 36, 205, 263, 
396, 405; iii. 194; iv. 280. 



AND TIMES. 

England, by counties (continued) : — 
Berkshire: Wallingford': — 

in the Civil War, i. 99, 164-5. 

incidental mention, i. 135, 203, 

232, 362, 507; ii. 105. 

■ natives of, i. 245, 507. 

assizes at, iii. 135, 260. 

M.P. for, ii. 239: recorder, iii. 135. 

castle, i. 114, 164-5. 

hospital of S. John, ii. 19, 113. 

— Wantage, i. 73, 241 ; ii. p. viii. 

— Whitham, i. 240, i. e. Wytham, 
q. v. 

— Whitley, ii. 481. 

— Whitnam, ii. 105, i. e. Wittenham, 
q. v. 

— Wick, Wyke, near Abingdon, ii. 41, 
380. 

— Wightum, see Wytham. 

— Windsor : — 

incidental mention, i. 71, 90, 203, 

233, 313 5 n - x 37> 2 °o, 35 8 , 4 8 9 5 iiL 
116, 447 ; iv. 75 : vicar of, iii. 25. 

drollery, ii. 176. 

■ forest, i. 90. 

Garter inn, i. 136. 

S. George's chapel, ii. 224-5 ; iii. 

239; iv. 271 ; v. 5. 

— deans of, ii. 225, 282, 295, 

380 ; iii. 57, 62, 65, 106 ; iv. 271. 

canons or prebends of, i. 125-6, 

416; ii. 105, 224-5, 276, 278, 397, 
506; iii. 25, 1 15-6, 208, 244, 258, 
301,304,360,411,425,475; iv.271; 
v. 7. 

catalogue of deans and canons, 

ii. 224-5, 498 ; iv. 271. 

organist, i. 321, 426. 

castle, iii. 58, 90, 484. 

as a prison, iv. 8 : as an arsenal, 

iii. 146 ; iv. 80. 

incidental mention as the royal 

residence, i. 415, 456; ii. 159, 162, 
207, 288-9, 448, 456, 462, 524, 532 ; 
iii. 17-8, 23, 54, 58, 67, 93, 107, 160, 
181, 222, 248, 289, 495 ; iv. 81. 

— Witham, see Wytham. 

— Little Wittenham, Witnam, Whit- 
ham, ii. 105, 378, 500. 

— Long Wittenham, iii. 310. 

— Wolley farm, iii. 1. 

— W T oodend, in Cumnor parish, i. 36, 
317 ; ii. 28 ; v. 14. 

— Wootton, Wotton, ii. 116, 512 ; 
v. 13. 

— Wyke, see Wick. 

— Wytham, Witham, Whitham, Whight- 
ham, i. 26, 104, 152, 240, 336; ii. 

290, 332, 339> 348-9> 549 5 "i. l 77> 
209, 499 ; v. 5. 

— Yattendon, i. 137. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



95 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Bristol, v. 99. 

Buckinghamshire, ii. 220, 389, 499; 
iii. 194, 214, 379. 

natives of, i. 36, 117, 421 ; ii. 47, 

184, 294, 499, 504-5 ; iii. 189, 194, 
341, 361, 404. 

events: — 1642, Buckinghamshire 

squires are for the Parliament, i. 71, 
101, 124; iii. 404 : 1679, Parliamen- 
tary contest, ii. 461 : 1680, Puritan 
feeling, ii. 504-5 : 1688, rising for the 
prince of Orange, iii. 282. 

archdeaconry, iv. 117. 

— Amersden, ii. 11, in error for Am- 
brosden, Oxon. 

— Aylesbury, Ailbury, i. 58-60, 64, 
72-3, 85, 9 2 > n 4- 6 > Il8 > 122-3, 1 3 6 , 
510; ii. 53-4; iii. 93, 306. 

— Beaconsfield, i. 33, 458; ii. 109, 
492 ; iii. 74, 243. 

— Biarton, ii. 454. 

— Bledlow, i. 36, 136, 160-1. 

— Boarstall, i. 114, 117-8, 123, 127; 

ii. 117, 133-5, 2 5 2 5 in - 282 5 iv - 
188. 

— Brill, i. 85, 87, 238, 462 ; ii. 54, 70, 
117, 134; iii. 33, 35, 39. 

— Britwell, ii. 75. 

— Buckingham, i. 279; ii. 11 ; iii. 
261. 

— Chalfont S. Peter's, i. 398. 

— Chetwood, Chitwode, i. 263, 276, 
384 ; ii. 487 ; iii. 246. 

— Cheyneys, ii. 141-2 ; iii. 478. 

— Chilton, ii. 138 ; iii. 260. 

— Chipping Wicomb, see Wycombe. 

— Steeple Claydon, i. 193-4. 

— Col(n)brook, i. 202. 

— Cowley, in Preston parish, i. 37 ; ii. 
24. 

— North Crawley, ii. 169. 

— Long Crendon, i. 114, 238 ; ii. 135 ; 

iii. 303. 

— Crendon bridge, i. 115, 117. 

— Denton (? Dinton), i. 35 ; ii. 107. 

— Dinton, iii. 440. 

— Dorton, iii. 303. 

— Eton, Eaton: — ii. 183, 297, 514; iii. 
116. 

Eton college : — 

provosts, i. 328, 380 ; ii. 26, 42, 

28 9> 5H> 5*7; iii- 66, 491 ; iv. 
• 237. 

fellows of, i. 203, 331 ; ii. 389, 

496, 498, 517 ; iii. 37, 116, 189, 192, 
491 ; iv. 237. 

property of, i. 50 : patronage of, 

iii. 364. 

schoolmaster, iii. 35. 

schoolboys, i. no, 137; ii. 123, 



England, by counties (continued) ; — 
498, 540 ; iii. 372 : postmasterships 
at Merton college, i. 134-7. 

Buckinghamshire : Eton college, cook 
of, ii. 200. 

chapel, inscriptions in, i. 400 ; iv. 

2 37- 

Miles Windsore's collections for, 

iv. 227 : Anthony Wood's collections 
for, iv. 237. 

— Gerrard's Cross, iii. 411. 

— Haddenham, Hadnam, ii. 134-5, 

3i°> 555 5 iii- *4- 

— Hambledon, iii. 26. 

— Ham(p)den, i. 250. 

— Hardwicke, i. 240 ; iii. 452, 506. 

— Great Harwood, Horwood, ii. 198, 
308 ; iii. 266. 

— Haversham, i. 135; iii. 255, 453. 

— Hilsden, iii. 361. 

— Hughenden, i. 37. 

— Ickford, i. 31, 36, 362 ; ii. 141 ; iii. 
486 ; v. 17. 

— Kingsey, i. 116, 382; ii. 481; iii. 

65> 2 57- 

— Lamport (?), iii. 169. 

— Lee, ii. 54. 

— Lee Grange, iii. 461. 

— Lillingston-Dayrell, i. I41. 
• — the Lyde, i. 160-1. 

— Marlow, iijj. 79. 

— Monks Risborough, ii. 336. 

— Moreton, in Denton (?) parish, i. 35 ; 

ii. 107. 

— Muswell, ii. 134. 

— Newport-Pagnell, ii. 538. 

— Notley, Nutley, ii. 133-5. 

— Oakley, Okeley, ii. 133, 135. 

— Owley, i. 263. 

— Peterley, iii. 214. 

— Piddington, ii. 134. 

— Pitchcot, iii. 168. 

— Preston, i. 37, 279 ; ii. 24. 

— Quainton, iii. 439. 

— Quarendon, i. 351. 

— Shabbington, i. 151, 175-6. 

— Shaldeston, ii. 264. 

— Southlie, ii. 393, South-Leigh, iv. 75 : 
probably Slough. 

— Steeple Claydon, i. 193-4. 

— Water Stratford, iii. 453-4. 

— Tingswick, iii. 90. 

— Turville, Turfieldheath, i. 146. 

— Tyringham, iii. 453. 

— Twyford, i. 127, 250; ii. 29, 103; 

iii. 184. 

— Uborne, i.e. Woburn, iii. 465. 

— Upton, iii. 204. 

— the Vach, i. 398 ; iii. 441. 

— Waddesdon, ii. 559 ; iii. 181 ; iv. 
77, 80. 



96 WOOD'S LIFE 

England, by counties (continued) : — 
Buckinghamshire'. Wickham, Wicomb, 
see Wycombe. 

— Woburn, see Uborne. 

— Wotton-Undcrwood, i. 421. 

— Wycoml)e, Wickham, i. e. High 
Wycombe, i. 91, 398, 499; ii. 314; 
iv. 65 : called Great Wycombe, i. 
458 ; iii. 65, 81-2 : called Chipping 
Wycombe, iii. 374 : M. P. for, iii. 
374 : high steward of, iii. 431 ; 
recorder of, i. 35, 421. 

— West Wycombe, iii. 461. 
Ca m bridges h ire . 

— Barnwell, iv. 90. 

— Cambridge town and university, see 
infra. 

— Doddington, i. 151. 

— Isle of Ely, i. 151; iii. 335. 

— Ely, i. 309 ; iii. 182. 

— ■ — bishops of, iv, 94 ; formal election 
by dean and chapter, iii. 363. 

— Philip Morgan, 1431, iv. 90. 

— Matthew Wren, i. 201 ; ii. 

106, 247. 

Benjamin Laney, ii. 106. 

Peter Gunning, ii. 447 ; iii. 

38, io5- 

Francis Turner, v. 72. 

Simon Patrick, iii. 360, 363, 

37i 5 483- 

minster, ii. 282 ; iv. 94, 207. 

dean of, iii. 424 : dean and chapter, 

iii. 363. 

— Gamlingay, iii. 407. 

— Grantbrugge, iv. 301. 

— Hatley St. George, iii. 356. 

— Newmarket, i. 69 ; ii. 229, 297-8, 
358, 420, 463, 530 ; iii. 38, 58. 

— Sturbridge fair, iii. 470, 489. 

— Wilburton, iii. 439. 

— Cambridge, ii. 247, 356, 470 ; iii. 
42, 167, 380, 447; iv. 276-7 : carrier 
to, ii. 77: Cambridge jests, ii. 175: 
books printed at, i. 11-2 ; ii. 361 : 
assizes, iii. 214. 

— Cambridge University : — 
events mentioned : — 

1553, desolation under Edward 

VI, i. 292. 
1564, visit of queen Elizabeth, 

iv. 283. 

1642, visit of Charles I, i. 

1644, ejections by the Parlia- 
ment, ii. 183. 

1648, Puritans come to Oxford 

in hope of fellowships, i. 148-9, 204, 
298, 300. 

1653, threatened by the Rump, 

i. 294. 



AND TIMES. 

England, by counties (continued) : — 
Cambridgeshire: Cambridge University: 

events mentioned : 1660, address to 

Charles II, i. 318. 
1664 (?), visit of Edward, earl 

of Clarendon, ii. 58. 

— 1665-6, plague, ii. 68, 73, 81. 

1669, visit of Cosmo de Medici, 

ii. 155-6, 160 ; iv. 71. 
1670, visit of the prince of 

Orange, ii. 205-6. 
1 67 1, visit of Charles II, ii. 

231. 

— 1675, visit of the prince of 

Neuburg, ii. 315. 
1676, epidemic of small-pox, 

ii. 350. 

visit of the duke of Lauder- 
dale, ii. 357. 

1678, visit of Nell Gwyn, ii. 

420. 

1679, address to Charles II, ii. 

463. 

1 68 1, emigrants from Oxford, 

ii. 524. 

visit of Charles II and his 

consort, ii. 555. 
— 1682, visit of the envoy from 

Morocco, iii. 11. 

— — — — collection for Roger 
L'Estrange, iii. 26. 

■ — 1685, verses on death of Charles 

II, iii. 97, are presented to James II, 

iii. 136. 

1686, mandate from James II 

to influence college elections, iii. 200. 

— 1687, mandate from James II 

to elect a Romanist head of Sydney- 
Sussex College, iii. 214-5. 

— mandate from James II 

for a degree for a Romanist, iii. 221, 
35 6 - 

1689, visit of William III, iii. 

312. 

1691, non-jurors, iii. 363, 380-1, 

43o. 

officers : — 

— chancellor, ii. 57-8, 298, 444; 

iii. 136, 279 ; iv. 174. 
vice-chancellor, ii. 376, 420 ; 

iii. 42, 221, 363. 

— proctors, ii. 420. 

— registrary, iv. 175. 

deputy public orator, ii. 555. 

— — members: — 

incidental mention, i. 294-5 ; 

ii. 162, 233, 249, 251, 271, 329, 356, 

393, 4 r 4> 417, 4 J 9> 4^7> 438, 444; 

iii. 4, 121, 262, 274, 295, 300, 312, 
363, 37 6 > 383, 49°; iv - 8 5, 220-1. 

incorporated at Oxford, i. 69, 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



97 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
333» 49 6 ; 3^, 160, 263, 287, 297 ; 

iii. 15, 120. 

Cambridgeshire : Cambridge University : 
representatives present at the Act in 
Oxford, i. 221 ; ii. 165-6, 548. 

degree system : — 

degrees easier to obtain than 

at Oxford, ii. 262. 

themes of degree disputations, 

ii. 165. 

■ ' Commencement,' i. 266, 296 ; 

ii. 196, 350; iii. 222, 332: 'Terrae 
films' at, iii. 312 : ' umbra' or ' prae- 
varicator ' at, i. 266 : Oxford visitors 
at Commencement, i. 266. 

— — documents about, iv. 92, 94, 
174-5- 

Brian Twyne's collections for, 

iv. 174-5, 207, 214, 217-8, 220-1. 
claims greater antiquity than 

Oxford, i. 266 ; iii. 383 ; iv. 174, 275 : 
Johannes Caius alias Londinensis ' de 
Antiq. Cantab.,' ii. 24 ; iii. 167 ; iv. 
174, 263 : Thomas Fuller's 'History 
of Cambridge,' ii. 316, 361 ; iv. 
174. 

David Loggan s views of, iv. 

83. 

pamphlets, i. 122, 235; ii. 175, 

262 ; iii. 221. 

miscellanea : — 

academical dress different from 

Oxford, i. 149, 300. 
sermons before University, i. 

296. 

formal University verses, iii. 

136. 

MSS. in the University library, 

iv. 145, 175, I93> J 99- 
Great S. Mary's, i. 296. 

— colleges : — 

— — S. Bennet's, Corpus Christi, 
members, ii. 239 ; iii. 424-5 : MSS. 
of, iv. 91, 121, 132, 144, 152, 198, 
242-3. 

Caius, Gonville and Caius, mem- 
bers, ii. 333, 398 ; iii. 327; iv. 194; 
MSS. of, iii. 383 ; iv. 195. 

S. Catharine's, iii. 397. 

Christ's, i. 296; ii. 80; iii. 15, 

30, 58. 

Clare hall, ii. 298, 562 ; iii. 453 ; 

iv. 203. 

Corpus Christi, see S. Bennet's. 

Emmanuel, ii. 397, 507; iii. 221. 

Gonville, see Caius. 

Jesus, ii. 498. 

S. John's, i. 298, 308; ii. 251, 

334> 36o, 362, 441-2, 548, 555 ; iii. 
380, 430, 442. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Cambridgeshire: Cambridge University: 
colleges, King's, i. 110; ii. 183, 199, 
232, 496, 498; iii. 35, 45, 116, 312; 
iv. 175. 

S. Mary Magdalene, ii. 25. 

Pembroke hall, i. 296; iii. 215; 

iv. 198. 

Peterhouse, iv. 164. 

Queens', ii. 203 ; iii. 214. 

Sydney, iii. 19, 215, 221. 

Trinity college, i. 308, 363, 422 ; 

ii. 352, 494, 555 ; iii. 1, 43-4, 241, 
247, 249; iv. 91, 95, 156, 198. 

Trinity hall, iii. 97. 

Cheshire : — 

history of, i. 435 ; ii. 188. 

lord lieutenant of, iii. 441. 

natives of, i. 325, 336 ; ii. 9, 188, 

226, 245, 264, 404, 445; iii. 194, 

2 57- 

events : 1644, skirmish, i. 106 : 

1654, plague, i. 185 : 1659, cavalier 
plot, i. 280-1, 368: 1682, duke of 
Monmouth's progress, iii. 27 ; rises for 
prince of Orange, iii. 284; Jacobites 
in, iii. 463. 

incidental mention, iii. 291, 441. 

— Budworth, ii. 188. 

— Chester, i. 106, 160, 185 ; ii. 532 ; 

iii. 15, 316, 476: is the port for 
Ireland, ii. 390 ; iii. 66, 316, 334. 

castle, as prison, iii. 463, 467 ; 

execution at, ii. 456. 

chief justice of, iii. 123, 418. 

bishop of, Henry Ferne, i. 431, 

435: George Hall, i. 286, 329; iL 
141; iii. 174: John Wilkins, v. 74: 
John Pearson, ii. no, 258; iii. 121, 
184, 193 : Thomas Cartwright, v. 
29 : Nicholas Stratford, iii. 309. 

dean of, ii. 15, 25, 291 : arch- 
deacon of, ii. 377 : prebend of, ii. 443. 

— Eaton, i. 325. 

— Grappen hall, iii. 220. 

— Leighton, iii. 425. 

— Nantwich, ii. 218, 366. 

— Newton, ii. 9. 

— Norbury, i. 200 ; ii. 540. 

— Northwich, i. 185. 

— Poynton, ii. 347. 

— Smalewood, iii. 335. 

Cornwall, i. 136, 195 ; ii. 96, 141, 284; 

iii. 169, 414, 431, 455. 
natives of, ii. 252, 347, 464, 478 : 

Cornish wrestler, i. 406 : Cornish 

miners, iii. 388. 

auditor of the duchy of, iii. 405. 

archdeacon of, iii. 204. 

— Bodnam, ii. 229. 

— Botreaux, i. 134. , 



VOL. V. 



H 



9 8 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Cornwall ■. Foy, Fowey, ii. 54. 

— Godolphin, ii. 360. 

— the Lizard, iii. 419. 

— S. Michael's, iii. 120. 

— S. Tew, ii. 236. 

— Saltash, iii. 374. 

— Scilly, i. 156. 

— Tregony, iii. 445. 
Cumberland : — 

— Burgh under Stainsmore, i. 273. 

— Carlisle, iii. 91, 356, 383, 484 : jail, 
ii- 327,371. 

bishops of, iii. 205 : John Halton, 

iv. 113: Edward Rainbow, iii. 27, 60, 
91 : Thomas Smith, iii. 91, 97, 121. 

deans of, i. 346; iii. 49, 91, 97, 

183-4: archdeacon of, iii. 27 : canon 
of, iii. 27 : chancellor of, iii. 91. 

— Dalston, iii. 91. 

— the Eden, iii. 356. 

— Lanercost, iv. 98. 

— Rosse castle, iii. 91. 
Derbyshire, i. 210, 401 ; ii. 148 ; iii. 

284. 

— Chatsworth, ii. 471. 

— Old Coates, iii. 218. 

— Cranfield, i. 167 : in error for Cran- 
field, Beds. 

— Derby, ii. 148; iii. 170. 

— Greenhill, in Norton parish, ii. p. viii. 

— Hardwick, ii. 471. 

— Hasland hall, ii. 365. 
Devonshire, i. 195, 311, 434; ii. 141, 

235. 533, 561 ; iii. 143. 

collections for, i. 182, 508 ; iv. 

240, 289. 

John Prince's ' Worthies of Devon,' 

iii. 468. 

natives of, i. 219, 236, 279, 311, 

508 ; ii. 356, 470; iii. 68, 143, 466. 

— Allington, ii. 236-7. 

— Aveton Gifford, iii. 147. 

— Bampton, i. 306. 

— Barnstaple, i. 417 ; ii. 253. 
archdeacon of, iii. 204. 

— Bereferrers, iii. 255. 

— Berry Pomeroy, iii. 467. 

— Bickleigh, iii. 105. 

— Bickliford, ii. 358. 

— Bideford, ii. 358. 

— Brixham, iii. 425 : ' Rixam ' in error. 

— Colebrook, i. 202 : in error for Coin- 
brook, Bucks. 

— Columpton, iii. 349. 

— Dartmouth, iii. 413, 425, 476. 

— Exeter, i. 195, 304, 419, 427 ; ii. 186, 
477, 485; iii. 144, 164, 174, 293, 
33L 352, 440 : book about, ii. 471 : 
MS. about, iv. 277 : 'Exon' confused 
with ' Oxon/ iv. 261. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 

De7Jonshire : Exeter, bishops of, iv. 278 : 
Seth Ward, v. 74 : Anthony Sparrow, 
ii. 352 : Thomas Lamplugh, v. 57 : 
Jonathan Trelawney, v. 72. 

cathedral, iii. 205, 295 : library 

of, iv. 269, 309. 

dean of, i. 304; ii. 516; iii. 12, 

175, 204, 252, 368, 459, 471: sub- 
dean of, i. 247 ; iii. 476. 

archdeacon of, iii. 175, 252. 

canon or prebend of, i. 456 ; ii. 

256, 477 : chancellor of, ii. 195, 331, 
389; iii. 1, 252, 328 ('Oxon' in 
error) : precentor, chanter, of, i. 363 ; 
ii. 322, 389. 

— Halsbury, i. 188. 

— Halton, ii. 353. 

— Harpford, iii. 164, 170. 

— Heanton, ii. 253. 

— Little Hempston, i. 282. 

— Honiton, iii. 164. 

— Ken, near Exeter, iii. 350. 

— Kingsbridge, iv. 289. 

— Luppit, i. 35. 

— Lupton, iii. 201. 

— Milton- Abbot, iv. 188. 

— Mohun's-Ottery, i. 35. 

— South Moulton, i. 195. 

— Newingham, i. 116. 

— Newton-Ferrers, iii. 8. 

— Nithway, i. 212-3. 

— West Ogwell, iii. 222. 

— Petrockstow, ii. 362. 

— Pinhoe, Pynhawes, i. 304-5, 419. 

— Plymouth, iii. 371, 399, 455. 

— Plympton, i. 116. 

— East Portlemouth, iii. 350. 

— Pynhawes, see Pinhoe. 

— Rixam, iii. 425 : in error for Brixham. 

— Slade, ii. 414. 

— Tavistock, iii. 8. 

— Totnes, archdeacon of, iii. 204. 

— Upton, iii. 201. 

— Winscot, i. 508. 

— Yeanton, ii. 253. 

Dorsetshire, i. 195; ii. 245, 544; iii. 

108, 145 ; iv. 81. 
archdeacon of, iii. 204. 

— Abbotsbury, ii. 357. 

— Alton, ii. 14. 

— Blandford, i. 195 ; ii. 251 ; iii. 85. 

— Bridport, iii. 164. 

— Candelpurse, iii. 205. 

— Child Ockford, iii. 477. 

— Clift, i. 307. 

— Croscombe, ii. 558. 

— Develish, i. 134: probably Dewlish. 

— Dorchester, ii. 480 ; iii. 159, 164. 

— Dunsehaym, ii. 290. 

— Gillingham, ii. 130, 483. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



99 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Dorsetshire : Grangeheath, ii. 427. 

— Kingston hall, iii. 272. 

— Langton, iii. 439, 460. 

— Lyme, iii. 58, 144-5, I ^4- 

— Melbury Sampford, ii. 357. 

— Middle Marchal, i. 192. 

— Isle of Purbeck, ii. 290, 426-7 ; iii. 
439. 460. 

— Shaftesbury, iii. 79. 

— Sherborne, iii. 164. 

— Sweire, i. 192. 

— Symondsbury, ii. 439. 

— Upway, ii. 211. 

— Wareham, ii. 426. 

— Weymouth, iii. 108, 164. 

— Wimborne Minster, iii. 108. 
Durham : — 

— Durham, i. 294; iii. 471 ; iv. 223. 
proposed University at, 1658, ii. 

506 ; iv. 64. 

minster, iv. 92-4, 267. 

bishops of, iv. 92-4 ; registers of 

the bishops, iv. 93, 203 : Twyne's 
excerpts from them, iv. 206 : Richard 
of Bury, iv. 262 : Richard Fox, iv. 
92 : John Howson, i. 181 : John 
Cosin, i. 348, 379 ; ii. 241, 362 ; iv. 
166 : Nathaniel Crewe, v. 39. 

cathedral, iii. 137 ; iv. 92-4, 203 : 

library of, iv. 1 20-1, 166, 206, 258, 293. 

deans of, i. 302 ; iii. 119-20, 360, 

37L 388. 

prebendaries of, i. 274, 281, 332, 

346, 348, 472 ; ii. 259, 357, 430 ; iii. 
44, 119, 342, 386, 471, 490 ; iv. 206 : 
chancellor of, ii. 362 ; iii. 190. 

— Houghton, ii. 217. 

— Stanhope, iii. 139, 143. 

Essex, i. 227, 508 ; iii. 18, 31, 41 1, 441. 

— natives of, i. 36, 381; ii. 552; iii. 
243- 

— Abbots-Roothing, iii. 446. 

— Baddow, iii. 99. 

— Barking, iii. 274. 

— Black Notley, ii. 253. 

— Bocking, ii. 294. 

— Brenthall, ii. 360, 362. 

— Bubbingworth, Bobbingworth, iii. 
446. 

— Cambourne, ii. 282. 

— Chelmsford, i. 468 ; ii. 77. 

— Colchester, i. 146; ii. 10, 176, 311 ; 
iii. 31, 422. 

— Cressing- Temple, iii. 101. 

— Dagenham, iii. 274. 

— Epping Forest, iii. 304. 

— Fyfield, iii. 398. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Essex: Ginges, Gynges-Mountegney, 

i. e. Mountnessing, ii. 113. 

— Harwich, iii. 432. 

— Heny, i. 403. 

— Horksley, ii. 113. 

— Hornchurch, iii. 182. 

— Ingarston, iv. 260. 

— Lambourne, ii. 282. 

— Mountnessing, see Ginges. 

— Norton Mandeville, i. 137 ; iii. 85. 

— Black Notley, ii. 253. 

— Rivers, ii. 555. 

— Saffron Walden, ii. 561. 

— St. John's, ii. 311. 

— Stanford Rivers, ii. 123. 

— Walthamstow, ii. 360. 

— Writtle, ii. 250 ; iii. 99, 123. 
Gloucestershire, i. 98, 272, 281 ; iii. 441. 
natives of, i. 41-2, 147, 193, 214, 

404; ii. 77, 89, 146, 230, 289, 325, 

328, 365, 379, 4 l6 5 "I- 3 12 - 

— Ablodes court, iii. 68. 

— Alderley, ii. 359, 362. 

— Alveston, Alleston, Allaston, i. 132 ; 

ii. 356. 

— Ampney-Crucis, see Holyrood Amp- 
ney. 

— Ampney, see Down-Ampney. 

— Great Barrington, iii. 23. 

— Barnesley, see Burnesley. 

— Basset' s-down hill, i. 323. 

— Beckford, i. 193-4; ii. 72, 456. 

— Bishop's Cleeve, iii. 349, 431. 

— Bleddington, ii. 364. 

— Bourton-on-the-hill, Borton, Burton, 

i. 180, 452; ii. 323, 563. 

— Bourton-on-the-Water, ii. 212. 

— Bradwell, i. 144 ; ii. 141-2. 

— Bristol, i. 90-1 ; ii. 145, 336, 356, 
381, 478, 494, 507; iii. 252, 476: 
residents or natives of, i. 180; ii. 39, 
5°7j 55 1 : book printed at, i. 50 : 
MS. collections about, iii. 174-5, 206. 

cathedral, iii. 88, 175. 

bishops of, iii. 174, 287, 360: 

Gilbert Ironside, senior, i. 379 ; ii. 

116; iv. 65 : Guy Carleton, i. 328-9 ; 

ii. 243, 420 ; iii. 91 : William Gulston, 
ii. 439; iii. 92: John Lake, v. 57: 
Jonathan Trelawney, v. 72 : Gilbert 
Ironside, junior.v. 49 : John Hall,v. 47. 

— Broad Campden, see Campden. 

— Broadway, ii. 373-4, 482. 

— Brockworth, ii. 143, 268. 

— Bromsborrow, ii. 17. 

— Buckland, ii. 482. 

— Burnesley, i. e. Barnesley ii. 324. 



1 In all these ambiguities there are two possibilities ; (i) that I have misread 
the ill-formed letters of the blotchy MS., (ii) that Wood, deaf as he was, had 
mistaken the name. 

H 2 



IOO 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Gloucestershire: Bybery, i. 132. 

— Campden, Camden, i. 452; ii. 364, 
369, 404; iii. 32, 122 : Broad Camp- 
den, i. 264. 

— Cheltenham, i. 4. 

— Cirencester, Cicester, Ciceter, i. 75 
('Chichester'), 81, 87-8, 92, 460, 
474, 492-3 ; ii. 245, 324, 406-7, 481 ; 

iii. 234, 282 ; iv. 81, 92. 

— Little Compton, i. 265 ; iii. 464. 

— Cooper's hill, Coupaster's hill, Cow- 
per's hill, ii. 143, 268. 

— the Cotswolds, ii. 541. 

— Doddington, ii. 444. 

— Down-Ampney, i. 323. 

— Eastington, Estington, Eston, ii. 273, 
473- 

— Eberton, Ebrington, ii. 356, 380. 

— Fairford, i. 321, 323-4; ii. 406-7. 

— Frampton, i„ 341. 

— Gayting, i.e. Guyting, ii. 282. 

— Gloucester, i. 91, 98, 116, 180, 193 ; 
ii. 240, 280, 336; iii. 68, 251, 320; 

iv. 59 : Wood's visit to, ii. 143 : 
residents or natives of, i. 42 ; ii. 269, 
419, 514 ; iii. 200 : assizes at, i. 453 ; 
ii. 450. 

S. Peter's abbey, i. 460 ; iv. 96. 

cathedral, i. 115-6 ; ii. 143, 225, 

246, 329, 434. 

bishop of : Godfrey Goodman, i. 

125-6 : William Nicholson, i. 116, 
379 ; ii. 67 ; iv. 65 : John Prichet, ii. 
244,427, 447, 510 : Robert Frampton, 
ii. 510, 521, 532, 539 ; iii. 121, 308, 
33°, 33 6 , 359> 3 66 = Edward Fowler, 
iii- 357? 360, 366: registers, iv. 286. 

dean of, i. 485; ii. 224-5, 510, 

539 5 i^ I 3 8 » I 4 I > 2 °4> a6o > 3H- 
archdeacon of, i. 134, 362; ii. 

246-7, 329 ; iii. 400, 424. 
prebendary or canon of, i. 134, 

362 ; ii. 246-7, 329; iii. 400, 424. 

— Hampton Meysey, see Meysey. 

— Hawling, Hailing, i. 180. 

— Hidcot-Bertram, iii. 25. 

— Highmeadow, ii. 367, 461. 

— Holyrood-Am(p)ney, i. 18 1 ; ii. 
460. 

— Ilmington, ii. 371. 

— Kempsford, ii. 387, 482. 

— Lackington, i. 194. 

— Langford, ii. 49. 

— Lechlade, Leechlade, i. 42 ; ii. 49, 
192, 194, 250, 406 ; iii. 242. 

— Lechton, i. 341. 

— Dry Marston, ii. 320. 

— Meysey-Hampton,i. 321, 323, 441-2, 
460 ; v. 13. 

— Mickleton, i. 336 ; ii. 134. 



England, by counties (continued) : — ■ 
Gloucestershire : Middlehill, i. 6. 

— Minchinhampton, iii. 343. 

— Northleach, ii. 543, 555. 

— Overton, ii. 369. 

— Painswick, ii. 127, 145. 

— Quinton, Quainton, ii. 320. 

— Risington, iii. 287. 

— Saperton, ii. 413. 

— Seyntbury, iii. 147. 

— Shirborne, Sherburne, i. 350 ; ii. 310; 
? iii. 104. 

— Sotithrop, ii. 443. 

— Standish, ii. 473 ; iii. 174. 

— Stokelark, ii. 368, 371. 

— Stow-on-the- Wold, i. 60 ; ii. 281,283, 
364. 

— Stratton, iii. 99, 101. 

— Sudeley castle, ii. 88. 

— Sutton, iii. 178. 

— Tedbury, Tetbury, iii. 252. 

— Tewkesbury, i. 180; ii. 54, 143 ; iii. 
455 ; iv. 109. 

— Thornborough, i. 137. 

— Toddington, ii. 344. 

— Todenham, ii. 320 ; iii. 32, 171. 

— Toulton, ii. 370. 

— Tredington, ii. 370. 

— Upton, i. 193. 

— Welford, i. 137 ; ii. 320. 

— Westcote, ii. 346. 

— Westerleigh, iii. 175, 217; iv. 271. 

— Weston, ii. 404. 

— Weston-subter-Wethele,iii. 122 : this 
is either in error for Weston-under- 
Edge, Glouc. ; or for Weston-under- 
Wheathley, Warw. 

— Winchcomb abbey, ii. 87-8 ; iv. 
109. 

— Wyche, i. 341. 

Hampshire, Southants, i. 90, 204, 226, 

274, 338 ; iii. 374. 
natives of, i. 180 ; iii. 222, 371. 

— Andover, iii. 213. 

— Basing, i. 90, 171. 

— Basingstoke, iii. in. 

— Beriton, Boroughton, i. 265. 

— Bishop's Waltham, iii. 105. 

— Bramdeane, i. 106. 

— Cheriton, iii. 372 : ' Cherlton ' in 
error. 

— Church Oakley, iii. in. 

— Compton, iii. 75. 

— Deane, ii. 394. 

— East Oakley, iii. ill. 

— Froyle, ii. 552. 

— Goldley, iii. 258. 

— Hackwood, i. 133. 

— Hallplace, ii. 394. 

— Headly, ii. 251. 

— Herriot, ii. 36. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



101 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Hampshire: Highclere, iii. 397. 

— Hursley, i. 315-6 ; iii. 410. 

— Hurst castle, ii. 416. 

— Hyde abbey, iv. 97, 242. 

— Kingsclere, ii. 496. 

— Laurence Wotton, see Wootton. 

— Manidowne, ii. 460. 

— Nusted, Newsted, ii. 347. 

— Oakley, Church, and East, iii. III. 

— Portsmouth, i. 440; ii. 220, 336; 

iii. 401, 468. 

— Priors Dean, iii. 258. 

— Ringwood, i. 118. 

— Romsey, Rumney, ii. 474. 

— Sarston, i. 110. 

— Selborne, iii. ill. 

— Silkstede, i. 239-40 ; ii. 307. 

— Southampton, i. 476 ; iii. 436. 

— Stockbridge, iii. 308, 473. 

— Tichfield, i. 227. 

— Vernham, ii. 489. 

— Waltham, ii. 439. 

— South Warnborough, iii. ill. 

— Wight, Isle of, infra. 

— Winchester, Winton, i. 73, 83,440-1, 

4 6 7; 54. 5° 2 ; iii- 75, 8o , 8 3, 8 7> 

92, 134, 160, 280, 310, 410, 415, 468, 

488 ; iv. 239. 
natives of, i. 338-9 ; ii. 446, 499, 

501 ; iii. 90, 262. 
S. Swithun's monastery, iv. 274, 

291. 

S. Cross' hospital, chapel of, iii. 

134 ; masters of, i. 355 ; ii. 559 ; iii. 
372, 464. 

college, ii. 180, 251 ; iii. 73, 159 ; 

iv. 237. 

chapel of, i. 240 ; iii. 74. 

registers of, iii. 134. 

warden of, i. 35, 108-9, 240, 

440-1 ; ii. 455-6 ; iii. 74. 
fellow of, i. 362 ; ii. 251, 317, 

324, 507; iii. 2, 331. 
organist of, ii. 501 ; chaplain, 

school, master of, i. 108 ; iii. 74. 

boys at, i. 199; ii. 320, 416, 

502, 543, 558 ; iii. 372, 488 : election 

of scholars to New college, i. 226 ; 

iii. 227, 468. 
cathedral, iii. 239, 310 ; iv. 110 : 

inscriptions in, iii. 73, 134. 
dean, i. 330; ii. 67; iii. 411, 

4I3- 

canon, i. 191, 274, 355 ; ii. 507, 

559 5 iii- 74, 9 8 , " 6 , 372, 415, 464. 

singing man, iii. 74. 

archdeacon, i. 191 ; iii. 92, 105. 

bishop of, iii. 376; iv. 267 : regis- 
ters of, iv. 114. 



England, by counties {continued') : — 
Hampshire'. Winchester, bishop of: 
John de Pontissara, iv. 114: Adam 
de Orleton, iii. 1 59 : Henry de Beau- 
fort, or de Woodstock, iv. 114: 
William de Wainfleet, iv. 162 : 
Thomas Cooper, i. 202 : Thomas 
Bilson, ii. 118 : Walter Curie, ii. 151 : 
Brian Duppa, i. 438 : George Morley, 
v. 63: Peter Mews, v. 62. 

— Wonsington, Wounson, ii. 502. 

— Wootton S. Laurence, Laurence 
Wotton, ii. 460 ; iii. in. 

— Isle of Wight, i. 173, 204, 226-7; 

ii. 380 ; iii. 308, 404, 408-9, 420. 

Carisbrooke castle, i. 227. 

Newport, iii. 486. 

Whippingham, iii. 10. 

Yarmouth, iii. 481. 

Herefordshire, i. 135, 215 ; ii. 82, 481 ; 

iii. 117, 189, 441. 

— Doulas, ii. 370. 

— Foy, ii. 341. 

— Henant-in-the-arbour, ii. 28. 

— Hereford, i. 115 ; ii. 221, 359, 461 ; 

iii. 37, 107. 

cathedral, iii. 159 : library of, ii. 

268. 

dean of, iii. 192, 205, 400, 402, 

472 : archdeacon of, iii. 205 : canon 
of, ii. 247 ; iii. 107, 472. 

bishops of, Robert de Losinga, 

iv. 280 : Robert de Betun, ii. 268, 
300 : S. Thomas of Cantelupe, iii. 
159: Adam de Orleton, iii. 159: 
William Juxon, i. 125-6, 476, 480 : 
Nicholas Monk, i. 380 : Herbert 
Croft, iii. 121, 359 : Gilbert Ironside, 

v. 49. 

— Hopton, iii. 366. 

— Keinchurch, i. 132. 

— Keinton, iii. 117. 

— Langarran, iii. 117. 

— Langston, iii. 117. 

— Ledbury, iii. 1 50, 400. 

— Leominster, Lempster,ii. 204; iii. 394. 

— Ludlow, iii. 1 60. 

— Orleton, ii. 286. 

— the Postles, iii. 117. 

— Sutton, i. 178. 

— Welby, iii. 454. 

— Wigmore, ii. 283. 
Hertfordshire, i. 136; ii. 408, 500; iii. 

31,33,137.206,405. 

— Abbots Langley, ii. 46. 

— Aldenham, iii. 254. 

— Barnet, i. 156. 

— Berkhampstead, Barchamstede,ii.53. 

— Bovingdon, ii. 97. 

— Codicot Berry, i. 8, 9. 

— Diggswell, ii. 169. 



102 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Hertfordshire: Little Gattesden, iii. 
198. 

— Gorhambury, iii. 121. 

— Gubbins, iii. 99. 

— Hadham, ii. 194. 

— IJatiield, iii. 471 : King's Hatfield, 

ii. 6. 

— Hempsted, ii. 124. 

— Hcxton, Hexon, i. 40, 50 ; ii. 77. 

— Hextonbury, i. 39. 

— Northmincs, iii. 132. 

— Punsbourn, iii. 99. 

— Rickmansworth, ii. 97. 

— Rye house, iii. 58, 118. 

— S. Alban's, iii. 370 : S. Alban's 
abbey, i. 95 ; iv. 108, 275, 287, 298, 
307- 

— Sandon, iii. 114. 

— Verulam, iii. 121. 

— Watford, ii. 148, 552. 
Huntingdon shire, iii. 30, 260, 437. 

— Buckden, Bugden, ii. 312, 324, 372 : 
bishop of, ii. 438. 

— Denton, iii. 30. 

— Huntingdon, archdeacon of, ii. 456. 

— Ramsey abbey, iv. 107. 

Kent, i. 227; ii. 213, 424, 464, 508; 

iii. 7, 31, 163, 180, 232, 308, 374. 
natives of, or residents in, i. 27, 

33, 35, 78-9, no, 137, J 93, 233, 267 ; 

ii. 49, 146, 150, 200, 225, 255, 320, 
33 1 , 379-8°, 44°; 35, 180, 233, 
288, 346 ; v. 7. 

— Ashford, iii. 216, 401. 

— Aylesford, ii. 335 : Aylesford bridge, 

iii. 288. 

— Bersted, iii. 288. 

— Bishop's-bourn, iii. 9. 

— Bourn, i. 425. 

— Bredgar, iii. 288. 

— Canterbury, ii. 489 ; inhabitants or 
natives of, i. 329, 435 ; ii. 155, 450 ; 
iii. 101, 350; iv. 91, 190, 260. 

S. Augustine's abbey, ii. 268 ; iv. 

91. 

Christ Church, iv. 219. 

the Dungeon, iii. 99. 

Ethelbert tower, iii. 401. 

the great bell, i. 184. 

S. Margaret's parish, ii. 155. 

S. Mary Bredin church, ii. 450 ; 

iii. 99. 

cathedral documents, iv. 91-2, 105, 

203, 300. 

dean and chapter of, iii. 312. 

dean of, i. 104 ; ii. 251, 519 ; iii. 

r 39, 304, 3!o> 368, 388. 

archdeacon of, iii. 260-1. 

canon of, i. 116, 141, 413, 519; 

iii. 29, 118, 195, 360. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Kent: Canterbury, archbishop of, ii. 
395; iii. 163, 312, 474; iv. 1 1 1-2, 
121, 164, 174, 278, 288, 294-5, 3°4* 

Matthew Parker, i. 247-8, 308 ; 

ii. p.vii ; iv. 112, 174: George Abbot, 
ii. 538; iv. in: William Laud, v. 
57 : William Juxon, i. 265, 394, 471, 
475, 477-8o, 483 : Gilbert Sheldon, 
v. 68 : William Sancroft, v. 67 : John 
Tillotson, v. 71 : John Tenison, v. 

as Visitor of Merton college, 

i- 383, 385, 39 2 , 394> 397, 47 1 5 «• 
313 ; iii. 93, 435-6 : as Visitor of All 
Souls, i. 348 ; ii. 372, 500 ; iii. 208, 
404. 

registers of the archbishops, 

iv. 111-2, 203-4, 222. 

— Chatham, iii. 311, 401. 

— Chepstow, ii. 41. 

— the Cinque ports, ii. 417 ; iii. 454. 

— Cray ford, i. 177. 

— Deptford, ii. 176, 317. 

— Dover, ii. 418 ; iii. 278, 287, 454, 464. 

— the Downs, iii. 463. 

— Eaton-bridge, i. 119. 

— Elmeley ferry, iii. 288. 

— Fertonden, ii. 359. 

— Feversham, i. 233 ; ii. 123, 234, 335, 
347 ; iii. 287-9, 343, 388. 

— Gillingham, ii. 419. 

— Gravesend, iii. 5, 290. 

— Greenwich, i. 39, 42, 233; ii. 247. 

— Harty isle, iii. 288. 

— Harwood, i. 1 34. 

— Hawkhurst, ii. 424. 

— Hollingbourne hill, iii. 288. 

— Horsmanden, i. 214. 

— Hythe, iii. 216. 

— Knole, iv. 264, 283, 289, 295. 
■ — Lydd, ii. 367. 

— Maidstone, i. 134, 233; ii. 233-4; 

iii. 287-9. 

— Medway, iii. 288, 290. 

— Murston, iii. 288. 

— Newington, i. 233. 

— Otford, ii. 41. 

— Otteham priory, ii. 113. 

— Oxney, iii. 216. 

— Penendon common, iii. 288. 

— Penshurst, ii. 213. 

— Pichendon heath, iii. 288. 

— Queenborough, iii. 290. 

— Rochester, i. 475 ; ii. 420, 480 ; iii. 
289-90, 374, 401. 

cathedral, i. 417; iii. 124, 290; 

iv. 108 : monks of, i. 426 ; iv. 108. 
dean of, ii. p. viii, 24, 130, 253, 

352 ; iii. 204, 281 : archdeacon, iii. 
204 : chancellor, iii. 94, 118. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Kent : Rochester, bishop of : John 
Fisher, iv. 270: John Warner, i. 324, 
347 ; ii. 89, 202 : John Dolben, v. 
41 : Francis Turner, v. 72 : Thomas 
Sprat, iii. 106, 116, 118, 121, 173, 
184, 193, 312, 390. 

— Romney, i. 135. 

— Sandwich, i. 233 ; ii. 308. 

— Sevenoaks, ii. 41. 

— Sheerness, iii. 401-2. 

— Shellness, iii. 288. 

— Sittingbourne, iii. 288. 

— Stokebury, i. 35. 

— Tonbridge, Tunbridge, i. 119; ii. 
41 ; iii. 189, 206, 487 : Tunbridge 
school, ii. 232 : Tunbridge Wells, iii. 
26. 

— Tunstall, iii. 288. 

— Water bury, i. 78. 

— Woodchurch, i. 134. 

— W 7 rotham, i. 126. 

— Wye, iii. 188. 

Lancashire, i. 45, 263, 434 ; ii. 93, 137, 
273-4, 357, 457 5 iii- J 74, 223, 312, 
328, 353, 444, 454, 470-2 ; v. 18-9. 

— Ashurst, ii. 137. 

— Badyham, iii. 216. 

— Birch, ii. 514. 

— Bold, Bould, ii. 347, 388. 

— Bold hall, ii. 347. 

— Bolton, iii. 205. 

— Bradshaw, ii. 137. 

— Castleton, ii. 274. 

— Crosse hall, ii. 176. 

— Croston, i. 23-5 ; v. 3-4, 17, 19-20. 

— Eccleston, iii. 174. 

— Gawthorpe hall, iii. 216. 

— Houghton Tower, ii. 458. 

— Lancaster, duchy of, iii. 30 ; iv. 98. 

— Lancaster, ii. 441 ; v. 3 : Lancaster 
castle, i. 23-4 ; v. 3, 17-8. 

— Latham, v. 1 7-8, 20 : Latham house, 
i. 24. 

— Manchester college, i. 308 ; ii. 200. 

— Middleton, ii. 198. 

— Ormskirk, v. 20. 

— Preston, i. 23, 26 ; ii. 484 ; v. 3-4, 18. 

— Rochdale, ii. 400 ; iii. 470. 

— Sharsbrick, iii. 214. 

— Standish, v, 19. 

— Walton, ii. 458. 

— Warrington, i. 156. 

— Whalley, ii. 198-9. 

— Wigan, iii. 12. 

— Winwick, i. 151, 429; iii. 355. 
Leicestershire, i. 37, 182 ; ii. 543 ; iii. 

118. 

archdeacon of, ii. 374. 

— Barkby, ii. 316. 

— Beavoir, Belvoir, castle, iii. 159. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Leicestershire : Cold-Overton, iii. 490. 

— Cole-Orton, i. 472. 

— Cosby, i. 37. 

— Cossington, ii. 368. 

— Cyeston, see Seiston. 

— Drayton, i. 387 ; ii. 405. 

— Holt, i. 193 ; ii. 230. 

— Husband's Bosworth, iii. 443. 

— Leicester, ii. 513 ; iii. 374 : Leicester 
school, i. 108 ; ii. 116. 

— Longborough, i. 33. 

— Lutterworth, ii. 38. 

— Narborough, i. 37. 

— Ratcliffe, ii. 141. 

— Seiston, Cyeston, ii. 550. 

— Snareston, i. 32. 

— Stapleford, iii. 6. 

— Tabley, ii. 428. 

— Thornton, ii. 342. 

— Thurcaston, ii. 461. 

— Tilton park, iii. 204. 

— the Wreak, ii. 141. 
Lincolnshire, i. 101, 230; ii. 181, 203, 

340 ; iii. 67, 464, 488. 

natives of, i. 180, 196, 231-2, 

285 ; ii- 316, 345- 

— Bardney abbey, iv. 274. 

— Barton, i. 197. 

— Boston, ii. 257 ; iii. 444. 

— Brocklesby, ii. 215. 

— Burgh, Burrough, Borough, i. 285 ; 

ii. 172 ; iii. 43. 

— Carlton-Scroop, ii. 200. 

— Croft, iii. 43, 329. 

— Crowland, Croyland, abbey, iv. 92, 
3H. 

— Crowley, ii. 302. 

— Dunnington, iii. 370. 

— Grantham school, iii. 122. 

— Haydor, ii. 354. 

— Heling, near Grimsby, iv. 265. 

— Kirkstead abbey, iv. 98. 

— Legsby, i. 197. 

— Lincoln, ii. 117; iii. 41 ; iv. 113, 223. 
cathedral, i. 180; ii. 312; iii. 

342 ; iv. 99. 

great Tom, ii. 438. 

dean of, i. 180; ii. 554-6; 

iii. 472, 484, 491 : sub-dean, ii. 555 ; 

iii. 477. 

archdeacon, i. 329 : canon, ii. 

230 ; iii. 3 : precentor, iii. 10 ; iv. 

240 : chancellor, iii. 42. 

diocese, iii. 471 ; iv. 117. 

bishops of : — 

Remigius, + 1092, i. 223. 

Alexander, + 1147, i. 223, 

34°- 

Walter de Constantiis, 11 83, 

iv. 260. 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Lincolnshire: Lincoln, bishops of: 

S. Hugh, f 1200, i. 341 ; iv. 311. 

1 1 ugh Wells, f 1235, iv. 113. 

Robert Grosteste, \ 1254, i. 

365 ; iv. 274-5. 
Oliver Sutton, i. 217 ; iv. 113, 

123. 

John Dalderby, iv. 113. 

Henry Burgersh, iv. 113. 

Thomas Beke, iv. 113. 

John Gynewell, i. 373-4 ; iv. 

113. 

Henry Beaufort, iv. 113. 

Philip Repingdon, iv. 113. 

William Alnwick, iv. 113. 

Thomas Rotherham, iv. 160. 

William Smyth, i. 145 ; iv. 

113, 274. 

John Longland, iv. 113. 

John Williams, i. 154, 267. 

Robert Sanderson, i. 347, 468 ; 

ii. 26, 354-5, 429; iii- 159; iv - I 9°- 
Benjamin Laney, ii. 26, 106, 

297. 

William Fuller, i. 329, 364 ; 

ii. 312. 

Thomas Barlow, v. 26. 

Thomas Tenison, v. 71. 

James Gardner, iii. 477, 481. 

— registers of the bishops, iv. 1 13, 

201, 203-4, 206. 
jurisdiction over the chancellor 

of Oxford University, iv. 211. 
Visitors of Lincoln college, iii. 

69, 72 : patrons of a fellowship in 

Lincoln college, i. 472 ; iii. 68. 

— Mereringham, i. 180. 

— Roppesly, ii. 354. 

— Stamford, Stanford, i. 139; ii. 69; 

iii. 435 ; iv. 152. 

— Stow, archdeacon of, ii. 374 ; iii. 
34 2 - 

— Swineshead, ii. 323. 

— Uffington, iii. 435. 

— Waddington, iii. 171. 
London : — 

— Admiralty, court of, ii. 51. 

— Albemarle buildings, iii. 482. 

— Aldermanbury, i. 26 ; iii. 309 ; v. 18. 

— Aldersgate street, ii. 278 ; iii. 117. 

— Aldgate, iii. 15, 153, 317. 

— Alienations office, ii. 

— Allhallows, Barking, i. 485. 

— Allhallows, Stayning, iii. 273. 

— S. Andrew's, Holborn, i. 240 ; ii. 
io 5> 2 74> 307, 365; iii- 3io. 

— S. Anne's, Blackfriars, iii. 274. 

— S. Anne's, in the City, iii. 371. 

— S. Anne's, Soho, iii. 380. 

— S. Anne's, Westminster, iii. 327, 390. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
London : archdeacon of, ii. 48, 352. 

— Arches, court of, iii. 39. 

— Arlington house, iii. 358. 

— Arlington street, iii. 410. 

— Hon. Artillery company, ii. 466. 

— Artillery yard, ii. 474 ; iii. 23, 205. 

— New Artillery yard, ii. 536. 

— Arundel house, ii. 368. 

— Arundel library, ii. 155; iii. 342; 
iv. 90, 95, 108, 179, 198, 295. 

— Augmentations office, iv. 178. 

— Axe inn, Aldermanbury, i. 26; v. 18. 

— Bank, iii. 462. 

— Barbican, iii. 217. 

— Barking, All Saints, i. 485. 

— Bartholomew fair, iii. 156, 275-6. 
■ — Great S. Bartholomew's, iii. 425. 

— S. Bartholomew's close, ii. 430. 

— S. Bartholomew's hospital, iii. 351, 
354- 

— Old Bayly, ii. 436; iii. 154, 185, 
339-4°> 353> 362, 466. 

— Bedlam, Bethlem, hospital, ii. 171, 

240, 376, 533 ; iii- 354, 4 J 5- 

— Bell Savage, i. 78; iii. 112. 

— Bell yard, ii. 485. 

— S. Bennet's, Paul's wharf, iii. io7 r 
190-1. 

— Bennet hill, iii. 276. 

— Berkshire house, ii. III. 

— Bethlem, see Bedlam. 

— Bethnal Green, ii. 484. 

— bishop of London, v. 110. 

— bishop of London's registry, v. 6. 

— Bishopsgate, iii. 117. 
S. Botolph's, iii. 341. 

■ — Bishopsgate street, ii. 399. 

— Blackfriars, iii. 232, 34I, 468. 
church, iii. 277 : churchyard, ii. 

554- 

stairs, iii. 413. 

— Black Spread Eagle court, iii. 180. 

— Bloomsbury, ii. 117, 418 ; iii. 469. 
square, iii. 409-10, 448. 

— Blue bull, ii. 475. 

— S. Botolph's, Aldersgate, ii. 487 ; iii. 
25- 

— S. Botolph s, Bishopsgate, iii. 341. 

— Bow church, S. Mary's, iii. 14, 196, 
371, 403 ,477: confirmation of election 
of" bishops in, iii. 106-7, I 9^ J 366. 

— Bow lane, i. 177, 228. 

— Bow street, i. 476 ; ii. 335. 

— Bowling alley, Westminster, iii. 474. 

— Bravalow street, ii. 142. 

— Brick lane, iii. 323. 

— S. Bride's church, ii. 356; iii. 481 : 
parish, ii. 142. 

— Bridewell, iii. 173, 415, 460. 

— British Museum, i. 1, 109. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
London : Bucklersbury, iii. 320. 

— Bunhill, ii. 297, 536 : Bunhill fields, 
iii. 45. 

— Camberwell, iii. 413. 

— S. Catherine Cree church, iii. 459. 

— Chancery, iii. 44. 

— Chancery lane, ii. 201, 314 ; iv. 177. 

— Charing cross, ii. 330, 480; iii. 189, 
200, 305, 339, 378. 

— Charterhouse, ii. 297, 488 : master 
of the, ii. 297 ; iii. 376. 

school, iii. 134. 

— Cheapside, i. 400 ; ii. 467 ; iii. 166, 
431, 469. 

cross, i. 51. 

— Chelsea, v. III. 

— Christ Church, ii. 425. 

— Christ Church, near Newgate, iii. 
378. 

— Christ Church hospital, iii. 303, 354. 

— Christ's hospital, ii. 341, 472. 

— Clapham, ii. 96. 

— Clarendon house, i. 337; ii. Ill, 
205, 286. 

— S. Clement's church, iii. 383 : S. 
Clement Danes church, i. 131, 473; 
iii. 99, 342, 371, 382, 392, 406, 412. 

— Clerkenwell, i. 26 ; ii. 450 ; iii. 44, 
347 ; v. 4, 6, 18. 

— Clifford's inn, iii. 343, 410. 

— Cock, i. 476 ; ii. 243, 335. 

— Cock and Sugarloaf, Fleet street, 

ii. 478. _ 

— Cockpit, Westminster, ii. 184. 

— coffee-house, iii. 274,431 : ^Marie's, 
Rutter's, Will's. 

— Common pleas, court of, iii. 323, 
455-6- 

— Convent garden, see Covent. 

— Converts, House of, iv. 177. 

— Cornhill, i. 105 ; ii. 251 ; iii. 33. 

— Cottonian library, i. 249, 441 ; ii. p. 
vii, 109-10, 155, 167, 174, 186, 191, 
203 ; iv. 80-97, IOI > I 5 2 > J 97> 2 °3> 
223, 243. 

— Covent, Convent, garden, i. 476 ; 

«• 335, 473 5 iii- "4, 35*- 

— Covent garden church, ii. 240. 

— Cursitors alley, i. 1 93. 

— Cursitors office, ii. 562. 

— Dean of Paul's court, ii. 367. 
1 — Dean of Paul's yard, iv. 179. 

■ — Doctors Commons, i. 395 ; ii. 242 ; 

iii. 107, 118, 163, 190, 247; iv. in, 
209. 

— Drapers' hall, ii. 466. 

— Drury lane, ii. 215, 314; iii. 480, 
486. 

— Duck lane, iii. 320. 

— S. Dunstan's church, i. 35 : S. Dun- 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
stan's in Fleet street, i. 156 ; ii. 331, 
426, 453 ; iii. 44, 302, 476 : S. Dun- 
stan's in the west, ii. 351 ; iii. 409. 

London: S. Dunstan's court, iii. 413. 

— Durham yard, ii. 375. 

— S. Edmund's, Lombard street, iii. 
312. 

— Ely house, i. 431; ii. 317; iii. 
38. 

— Essex house, i. 318. 

— Exchange, iii. 56, 189 ; iv. 48 : Old 
Exchange, i. 105,400; iii. 127, 153: 
New Exchange, i. 184: Royal Ex- 
change, iii. 126-7, I 8o, 314, 401. 

— Exchequer, court of, iii. 365; iv. 
i75> 177-8. 

— Exchequer office, ii. 65. 

— Excise office, ii. 393 ; iii. 300. 

— Exeter house, ii. 242-3 ; iv. 72. 

— S. Faith's church, iii. 353. 

— Fenchurch, ii. 507. 

— Fetter lane, iii. 410. 

— Finch lane, iii. 180. 

— Fish street, iii. 115. 

— Fleet prison, iii. 160, 317. 

— Fleet street, ii. 453, 478; iii. 44, 
323, 348, 401, 413, 441. 

— Fountain tavern, Strand, iii. 405. 

— the French church, ii. 338. 

— Friday street, iii. 31, 33, 444. 

— Fulham, v. III. 

— Fuller's rents, ii. 365. 

— Furnival's inn, iii. 387. 

— S. Gabriel, Fenchurch, ii. 507. 

— the Gatehouse, i. 59 ; ii. 463, 474 ; 

iii- 19, 333, 350. 

— S. George's, Southwark, i. 203. 

— Gildhall, i. 314, 321, 323; ii. 560; 
iii. 2 : chapel, iii. 354-5. 

— S. Giles', Cripplegate, ii. 510. 

— S. Giles' in the fields, ii. 13, 241, 

367, 4H, 43°, 453, 545 5 9> 348, 
360, 370, 443, 454, 481-2, 493. 

— Gloucester hall, ii. 109. 

— Gracechurch street, iii. 409. 

— Gray's Inn, Grey's Inn, i. 20, 177, 
239-40; ii. 257, 268, 307; iii. 14, 
58, 99> 153, !75> 262, 264, 391, 415, 
458. 

— Gray's inn gate, iii. 115. 

— Gray's inn lane, ii. 202 ; iii. 372. 

— the Greek church, ii. 379. 

— Greek hall, iv. 294. 

— S. Gregory's, by S. Paul's, ii. 554. 

— Gresham college, i. 201 ; iv. 48. 

— Greyfriars, iv. 119. 

— Greyhound, ii. 221. 

— Grocers' hall, i. 462. 

— Guildhall, see Gildhall. 

— Haberdashers' hall, i. 157. 



io6 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
London: Hackney, ii. 512; iii. 329, 
35 6 - 

— Hammersmith, iii. 155, 158-60, 163, 

166, 448. 

— Hatton garden, ii. 97, 513, 537 ; iii. 
448. 

— Haymarket, iii. 200. 

— Great S. Helen's church, ii. 311. 

■ — Heralds' college, College of Arms, ii. 

167, 321, 439; iii. 98, 103-4, "5> 
163, 273, 276 ; iv. 175, 178, 242, 292. 

— Holborn, i. 169 ; ii. 97, 109, 192, 
221, 314, 317, 365, 404, 463 ; iii. 38, 
153, 205, 252, 296, 319, 340, 387, 
415 : see S. Andrew's. 

— Holborn bridge, iii. 430. 

— Holloway, v. 6. 

— Horn tavern, iii. 276. 

— Horseferry, Westminster, ii. 256, 285, 
363- 

— Hosier lane, iii. 156. 

— H'ungerford market, iii. 350. 

— Hyde park, iii. 4. 

— Inner Temple, see Temple. 

— Inns of Court, i. 274; ii. 229; iii. 
87 : see Gray's Inn, Lincoln's Inn, 
Temple. 

— Ironmonger lane, ii. 507. 

— Islington, i. 25-7, 78-9 : ii. 97,499; 

i»- 337 , 4 QI 5 v - 4~ 6 , l8 - 

— Ivy lane, iii. 232 ; iv. 177. 

— Jackanapes alley, ii. 485. 

— S. James' church, iii. 194, 272. 

— S. James's church, Westminster, iii. 

395, 397, 4°3, 4°5, 473, 476. 

— S. James', Clerkenwell, i. 26 ; v. 5. 

— S. James' house, ii. 414 ; iii. 266. 

— S. James' palace, i. 156, 311 ; ii. 
462 ; iii. 123, 186-7, 265, 268, 286, 
290. 

chapel, iii. 266, 279. 

— — library, the Royal library, ii. 109, 
199, 268, 482, 486; iv. 98, 118, 174, 
223, 270, 273, 288, 307. 

park, ii. 293, 414 ; iii. 321, 401. 

— S. James' square, iii. 106, 194, 272, 
275- 

— S. Jones, i.e. S. John's wood, ii. 282 ; 
iii. 205. 

— S. Katherine's hospital, ii. 237, 312, 
560. 

— Kensington, ii. 81, 118, 130; iii. 

349, 379, 4° J , 418, 437, 444, 475- 

— Kent street, Southwark, iii. 346. 

— King's Bench bar, iii. 93, 199, 313, 
324-5» 333, 346, 425, 435 : court of, 
ii. 389; iii. 133, 168, 185, 222, 274, 
314, 323, 345, 364, 375, 444, 45 2 , 
4 6 °, 473, 520. 

— King's Bench office, iii. 412. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
London : King's Bench prison, iii. 94, 

' s 7, 34 1 , 43i. 

— King's Bench walk, iii. 410. 

— the Lamb, in Holborn, iii. 205. 

— Lambeth, i. 126, 476; ii. 363, 392, 
453, 5 OJ ! iii- 28 , 289, 476 ; iv. 57. 

house, residence of the archbishop 

of Canterbury, ii. 167-8, 242 ; iii. 
93, 159, 363, 365-6. 

chapel, iii. 66, 362 : consecration 

of bishops in, ii. 81, 258, 359, 497 ; 

iii. 79, in, 116, 124, 135, 169, 278-9, 
380, 481. 

library, iii. 363, 380; iv. in, 

133, M3, 276, 298. 

— Lambeth degrees, iii. 425, 481. 

— Lambeth ferry, iii. 289. 

— Little Lambeth, iii. 115. 

— South Lambeth, ii. 391, 435 ; iii. 57, 
109. 

— Lancaster, duchy of, office, ii. 65. 

— S. Laurence church, iii. 176. 

— S. Laurence Jury, iii. 473. 

— S. Laurence lane, i. 126 ; ii. 507. 

— Law courts, ii. 65. 

— Leicester fields, iii. 258, 394, 401, 
459- 

— Leicester street, Westminster, in. 277. 

— the Lily's head, iii. 275. 

— Lincoln's Inn, ii. no, 168-9, I 73, 
268, 298, 312, 334, 372; iii- 132, 
220, 373, 415, 466, 472, 476, 485 ; 

iv. 178, 209 ; v. 8. 
chapel, iii. 335. 

— Lincoln's Inn fields, ii. 197 ; iii. 66, 

Ii5,i7i,43i- 

— Lindsey house, iii. 479. 

— Lion court, iii. 346. 

— Little Britain, ii. 109 ; iii. 301. 

— Lombard street, i. 202, 294. 

— London, archdeacon of, ii. 48, 352. 
bishop of, v. no. 

— London bridge, iii. 302. 

— London stone, i. 202. 

— London wall, ii. 551. 

— Ludgate, ii. 142, 162-3 ; iii. 275 : 
see S. Martin's. 

— Ludgate hill, i. 78-9. 

— Lumbard, see Lombard. 

— Lyon, see Lion. 

— the Marble Arch, i. 68. 

— S. Margaret's, Westminster, ii. 169 ; 
iii. 205, 420. 

— S. Margaret's lane, Westminster, ii. 7. 

— Marie's coffee-house, iii. 205. 

— Marshalsea, iii. 311. 

— S. Martin's in the fields, i. 204 ; ii. 

J 3°, 346, 374, 444, 489, 497 ; i»- 79, 
87, 100, 194, 380, 395, 397, 447, 

474- 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
London : S. Martin's, Ironmonger lane, 

ii. 507. 

— S. Martin's, Ludgate, iii. 312, 410. 

— S. Martin's, Outwich, iii. 362. 

— S. Martin's, Westminster, ii. 329. 

— S. Martin's lane, iii. 73, 184. 

— S. Martin's lane, Westminster, ii. 329. 

— S. Mary, Aldermanbury, iii. 304. 

— S. Mary, Bow, see Bow church. 

— S. Mary of Metfellon, iii. 471. 

— S. Mary Overees, iii. 270. 

— S. Matthew's, Friday street, iii. 444. 

— Mercers' chapel, iii. 366, 469. 

— Merchant Tailors' company, ii. 537. 
hall, ii. 466 ; iii. 378. 

school, i. 152; ii*. 537; iii. 372, 

410. 

— the Mermaid, iii. 115. 

— the Mew, iii. 459. 

— S. Michael's, Basingshaw, iii. 332. 

— S. Michael's, Cornhill, i. 42, 462. 

— S. Michael's, Crooked lane, ii. 336. 

— S. Michael's, Wood street, ii. 506. 

— Middle Row, Holborn, iii. 103. 

— Middle Temple, see Temple. 

— S. Mildred's, Poultry, iii. 312. 

— Little Minories, ii. 475. 

— the Mint, iii. 310. 

— the Monument, iii. 310. 

— Moorfields, ii. 399 ; iii. 321. 

— the Naked Boy, iii. 350. 

— Neathouses, ii. 457. 

— Newgate, i. 156, 468 ; ii. 235, 418-9, 
435. 453, 463, 466, 562 ; iii. 34> 58, 
105. 153-5. l8 5, l8 7, 189, 205, 303, 
323, 333, 336, 356, 37 8 » 389, 463-4- 

— Nonconformist cemetery, iii. 23. 

— Northumberland house, iii. 275. 

— Oxford arms, iii. 362. 

— Palace Treasury, Westminster, iv. 
155, 178. 

— Palace Yard, Westminster, iii. 189, 
339, 437 : Old Palace Yard, iii. 93, 
153, 414, 440: New Palace Yard, i. 
400 ; iii. 414. 

— Pall Mall, Westminster, ii. 293 ; iii. 
5, 106. 

— Palsgrave's- Head court, iii. 366. 

— S. Pancras, ii. 475. 

— Papers office, iv. 178. 

— Paternoster row, i. 37, 431. 

— S. Paul's, old, i. 267, 337 ; ii. 180 ; 

iii. 160; iv. 194: new, i. 243; ii. 
288, 317, 392 ; iii. 353-4. 

library of, iv. 198, 267, 269, 284, 

291, 301. 

dean of, i. 89, 330 ; ii. 396 ; iii. 

301, 310, 360. 
Dean of Paul's court, ii. 367 : 

Dean of Paul's yard, iv. 179. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
London : S. Paul's, canon of, iii. 83, 

265, 310, 341 : minor canon of, ii. 

39- 

— Paul's chain, iv. ill. 

— Paul's churchyard, ii. 367 ; iii. 232. 

— Paul's wharf, iii. 98: seeS. Bennet's. 

— S. Paul's, Covent garden, ii. 389, 
464, 499. 

— the Peacock, iii. 476. 

— the Pelican, iii. 9, 301. 

— S. Peter's, Westminster, see West- 
minster abbey. 

■ — Physicians, college of, ii. 393 ; iii. 
25, 76, 295, 381, 448, 472 ; iv. 67. 

— pillory : — at Charing Cross, iii. 378 ; 
in Cornhill, iii. 33 ; at the Old Ex- 
change, iii. 153; at Old Palace yard, 
iii. 153 ; at Temple gate, iii. 157. 

— Pipe office, iv. 179. 

— Plantation office, ii. 555. 

— Play-house, King's, ii. 192 : New, ii. 
236. 

— Plough-and-Harrow, i. 78. 

— Poultry, iii. 310, 396, 476. 

— Prerogatives office, ii. 167, 238, 367, 
551 ; iii. 163 ; iv. 175, 179; v. 6. 

— Princes' chamber, Westminster, iii. 
193. 

— Queen street, ii. 366 ; iii. 115. 

— Red Bull, Drury lane, iii. 480. 

— Red Lion square, iii. 336. 

— Registry of the bp. of London, v. 6. 

— Rolls office, iv. 175, 177. 

— Rolls, preacher at the, iii. 118. 

— Rolls tavern, ii. 201. 

— Rose tavern, iii. 114. 

— Royal library, see S. James'. 

— Royal society, i. 14, 290, 309, 354, 
473; ii7, 185, 285, 395'; iii. 73, 
78, 119, 194: journal of the, see 
Newspapers, in Index IV. 

— Rutter's coffee-house, iii. 319. 

— Sadlers' hall, iii. 45. 

— Salisbury court, iii. 348. 

— Saracen's head, ii. 223. 

— S. Saviour's Southwark, iii. 257. 

— Savoy, the, i. 347 ; ii. 185, 338, 388, 
455, 487 ; iii- 288, 313, 439. 

— Savoy stairs, iii. 377, 412. 

— Scotland yard, ii. 539. 

— Serjeants' inn, ii. 87, 149, 250. 

— Sheer lane, ii. 191. 

— Sion college, iv. 271. 

— Six Clerks' office, ii. 65. 

— Smithfield, iii. 276, 330. 

— Smithfield bars, iii. 415. 

— Snow hill, ii. 223. 

— Soho, iii. 380, 425 : Soho fields, ii. 
379- 

— Somerset house, i. 204; ii. 168-9, 



io8 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
191, 223, 247, 417-8, 432, 487; iii. 
91, 172, 176, 266, 286, 289, 412. 

London : Somerset house chapel, ii. 
487 ; iii. 101, 317. 

— Somerset house yard, iv. 309. 

— Old Southampton buildings, Hol- 
born, i. 169 ; ii. 213. 

— Southampton street, iii. 319. 

— Southwark, i. 203, 237 ; ii. 562 ; iii. 
270, 337. 346, 4!6, 47o see S. 
Saviour's, S. Thomas'. 

— Spring gardens, iii. 104. 

— Stanhope street, iii. 205. 

— Staple inn, i. 42 ; ii. 420, 424 ; iii. 14. 

— Star, Bucklersbury, iii. 320. 

— S. Stephen's, Walbrook, iii. 364. 

— Stocks market, ii. 330. 

— Strand, i. 204, 227, 476; ii. 168, 
242,311, 374.443, 4§7 J Hi. I75>3i7» 
35o, 405- 

— Stratford Bow, i. 135. 

— Suffolk street, ii. 243. 

— Surgeons' hall, iii. 311. 

— Sutton's hospital, ii. 395 ; iii. 491. 

— Temple, without distinction, i. 42, 
!37 J 253, 4 l8 > 4 22 , 456; iii- 68, 
176, 191, 220, 261, 391, 402, 412, 

433, 437, 444, 446, 472-3- 
Inner Temple, i. 13, 187, 196, 

199, 214, 240; ii. 204, 235,240,314, 

389, 469; iii. 40, 58, 79, 121, 176, 

335, 345, 379, 4 J °; iv. 18. 
Middle Temple, i. 31, 151 ; ii. 

109, 191, 269, 285; iii. 242, 350; 

v. 17. 

Temple church, i. 199 ; ii. 149-50, 

250; iii. 206, 220, 255, 321, 422: 
master of the Temple, iii. 341 : 
preacher of the Temple, iii. 94. 

— Temple bar, ii. 191, 257 ; iii. 126-7, 
317, 339> 365-6, 37 8 ; iv- 161. 

— Temple gate, ii. 351 ; iii. 157, 318. 

— Middle Temple lane, ii. 435. 

— Thames street, i. 20. 

— Theatre Royal, iii. 412. 

— S. Thomas the Apostle parish, ii. 370. 

— S. Thomas' hospital, iii. 354. 

— S. Thomas', Southwark, iii. 96. 

— the Three legs, iii. 396. 

— Tower : — 

as king's prison, i. 208, 379 ; ii. 

247, 346, 366, 434, 437, 448, 472, 
552 ; iii. 60, 86, 123, 157, 170, 268, 
280, 288-9, 302, 313, 321, 323, 325, 

333, 344, 35 0 " 1 . 389-9°* 434, 444, 
459, 462, 483 ; iv. 8 : escapes from, 

iii. 464, 471, 479. 

■ as repository of national records, 

ii. 1 09-11 1, 186, 314; iii. 102, 300; 

iv. 175-7, !94> i9 8 > 206, 223. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
London : Tower : arsenal, ordnance, in, 

i. 302 ; ii. 349, 461, 550; iii. 24, 60, 
276. 

regalia in, ii. 222. 

incidental mention of, i. 485 ; ii. 

309, 450, 462, 475, 479, 550/560; 

iii. 58, 115. 
chapel, S. Peter's ad vincula, ii. 

461, 550; iii. 154, 302. 
minister of, ii. 545 ; iii. 265, 

291. 

lieutenant of, i. 208, 219 ; ii. 451 ; 

iii. 124-5, 288, 324. 

— Tower hill, iii. 154. 

— Tradescant's museum, ii. 391. 

— Great Trinity lane, i. 177. 

— Turkey company, the, i. 168. 

— Tuttle street, Westminster, ii. 240 ; 
iii. 474. 

— Tyburn, ii. 48,93, 155, 193, 245,366, 
379, 426, 434, 436, 470, 545 ; iii. 97, 
153-4, !72, 189, 311, 323, 348, 353, 
37!-2, 425, 454- 

— Upper Bench prison, i. 353. 

— Wallingford house, iii. 455. 

— Wapping, iii. 30. 

— Warwick house, iii. 296. 

— Warwick lane, iii. 346, 376. 

— Westminster, i. 116, 227, 341, 476; 
ii- 5> 7, 7o, 73, 88, 109, 185, 188, 190, 
329,363, 395, 4^,473; iii- 39, 122, 
155, 168, 181, 239, 247, 312, 354, 371, 
374, 388, 40i»453; iv- 155, 178-9: 
Westminster assembly, iii. 219, 464: 
Westminster drollery, ii. 1 76. 

archdeacon of, iii. 205. 

S. James' chapel, iii. 219. 

Princes' lodgings, iii. 126. 

abbey, S. Peter's church, i. 437 ; 

ii. 362 ; iii. 76, 122 (?) ; iv. 110, 178, 
271. 

consecration of bishops in, i. 

421 ; ii. 243. 
burials in, i. 116, 204, 440, 

458, 485-6; ii. 5 (?), 305, 329OO; 

iii. 3, 9, 125-6, 178, 218, 409-10, 

44 2 > 447, 45 1 , 454, 4 8l » 4 8 3- 
registers of, i. 458 : monu- 
ments in, ii. 47 1 ; iii. 4. 

great bell of, i. 185. 

king Henry VlPs chapel, iii. 

125-6,447,483. 
dean of, i. 267 ; ii. 66, 89 ; 111. 

59, 65-6, 74, 116; iv. 277. 
canon or prebendary of, i. 398 ; 

ii. 173, 249, 270, 420, 494, 516, 554; 

iii. 43-4, 81-2, 205, 265, 310, 411, 
425, 459> 462, 4 6 9> 47 1 " 2 , 483; iv- 
277. . „ 

hall, i. 289, 397, 477; u. 76, 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



109 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
109, 167 ; iii. 153, 313-4, 36i, 45 2 , 
460, 479, 490 ; iv. 5, 8, 45, 47, 49. 

London : Westminster school, i. 274, 
500; ii. 181, 436, 507, 558; iii. 22, 
181, 320, 483; iv. 156. 

— Whetstones park, ii. 192, 511. 

— Whitechapel, iii. 471-2. 
bar, iii. 317. 

— Whitecross street, ii. 399. 

— Whitefriars, ii. 240, 356. 

— Whitehall, i. 153 ; ii. 205, 363, 366, 

445. 539, 55 2 5 iii- 38, 75, 155-6, 
164, 187, 250, 339, 423, 437, 445, 
451,478,527. 
a royal residence, i. 144, 499 ; 

ii. 25, 132, 291, 378, 444, 462, 480, 
518; iii. 58, 118, 125, 127, 165, 186, 
280, 285, 288-9, 317, 356, 358-9, 
405, 433, 4 6 5, 532. 

chapel, ii. 167, 363; iii. 132, 

215, 244. 

James II's Romanist chapel, 

iii. 201, 376. 

privy gallery, ii. 420 : privy 

garden, iii. 64, 358. 

gate, ii. 167 ; iii. 125, 127. 

privy-council chamber, i. 372 ; ii. 

168 ; iii. 461. 
station of the guards, ii. 88 ; iii. 145. 

— White horse, ii. 551. 

— Whitelion, Islington, i. 26; v.4,5,18. 

— White swan, iii. 430. 

— White swan tavern, iii. 115. 

— White tower, ii. 1 10. 

— Will's coffee-house, ii. 473. 

■ — Wills office, ii. 243, 481; iii. 224, 

226, 273; iv. 175, 179. 
of the bp. of London, v. 6. 

— Wood street, ii. 506. 

— Great Wood street, i. 395. 

— Woolsack, iii. 431, 469. 

— Worcester house, i. 347, 372, 438, 
507 ; ii. 168. 

— incidental mention of London, ii. 
25, 30, 68, 88, 105, 121, 136, 140, 
H7, ^5, I7 1 , 211, 237, 242, 280, 
327, 343, 374, 39 2 , 4 6 5, 5°°, 523-4, 
532, 554, 56o; iii. 5, 18, 43, 79, 93, 
103, 182, 185, 198-9, 20T, 222, 253, 
278, 299, 355, 369; v. 4. 

— incidental notice of persons dying 
in London, i. 411, 416, 508; ii. 76, 
80, 138, 180-1, 189-90, 202, 205, 
238, 241, 250-1, 372, 374, 416, 464, 
480, 485, 487, 493, 501, 514, 561; 
m. 40, 79, 87, 90, 93, 96, 191-2, 251, 
302, 306, 331, 358, 388, 448, 452. 

— lord mayor of, i. 321, 409; ii. 137, 
447, 4 66 ; H> 30/58, 19 6 , 276, 
309, 330, 4 2 3, 47o, 489- 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
London: sheriffs of, iii. 31, 79, 166, 
177, 276, 414. 

— aldermen of, i, 238, 252 ; ii. 137, 147, 
510; iii. 140, 340, 354, 400, 409, 
412, 415, 424, 443. 

— recorder of, i. 119-20, 177 ; ii. 506 ; 
iii. 29, 76, 133, 136, 179, 248, 373, 
389, 405; iv. 47, 59, 212. 

— ' merchants ' of, i. 119, 282-3, 3°7 5 

ii. 115, 144, 147, 216, 316, 340, 540; 

iii. 207, 213, 218, 448. 

— natives, or inhabitants, of, i. 30, 33-5, 
37, 4°, 238, 244, 416, 427 ; ii. 6, 97, 
I2 3, I.7 1 ! 2I 5, 222, 263, 455 ; iii. 12, 
24, 37, 39, 45, J 39, r 5°, 198, 207, 261, 
388, 402, 448 ; iv. 51 ; v. 4, 16, 18. 

fond of coming to Oxford in 

summer-time, iii. 67. 
residents of Oxford birth have an 

annual 'feast' in London, i. 462-3; 

ii. 154, 201, 336. 

— events mentioned : — 

1562, convocation: 1584, synod; 

J 633, synod, i. 327. 

1652, Muggletonians there, i. 177. 

1660, entry of Charles II, i. 317. 

166 1, large French colony in, i. 

423. 

1665, tne Great Plague, i. 395 ; 

ii- 24, 34, 39, 42-4, 46, 48, 52, 54, 

57, 67, 79, 86 ; iii. 111. 
1666, the Great Fire, i. 337 ; ii. 

13, 85-7, 89, 93, 97-8, no, 119, 122, 

430; iii. 31, 310; iv. no. 

1668, small-pox, ii. 133. 

1676, the Great Frost, ii. 363. 

1678, expulsion of Romanists, ii. 

422. 

1679, Protestant zeal of, ii. 468. 

1681, French refugees in, ii. 549. 

1682, attack on the City charter, 

iii. 4, 70. 

1683, the City charter is forfeited, 

iii. 57. 

1685, suspected of favouring Mon- 
mouth, iii. 151, 168. 

1688, epidemic, iii. 267, 270. 

flight of James II, ii. 288-90. 

1692, earthquake, iii. 401. 

— trades and professions mentioned: — 
apothecary, i. 137, 202 ; iii. 31, 

33- 

Barbary merchant, i. 33. 

barber, i. 156; iii. 175: barber- 
surgeon, i. 475. 

bell-founder, ii. 515. 

blacksmith, ii. 216. 

bookseller, i. 19, 20, 286, 431 ; 

ii. 7, 109, 170, 231, 463, 467, 479, 
483, 489 ; ni. 160, 186, 206, 239, 251, 



I TO 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
301, 340, 344, 369, 381, 396, 440; 
iv. 17 8, 161, 267, 309: see stationer. 

London : trades and professions men- 
tioned : brownbakcr, i. 177. 

• ehandler, i. 177 ; ii. 44. 

clockmaker, i. 241. 

coffee-man, iii. 431. 

cook, iii. 232. 

customer, high, iv. 91. 

cutler, ii. 35 J. 

dancing-master, iii. 465. 

draper, ii. 201 ; iii. 11 1. 

dragster, iii. 448. 

■ engraver, iii. 399. 

filacer, i. 35. 

■ girdler, i. 180. 

goldsmith, ii. 326. 

haberdasher of hats, i. 35, 78. 

hangman, iii. 177. 

hawker, iii. 160. 

herald-painter, ii. 152, 192. 

jeweller, ii. 257. 

joiner, iv. 71. 

law, doctors of, i. 187. 

mathematical instrument maker, 

ii. 237. 

merchant, v. 109. 

milliner, iii. 382. 

musician, i. 241-2, 256, 469, 475. 

oilman, i. 30; iii. 503. 

organist, ii. 341. 

physician, ii. 172, 269, 325, 353; 

ih. 35§ 5 39 6 ' 448- 

potter, ii. 399. 

prentices, iii. 33. 

printer, i. 109; ii. 170, 474; iii. 

336, 425 ; iv. 147. 

publisher, iii. 160, 206. 

sadler, ii. 399. 

Salter, iii. 58. 

schoolmaster, iii. 288. 

scrivener, i. 42, 276. 

■ Serjeant- at-mace, iii. 27. 

shoemaker, iii. 368. 

silkman, i. 37, 431 ; ii. 481 ; iii. 

45- 

skinner, i. 42, 320. 

Spanish merchant, iii. 218, 448. 

stationer, i. 20 ; ii. 477, 531 ; iv. 

61, 216 : stationers' company, iii. 392; 

iv. 17: see bookseller. 

surgeon, i. 35. 

tailor, i. 177 ; ii. 281, 285, 399. 

tipstaff, ii. 426. 

tradesman, i. 141. 

trunkmaker, iii. 431. 

Turkey merchant, iii. 448 : the 

Turkey company, i. 164. 

■ upholsterer, iii. 385. 

woodman, ii. 176. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
London : trades and professions men- 
tioned : wood merchant, ii. 419. 
woollendraper, ii. 137, 370. 

— miscellaneous notes : — 

barge, iii. 365 ; wherry, iii. 302. 

fog, ii. 121, 298 : smoke, i. 508. 

hackney coaches, iii. 450, 452, 

461. 

lodgings in, cost of, 1667, ii. 109. 

militia, i. 63-4, 71 ; ii. 416, 419, 

450. 

poor- relief, ii. 430. 

postage, i. 264. 

Roman remains, ii. 162-3. 

tides at, i. 349 ; ii. 208. 

communication with Oxford : by 

water (barges), iv. 51, 53, 69-70, 217 : 
by road, (i) stage-waggon, i. 201 ; iii. 
l8 L 365, 395> 4 1 1 > 4 IQ •' (") hackney- 
coach, iii. 285, 438; or stage-coach, 
iii. 318; there being a halt at High 
Wycombe, for the night, i. 499; or 
to bait, iii. 81-2. The coach at first 
took two days, ii. 109, 155. After 
1669, in summer-time, an express- 
coach ran in one day, ii. 153 (fare 
12s -)> r 55> l6 7> 220, 223, 245 (fare 
ios.). In 1670-2 a rival coach ran, 
infringing the University monopoly, 

ii. 196, 221, 242. The old two-days' 
coaches still ran, ii. 153. 

books published at London, term- 
catalogues of, i. 15 ; iv. 235 : special 
' Great Fire ' collections of, ii. 87 : 
bearing fictitious imprints, e.g.' Am- 
sterdam,' iii. 120 : ' Caropoli,' ii. 500: 
' Paris,' ii. 252, 464. 

almanacs printed at, i. u-2, 14. 

— bishop of, colonial jurisdiction, ii. 
J 5, 79- 

Richard Fitz-nigel, iv. 269. 

Richard Clifford, iv. 265. 

Richard Vaughan, i. 154. 

William Laud, i. 485; ii. 214; 

v. 57- 

William Juxon, i. 126, 265, 476, 

480. 

Gilbert Sheldon, v. 68. 

Humphrey Henchman, i. 466 ; ii. 

67, 202. 

— — Henry Compton, v. 38. 

— Gazette, i. 15. 
Middlesex : — 

natives of, i. 78, 287 ; ii. 282. 

sheriff of, ii. 137 : undersheriff of, 

iii. 58. _ _ 

militia of, ii. 450. 

archdeacon of, ii. 352, 372. 

— Acton, ii. 554. 

— Bishop's Wood, iii. 180. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



in 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Middlesex: Blackwell hall, i. 124. 

— Brentford, Brainford, i. 71, 91, 135 ; 

ii. 251 ; iii. 401. 

— Chelsea, ii. 196, 338, 363, 371 ; iii. 
409, 418: Chelsea chapel, iii. 370: 
Chelsea college, iii. 5, 166 : Chelsea 
hospital, iii. 5, 433. 

— Cooper's hill, ii. 349. 

— Dawley, iii. 479. 

— Ealing, ii. 290; iii. 342. 

— Enfield chase, iii. 401. 

— Fulham, i. 383 ; iii. 39 : consecra- 
tion of bishops at, iii. 301, 312. 

— Grenford, i. 351. 

— Gunnersbury, iii. 342. 

— Hampstead, iii. 350. 

— Hampton Court, i. 227 ; ii. 67, 495 ; 

iii. 306 ; iv. 55, 58, 209. 

— Harefield, ii. 510. 

— Harlington, iii. 479. 

— Harrow-on-the-hill, ii. 178. 

— Highgate, iii. 121, 180. 

— Hogsden, Hoxton, ii. 421 ; iii. 
366. 

— Hounslow, ii. 512. 

— London, v. 104. 

— Longford (near Colnebrook in Bucks.), 
i. 202. 

— Newington-green, ii. 447. 

— Poplar, iii. 398. 

— Sandwell chapel, i. 34. 

— Stoke Newington, i. 40 ; ii. 391 ; iii. 
215- 

— Stratford Bow, i. 135. 

— Tottenham high cross, ii. 329. 

— Twickenham, iii. 413. 

— Uxbridge, i. 458; ii. 510: iii. 
388. 

— Westminster, v. 108. 
Monmouth, iii. 441. 

— Chepstow, ii. 504. 

— Lantarnam, ii. 381, 397, 399, 400. 

— Llanthony priory, ii. 268; iv. 98, 
3°°> 3?3> 3o8. 

— Llanvihangel, ii. 381. 

— Michel Troy, ii. 220. 

— Trylegh, iii. 162. 

— Uske, ii. 461. 

Norfolk, i. 116, 240, 475; ii. 104, 398, 
4!7> 536. 

— Brysley, i. 240. 

— Deerham, ii. 335. 

— Doores, ii. 539. 

— North Elmham, i. 50, 240. 

— Norwich, ii. 351, 417; iii. 29-30, 
167, 489 ; assizes, ii. 104. 

cathedral, iii. 9 ; iv. 239 : register 

of, ii. 305 ; iv. 241. 
dean of, i. 329; ii. 124; iii. 9, 

!86, 310, 316. 



England, by counties {continued') : — 
Norfolk : Norwich, archdeacon of, ii. 

305, 348; iii. 447. 
chancellor of, ii. 39S ; prebendary 

of, iii. 9. 

bishop of, ? London house of, iii. 

366. 

John of Oxford, iv. 285. 

Richard Corbet, i. 437. 

Edward Reynolds, v. 67. 

Anthony Sparrow, ii. 352 ; iii. 

121, 138. 

William Lloyd, v. 59. 

John More, iii. 360, 435, 489. 

— Oxley, iii. 106. 

— Thetford, iii. 9. 

— Yarmouth, i. 116; ii. 375,417. 

— Little Yarmouth, ii. 180. 
Northamptonshire, i. 510; ii. 139; iii. 

178, 180, 361, 379, 445. 

natives of, i. 37, 113, 136, 181, 

282 ; ii. 99, 229, 415 ; iii. 25, 95, 267, 
396, 453, 488. 

— Astrop wells, Eastrop, Esthorp, ii. 
12, 40, 79, 94, 250, 320, 351 ; iii. 89, 
108, 222, 387, 460-3. 

— Aynho, i. 274, 285; ii. 299, 357, 
391 ; iii. 43, 222 ; v. II. 

— Billing, iii. 349. 

— Boughton, iii. 86. 

— Brackley, i. 37, 55-6; ii. 34, 152; 

iii. 184, 284: Brackley hospital, ii. 

34 ; iv - 9°- 

— Byfield, i. 67 ; ii. 548. 

— Castle-Ashby, ii. 562. 

— Charwelton, Charleton, Charlton, i. 
281 ; iii. 150, 461, 490. 

— Cold Hyam, ii. 558. 

— Cottingham, i. 267. 

— Crowlton, iii. 146. 

— Culworth, ii. 446; iii. 147. 

— Easton-Neston, i. 113; ii. 218; iii. 
394- 

— Eastrop, see Astrop. 

— Edgecott, i. 67. 

— Edgeworth, i. 67. 

— Evemley, iii. 416. 

— Everdon, i. 260. 

— Farthingo, i. 138. 

— Fenford, i. e. Thenford, ii. 89. 

— Flower, iii. 443. 

— Heyford, iii. 100. 

— Higham-Ferrers, iv. 153. 

— Holdenby, Holmby, i. 227, 460. 

— Isham, iii. 453. 

— Killingworth, i. 263. 

— King's Sutton, ii. 12, 320; iii. 387, 
460-1. 

— Kirby, i. 274. 

— Lamport, Langport, ii. 203, 309 ; 

iv. 268. 



112 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Northamptonshire: Lilburne, iii. 461. 

— Middleton-Cheyncy, i. 37, 275-7; 

»• 539- 

— Nascby, i. 1 28. 

— Newbottle, iii. 461. 

— Northampton, ii. 124, 151, 156, 
159; iii. 66, 225, 261, 284, 432, 447: 
mayor of, ii. 251 : great (1675) fire, 

ii. 323 ; iv. 74: corn (1693) riot, iii. 
433: assizes, iii. 328: jail, i. 60: 
hospital, i. 127. 

— Oundle, iii. 331, 420. 

— Peterborough, ii. 146. 

dean of, i. 379 ; iii. 362-3 : pre- 
bendary, iii. 178. 

bishop of, Joseph Henshaw, ii. 

444 ; iii. 87 : William Lloyd, v. 59 : 
Thomas White, v. 74 : Richard Cum- 
berland, iii. 360, 366. 

— Purston, iii. 461. 

— Rainsborough, iii. 461. 

— Seisham, ? Syresham, iii. 96. 

— Sparton-hill, ? Spratton, i. 441. 

— Stanwick, iii. 207. 

— Stene, ii. 11, 16. ( 

— Stoke-doyle, iii. 178. 

— Strixton, iii. 453. 

— Thenford, ii. 89. 

— Thingdon, iii. 310. 

— Towcester, iii. 24. 

— Turston, i. 37. 

— Walgrave, i. 218. 

— Wapenham, ii. 185. 

— Warkworth, Werkworth, i. 275-6. 

— Welton, iii. 216. 

— Whitfield, ii. 77 ; iii. 135. 
Northumberland, i. 225. 

natives of, ii. 550 ; iii. 172, 183. 

archdeacon of, ii. 357; iii. 139, 

386,509. 

— Berwick-on-Tweed, i. 119, 400. 

— Embleton, Emildon, i. 135 ; ii. 246 ; 

iii. 67. 

— Flodden field, ii. 15. 

— Hexham, iv. 289. 

— Newcastle, i. 90, 266 ; iii. 251, 320, 

349, 374- ^ 

— Pontelm, Ponteland, 111. 374. 
Nottinghamshire, i. 194,434; iii. 373~4» 

— Holm Pierpoint, iii. 83, 340. 

— Lenton priory, iv. 269. 

— Newark, i. 120, 232 ; ii. 345. 

— Nottingham, i. 434 ; iv. 60. 
archdeacon of, ii. 52, 115. 

— Ollerton, iii. 99. 

— Southwell, iii. 425. 

— Trent, river, ii. 554. 

Oxford : see Index I in Wood's City of 
Oxford, vol. iii. 

— Addison's walk, i. 497. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford: S. Alban hall, see in Index III. 

— S. Aldate's church, i. 279, 317, 470 ; 

iii. 344; iv. 73, 207, 213 : muniments 
of, ii. 41 ; iv. 1 1 5 : registers of, i. 501 ; 

iv. 1 1 5. 

chancel, burials in, i. 132, 199. 

steeple, iii. 300. 

West's chapel, ii. 295. 

great south door, iii. 6. 

baptisms in, ii. 415 : marriages, 

i. 127, 231; ii. 415: burials, i. 36, 
127, 181, 211, 231, 420, 469; ii. 
p. viii, 49, 70, 103, 236, 245, 250, 
308, 349 ; iii. 6, 7, 30, 143. 

churchyard, burials in, ii. 295 ; 

iii. 4. 

parish-clerk, i. 385. 

parish, i. 120, 127, 168, 243, 295, 

317, 338, 385, 39 2 > 436, 4 6 9? 7°> 
72, 127, 150, 180, 222, 224, 226, 250, 
308, 349, 363, 467, 549 ; iii. 6, 85, 
119, 143, 220, 242 ; v. 10, 12. 

called S. Toll's, i. 233, 432 ; ii. 

77, 241 ; iii. 4, 85, 286, 406. 

— S. Aldate's street, i. 80, 168 ; ii. 385 ; 
iii. 228. 

— alehouses, i. 366, 372, 384, 414, 423 ; 

ii. 96, 128, 404, 429 ; iii. 3, 41-2, 122, 
130, 243; v. 29, 43. 

— All Saints' church, Allhallows, i. 
136, 211, 215, 221, 291, 386, 445; 

ii. 52, 82, 96, 133-4, 207, 354, 522 ; 

iii. 147, 149, 166, 197, 308, 384, 394, 
532 ; iv. 213 : muniments of, ii. 107 ; 

iv. 114 : registers of, iv. 114 : register 
in Commonwealth time, i. 183 (this 
has been found, and is now, as also 
a transcript of it, in the Bodleian). 

sermons in, i. 293, 360. 

steeple, i. 433. 

S. Anne's chapel, i. 119 ; ii. 201. 

vault, i. 104, 119; ii. 201, 203, 

349- 

chancel, i. 119 : burials in, i. 401 ; 

ii. 26, 174. 

the ( college chancel,' where 

Lincoln college buried, i. 127, 155, 
175, 228 ; ii. 89, 141 ; iii. 138-9. 

the ' parish chancel,' ii. 1 54 ; 

iii. 242. 

burials in, i. 105, 238, 244 ; ii. 21, 

36, 34° > 35°> 40 2 5 iii- 221, 366. 

churchyard, i. 377 : burial in, 

iii. 15. 

north churchyard, iii. 91, 394. 

parish, i. 31, 203, 259, 290, 448, 

473, 505 ; «• I02 > 105. 240, 255, 274, 
310, 320, 331, 380, 391, 402, 414, 
423, 54 x > 55 1 5 iii- 21, 4°> 8 5> *94> 
242, 260, 308, 533. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



"3 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford : All Souls college, see in Index 
III. 

— All Souls corner, ii. 209. 

— Amsterdam court, ii. 106, 165, 226. 

— Angel inn, the Angel, i. 168, 189 ; 
ii. 139, 156-7, 159-60, 213, 219, 224, 

25°-^ 315. 37 6 , 44i 5 in - J 7-8, 274, 
318, 423, 508. 

— Angel mead, ii. 355. 

— Apodyterium, Archives, see in Index 
III. 

— Aristotle's well, Hi. 227. 

— Ashmolean museum, see in Index III. 

— assizes, i. 44, 72, 90, 308, 368, 422, 
445, 468-9 ; ii. 6-7, 18, 30, 55, 104, 
5*9, 544' 548, 55 1 ; 9> 43> 7 2 , 9°> 
i34> 155-6, 169, 223, 260, 383. 480; 
iv. 52 : assize sermon, see infra in 
S. Mary's church. 

— Aulburne, aula de, iv. 129. 

— Austin friars, ii. 187. 

— back lane, the, i. 449. 

— Friar Bacon's study, iv. 180. 

— Balliol college, see in Index III. 

— S. Bartholomew's grove, i. too, 289. 
hospital, i. 232, 289, 454; iv. 106, 

182 : marriage in, ii. 440. 
well, i. ^89. 

— Bayly, the Great, i. 319. 

— Bayly street, North, i. 48, ill. 

— Beam hall, i. 447. 

— Bear inn, the Bear, i. 62, 86, 314, 
456-7> 5 QI J 9 8 , 270 ; iii. 59, 358, 
366, 508. 

— Bear lane, i. 456 ; iii. 366. 

— Bedell hall, iv. 167. 

— Beef hall, iv. 123. 

— Beef-hall lane, ii. 358. 

— S. Benedict's, Bennet's, church, iv. 
207, 213. 

— S. Bernard's college, iv. 129. 

— bidding-prayer, ii. 434. 

— Biddle hall, iv. 167. 

— bills of mortality, i. 49. 

— Blackboy lane, iii. 367. 

— Black bull, ii. 425. 

— Black friars, i. 112, 255 ; ii. 187; iv. 
119. 

— Black hall, in Cat street, i. 431. 

— Black hall, in S. Giles', i. 279; ii. 
153. 

— Black hall, in Schools street, ii. 
388. 

— Blue anchor, i. 220. 

— Blueboar inn, the Blue boar, i. 436 ; 
ii. 6, 71, 120, 122, 125, 150, 189, 378, 
449, 548 ; iii. 6, 486 ; v. 12. 

— Blueboar lane, ii. 388. 

— boarding house, iii. 296. 

— - Bocardo, i. 49, 55, 491, 498 ; ii. 470 ; 



England, by counties (contimied) : — 
iii. 226, 312, 492 : prison, i. 66; ii. 
341 ; iii. 42 : debtors' prison, iii. 80. 

Oxford: Bocherew, the old Bochero, 
Butchero, i. 28, 30, 48, 111, 210, 279, 
311, 463, 491 ; iii. 192, 355, 485 ; v. 
11-2. 

— Bodleian library, see in Index III. 

— Bollshipton farmhouse, iv. 180. 

— Bookbinders' bridge, i. 241 . 

— Bostall hall, ii. 156. 

— Botanic garden, iii. 105 : see Physic 
garden. 

— Botley causeway, i. 57 ; ii. 24-5, 377. 

— bounds, beating the city, ii. 493. 

— Brasenose college, see in Index III. 

— Brasenose lane, iii. 53. 

— brewhouses, iii. 319, 386. 

— Bridewell, i. 505. 
gate, iii. 478. 

— Broad street, ii. 522 ; iii. 53, 120. 

— Broadgates hall, members of, i. 26, 
78; ii. 145; iii. 467; iv. 151; v. 5. 

— Brokenhays, i. 57, 62, 91, 250; ii. 
244; iii. 147, 184, 195, 241. 

— S. Budoc's church, iv. 207. 

— Bulkley hall, i. 260. 

— Bull inn, i. 393, 492; ii. 139; iii. 
249, 264. 

— Bullock's lane, i. 28, 30 ; ii. 3, 13, 
236, 5°3 ; iii- 26 ; v. 12-5. 

— Bulstake bridge, iii. 179. 

— Bulwarks alley, i. 28. 

— Butchero, i. 210: see Bocherew. 

— Caesar's lodgings, ii. 341. 

— cage, the, i.489, 509; ii. 371 ; iii. 271. 

— Canditch, i. 41, 320, 492, 498 ; ii. 43, 
193, 249, 278, 516, 522, 531 ; iii. 147, 

239, 359, 456, 4797 4 95, 532. 

— canon-foundry, i. 84. 

— Canterbury college, i. 435 ; ii. 2 ; iii. 
232 ; iv. 105, 240, 300. 

— Cardinal's cap, inn, iii. 131. 

— Cardinal college, Cardinal Wolsey's 
college, ii. 11 3-4; iv. 155-6. 

— Carfax, Quadrivium, Quatervois, i. 
55, 57, 67, 73, 482, 492, 497; ii. 3, 
86, 112, 152, 160, 207-8, 382, 425, 
518, 526 ; iii. 42, 48, 108, 148-9, 152, 
162, 226, 228, 230, 233, 240, 268, 
285-6, 490, 532 : gibbet at, i. 82, 91, 
93 : place for the city bonfire, iii. 48, 
72, 129 : place for the city music, iii. 
48, 72, 112, 230. 

church, see S. Martin's. 

conduit, i. 76, 82, 91 ; ii. 382 ; 

iii. 48, 112-3, 128, 202, 228, 485 ; 

iv. 58, 80-1, 209. 

— Carmelite friars, iv. 220, 275. 

— castle, i. 97, 165, 170, 192, 474, 477, 
487-8 ; ii. 379-8°, 4 22 , 547, 55*, 559 5 



VOL. V. 



I 



ii 4 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued*) : — 
iii. j 69, 393 ; iv. 105, 240 : as prison, 
i. 73, 88, 105, 157, 186, 334, 488 ; ii. 
100, 4S4, 487; iii. 42-3: debtors' 
prison, iii. 492 : political prison, iii. 
145-6. 

Oxford: castle, bridge to, iii. 169: 
first gate (wicket), iii. 51 1-2 : gates, 
iii. 43. 

execution in, iii. 263. 

— Castle inn, i. 267 ; ii. 146 ; iii. 373. 

— ' the Castle,' a tavern, ii. 1, 23-4, 31, 
35, 37, 39-4o, 43, 73, 75, 146, 189. 

— Castle mills, ii. 277, 427 ; iii. 169. 

— Castle mill-tail, iii. 169 : bridge at, 

iii. 169. 

— Castle street, i. 28. 

— Castle yard, i. 101, 165, 169, 186, 
192 : ii. 104, 305, 552-3 ; iii. 393. 

— Cat street, Kat street, i. 176, 199, 

251, 44 8 > 45?, 462, 481, 484-5, 496, 
506, 508-9 ; ii. 34, 66, 192, 209, 305, 
402, 511, 531; iii. 23, 53, 161, 213, 

377, 434, 485- 

— Catherine Wheel, Katherine Wheel, 

i. 119, 146 ; ii. 280. 

— cattle fair, iii. 184. 
market, iii. 89. 

— chains and posts to close streets, i. 
55. 67. 

— Checquer inn, ii. 148, 381, 560 ; iii. 
29, 253- 

1 — Cherwell, i. 97, 497; ii. 77, 94, 127, 
!88, 355 ; iii. 480. 

— Christ Church, see in Index III. 
meadow, i. 60, 91, 97, 100, 102, 

234, 494 5 »• 55 5 iii- J 47, I 5 2 - 

— churches, Brian Twyne on Oxford, 

iv. 207, 213, 222. 

— cider house, ii. 145. 

— Clarendon Building, ii. 172. 
Hotel, i. 57, 444. 

— S. Clement's church, i. 97 ; iii. 25 ; 

iv. 207 : register of, iv. 1 15 : vicar of, 

ii. 447 ; iv. 207. 

chancel, burial in, ii. 94. 

burial in, iii. 181. 

parish, i. 91, 99, 100 ; ii. 106, 139, 

471, 473 ; iv. 180. 
(suburb), i. 497, 499 ; ii. 127, 131, 

422, 516, 522, 551 ; iii. 241, 286, 325, 

333, 380. 

— S. Clement's High-street, i. 476. 

— coffee-houses, i. 21, 168-9. 

1650, the first in Oxford, i. 168. 

1654, another in Oxford, i. 188. 

165 5, opening of Arthur Tilliard's, 

v. 71. 

1663, a ' new' coffee-house in 

Oxford, i. 471. 
1665, Parliament cannot meet in 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxford without its coffee-house, ii. 
60. 

Oxford: coffee-houses: 167-, a new 
coffee-house, outside Turl gate, ii. 
230. 

1 675, an object of suspicion to 

the government, ii. 329, 331. 

1676, ' bantering' at, ii. 332, 334. 

much frequented by members of 

the University, i. 5, 423, 488-9; ii. 
93, 279, 300, 331, 429 ; iii. 243, 245, 
263, 352 : e. g. by Anthony Wood, 

i. 416, 468 ; ii. 15, 23-4, 27, 30, 37, 
81, 85, 89, 92, 98-9, 102, 106, 119, 
126-7, I 3°, x 38, J 45-6; iii. 108. 

one attraction was the political 

and theological discussions there, ii. 
300, 531 ; iii. 171, 245, 309, 448. 

the chief attraction was the 

newspaper, sent down from London 
and handed about. Wood cites, 1675 
onwards, ' coffee-house letter,' ' letter 
at the coffee-house,' ii. 308, 510: 
I coffee letter,' ii. 506, 537, 550, 563 ; 
iii. 2, 9, 14, 29, 126, 311, 391 ; ' public 
coffee letter,' ii. 530 ; ' the letter,' or 
< letters,' ii. 556, 562 ; iii. 33, 76, 157, 

313, 3i7' 35 1 - 2 , 356-7, 359~ 6o > &c - 
W T ood bought these papers, iii. 215, 
257, 3o6. 

coffee-houses were used to dis- 
tribute papers, ii. 288, 293, 505; iii. 
310. 

they were open on Sundays at 

5 p.m., 1677, ii. 396, 463; 1691, iii. 
357- 

— — the chief Oxford coffee-houses 
of Wood's later time were : — 

Browne's, 1690, ii. 333, 336, 

354, 36i, 380. 

— — — widow Day's, 1669-91, ii. 
163 ; iii. 67, 108, 217, 332, 358. 

James Hall's, 1689-95, v. 46. 

Thomas Short's, 1662-92, v. 

70. 

— the Turl coffee-house, 1688, 

iii- 254, 273, 302, 357 ; v. 46 : cp. 

ii. 230. 

Wolley's, 1688, iii. 257, 271, 

305. 

— conduit, see Carfax. 

— Congregation house, Convocation 
house, see in Index III. 

— cookshop, i. 5 J v. 27, 40, 60, 65, 

80-1. 

— corn market, i. 93, 489, 491. 

— Cornmarket street, i. 55, III, 444, 
489 ; ii. 371 ; iii. 54. 

— Corpus Christi college, see in Index 
III. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 115 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford: council chamber, iii. 129, 199, 
256 ; iv. 81. 

— Cowley lands, i. 97. 

— Cowley mead, iii. 377. 

— S. Cross, see Holywell. 

— Cross inn, i. 255 ; ii. 14, 92, 152, 371, 
452, 524, 549-50; iii. 47, 79, 89, 96, 
108, 127, 145, 223, 254, 268, 271, 
277, 284, 286, 303, 377, 422, 508. 

— Cross-inn yard, iii. 97. 

— Cross Keys, ii. 149 ; iii. 80. 

— Crouched friars, ii. 187. 

— Crown inn, ii. 152, 187; iii. 206-7, 
508. 

— Crown tavern, patronized by Anthony 
Wood, i. 254, 256, 258, 264, 267, 275, 
281, 284, 310, 316, 326-7, 336, 338, 
378, 380, 382, 389, 399-401, 404, 410, 
428, 444, 468, 472, 475, 477-8, 486 ; 

ii. 15, 18, 24, 40, 69, 71, 73, 126, 130, 
174, 177, 184, 189-91, 193, 542-3; 

iii. 40, 168, 186, 311, 327, 336, 357. 

— dancing school, i. 322; iii. 299. 

— Deep hall, i. 290. 

■ — ditch, the city, see moat. 

— Dolphin inn, i. 193, 433, 489, 509 ; 

ii. 140, 270 ; iii. 41, 45. 

— Dover pier, i. 497. 

— Durham college, iii. 364; iv. 118, 
206, 220. 

— Eagle and Child, ii. 92, 195 ; iii. 408 ; 

iv. 82. 

— East bridge, i. 55, 60, 75, 97 ; ii. 40 ; 

iii. 308. 

— East gate, i. 61, 71, 189, 201; ii. 
156-7, 164, 385 ; iii. 7, 27-8, 47, 66, 
127-8, 161, 225, 286, 408, 494, 532-3 ; 

iv. 216. 

• the place for formal receptions by 

the city, ii. 207, 525 ; iii. 47, 112. 

— East-gate street, iii. 306. 

— S. Ebbe's church, i. 220, 442 ; ii. 247, 
279; iii. 379, 458: registers of, ii. 
387 ; iv. 115 : muniments of, ii. 345, 
450; iv. 115 : rector of, ii. 451. 

chancel, burial in, iii. 260 : north 

aisle of, i. 255. 

burials in, i. 211 ; ii. 412. 

churchyard, burial in, ii. 461. 

keykeeper, ii. 345. 

parish, i. 27, 61, 156, 255, 506 ; 

ii. 10, 49, 106, 236, 247, 258, 286, 

412, 444, 446, 461, 538; iii. 358, 

393 J v. 8. 
vicarage, i. 241. 

— S. Edmund hall, see in Index III. 

— S. Edmund hall lane, i. 168. 

— S. Edward's church, iv. 207 : parish, 
i. 353- 

— - Exeter college, see in Index III. 

I 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford: fair, iii. 65, 184. 

— Fish row, iii. 198. 

— Fish street, i. 46 ; iii. 228, 231, 377, 
485. 

— flesh market, i. 93, 491 ; ii. 382. 

— Fleur-de-luce inn, Fleur-de-liz, i. 80 ; 
ii. 299, 427; iii. 138: damaged by 
fire, 1644, i. in, 151. 

shows at, ii. 15 ; iii. 219, 221. 

frequented by Wood, i. 213, 271, 

2 75, 2 78-9 ; ii- 27, 40, 99, 104, 112, 
115, 117, 122, 126-7, I2 9, i 3 i j I 44"6, 
i49> i5 J » I 55> J 77, 189-91 ; iii. 395, 
483 ; v. 20. 

leased by the Wood family from 

Merton college, i. 45, 79, 169, 311, 
319 ; ii. 9; iii. 392-3, 491, 505 : see 
also v. 77, 80-2 : sub-let to an inn- 
keeper, ii. 214. 

— Flying Horse, iii. 485. 

— Folly bridge, i. 169, 220 ; iii. 361. 

— fortifications, i. 72-4, 91, 97, 99, 100. 
112 ; ii. 260. 

— franchises of the city, going the, ii. 
493- 

— Frewen court, i. 443. 

— Frewen hall, i. 84, ill, 443 ; ii. 108, 
482 ; iii. 68. 

— friars in Oxford, ii. 187. 

— Friars' entry, ii. 280. 

— S. Frideswyde's church, i. 385-6 : 
parish, i. 353. _ 

meadow, ii. 55. 

priory, i. 248, 286, 315, 322, 373, 

410; iv. 103-4, io 7> I 55» 1 9^j 22 °, 

260. 

— cartulary of, ii. 34, 355 ; iv. 

207: muniments of, ii. 112-4, 118; 
iv. 103. 

— gallows, of the city, i. 250 ; ii. 484 : 
of Holywell manor, i. 291 : military, 
i. 82, 91, 93. 

— gates of the city secured by chains, 
1642, i. 67. 

— Gates, the Three, ii. 449. 

— S. George in the Castle, college of, 
iv. 105, 107, 221. 

— George inn, ii. 30, 79 ; iii. 385, 
479- 

— George street, i. 111. 

— George tavern, iii. 352. 

— gibbet, military, at Carfax, i. 82, 91, 
93- 

— Gildhall, Yeild hall, i. 44, 66, 70, 
7 2 , 74, 8 3, 9 6 , l8 3> 2 45> 416, 441 ; 
ii- 15, 55, x 54, 193, 222, 229, 378, 
426, 525 ; iii. 47, 109, 129, 199, 227-8, 
260, 280, 418, 422 ; iv. 52 : see Town 
hall. 

Lower Gildhall, ii. 15 ; iii. 305. 



n6 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxford: Gild-hall yard, i. 246, 438, 
40a ; ii. 1 65, 55 1 ; iii. 1 27. 

— S. Giles' church, i. 55-6, 72, 88, 226, 
382, 414, 470, 492 ; ii. 13, 123, 278, 
401 ; iii. 239, 297, 367, 426 ; iv. 180. 

register of, iv. 115: church- 
wardens' accounts, ii. 477; iv. 115: 
benefactor, ii. 401 : annual sermon, 

ii. 401 : plate of, i. 118. 

clergy, ii. 145, 401 : lecturer, ii. 

543 5 »i. 32? : . 
chancel, iii. 459: chapel of chancel, 

i. 279. 

north aisle of nave, burial in, ii. 

198. 

burials in, i. 118; ii. 150, 185, 

552 ; iii. 139, 466 : monument in, iii. 

churchyard, burials in, ii. 401 ; 

iii. 367: passage through, ii. 280. 
parish, i. 30, 191, 193, 231, 279, 

317; ii. 29, 41, 96, 153, 198, 257, 
482; iii. 38, 43, 120, 139, 209, 213, 
226-8, 259, 339, 362, 447, 466; iv. 
188 ; v. 8, 14. 

— S. Giles* fields, i. 72, 494; iii. 224, 
227. 

— S. Giles' manor, ii. 118. 

— S. Giles' street, i. 492, 494; ii. 278, 
455 ; iii. 228, 339. 

— Gloucester, Glocester, college, iii. 
342 ; iv. 105, 107, 220. 

— Gloucester green, i. 250. 

— Gloucester hall, see in Index III. 

— Glovers' hall, iii. 112. 

— Golden Fleece, ii. 127. 

— Golden Lion, i. 454, 477; ii. 119; 
iii. 60. 

— Grandpont, i. 30, 368, 468, 494; ii. 
103 ; iv. 188 ; v. 12-3. 

— Grandpoole, i. 36, 66, 127, 180, 368, 
469-70; ii. 27, 103, 125, 221. 

— Gratian street, ii. 192. 

— Greek hall, iv. 294. 

— Greeks, projected college for, ii. 379 ; 
iii. 399, 426. 

— Greenditch, i. 250, 490; ii. 484. 

— Grey friars, ii. 187 ; iv. 268, 303-4: 
see Minorites. 

— Greyhound inn, i. 433 ; ii. 164, 479 ; 
iii. 285, 328 ; iv. 82. 

— Grope lane, i. 154, 448-9; ii. 154, 
249, 255, 487 ; iii. 20. 

— Grove street, iii. 510. 

— Halfmoon, i. 474; ii. 117; iii. 329, 
< 4 8i. 

— Halfmoon sconce, ii. 188. 

— halls, MSS. about the, iv. 146 : cata- 
logues of, iv. 199, 213, 219, 221, 227, 
291 : statutes of, iv. 130-1, 221. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxford: J fare and Hounds, iii. 138. 

— llarehall lane, ii. 156. 

— I larpsichord row, i. 303. 

— Hart hall, see in Index III. 

— Henry VIIl's college, ii. 1 1 3-4 ; iv. 
155 r >- 

— Hertford college, Dr. Richard New- 
ton's, i. 168; iv. 159: present, ii. 
p. viii. 

— High bridge, i. in, 294; iii. 283-4. 

— High street, i. 54-5, 62, 67, 168, 
415, 492, 496, 499: ii. 102, 154, 
156, 382, 385, 525-6; iii. 42, 47-8, 
128, 161, 185, 377, 415, 511. 

— Hinksey steps, iii. 395. 

— Holy bush, the Hollybush, i. 129 ; iii. 
284. 

— Holy Lamb inn, i. 433. 

— Holywell church, S. Cross' church, 
i. 291 ; ii. 107, 127 ; iii. 182 : register 
of,i. 205; ii. 237, 253-4, 360 ; iy. 115. 

chancel, i. 194 : burials in, i. 193, 

219 ; ii. 72, 229-30,459; iii. 124,376. 

bells, i. 397. 

gallery, ii. 332. 

parish-clerk, i. 126; ii. 360. 

burials in, i. 208 ; ii. 180 ; iii. 37, 

360. 

— churchyard, i. 160; iii. 470: 

burials in, ii. 231-2. 
parish, i. 208; ii. 169, 171, 217, 

271, 308 ; iii. 88 : see infra Holywell 

(suburb). 

— Holywell farm, ii. 127. 

— Holywell green, well on, ii. 107. 

— Holywell manor, ii. 107 : manor 
house, ii. 230 : court of the manor, 
iii. 27, 76, 165, 198. 

— Holywell meads, i. 396. 

— Holywell street, i. 168 ; iii. 286. 

— Holywell (suburb), i. 28, 31, 49, 54, 
96, 154, 168, 191-2, 204, 237, 241, 
251-2, 277, 389, 397, 403, 405, 448, 
476, 506; h. 35, 77, 96, 125, 213, 
216, 231, 233-4, 237, 312, 326, 396, 

456, 459. 5™, 54i, 549 = "i- 9, 37 > 
45, 109-10, 122, 132, 173, 194, 213, 
218, 267, 286, 300, 362, 376, 468, 
489-91, 495, 532; iv. 74; v. 16-7. 

— horse fair, iii. 89, 184. 

— horse race, Oxford, iii. 509. 

— Horsmull lane, ii. 156. 

— hospital (i.e. almshouse), projected, 
1682, iii. 12. 

— hustings court, iv. 183-4. 

— Hythe bridge, i. in, 294; iii. 283. 

— Iffley road, ii. 363. 

— Independents' meeting-house of, iii. 
393- 

— inns, i. 372, 414. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



117 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford: Islet, the, ii. 363. 

— jail, ii. 99. 

— Jericho gardens, ii. 139. 

— Jesus college, see in Index III. 

— Jesus college lane, ii. 214, 433,449, 
487 ; iii. 162. 

— Jews, Oxford, i. 168, 188-9. 

— S. John Baptist church, see Merton 
college chapel in Index III. 

patronage of, iv. 208. 

christenings in, i. ill, 440; v. 

13- 

marriages in, i. 138, 220; ii. 242 

308, 402, 469; iii. 96. 
burials in, see Merton college 

chapel in Index III. 
churchyard, burials in, i. 132, 

448-9; ii. 44, 146, 148, 247, 265, 

344, 471, 498; iii. 2, 419. 

— — registers of, ii. 53, 230 ; iii. 499 ; 
iv. 115: Gurgany's, i. 130, 446: 
Jellyman's, i. 183, 418, 446 : Wilton's, 

i. 446 : Wood's, i. 23, 446. 

parish, i. 43, 51, 338, 447-50, 

511; ii. 56, 103, 204, 223-4, 454, 
487; iii. 38-9, 43, 169, 503; iv. 
*4-5> 34, 4°> 115; v. 7-9, 11-7. 

— beating the bounds of, iii. 20, 

46. 

— S. John Baptist college, see in 
Index III. 

— S. John Baptist hospital, ii. 354; iii. 
522; iv. 106, 161-2: chapel of, iii. 
522 : muniments of, ii. 78-9. 

— S. John Baptist street, i. 28, 461, 
510 ; ii. 156, 539 ; iii. 20, 344, 493 ; 
iv. 13-4; v. 13: see S. John's street. 

— S. John's college, see in Index III. 

— S. John's grove, i. 485. 

— S. John's pool, i. 401 ; ii. 545 : per- 
haps the deep reach of the Cherwell 
at the S.E. corner of the Botanic 
garden, taking its name from the 
adjoining parish. 

— S. John's street, iii. 533 ; i.e. S. John 
Baptist street. 

— Judges' house, the, iii. 112, 194. 

— Kat street, ii. 34; i.e. Cat street. 

— Keble college, ii. 185 ; iii. 297. 

— Kettell, Kettle, hall, i. 41, 336, 401 ; 

ii. 372 ; iii. 359; iv. 62, 67. 

— Kibald, see Kybald. 

— Kidney hall, iii. 219, 274. 

— King Henry VIII's college, ii. 1 1 3-4 ; 
iv. 155-6. 

— King's Arms, i. 168, 405-6, 454. 
in Holywell, i. 389. 

— King's Head, i. 313; ii. 226; iii. 
225, 273. 

Tavern, iii. 264, 365, 369. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford : King's Mill, ii. 94, 402 ; iii. 
95- 

— Kybald, Kibald, street, iii. 20 : twy- 
chen, ii. 156. 

— laboratory, see Ashmolean in Index 
III. 

— lecturers, the city, see infra in S. Mar- 
tin's church. 

— Lincoln college, see in Index III. 

— Little South gate, i. 60. 

— Logic lane, ii. 156, 450; iii. 8, 20, 

— London road, iii. 143. 

— London terrace, i. 303. 

— Long bridges, ii. 364. 

— Longwall street, ii. 216-7 > iii. 2 %6- 

— Louse hall, i. 302 ; ii. 6. 

— Lumbard lane, i. 243 ; iv. 213 ; v. 10. 

— Magdalen bridge, i. 55, 71-2, 80-1, 
433, 474; ii. 30, 516, 519. 524; "i- 
25, 97, 484, 495 ; iv. 216 : Magdalen 
college bridge, iii. 287. 

watering place at, ii. 524. 

— Magdalen church, S. Mary Magda- 
lene church, i. 88, 161, 215, 313; ii. 
144, 278; iii. 177, 245, 296: vicar 
of, iv. 269 : clerk of, ii. 131, 280. 

muniments of, ii. 106, 131; iv. 

116: register of, i. 41; ii. 106-7, 

131 ; iv. 116. 
chancel, burials in, ii. 73, 247, 

37 2 - 

' minister's ' chancel, burials 

in, ii. 311, 325. 
' parish ' chancel, burial in, ii. 

18S. 

nave, burial in, ii. 188. 

burials in, i. 41, 113, 158, 171, 

178-9, 183, 215; ii. 36, 80,91, 262, 

330; iii. 225. 
churchyard, burial in, ii. 280 : 

way through, ii. 280. 
north churchyard, burial in, ii. 

34 1 - 

marriage in, iii. 367. 

monuments in, iii. 309. 

parish, i. 124, 146, 189, 193-4, 

23 1 , 3 6 9> 4H, 44 2 , 509; ii. 28, 58, 
73, 83, 105, 141, 200, 255, 270, 278, 
416, 474,476; iii. 6-7, 11, 45,117, 
120, 124, 131, 214, 255-8, 279, 489; 
v. 14. 

— Magdalen college, Magdalen hall, 
see in Index III. 

— Magdalen street, iii. 228. 

— Magpie, alehouse, i. 108, 449; ii. 
487 ; iii. 20, 42, 510. 

— Magpie lane, iii. 510. 

— malthouses, ii. 221-2, 241. 

— maps of, ii. 14, 49, 260. 



n8 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued): — 
Oxford: S. Margaret's road, i. 250,490. 

— market, i. 278, 372; ii. 128, 385; 

iii. 493-4; iv. 146, 211-2, 217: 
clerks of the, i. 372 ; ii. 530 ; iv. 146, 
212 : place, ii. 526. 

on Saturday, i. 55, 62, 49 1 ; iii. 

229: on Wednesday, i. 491 : on an 
unusual day, iii. 178, 229. 

— Market street, ii. 433, 487. 

— S. Martin's, Carfax, church, i. 47, 

I39> 2 59 5 86 5 ni - M9> J5 1 ' 

479- 

muniments of, ii. 41, 115; iv. 

115: registers of, ii. 239, 365, 388; 

iv. 115. 

font of, iii. 206-7 : tower of, i. 

280 : bells of, ii. 357. 

great bell of, iii. 185. 

rung to collect town, iii. 227. 

rung for city elections, iii. 280, 

334- 

city lecturers in, i. 387 ; ii. 185, 

434 '; iii. 369. 
marriage in, v. 15. 

— chancel, burials in, i. 198-9; ii. 12, 
127, 240; iii. 40, 185-6, 257-8. 

— burials in, i. 39-40, 196, 211; ii. 
99-100, 218-9, 239, 269, 287, 440, 
549; iii. 62, 206-7, 373, 433, 449. 

parish, 1. 30, 45, 169, 311, 448 ; 

ii. 25, 95, 214, 248, 252, 269, 318; 
i". 33; 8 5> Io8 > 2 °7, 3 66 > 3745 v. n, 
14-5- 

— Martyrs' memorial, iii. 177. 

— S. Mary Magdalene church, v. 117. 

— S. Mary Magdalene college, S. Mary 
Magdalene hall, see in Index III. 

— S. Mary's college, of canons regular, 
i. in, 443; ii. 108, 482; iii. 68 ; iv. 
105, 221. 

chapel of, i. 84 ; old stone build- 
ing (? = lodgings over gateway), i. 
1 90-1. 

— S. Mary's church, S. Mary the Virgin, 

i. 279, 421-2, 442, 485, 499, 504-5 ; 

ii. 59; iii. 166; iv. 81, 84-5. 
Brian Twyne's history of, iv. 

20S-9 : Anthony Wood's, i. 483. 

muniments of, i. 489; iv. 116: 

register of, ii. 476, 511; iii. 8; iv. 
116: register of, in the Common- 
wealth period, i. 183, 266 : plate of, 
iv. 51. 

vicar, iii. 434: clerk, i. 220: 

churchwardens, i. 489 ; iv. 76. 

marriages in, i. 126 ; v. 7. 

burials in, i. 27, 118-9, 202-3, 

211, 262, 438, 459, 462, 472; ii. 9, 
41, 70, 128, 261, 344, 360, 362, 537 ; 

iii. no, 166, 217, 348, 385; v. 7. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxford: S. Mary's church: chancel or 

choir, iii. 137 ; iv. 65. 
burials in, i. 102, 145, 325, 

336, 4°5 5 »• 2I 9> 469* 55°; J 9 6 > 
242. 

meetings of Convocation and 

Congregation held in, ii. 60, 517-8, 
5 2 4- 

high altar, iii. 196. 

nave or body, iii. 215, 243 : burial 

in, ii. 310. 
brasses in, i. 265 : monument in, 

ii. 518. 

pulpit, ii. 70 ; iv. 63 : stone pulpit, 

iii. 369. 

galleries, i. 496 ; iv. 63. 

vice-chancellor's seat, ii. 70 : 

doctors' seats, i. 496 ; iii. 301 ; iv. 
63 : M.A. seats, iii. 301 : B.A. and 
gentlemen-commoners' seats, i. 496 : 
ladies' seat, i. 396 : gallery, i. 496. 

precedence in, ii. 397 ; iii. 85, 134. 

— Adam Brome's chapel, ii. 362 ; iii. 
in : burial in, iii. 339. 

repairs to : — 1664, large repairs, 

iv. 65 : 1668, construction of door- 
way, iv. 71 : 1675, exterior, iv. 75. 

use by University: — the vestry 

where the doctors robe, ii. 360; iii. 
234 : meeting-place of some Uni- 
versity committees, i. 371 : occasional 
place for vice-chancellor's court, ii. 
517-8. 

the Old Congregation house, i. 

509 ; ii. 9 ; iv. 122-3, I 5 2 > 211. 
the organ -gallery, iii. 362, 377, 

4 2 4> 433, 47 2 , 474> 4 8 5> 4 8 9> 495~ 6 
(< the gallery '). 
the organ, 1650, iv. 63; 1676, ii. 

35 8 5 iv - 75-6. 

music at the University sermon — 

on ' Thanksgiving ' days, iii. 

377, 474, 489 ; iv. 85. 
on' Gunpowder plot ' day, iii. 

406, 472. 

on Restoration day, iii. 362 : 

contrast iii. 424, 485. 

on special Sundays, iii. 495-6. 

music at the Oxford ' feast,' iii. 

433- 

door, gate, great gate, i.e. the east- 
ward door on the south side of the 
church, i. 484. 

the place for proclaiming a 

king, i. 259 ; iii. 128. 

a place for posting University 

notices, iii. 429. 

the place for the University 

bonfire, iii. 48, 141, 434. 

the place for formal receptions 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



England, by counties (continued) : — ■ 
by the University, ii. 207-8, 385, 
518 ; iii. 48 : it still is so used for the 
reception of the judge on occasion of 
the assize sermon. 

Oxford : S. Mary's church : porch, and 
graven image over it, i. 63, 444; iv. 56. 

north door, i. 98. 

belfry door, ii. 349. 

steeple, iii. 11 1 ; iv. p. vi, 75-6. 

clock, iv. 57. 

bells, iii. 334 ; iv. 208-9. 

■ — chimes, iv. 76. 

two smallest bells rung for 

University examinations, i. 168. 

'great bell' (called ' the Uni- 
versity ' bell, iii. 227), rung to collect 
the University, i. 412, 492; ii. 156, 
159, 207, 385; iii. 226 : rung for the 
University sermon, iii. 265 : rung to 
intimate meetings of Convocation, ii. 
157, 208, and so called ' the Convoca- 
tion' bell, ii. 157. 

rung as passing bell, iii. 

412. 

for officials of the Uni- 
versity, ii. 474, 544. 

for parishioners, ii. 219, 

545 ; iii. 94 : including members of 
All Souls college, ii. 253, 346, 544; 

iii. 263: Brasenose, ii. 539; iii. 2, 
223 : and University college, iii. 390. 

ringers, iv. 64-5, 77, 82-4. 

churchyard, i. 377 ; iii. 53 : burial 

in, ii. 287. 
dial in, i. 377 : path through, 

ii. 349. 

structural changes: — 1 633, repa ving 

and repairs, iv. 52 : 1655, reseating, 
&c, iv. 63: 1668, repairs, iv. 81: 
1675-6, repaving and repairs, ii. 385 ; 

iv. 75-O : 1676, addition of pinnacles, 
ii- 344> 34 8 , 35 8 : 1692-4, repairs, 
iv. 84-5. 

■ special occasions : — 1659, prayer 

for rain, i. 279 : 1685, sermon to the 
county militia, iii. 145 : 1685, 1687, 
meeting-place of clergy of the diocese, 

iii. 137, 220: 156- (?), sermon by 
a layman, i. 387. 

■ sermons there, for the Oxford 

feast, ii. 230: Oxfordshire feast, ii. 
201 : joint Oxford and Oxfordshire 
feast, iii. 199, 344, 374, 433. 

use of by the University, sztj>ra, 

p. 118. 

as muster-place of graduates, 

i. 412, 499; ii. 66, 156, 159, 207-9, 
385, 527 ; iii. 494. 

to receive the mayor of Oxford's 

oath to the University, about Michael- 



England, by counties (continued?) : — 
mas, i. 150, 371-6, 379; iii. 277; 
iv. 65, 212. 

Oxford : S. Mary's church : use of by 
the University, for the S. Scholastica's 
day, 10 Febr., service, i. 150, 158 
('offering pence'), 372-7; ii. 512, 
517, 523; iii. 4, 256; iv. 208, 218. 

for the exercises of the ' deter- 
mining bachelors,' concluded by the 
junior proctors speech, ii. 8 : after 
the building of the Sheldonian, these 
exercises were transferred thither. 

for the 1 Act,' i. e. final dis- 
putations of masters and doctors, 

i- 336, 347 5 563 ; iv- 63 : on 
these occasions elaborate scaffolding 
was put up in the church, iv. 63, 
209. From 1669 onwards the cere- 
monies and speeches of the Act, 
except the Act sermons (see infra), 
were transferred to the Sheldonian. 

University sermons there, except 

on a few special occasions : — 

bidding-prayer before, i. 445. 

incidental mention, i. 291, 349, 

387, 411; ii. 25, 108, 258, 516; 

iv. 57, 139- 

— on Sunday mornings, i. 62, 

97-8. 379, 413, 445 ; ii. 47-8, 51, 62, 
488, 531-2; hi. 86, 183, 193, 232, 
495. This sermon in term time was 
preached in turn by the clerical Heads 
of Houses, i. 379, 445 ; ii. 62 ; iii. 
86, 495, and the Divinity professors, 

i. 188 ; iii. 374 : but they might do it 
by deputy, i. 357, 361 ; ii. 488, 491. 
Out of term it was preached in turn 
by graduates, ii. 47-8 ; iii. 193, 232. 
' Special preachers ' were suggested at 
the time of the 1665 Parliament, 

ii. 58 ; and were actually appointed 
at the time of the 1681 Parliament, 

ii- 48, 5 l 5, 5 22 , 53 1 " 2 - 

on Sunday afternoons, i. 98, 

349, 413, 495 5 ii- 5 1 , 66 > 2 °7, 4 2 4> 
531-2, 560; iii. 67, 189, 244, 279, 
368, 496. The sermon was preached 
by graduates in their turns, who 
might do it by a deputy, iii. 189. 
During part of the Puritan domina- 
tion, special preachers were appointed 
for the afternoon, i. 166. 

on Act Sunday the sermons, 

morning and afternoon, were preached 
by inceptors in Theology, ii. 548 ; 

iii. 18, 24, 60, 205, 305, 427; iv. 
71. Wood first mentions them in 1681. 

a special question was raised 

in 1673 and 1679 as to whether canons 
of Christ Church preaching qua. 



120 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



"England, by counties (continued) : — 
graduates might claim to preach in 
the cathedral and not at S. Mary's, 
ii. 274, 283, 441 2 ; iv. 189. 

Oxford : S. Mary's church : University 
sermons there : on most saints' days 
and most other Church holydays, there 
was a sermon at S. Mary's in the 
morning, which Wood hardly ever 
mentions. The exceptions are : — 
Purilicatio B. M.V., 2 Feb., 1695, iii. 
478: Whit-Monday, 1686, iii. 186; 
and by implication Easter Monday 
and Tuesday, see next entry. 

— — — four Easter sermons were 
preached, at S. Mary's on the mornings 
of Easter and Easter Monday and 
Tuesday, at S. Peter's in the East on 
the afternoon of Easter. The Sunday 
following, Low Sunday, a graduate 
recited (' repeated') these at S. Mary's, 
and of this performance Wood takes 
more notice than of anything else in 
the sermon line, ii. 96, 261, 304, 343, 
372, 402, 449, 485, 537 ; iii. 13, 43, 
92, 142, 183, 217, 264, 301, 304, 
330, 385, 42i, 45°, 482. 

— — — three Latin sermons were 
preached : — (i) on the first day of 
Term, i. 48, 360, 441, 453 (' concio 
ad clerum'); ii. 38 ('concio ad 
clerum'), 60, 516; iii. 386 : (ii) on 
Ash- Wednesday, i. 149 : (iii) on the 
Tuesday after the Act, last day of the 
academical year, iii. 24, 427. 

— — — Assize sermons, preached 
before the judges on circuit, i. 368, 
445 5 5*9, 54 8 , 55 1 5 iii- 9> 260, 480. 

— — — Tuesday morning sermons, 
discontinued in 1661, h 159-60, 356, 
359, 37o. 

— — — Gunpowder plot sermons, 
v. 49. 

sermon on January 30, Charles 

I's day, v. 31. 

sermon on May 29, Restoration 

day, v. 36. 

— sermon on king's accession- 
day, iii. 179, 209, 256. 

■ — — University sermons on special 
occasions : — 

sermons on king's coronation- 
day: — James II, iii. 137, 140: William 
III, iii. 301.. 

— — — sermons on special ' fast ' 
days : — 

1642, because of war in 

Ireland, i. 57. 
1678, in prospect of war 

with France, ii. 403. 
in dread of Romanism, 



England, by counties (continued) : — 

ii. 423 : and again, 1679, 44 8 : and 
1680, ii. 505. 

Oxford : S. Mary's church : University 
sermons on special 'fast' days: 1689, 
because of war(?), iii. 304. 

1690-95, monthly during 

the campaign season, because of war, 
»i. 327, 330-2. 334, 338, 340, 362, 
364, 368, 371, 386, 390-1, 394, 398, 
402, 404, 422, 424, 428, 430, 455, 
468, 486. 

sermons on special ' thanks- 
giving ' days : — 

— I0 43, for royalist successes, 

i. 102 ; iv. 59. 

— — 1 683 , for failure of Rye 

house plot, iii. 72. 

— — — — 1685, for Monmouth's 
failure, iii. 152, 156, 165. 

1688, for queen's pregnancy, 

iii. 255. 

for birth of prince of 

W T ales, iii. 271. 

— — — — 1689, for accession of 
William and Mary, iii. 299. 

1690-5, for successes by sea 

and land, iii. 342, 373, 377, 391,406, 
436, 474, 489. 

University sermons, formalities of 

the :— 

preacher escorted by bedell, 

i. 48. 

— — — vice-chancellor escorted to 
church by bedells, ii. 424. 

colleges, on special occasions, 

march to S. Mary's in procession, 
iii. 140. 

graduates put on their caps 

during sermon, i. 290-1. 
University funerals, sermons on 

occasion of, i. 484 ; ii. 66. 
parish, i. 26-7, 132, 202-3, 2 °5, 

220, 242, 290, 350, 353, 385, 449; 

ii. 105, 154, 243, 255, 309-10, 331, 
349, 36o, 362, 396, 469, 537, 545 ; 

iii. 8, 20-1, 26, 28, 110-1, 134, 169, 
196, 207, 258, 310, 377, 417, 437, 

4 8 °, 535; v. 4-5- 7, !7- 8 - 

— S. Mary's college, supra, p. 118. 

— S. Mary hall, see in Index III. 

— S. Mary hall lane, i. 484 : S. Mary 
lane, i. 440. 

— meat-market, i. 93, 491 ; ii. 382. 

— Mermaid tavern, much frequented by 
Anthony Wood, i. 268, 281, 284, 
286, 310, 313-4, 318, 321, 327, 349, 
37 8 , 388-9, 401, 405, 410, 420, 434, 
439, 457-8, 463, 467, 474, 486, 501 : 
ii. 15, 18, 20, 22-3, 33, 35, 37, 40, 
43, 45, 47, 5 1 . 6 9"7°, 82, 99, 115, 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



121 



England, by counties {continued) : — 

151, I53> 155, J 77 5 ii 1 - 83, Io8 , 218, 

269, 373; v - r 5- 
Oxford: Merton college, see in Index III. 
— S. Michael's church, i. 322 ; iii. 358 : 

' curate' of, iii. 60 : clerk of, i. 213. 
plate of, iv. 76 : property of, 

v. 12. 

muniments of, ii. 40-1 ; iv. 116 : 

registers of, ii. 214, 257, 341, 429, 
542; iii. 80, 185-6, 221, 251, 292, 
473: register of in the Commonwealth 
period, i. 183. 

sermon in, iii. 70 : Lincoln college 

sermon in, iii. 70. 

bells of, ii. 152; iii. p. vii, 300, 

47 8 -9- .... 

burials in, i. 203; ii. 15, 108, 

237, 294, 395 ; iii. 68, 80, 94 : monu- 
ment in, iii. 68. 

chancel, burials in, ii. 178, 220, 

' minister's chancel,' ii. 257 ; 

iii. 477 : the ' college chancel,' iii. 30, 

68, 144, 221 : both names applied to 

the chancel proper. 
' north aisle to chancel,' ii. 

10S ; i.e. the lady-chapel. 
north aisle, iii. 80 : possibly the 

transeptal chapel on north side of 

the church. 
' parish ' aisle, i. e. that on north 

of nave, ii. 220. 
'Welsh' aisle, i.e. that on south 

of nave, iii. 420. 

churchyard, iii. 200, 378. 

parish, i. 196, 385, 436, 505; 

53, 95, 220, 294, 307, 325, 482; 

m. 21, 68, 185, 433 ; v. 12, 15. 

— S. Michael's lane, ii. 433. 

— Middle row, i. 177, 189. 

— Milham bridge, i. 97 ; ii. 269. 

— Minorite friars, iv. 119-20 : see Grey 
friars. 

— mint, 1643, i. 94-5. 

— Mitre, the, inn, i. 282-3, 288, 312, 
314, 402, 486 ; ii. 174, 221 ; iii. 57, 
83, 88, 256, 286-7, 354, 393-4, 407, 
508. 

— — host of, i. 305 ; iii. 83, 88, 
286-7. 

frequented by the Sheldons, and 

other Romanists, because its hosts 
are Romanist, ii. 227-8, 312, 424; 
iii. 29, 62, 123. 

an occasional resort of Wood's, 

i. 281, 287, 306 ; ii. 119 ; iii. 333. 

— Mitre court, iii. 66 : Mitre yard, 
i. 288. 

— moat, the city ; ditch, the town, 
i. 97; ii. 216-7; 1V « 2l8 - 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford: mortality, bills of, i. 49. 

— ' mouth,' the city, ii. 525. 

— Napper's bridge, ii. 127. 

— New college, see in Index III. 
butts, i. 492 ; iii. 226, 228. 

— New college lane, i. 170. 

— New Examination Schools, ii. 156. 

— New-Inn hall, see in Index III. 

— New-Inn-hall lane, i. 169, 491 : street, 
i. in. 

— New-Inn lane, i. 111 ; ii. 13. 

— New parks, i. 54-8, 64, 72, 74, 82, 
95-6; ii. 56; iii. 220, 281, 297, 
399- 

— S. Nicholas church, i. 306. 

— night watch, University claim to the, 
resisted by the City, i. 371-2, 375, 
380; ii. 356, 381, 390, 400, 512; 
iii. 44, 89, 322 ; iv. 212. 

— Nightingale-hall lane, ii. 156. 

— Nixon's school, i. 245-6, 256, 258, 
437-8- 

— Non-ultra walk, ii. 185 ; iii. 297 : 
Wood's City, iii. 221. 

— North Bayly street, i. 48, in. 

— North gate, i. 68, 83, in ; iii. 129, 
225-6, 228, 230, 299, 379, 485. 

— Northgate hundred, i. 489 (wrongly 
said to be 'street'), 509; ii. 27; iv. 
177, 268. 

— North-gate street, i. 489 (should be 
£ hundred 492, 509 ; ii. 449; iii. 60, 
226, 228, 231, 306, 355, 377, 485. 

— North street, iii. 54, 162, 264. 

— office, the city, ii. 480. 

— Oriel college, see in Index III. 

— Osney, i. 136, 241, 249, 345; iii. 
343 ; iv. 118. 

— Osney abbey, i. 95, 218, 286, 304, 
306, 373 ; ii. 1 12-4, 118, 355; iv. 
99-103, 107, 155, 220, 260, 304. 

bell of, i. 184-5. 

— Osney bridge, i. 57-8; ii. 30; iii. 
306. 

— Osney fulling-mill, i. 74. 

— Osney gunpowder-mill, i. 74. 

— Osney island, iv. 180. 

— Osney mill, i. 241 ; ii. 354 ; iv. 180. 
stream, i. 57. 

— Osney walk, i. 241. 

— Ousney, i. 241. 

— Paradise, ii. 15, 18. 
garden, ii. 40, 81, 112. 

— parishes, collections in, i. 105 ; iii. II. 

— parish relief, i. 448 ; iii. 2. 

— Park Town, i. 493. 

— Patten's pleasure, Patin's, ii. 80 ; 
iii. 306, 399. 

— Peckwater's inn, i. 71 ; ii. 259 : see 
in Christ Church in Index III. 



122 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxford: Pembroke college, see in Index 
111. 

— Petiitentiarian friars, ii. 187. 

— Penniless bench, i. 57, 68, 139, 399 ; 
ii- "5> 2 34> 426; iii. 72, 149, 151, 
228, 230, 280, 286. 

— Pennyfarthing, see Penyfarthing. 

— Penruddock hall, iii. 508. 

— Penyfarthing street, i. 145, 198, 287, 
429, 492 ; ii. 49; iii. 94, 129, 143, 
303, 406, 485. 

— S. Peter-le-Bailey church, i. 48, 11 1, 

231, 302, 506 ; ii. 270. 

— — muniments of, ii. 40; iv. 116: 
register of, ii. 258 ; iv. 116. 

burials in, i. 186, 508 ; ii. 80, 177, 

i§5 5 305, 4 8 7> 5°4; "i- 8 > J 44> 342, 
39i- 

aisle south of chancel, i. 132. 

aisle north of nave, iii. 85. 

churchyard, iii. 26. 

r parish, i. 105; ii. 374, 552; iii. 

223, 367 ; v. 11-5. 

— S. Peter's-in-the East church, i. 217, 

232, 313 ; ii. 256, 331 ; iii. 135, 200, 
268, 305. 

vicar of, iii. 16 : clerk of, i. 433 : 

churchwarden, iii. 16. 
benefactor to, iii. 79. 

— — muniments of, ii. 41 ; iv. 116 : 
register of, ii. 138, 387-8; iv. 116: 
register of in Commonwealth period, 

i. 183. 

marriages in, i. 33, 239 ; ii. 558. 

burials in, i. 102, 104-5, I2 4> *92, 

200, 307, 400 ; ii. 3, 24, 43, 47, 52, 

74, 77, 114, 197, 235, 296, 375, 415, 

462, 548; 111. 213. 

monument in, iii. 8. 

pulpit of, iii. 8. 

aisle north of chancel, iii. 8, 197 : 

burials in, ii. 345, 540, 

aisle south of chancel, ii. 225. 

aisle north of nave, ii. 200 ; iii. 39. 

S. Thomas Becket chapel, burial 

in, ii. 28-9. 

belfry, i. 440 ; ii. 235. 

bell. ii. 287 ; iii. 188, 254. 

— — churchyard, i. 157 ; iii. 165 : 
burials in, ii. 305, 450; iii. 164, 318. 

north churchyard, iii. 328. 

- — — sermon of the Oxford ' feast,' 

ii. 154, 193, 558 : of the joint Oxford 
and Oxford shire 'feast,' iii. 312. 

— — University sermons at : — (i) 
on Sunday afternoons in Lent, ii. 
448; iii. 135; (ii) on Easter after- 
noon, v. 120: (iii) on S. Simon and 
S. Jude, iii. 492. 

parish, i. 28, m, 169, 213, 238, 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
447, 461, 510-1 ; ii. 192, 223-4, 271, 
388, 473, 484, 540 ; iii. 8, 15, 28, 46, 
162, 197, 217,' 223, 255, 302, 432, 
492, 533; v. 13, 17. 

Oxford: Philosophical society of Ox- 
ford, iii. 75-6, 78, 107. 

— Phoenix inn, ii. 350. 

— Physic garden, i. 71, 96, 441, 457, 
475; ii. p. viii, 88, 112, 158, 161, 
164-5, 202, 208, 478 ; iii. 17, 37, 49, 
105/471, 484; iv. 50, 54, 64, 84-5, 
149, 209. 

— piepowders' court, iv. 184. . 

— Pigmarket, ii. 517. 

— pillory, the, i. 489, 508-9 ; ii. 152, 
371- 

— Pit, the, a court off Merton street, 
containing an alehouse frequented by 
Wood, i. 24, 132, 213, 237, 242, 266, 

32 7>447>449> 49°; »■ 47 1 5 "i- 37- 

— Pit yard, i. 338, 447-9. 

— Plough inn, iii. 200. 

— police, see night watch, watch. 

— Portionists' hall, i. 45, 447 ; ii. 9 ; 
v. 8-14. 

— Portmeadow, i. 92, 343 ; ii. 487, 
496; iii. 45, 56, 154, 227,509; iv. 189. 

— Post, the, iii. 59. 

— Post Boy, the, ii. 102. 

— postern, i. 67. 

— Postmasters' hall, i. 27-9, 45, 447 ; 
ii. 9 ; v. 8, 14. 

— Post office, ii. 142. 

— pound, the, i. 509. 

— Preachers' lane, ii. 222. 

— Preaching friars, i. 60, 112 ; iv. 119- 
120, 221. 

— Presbyterian meeting-house, iii. 379. 

— printing house, iv. 70, 84-5 : the 
little printing house, ii. 172 ; iv. 69, 81. 

— Proscholium, see in Schools in 
Index III. 

— pump, in the Bocherew, i. 463 : at 
the Star inn, iii. 72. 

— Pun's, Tom, house, (i) in Broken- 
hays, ii. 244 : (ii) near the Theatre, 

ii. 172. 

— Quadrivium, i. 139 : see Carfax. 

— Quakers' meeting-house, iii. 233, 
279: burial-place, iii. 279. 

— Quarter sessions, iii. 86 : see Sessions. 

— Quatervois, see Carfax. 

— Queen's Arms, ii. 131. 

— Queen's college, see in Index III. 

— Queen's college corner, i. 188, 201; 

iii. 485. 

— Queen street, i. 28, ill. 

— racket-court, i. 86 ; ii. 95, 217; iii. 
118. 

near Smith gate, ii. 229. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



123 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxford : Radcliffe library, ii. 388. 

— Ram inn, i. 290. 

— Rats-and-mice hill, iii. 367. 

— Red Lion, i. 44S ; ii. 27 ; iii. 297. 

— Rewley, ii. 565 ; iv. 180. 

abbey, i. 217; iv. 107, 221, 286. 

prior of, ii. 212. 

— Rewley house, ii. 405. 

— Robinson's lane, i. 255. 

— Roebuck, i. 279. 
yard, ii. 548. 

— Rump hall, iii. 41, 245, 426. 

— Salutation Tavern, i. 241, 284, 306. 

— Saracen's Head, i. 363, 377 ; ii. 156, 
540. 

— S. Scholastica's day, v. 119. 

— Schools, the, see in Index III. 

— Schools street, i. 492, 496. 

— Schydyard street, i. 440, 495-6. 

— Scruple office, iii. 223. 

— Segrim hall, iv. 309. 

— Sessions, the, i. 372, 399; ii. 390, 
484; iii. 42, 86 : see Assizes. 

— Seven-deadly- sins lane, i. 191. 

— sewer, i. 463 ; iv. 70. 

— shambles, the, ii. 382. 

— Sheerlake, ii. 221-2. 

— Ship inn, ii. 433. 

— Ship street, ii. 433. 

— 1 signs ' of inns, iv. 187. 

— Slaying lane, i. 243 ; ii. 72, 103 ; 
v. 10. 

— Smith gate, L 55, 251; ii. 229, 249; 
iii. 213 ; iv. 56, 63. 

— South bridge, i. 73, 75, 89, 90; ii. 
40 ; iv. 216. 

— South gate, ii. 59, 355; iii. 128, 
282. 

Little South gate, i. 60. 

— South-gate street, ii. 385. 

— South street, the south street, i. e. 
Wood's Fish street (north half of 
S. Aldate's street), i. 492 ; ii. 385, 
526 ; iii. 303. 

— Split Crow, the, ii. 102. 

— Spread Crow, the, ii. 102 ; iii. 160. 

— Spread Eagle, the, i. 264; ii. 102 ; 
iii. 160. 

— Stafford's alley, iii. 494. 

— Star inn, i. 57, 61-4, 66-7, 86, 88, 
421, 444, 469; ii. 18, 176, 194, 220; 
iii. 72, 186. 

— S. Stephen's hall, iv. 158. 

— Stockwell street, iii. 342. 

— Stone's hospital, i. 476. 

— streets, cleansing, ii. 246; iv. 187: 
gravelling, iii. 226: paving, ii. 278 : 
pitching, ii. 455, 519; iii. 25 : repair- 
ing, i. 44; ii. 455. 

Twyne's notes of, iv. 213, 217. 



England, by counties [continued) : — 
Oxford: Swan, the, i. 255, 404, 468-9; 
ii. 128, 151. 

— Swan court, iii. 28. 

— Swiffin's wyre, iii. 361. 

— Tackley's inn, iv. 167. 

— Talbot, the, i. 449 ; iii. 20. 

— tanhouses, ii. 221-2. 

— taverns, i. 5, 366, 372, 384; ii. 215, 

229, 282 ; iii. 31, 130, 243, 364. 
banned by the Puritans, i. 298. 

— — after the Restoration frequented 
by M.A.s, e.g. i. 316, 336, 389, 474, 
509; iii. 9, 40-1, 160, 168, 218, 225, 
245, 253, 269, 311, 364-5, 369- 

frequented by Wood, e.g. i. 229- 

230, 242, 250, 254, 266; iii. 186, 
240, 327, 352, 481, 487. 

the chief taverns of Wood's time 

were the Crown, v. 115; Mermaid, 
v. 120; Salutation, v. 123; Pont's 
(formerly Bodicote's), v. 66. 

— tennis-court, i. 75, 111, 447 ; ii. ill, 
198, 270, 323, 454, 490, 494; iii. 20, 
136, 196, 320, 392-3, 503; v. 77, 81. 

New Tennis-court, ii. 226. 

— Thames street, i. 11 1 ; iii. 43. 

— thatched houses, ii. 214, 221-2, 241. 

— Theatre, see in Index III. 

— Theatre yard, ii. 493, 529 ; iii. 429 ; 
iv. 46. 

— S.Thomas' alias S. Nicholas' church, 
ii. 388. 

— S. Thomas' church, i. 306 ; iv. 213. 
vicar of, ii. 554 : clerk of, ii. 453 : 

benefactors of, ii. 453 ; iv. 117. 
muniments of, ii. 452 : register of, 

ii. 388 ; iv. 117. 

tower, iii. 179. 

chancel, burials in, ii. 29, 542. 

churchyard, i. 332 ; iii. 179, 198. 

burial in, ii. 354. 

parish, i. 58 ; ii. 176, 565 ; iii. 

169, 198, 393. 

— timber-yard, i. 96 ; iii. 328. 

— Titmouse lane, iii. 393. 

— Toll bridge, i. 343. 

— S. Toll's, i. e. S. Aldate's, v. 112. 

— Town hall, i. 467; iii. 112, 129, 
492, 508 : see Gildhall. 

— Town-hall yard, i. 258 ; iii. 129. 

— Trillmill, ii. 538. 
bow, ii. 221. 

— Trinity chapel, ii. 269. 

— Trinity college, see in Index III. 
grove, iii. 53-4, 149. 

— Trinity college lane, iii. 53. 

— Turl coffee-house, v. 46. 

— Turl gate, ii. 230. 

— Turl street, i. 168 ; ii. 522 ; iii. 347. 

— Tydmersh, iii. 393. 



124 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued '): — 
Oxford: Unicorn, the, ii. 340. 

— University college, see in Index III. 

— University tower, see in Schools in 
Index III. 

— vestry of Convocation house, see 
Apodyterium in Index III. 

— Wadham college, see in Index III. 

— wall, the city, ii. 156, 172, 522 ; iii. 
21 ; iv. 218. 

— Walton manor, ii. 118. 

— watch, i.e. police, iii. 244: see night 
watch. 

— water supply, iii. 485 : see conduit, 
pump. 

— Welcome's Folly, iii. 485. 

— West gate, i. 456 ; ii. 247 ; iii. 129. 

— wharf, iv. 70, 217. 

— Wheatsheaf, in All Saints' parish, 

iii. 308. 

in S. Aldate's parish, ii. 241. 

— White friars, ii. 187. 

— White hall, iv. 139. 

— W 7 hite house, i. 405. 

— Wills office, iv. 117. 

— Winchester college, i.e. New college, 

iv. 167. 

— wooden horse, the, i. 83. 

— Woodstock road, i. 493; iii. 224, 
226. 

— Worcester college, i. e. Balliol, ii. 
308. 

— Worcester college, present, ii. 379. 
Oxford : officials of the city : — 

— mayor : catalogues of, i. 430 ; iv. 
186-7, 221, 223, 225-6: Wood's 
City, iii. 3. 

election of, i. 63 ; ii. 270; iii. 73, 

277. 

— — serves as butler at the king's 
coronation, i. 399 ; iii. 111, 140, 184, 
301. 

welcomes the king to the city : 

Charles I, i. 68, 103 : Charles II, i. 
491-4 ; ii. 525 : James, duke of York, 
iii. 47: James II, iii. 228-30: the 
queen, ii. 46. 

• takes formal leave of queen on 

departure from city, ii. 68 : of king, 
iii. 239. 

proclaims James II, iii. 127-8. 

■ his scarlet gown, i. 103, 413; ii. 

207, 525; iii. 112, 128, 149, 151. 

his mace, i. 103, 491, 4Q4 ; ii. 

525; iii. 112, 128, 239: this was 
formally surrendered to the king on 
his visit to the city, i. 493; ii. 525; 
iii. 229. 

■ — — interferes with the market, i. 

491 ; ii. 128. 
joint action with the vice-chan- 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
cellor, ii. 40, 215, 222, 246; iii. 
244. 

Oxford : officials of the city : mayor : 
speech on going out of office, ii. 
496-7. 

mayor elect, ii. 383. 

— — mayor's council, i. 490-1 ; ii. 
128, 246 ; iii 256. 

mayor's court, ii. 128, 372 ; iv. 

183. m , j 
mayor's oath not to infringe the 

privileges of the University, i. 150, 

158, 336, 35°> 37o-6; iii- 277; iv. 
65, 212. 

incidental mention, i. 107, 332, 

427; ii. 90, 128-9, 242, 310, 378, 

383? 39 0 - r > 4^3> 5 I2 > 54 1 ; I2 > 
42, 86, 135, 161, 277, 280-1, 422, 
432, 439; iv. 181 ; v. 12. 

— 'mayor and his brethren,' 'mayor 
and some of his brethren,' a vague 
phrase describing the heads of the 
corporation (mayor, aldermen, &c.) 
on various occasions of ceremonial 
or business, i. 96,413,490-1; ii. 157, 

159, 207, 384, 480; iii. 47, 66, 112, 
128, 149, 151, 161, 226, 239, 283. 

on public occasions they wore 

scarlet gowns, i. 413; ii. 207; iii. 
112, 149, 151. 

— mayor's associates, i. 202; iii. 12, 
91,228. They were otherwise known 
as ' The Thirteen,' see infra. 

they wore scarlet gowns on public 

occasions, iii. 228. 

— mayor's assistants, eight in number, 
i. 96 ; iii. 140, 228, 242 : said in iii. 
242 to be otherwise known as ' The 
Thirteen.' 

— 1 The Thirteen,' members of the 
corporation who ranked in civil 
honour next to the mayor. Wood's 
statements as to their constitution are 
contradictory, sometimes including, 
sometimes excluding, the aldermen, 
i. 202, 238, 491, 493; ii. 159, 525; 
iii. 12, 91, 127-8, 135, 228, 242, 
432. 

they wore scarlet gowns on state 

occasions, i. 491, 493; ii. 159, 525; 
iii. 128, 228. 

— aldermen, four in number, i. 491 ; ii. 
12, 46, 128, 256, 340, 383-4, 512, 
523, 525; iii. 40, 86, 113, 127-8, 
135, 140, 161,228-30, 256, 261,280, 
416 ; v. 17. 

they wore scarlet gowns on public 

occasions, i. 490-1 ; ii. 515; iii. 128. 

in 1684, the city asked that there 

should be eight aldermen, iii. 89. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxford : officials of the city : bailiffs, 

two in number, catalogue of, iv. 

186-7 : see Wood's City, iii. 3. 
incidental mention, i. 427, 493; 

ii. 90, 95, 207, 278, 390, 525 ; iii. 
73, 86, 128, 140, 228, 242, 277, 280; 
v. 12, 15. 

they had charge of executions, i. 

250-1. 

they wore scarlet gowns on public 

occasions, i. 493; ii. 207, 525; iii. 
128, 228. 

bailiffs' court, iv. 184. 

— bailiffs-elect, i. 493. 

— ex-bailiffs, such as ' had bailiffs' 
places,' had some precedence over 
other members of the city council, ii. 
207, 525 ; iii. 128. 

they wore scarlet gowns, ii. 525 ; 

or black gowns, ii. 207 ; iii. 128. 
they are perhaps ' the gown-men 

of the house,' iii. 135. 

— chamberlains, i. 105, 251 ; iii. 311 ; 
iv. 183. 

— common-council, i. 490, 493 ; ii. 90, 
525; iii. 12, 47, 66, 112-3, 128, 226, 
228. 

they wore black budge gowns, 

i. 490-1, 493 ; ii. 525; iii. 112, 
228. 

— high steward, ii. 242, 391,434; iii. 
219, 225, 281 ; iv. 81. 

— recorder, who on public occasions 
spoke (in English) for the city, i. 39, 
50, 73, 181, 196, 259, 371, 399, 429, 
491-4; ii. 90-1, 157, 159, 207, 240, 
397, 4 J 4> 434, 5 2 5> 5 2 9 ; iu - 4°> 73, 
85, 114, *77, 228-30, 325, 418, 489, 
492. 

he wore a black gown, ii. 525. 

— deputy recorder, i. 127; ii. 103, 159; 

iii. 221 ; iv. 81. 

— town clerk, i. 72, 202, 246, 259, 377, 
491,494; ii. 154, 229, 340,525,549; 

iii. 112-3, 128, 140, 149, 228-9, 244, 
280,449-50,462, 478-9, 4S9 ; iv.75, 
85- 

he wore a gown, iii. 128, and 

silver chain, ii. 525. 

— military governors, i. 91, 96, 102, 
110,113,120,125,170; ii. 453, 485; 

iv. 60-2. 

deputy, i. 131. 

— members of Parliament, i. 310-1, 
388-9 ; ii. 439, 460, 516, 523, 529; 
iii. 86, 135, 296, 325, 492. 

— justices of the peace, ii. 222, 246, 
482, 544. 

— coroners, ii. 557; iii. 83, 179; iv. 
184. 

V 



England, by counties {continued') : — 

Oxford: officials of the city: con- 
stables, twelve in number, i. 491, 
493; iii. 47, 128, 227-8. In ii. 525 
they are said to be eighteen, perhaps 
by including other petty officers. 

four constables of the suburbs, i. 

49 1 ) 493 > ii- 22 7- they carried staves, 
i. 493 ; ii. 525 ; iii. 47, 128, 227. 

eight constables of the city proper, 

i. 491, 493; iii. 227: they carried 
staves, i. 491, 493; ii. 525; iii. 47, 
128, 227: on one occasion part of 
them carried maces, i. 491, 493. 

on one occasion, four 'high con- 
stables,' with staves, appear, iii. 128. 

incidental mention, i. 67 ; ii. 382 ; 

iii. 178, 274, 462. 

— marshals, two in number, iii. 47, 
128: with staves, iii. 128: city mar- 
shal, i. 482. 

— mace-bearer, i. 103, 491, 494 ; ii. 

44°, 5 2 5, 549 J ui - 47, II2 , I2§ , I 4°> 
2 28-9. He had charge of the mayor's 
mace, v. 124. 

— Serjeants at mace, city Serjeants, four 
in number, i. 491, 494; ii. 525 ; iii. 
128, 228: with silver staves, ii. 525, 
or maces, i. 491, 494. 

two were specially attached to 

the mayor, iii. 47, 140 : two to the 
bailiffs, iii. 140. 

incidental mention, i. 96, 203, 

469 ; ii. 128, 220, 403 ; iii. 112, 243. 

— bedell of beggars, i. 482. 

— bellman, i. 72, 397 ; iii. 140. 

— the waits, the city music, i. 18 1 ; iv. 
218. 

they had a sort of uniform, iii. 

128 : played on wind instruments, iii. 
48, 72, 112, 128, 229-30: and on 
state occasions were placed at Carfax, 
iii. 48, 72, 112-3, 229, 230. 

— militia, the city, city auxiliaries, 
trained band : — 

1642, favour the Parliament side, 

i- 5 6 -7 5 59, 62 > 66. 
Nov., disarmed by the king, i. 

70. 

1643-4, form part of the garrison 

of Oxford, i. 102, 107. 
1661, fire volleys in honour of 

the coronation, i. 399. 

review of, i. 414 bis. 

1663, form a guard of honour to 

Charles II, i. 494, 499. 
1678, called out on alarm of the 

Popish plot, i. 377 ; ii. 416. 
1680, form a guard of honour to 

a German prince, ii. 512 ; cp. ii. 495. 
16S2, iii. 31 . 



126 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by countios {continued) : — 
Oxford : gilds or trade-companies of the 

city, iv. 187: each with master, arms, 

flag, iii. 228. 

barbers, ii. 328-9 ; iv. 187. 

• — ■ — cooks, i. 55 ; ii. 327. 

cordwainers and shoemakers, iii. 

227-8 ; iv. p. vi. 

glovers, iii. 227-8 ; iv. 187. 

mercers, iii. 227-8; iv. 187. 

tailors, ii. 85 ; iii. 227-8 ; iv. p. 

vi, 187. 

weavers, iii. 227-8 ; iv. 187. 

— freemen, i. 57, 95-6, 246, 371 ; ii. 
490 ; iii. 129 ; iv. 183, 187. 

called ' hanasters,' iv. 187. 

— apprentices, ii. 154, 193, 215-6, 
229-30 ; iv. 187. 

— trade, complaints of dull, iii. 7, 163, 
209, 319. 

— benefactors of the city, ii. 90-1 ; iii. 
p. vii ; iv. 182. 

— city property, iii. 283 ; iv. 78 : muni- 
ments, ii. 480; iv. 180-7. 

— city charter, iii. 25,67, 86,89, II2_ 3> 
277, 280. 

— Romanists resident in Oxford, i. 191, 
360; ii. 427 ; iii. 122, 124, 182, 213-4, 
224, 271, 286-7, 4 11 * 

— Oxford natives in London, v. 109. 

— Oxford ' feast,' begun in 1669, a re " 
union of natives of the city at the 
Gildhall, whence they went in pro- 
cession to one of the churches to hear 
a sermon by one of their own number. 
Afterwards they dined at the Gildhall, 
and made a collection to apprentice 
poor boys. The church is here men- 
tioned when Wood gives it. 

1669, i. 462 ; ii. 154, 201, 255 : 

at S. Peter's in the East. 
1670, ii. 193, 201, 255 : at S. 

Peter's in the East. 

— — 1671, ii. 229-30, 255 : at S. 
Mary's. 

1672, ii. 255. 

1673, ii. 255, 271. 

1674, ii. 255, 294. 

1675, ii. 255 : omitted because of 

pestilence. 

1676, ii. 355. 

1677, ii. 388. 

1678, ii. 416. 

1679, ii. 467. 

1680, ii. 497. 

1 68 1, ii. 558 : at S. Peter's East. 

1682, iii. 26. 

1683, iii. 74: omitted. After- 
wards the ' Oxford feast ' and the 
'Oxfordshire feast' were joined, and the 
preacher was a native of Oxfordshire. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford : Oxford and Oxfordshire ' feast ' : 

1684, iii. 109. 

1685, no mention of it. 

1686, iii. 199 : at S. Mary's. 

1687, iii. 225. 

1688, iii. 279. 

1689, iii. 312 : at S. Peter's in the 

East. 

1690, iii. 344, 450 : at S. Mary's. 

— — 1691, iii. 374: at S. Mary's. 
1692, iii. 406. 

1693, iii. 433 : at S. Mary's, and 

with music. 

1694, iii. 471. 

1695, iii- 49 1 - 

— city present, sometimes a purse of 
gold, e. g., to Charles I, i. 68 ; to 
Charles II, i. 490-1, 493 ; to James 
II, iii. 229. 

sometimes gloves, i. 413, 491, 

493; ii. 208, 525 ; iii. 47. 

— city procession, i. 490-1, 493-4; ii. 
525 ; iii. 47, 112, 127-8, 227-8. 

Oxford: trades and professions men- 
tioned : — 

— alebrewer, i. 442, 506. 

— alehouse-keeper, i. 24, 447 ; iv. 2 1 7-8 : 
alekeeper, iii. 213 : aleseller, i. 449 : 
alewife, ii. 267. 

— applewoman, ii. 3. 

— apothecary, i. 76, 132, 175, 191, 201, 
203, 205, 220, 244, 260, 277, 290, 
35°> 395> 4™, 428, 473> 5° 6 5 105, 
115, 216, 229, 249, 310, 344, 354, 
360, 362, 375, 404, 474, 476, 500, 
514; iii. 7, 13, 23, 196, 284, 378, 
455> 46o, 470, 492 ; iv. 75, 217. 

— attorney, i. 44, 278 : ii. 25, 29, 107, 
125, 128, 248-9, 269, 412, 537; iii. 
30, no, 165, 260, 428; iv. 43, 70; 
v. 10, 14, 17. 

— baker, i. 127, 203, 332, 372, 384; 
ii. 12, 105, 277, 378 ; iii. 28, 422 ; 
iv. 212, 217 : white baker, iv. 187. 

— barber, i. 62, 146, 209-10, 231, 385, 
421, 436, 444, 467, 471, 477, 488, 
501 ; ii. 1, 8, 14, 18, 20, 23, 27, 40, 
47, 69, 76-7, 81, 115, 119-20, 127, 
138, 144, 151, 153, 190, 278, 280, 
327-9, 382, 424, 474, 476, 539; iii. 
16, 220, 314, 338, 377, 393, 407 ; iv. 
32, 187, 217. 

barber's boy, i. 439, 

Wood's barber was paid quarterly, 

but for some reason not plain, the 
1 quarterage ' varies : (i) 4s. 6d. a 
quarter, i. 260, 264, 275, 284, 310, 
318 : (ii) 4*. a quarter, i. 210, 215., 
220, 229, 254, 288, 331, 349, 388: 
(iii) 3* . 6d. a quarter, i. 416, 42 7, 444, 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



127 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
501 : (iv) y. a quarter, i. 401, 436, 
458, 467, 471, 477. 

Oxford: trades and professions men- 
tioned: barber: hair-cutting cost (i) 
6d., ii. 69, 91, 99, 106, 153, 177: (ii) 
is., ii. 47, 76, 81, 115, 120, 151. 

— bargeman, iii. 507-9 ; iv. 70, 78. 

— barristers, resident in Oxford, iii. 85. 

— bedmaker, i. 287, 468, 496. 

— — Wood's bedmakers were as 
follows : — 1667, Anne Street, during 
an illness, ii. 98 : 1676, Joan Adams, 
ii. 343, 351, 363 : 1677, Mrs. Ward, 

378, 393 : 1678, old Joan (? Adams 
again), ii. 412 : 1679-80, Mary James, 

ii. 456, 478, 485-6, 493: 1680-5, 
Mrs. Payne, ii. 503, 519, 542, 554, 
561 ; iii. 9, 27, 34, 74, 91, 120, 136, 
145, 165, 169 : 16S3-6, Mrs. Gilbert, 

iii. 66, 169, 172, 190, 196 : it appears 
that she did some cooking for him, 
iii. 190, and claimed to be away at 
haymaking time, iii. 188, 190: 1687, 
... Sig. (?), iii. 243: 1693, Jane 
Fowler, iii. 435. 

Wood paid his bedmaker $s. 

a quarter, ii. 351, 363, and in the re- 
ferences to Mary James and Mrs. Payne. 
In 1686, the charge seems to have gone 
up to 8s. a quarter, iii. 190, 196. 

— beggars, i. 270; ii. 212. 

bedell of the beggars, i. 466, 482, 

iii. 63 ; iv. 79. 

— bell-founder, i. 2 1 2 : probably not in 
Oxford. 

— birretarius, iv. 218. 

— boatman, i. 444; ii. 538; iii. 136, 

163, 179 ; iv. 70. 

— bodice-maker, i. 214, 505. 

— bonesetter, i. 178. 

— bookbinder, i. 213, 249,446,460,470, 
487; ii. 122, 180, 299, 413; iii. it, 
13, 408 ; iv. 56, 59, 64-5, 73, 77, 83, 
85, 199, 200, 209, 211. 

notices of binding, i. 6-7, 15, 

200, 470, 493 ; ii. 299, 345; iii. 11, 
13, 478; iv. 56-9, 65-6, 71, 73-4, 
83, 133, 205 ; v. 1. 

— bookseller, i. 57, 199, 202, 205, 211, 

2 57, 271, 385, 4™, 4^, 424* 436, 
450, 472, 486, 488, 492, 504, 509; 

ii. 22, 85, 103, 116, 122, 235, 476, 
479, 4 8 3, 54 1 ; "1. 6, 9, 15, 72, 157, 

164, 167, 338, 351, 395-6, 399, 407, 
490; iv. 28, 30, 63, 123, 188. 

— brasier, i. 444, 505. 

->- brewer, i. 107, 211, 231, 255, 372, 
384, 469; ii. 231, 242, 357,418, 538; 

iii. 156, 261, 281, 284; iv. 187, 212, 
217. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxford : trades and professions men- 
tioned : broker, ii. 85. 

— burglar, thief, iii. 241, 243-4, 3 12 , 
332, 373, 384-5, 387, 393, 465; iv. 
83, 126. 

— butcher, i. 62, ill, 192, 491 ; 
ii. 26, 86, 185, 212, 248, 545; iii. 
242, 312 ; iv. 187, 217. 

— butter- woman, i. 139. 

— button-maker, i. 506. 

— capper, iv. 218. 

— carpenter, ii. 75, 98 ; iii. 305, 399 ; 
iv. 53-5, 5 8 , 63, 66, 68, 70, 75, 78, 
81, 84-5, 205, 218: ^joiner, which 
seems to be the word in actual use. 

— carrier, i. 201, 458, 474 ; ii. 85, 192, 
196, 245, 299, 558 ; iii. 20, 180, 460; 
iv. 80, 217-8, 249. 

University carrier, i. 46, 449, 506 ; 

ii. 153 ; iii. 20. 

— carver, i.e. in stone, iv. 84: see stone- 
carver. 

— chandler, i. 31, 105, 189, 196; ii. 
340, 381, 400, 468; iii. 8, 40, 145, 
310 ; iv. 218. 

— chirurgion, see surgeon. 

— coachman, iii. 37. 

— cobbler, i. 314, 428 ; ii. 69, 71, 85, 
138- 383. 

— coffeeman, i. 468 ; ii. 192, 308 ; iii. 
431 ; v. 114. 

— compositor, ii. 226, 261, 264. 

— confectioner, ii. 95 ; iv. 66; v. 15. 

— cook, i. 55, 213, 298, 327, 399, 410, 
448, 452, 454, 4 6 9> 47 1 , 474 ; 36, 
47, 79, 83, 108, 163, 203, 229, 251, 
308, 327, 510; iii. 16, 21, 26, 486; 
iv. 217 ; v. 14, 114. 

— cooper, i. 441 ; ii. 556. 

— cordwainer, ii. 227-8; iv. p. vi. 

— corrector of the press, ii. 170, 180, 
272, 554; iii. 12, 189. 

— currier, i. 421. 

— cutler, i. 251, 259 ; iii. 42, 411, 511. 

— dancing-master, i. 212, 242 ; ii. 396, 
419 ; iii. 172. 

— draper, i. 26, 203, 238, 244, 459, 
47 1 , 473 ; ii- 220, 252, 378, 380, 402, 
463; iii. 28, 72, 94, in, 194, 197, 
242, 280, 432 ; v. 4, 18. 

— drawer, ii. 282. 

— dragster, iii. 470. 

— exciseman, i. 449 ; ii. 404. 

— fencer, iii. 284, 286. 

— fencing-master, iii. 312. 

— ferryman, ii. 13. 

• — fishmonger, iii. 281. 

— foot-boy, i. 396. 

— foot-messenger, i. 448. 
— - fuller, iv. 187, 218. 



128 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by countioR (continued): — 
Oxford: trades mid professions men- 
tioned: gambler, professional, i. 196. 

— gardener, i. 112, 302; ii. 163, 374, 
47 8 > 557- 

— glasier, i. 2K2; ii. 24, 95, 127, 552 ; 
iii. 440; iv. 52, 54-5, 71 ; v. 15. 

— glover, i. 210, 220, 229, 235, 249, 
281, 294, 464, 471, 492, 501, 505; 

ii. 6; iii. 59, 417, 257-8; iv. 55, 62, 
187, 218. 

— goldsmith, i. 131, 163, 196, 2 1 r , 
238, 264, 281 ; ii. 12, 202, 231 ; iii. 
40, 258, 260, 472 ; iv. 33, 56, 62, 69. 

— grazier, i. 192 ; iv. 217. 

— grocer, iii. 8, 117, 374. 

— groom, iii. 311. 

— gunsmith, iv. 63, 80, 82. 

— haberdasher, ii. 85; iii. 110-1. 

— hatter, i. 258, 310, 471; ii. 8, 33; 

iii. 16. 

— herald-painter, i. 118; ii. 52, 74, 
178, 254; iii. 97. 

— hosier, iii. 374. 

— hostler, iv. 212. 

— huckster, i. 139, 425 ; ii. 195 ; iii. 3. 

— innholder, i. 384; ii. 214, 487, 530 ; 

iii. 88; iv. 187, 217; v. 12: inn- 
keeper, ii. 471 ; iii. 6 ; iv. 212. 

— ironmonger, ii. 318, 423; iv. 78. 

— jailor, ii. 99. 

— joiner, i. 57, 101, 505-6; ii. 74, 151; 

iv. 63, 66, 71, 78-9, 85 : see carpenter. 

— laundress, i. 287 ; iv. 204. 

Wood's laundress in 1667 was 

Mrs. Percival, ii. 104. In 1680-5, 
Mary Watson^ ii. 489, 519, 547, 562 ; 
iii. 11, 23, 27, 91, 165. In 1680, tem- 
porarily, Mrs. Freeman, ii. 490. In 
1687 , perhaps Joan Thompson, iii. 244. 
In 1695, widow Dod, iii. 490. 

In 1663-66, Wood paid 2s. 6d. 

a quarter, i. 478, 501; ii. 1, 12, 15, 
27, 45, 75, 81, 89, 99, J °4, J 9°, J 9 6 » 
355, 375, 388, 4°4- . In 1680-95, he 
paid 4-y. a quarter, ii. 480, 489, 519; 
iii. 11, 23, 27, 34, 59, 91, 114, 120, 
M5, 165, 172, 190, 458, 483, 490. 

— lawyer, ii. 175 ; iii. 85. 

— letter-carrier, i. 448. 

— livery-stable keeper, i. 278,441,469, 
478. 

— locksmith, i. 176, 228. 

— lodging-house keeper, i. 78, 11 1, 205, 
260, 338, 440, 462, 468-9. 

— maltster, i. 233, 372, 384, 442 ; ii. 
550; iv. 217. 

— manciple, i. 49 ; iii. 8 ; iv. 217. 

— mason, i. 321 ; iii. 122, 364; iv. 55, 
62, 68, 75, 78, 81, 84-5. 

— matman, i. 505. 



England, by countie.; (continued) : — 
Oxford: trades and professions men- 
tioned : mealman, iii. 422. 

— mercer, i. 26, 63, 67, 203, 215, 407, 
442 ; ii. 402, 541 ; iii. 4, 28, 145, 155, 
256, 284, 366, 411, 468; iv. 58, 66, 

73, 187. 

— miller, i. 234; iii. 169, 422. 

— milliner, ii. 309-10, 396, 423, 479; 
iii. 4, io8, 373-4. 

— musician, i. 181, 275 ; v. 42, 45, 74. 

— music-master, i. 181, 205, 274-5, 
316 ; ii. 248 ; iii. 162. 

— nurse, ii. 117; iii. 198. 

— organist, ii. 501 ; iii. 24, 433 ; iv. 82. 

— painter, i. 109, 211 ; ii. 10, 117, 258 ; 
iii. 323; iv. 55-6, 85, 218. 

painter-stainer, iii. 91, 311, 323. 

— parchment-seller, iv. 218. 

— physician, i. 44, 66, 277, 395, 428, 
447, 469 ; iv. 217 ; v. 8. 

— plasterer, iv. 52, 75, 78, 84-5, 218. 

— plumber, iii. 280 ; iv. 54-5, 81, 84. 

— post-horse keeper, iv. 218. 

— printer, iii, 226, 267, 282, 299: see 
University press in Index III. 

— privileged persons, see in Index III. 

— quarryman, iv. 68. 

— sadler, i. 505 ; ii. 388, 416. 

— sawyer, i. 503 ; iii. 198. 

— scavenger, iv. 218. 

— schoolmaster, iii. 124, 225. 

— sculptor = engraver, ii. 160. 

— sempstress, iii. 143. 

— shoemaker, i. 385, 505 ; ii. 147, 229, 
311, 368, 485 ; iii. 44, 352 ; iv. 218. 

— shoe-smith, ii. 221. 

— slater, iv. 218. 

— smith, ii. 26, 484 ; iii. 521 ; iv. 54-5, 
60, 63, 66, 70, 78, 81, 84. 

— solicitor, i. 130. 

— stationer, i. 260, 353, 440; ii. 178, 
243, 293, 349, 474, 483, 526, 549, 
556 ; iv. 123, 21S ; v. 17. 

— stone-carver, ii. 160; iv. 84 (carver). 

— stone-cutter, i. 241, 279; ii. 213, 
400, 479, 492 ; iii. 464 ; iv. 63, 65-6, 
75, 78, 81. 

— stone-mason, iv. 218. 

— surgeon, i. 190, 215 ; ii. 172, 283, 
402, 545 ; iii. 94, 109, 169, 202, 284, 
348, 385; iv. 217. 

— tailor, i. 33, 124, 201, 218, 220, 254, 
278, 3", 338, 4°7, 436, 447-9,454, 
508 ; ii. 30, 35, 45, 73, 79-81, 84-5, 
9S-9, 102, 104, 106, 108, 117, 120, 
122, 144, 153, 162, 231, 314, 433, 
4 6 7> 47°, 5 11 , 55°, 558; iii- 12, 26, 

74, 94, 136, 138, 162, 177, 214, 276, 
313, 319, 489; iv. 69, 71, 187, 
217-8. 



INDEX II T( 

England, by counties (contimied) : — 
Oxford: trades and professions men- 
tioned : tailor : — the tailor who made 
the clothes was never also the mer- 
chant who sold the cloth : see, e. g. , 

i. 215, 220, 230, 279, 284, 286, 321, 
389, 471 ; ii. 23, 35, 73, 80, 98, 146, 
162, 190, 223, 314. 

— tanner, i. 157 ; iii. 344. 

— tapster, ii. 176. 

— tasker, i. 229. 

— thief, see burglar. 

— tinker, i. 249. 

— tinman, i. 130. 

— (?) tobacconist, i. 416; ii. 30. 

— turner, i. 449. 

— upholsterer, i. 505. 

— usurer, ii. 395. 

— verger, iii. 201. 

— victualler, i. 80, 447 ; iv. 212, 217-8. 

— vintner, i. 80; ii. 95, 172, 270, 391 ; 
iii. 243 ; iv. 123, 212 ; v. 15. 

— waiting-gentleman, ii. 127. 

— waiting-man, i. 427. 

— watchmaker, iii. 5.1 1. 

— waterman, ii. 78 ; iv. 68. 

— weaver, iii. 227-8; iv. 187, 218. 

— wheelwright, iii. 27. 

— writ-server, iii. 42, 312, 332, 
Oxford : miscellanea. 

— accidents, fatal : — 

fall of haystack, i. 443 ; fall of 

bridge, ii. 30. 
fall downstairs, ii. 139, 150; iii. 

328 : fall from tree, ii. 305. 
fall from horse, ii. 140, 351, 377, 

544-5 ; iii. 154, 336. 
by fire, ii. 423 ; iii. 4; at fire, ii. 

222. 

by frost, iii. 88 ; by lightning, ii. 

77-8. 

— • — by drowning, i. 401, 476 ; ii. 15, 

77, 80, 94> 378, 4° 2 5 iii- 95, J 79> 
306, 424. 

by gunshot, i. no; ii. 130, 185, 

433 ! iii- 245-6. 
in scuffle, i. 183-4. 

— diseases in Oxford : — 

ague, i. 416-7; ii. 95, 143, 150; 

iii. 91 : tertian ague, i. 277 : quartan 

ague, i. 176, 178. 
apoplexy, ii. 9 ; iii. 40, 1 20, 308, 

355, 365, 39°- 
colds, ii. 324, 399, 467, 470 ; iii. 

I2 4,434- 

consumption, i. 119, 197, 322 ; 

ii. 345 ; iii. 138-9, 470. 

cramp, iii. 282, 306, 383, 476. 

deafness, v. 79. 

diabetes, ii. 388. 

dropsy, ii. 214, 347 ; iii. 212, 373. 

VOL. V. 



J UGKAFHICAL. 129 

England, by counties (contimied) : — 
Oxford : diseases : exanthemata, iii. 
366. 

fever, feverish distemper, i. 322 ; 

ii. 10; iii. 307, 468, 470: spotted 
fever, i. 349. 

1657, new fever, i. 223. 

1661, strange fever, new epi- 
demic, i. 416-8. 

1670, strange fever, ii. 198. 

1672, pestilential fever, malig- 
nant fever, ii. 251-4. 

1675, prevalent, ii. 255, 324. 

1676-7, strange fever, malig- 
nant fever, ii. 345-7, 359- 6o > 365- 

1679, prevalent, ii. 470. 

1680, odd fever, ii. 497. 

1681-2, pestilential fever, ma- 
lignant fever, ii. 510, 555 ; iii. 6, 26. 

1684, pestilential fever, iii. 

108. 

1685, prevalent, iii. 124. 

1685-6, unusual fever, new 

malignant fever, iii. 173, 180, 183, 

190, 195. 

1 69 1, new malignant fever, iii. 

370-1, 374. 
1693-4, unusual fever, iii. 434, 

448, 451. 

French pox, ii. 36, 72 ; iii. 198, 

206: pox, ii. 95-6, 125, 300 ; iii. 3. 

gout, iii. T43. 

gripes, iii. 345. 

heartbroken, iii. 468, 492. 

jaundice, iii. 182. 

king's evil, touching for, i. 496-7 ; 

iii. 232-4. 

measles, i. 401 ; iii. 426. 

murrain among horses, ii. 144. 

ophthalmia, iii. 299. 

pestilence : — 

1637, watch set against, ii. 56. 

1 641-6, epidemical disease 

(' morbus campestris '), the plague, 

i. 104, 107, 118, 127, 132; iv. 57. 
1665, on occasion of the great 

plague, watch set to exclude infection, 

ii. 40 ; iv. 69 : successfully, ii. 66-8, 
73- 

see supra, fever. 

purples, i. 349 ; iii. 366. 

scurvy, i. 157 ; ii. 150 ; iii. 373. 

small-pox, incidental cases of, 

i. 45, 338; ii. 355,362,446; iii. 123, 

i5o,i73,337- 

■ epidemics, 1662, i. 461-3 ; 

1666-8, ii. 74, 78, 124, 133; 1670, 

ii. 205; 1674-5, ii. 288,317-8, 320-2, 
324, 330; 1683, iii. 61, 67-8, 79-81, 
83; 1686-7, iii. 189-90, 195, 200, 
209, 216, 220-2, 523 ; 1691, iii. 366, 



1 3° 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
37 1 - 2 , 374; l6 94-5> m - 4°4, 4^6, 
47i,473,475»4 8 8. 

Oxford: diseases: stone, i. 214; ii. 72, 
388 ; iii. 8, 72, 432. 

sweating sickness, i. 354, 461. 

— Oxford epigrams, i. 125-6, 154, 426, 
437, 478; ii- 26, 67, 125, 150, 244, 
249, 348. 

— executions in Oxford, i. 40, 91, 101, 
165, 169, 186, 192, 250, 422 ; ii. 305, 
327, 479. 483-4, 552 ; i". 263, 383, 
393- 

— fires in Oxford : — 

— — 1640, ii. 214. 

1644, i- riI > I2 9, 2 4 T > 4 2 9» i y * 

203, 214, 225. 

1659, i. 277. 

1669, ii. 153, 175. 

1671, ii. 221-2, 230 ; iv. 73. 

1672, ii. 242. 

1675, false alarm, ii. 310, 319. 

1678, ii. 423-4; iii. 4; iv. 76. 

1679, ii. 449. 

1687, iii. 219, 252. 

1690, iii. 344. 

— floods at Oxford : — 

1663, May, i. 474; ii. 279. 

1670, Apr., ii. 190. 

1673, June, ii. 265. 

— ■ — 1674, Jan., ii. 279. 

March, ii. 282. 

1676, Jan., ii. 331. 

1677, May, ii. 375. 

Dec, ii. 395. 

167I, Jan., ii. 399- 

1678, none, ii. 449, 452. 

1679, O ct -, 4 6 7- 

Dec, ii. 474. 

1680, June, ii. 4S7. 

Nov., ii. 501. 

1681, Oct., ii. 558. 

Dec, ii. 562. 

1682, Feb., iii. 7. 

Dec, iii. 34. 

1683, May, iii. 45. 

1684, no record. 

1685, Dec, iii. 172. 

1686, Jan., iii. 176. 

May, iii. 184. 

Dec, iii. 200. 

1687, Oct.-Nov., iii. 242, 244. 

1688, Apr., iii. 301. 

1689, Jan., iii. 320. 

1690, 1691, no record. 

1692, June, iii. 391. 

1693, Apr., iii. 421. 

1694, no record. 

1695, Feb., iii. 478, 480. 

May, iii. 484. 

— insanity at Oxford, i. 136, 287, 395, 



England, by counties {continued') : — 
448 ; ii. 195, 557 ; iii. 26, 34, 112, 
400, 475. 

Oxford-. Oxford 'jests,' ii. 176,234; iv. 
228. 

— murders in Oxford, ii. 18, 470, 484 ; 

iii. 220 (probably in a duel), 264, 
407 : possibly, i. 165 ; iii. 383. 

— Oxford nicknames, i. 52, 206, 212-3, 
306, 387, 414-5, 448 ; ii. 125-6, 195, 
339; iii. 85, 185, 196, 213-4, 299, 
519. 

— sudden deaths in Oxford, ii. 9, 24, 
26, 54; iii. 120, 180, 308, 318, 

374-. 

— suicides in Oxford, i. 136 ; ii. 125. 
by drowning, ii. 545 ; iii. 217, 

377- 

by hanging, ii. 280, 341, 557 ; ni. 

4, 276. 

by poison, i. 199 ; ii. 305. 

by shooting, iii. 328. 

by sword, ii. 354. 

by throat-cutting, ii. 503. 

goods of suicides were forfeit 

to the University, i. 136; ii. 125, 128, 

354, 503 ; iv. 70, 74-5, 77, 83-4- 
Oxford, diocese of: — 

— archdeaconry, ii. 212 ; iv. 11 7-8. 
archdeacons : Barten Holyday, 

i. 198, 214, 388, 417: Thomas Bar- 
low, v. 26 : Timothy Halton, v. 47. 

catalogue of archdeacons, iv. 

117. 

registrar of the archdeacon, and 

of the bishop, i. 325 ; ii. 121 ; iii. 
267 ; iv. 104, 117. 

— see of, foundation, iv. 156, 189: 
registers, iv. 114: endowment, iii. 
265: palace at Cuddesdon, i. 271: 
episcopal visitations, i. 47, 466. 

bishops of, catalogue of, ii. 273 ; 

iv. 156. 

John Bridges, iv. 102, 305. 

Richard Corbet, iv. 156, 

196-7. 

John Bancroft, i. 47, 267; ii. 

506 ; iv. 56. 
Robert Skinner, i. 324, 365, 

388, 390, 411, 466, 482-3. 

William Paul, ii. 175, 229. 

Walter Blandford, v. 28. 

Nathaniel Crewe, v. 39. 

— Henry Compton, v. 38. 

John Fell, v. 44. 

Samuel Parker, v. 65. 

Timothy Hall, iii. 273, 278-9, 

3°3> 3 22 > 329- 

John Hough, v. 48. 

chancellor of, Henry Aylworth, 

ii. 2, 108, 476; iii. 12, 127, 146, 305, 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



England, by counties {continued') : — 
427; iv. 80. In iii. 328 ' Oxon ' is 
a misprint for ' Exon.' 

Oxford, diocese of: clergy of — 

'685, elect a proctor for Con- 
vocation, iii. 137. 

1687, refuse to thank James II 

for his declaration of toleration, iii. 
220. 

• 1688, refuse to read the de- 
claration, iii. 267. 
Oxfordshire, i. 78; ii. 82, 134; v. 18. 

— Plot's Natural History of, v. 66. 

— Davenport's Oxfordshire cited, i. 
252 ; ii. 20 ; and passim. 

— Anthony Wood's collections for, i. 4, 
5, 215, 225 ; iii. 225 ; iv. 237-8. _ 

— Oxfordshire churches, inscriptions 
in, i. 4, 215; ii. 134; iii. 225 ; iv. 
237-8. 

— events : — 

1278, survey of the county, iv.' 

176. 

I577» the Black Assize, ii. 104. 

1642, called to arms by the king, 

i. 54, 61. 

— ordered by the king to help to 

fortify Oxford City, i. 72. 
1653, prison commissioners, i. 

185. 

1666, earthquake, ii. 54, 70. 

1683, earthquake, iii. 73. 

1685, liable for repairs of Oxford 

castle, iii. 169. 

— natives of, i. 117, 134, 236; iii. 
68. 

resident in London, v. 109. 

annual 4 feast ' in Oxford : — 

1670, i. 462 ; ii. 201. 

1683, perhaps held, iii. 74. 

1684 and afterwards, joined 

with the Oxford City feast, iii. 109 ; 

v. 126. 

— court day, iii. 278 ; quarter sessions, 

ii. 476; grand jury, i. 78; ii. 476: 
assize, v. 113. 

— Lords Lieutenant 1 : — 

March 1628, Thomas Howard, 

earl of Berkshire, i. 61. 

Aug. 1642, William Fiennes, vis- 
count Saye and Sele, i. 61. 

July 1660, Henry Cary, viscount 

Falkland, i. 379, 412, 472. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxfordshire : Lords Lieutenant : March 

1667, James Fiennes, viscount Saye 

and Sele, ii. 283. 
1674 James Bertie, lord Norreys, 

afterwards earl of Abingdon, v. 23. 
Oct. 1688, Edward Henry Lee, 

earl of Lichfield, iii. 254. 
1689, James, earl of Abingdon, 

again, v. 23. 
functions of, to muster the militia, 

i. 379 ; iii. 96 : entertain royalty and 
distinguished visitors, i. 412 ; iii. 16, 
47, 54 : proclaim the king, iii. 127-8. 

— Deputy Lieutenants, ii. 512, 529; 
iii. 278. 

— High Sheriffs 2 :— 

1568 3 , Richard Taverner, i. 50, 

387- 

1632, John Harborne, i. 252. 

1644, David Walter, i. 120, 216; 

ii. 449. 

1648, Nicholas Herman, i. 159. 

1653, Charnell Petty, i. 36, 184, 

381. 

1659, William Gore, i. 252. 

1662, John Taverner, i. 239, 461, 

468-70, 478 ; ii. 307. 

1663, ... Barber, ii. 415. 

1664, George Croke, ii. 30, 136. 

1665, Thomas Wheate, ii. 133. 

1666, William Dormer, i. 458; 

iii. 65. 

1675, Sir Edmund Feteplace, ii. 

324. 

— — 1676, John Gower, i. 42. 
1678, Ralph Holt, i. 37. 

— — 1680, Edmund Gregory 4 , i. 233, 
245; ii. 525 ('Robert Mayot' is in 
error), 551. 

1 68 1, Robert Mayott, iii. 9. 

— — 1682, John Wickham, i. 214; 
iii. 38, 47, 72. 

1683, Sir Robert Dashwood, i. 

218. 

1685, Sir John Doyly, iii. 127. 

1686, Sir Rowland Lacy, iii. 482. 

1688, Sir Henry Brown, iii. 260, 

269, 278, 281. 

1691, Thomas Rowney, i. 44. 

1695, Robert Jennings, iii. 480. 

1891, William Henry Ashhurst, 

ii. 137. 



1 See Davenport's Oxfordshire, 1888. 2 Ibid. 

3 Appointed in November : actual tenure of office, in this and subsequent years, 
was from about the end of the following February, i.e., here, Feb. 156-I. 

4 Held office, I presume, from about Feb. 168^ to Feb. 168^-. It is with the 
greatest trepidation that I therefore claim for Wood's acquaintance the dubious 
honour of ii. 551, which Mr. Davenport ('Oxfordshire,' p. 74) assigns to his suc- 
cessor. The notices of 1662 (John Taverner) seem to fix the dates of the office. 



K 2 



I 3 2 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 

Oxfordshire: IIi}.;h Sheriffs: catalogue 
of, iv. 199: accounts of, iv. 179: 
oath not to infringe the privileges of 
the University, iv. 212, 217. 

duties : — to attend the judges of 

assize, i. 468-70 ; ii. 30. 

escort prisoners, ii. 551. 

preside at election of M.P.s, 

iii. 278. 

serve the king's writs, iii. 269. 

head the gentry of the county 

in welcoming royalty, iii. 47. 

attend the proclaiming of the 

king, iii. 127. 

formal entry, with a mounted 

escort of county gentlemen, i. 470, 
478; ii. 30, 324; iii. 38, 260, 480: 
association of gentry to lessen the 
cost of the office, ii. 324; iii. 260. 

— under-sheriffs, i. 421-2; iii. no, 
194,249; iv. 31, 77; v. 17. 

— members of Parliament, knights of 
the shire, ii. 20, 317, 442, 461, 476, 
519, 525; iii. 136, 278, 296, 327, 
493- 

— justices of the peace, i. 239; ii. 81, 
476-7* 544; "i- 89, 260, 278. 

— gentry of the county, shirk the 
heralds' visitations, ii. 152. 

escort the high sheriff, see supra. 

— — assemble inOxford to form mounted 
processions of welcome, e.g. 

1661, the chancellor of the 

University, i. 412. 

1681, Charles II, ii. 524-5. 

1683, James, duke of York, 

iii. 47. 

1685, attend the proclamation of 

the king, iii. 127. 
present addresses on the king's 

accession, i. 313; iii. 130. 
incidental mention, ii. 529 ; iii. 

145, 254, 278 ; iv. 237. 
Romanist county gentlemen, i. 24, 

403-4; iii. 2, 73, 129, 260. 

— militia, or trained bands : officers of, 
i. 51 ; ii. 529; iii. 145, 149, 151 : 
chaplain of, iii. 145. 

a regiment of foot : — 

1642, called out by the king, 

i. 54, 61. 

Sept., called out by the 

Parliament, i. 64, 66. 
Nov., disarmed by the king, 

i. 70. 

1643, called out by the king 

to help to garrison Oxford City, i. 99. 

1 661, called out, i. 377. 379. 

1685, assembled at Oxford, 

June 19, iii. 145; paraded to a 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
sermon, June 22, iii. 145; disbanded, 
July 14, iii. 152. 

Oxfordshire : militia : a troop of horse : 
uniform, buff coats, ii. 526. 

T642, Nov., disarmed and dis- 
mounted by the king, i. 70-1. 

1 68 1, mustered to attend 

Charles II at Oxford, ii. 524-6. 

1684, mustered, iii. 96-7. 

1685, met at Oxford and 

marched towards Somerset, iii. 145. 

1688, only Romanists called 

out by James II, iii. 281. 

— heralds' visitations : — 

1574, Richard Lee's, i. 182; iv. 

237-8. 

1634, John Philipot's, i. 44-5. 

1669-75, Edward Byshe's, ii. 152, 

189. 473, 476. 

— schools, i. 321 ; see Charlbury, 
Cogges, Dorchester, Steeple Aston, 
Thame, Woodstock. 

— Adderbury, i. 135 ('Alderbury' in 
error), 271, 467; ii. 241, 415, 492, 
559; iii. 138. 

— Adwell, 1. 27, 33, 382 ; v. 7. 

— Alkerton, i. 463 ; ii. 124. 

— Ambrosden, Amersden, ii. it, 481. 

— Ardley, i. 284; v. n. 

— Ascot, in Great Milton parish, i. 458. 

— Ascot-under-Wychwood, i. 33 ; iii. 
65. 

— Asthall, Astoll, i. 305 ; ii. 414. 

— Aston, in Bampton parish, i. 42 ; ii. 
116; iii. no; v. 15. 

— North Aston, i. 33 ; ii. 39, 387 ; iii. 
106-7. 

— Aston Rowan t, ii. 544 ; iii. 27, 65. 

— Steeple Aston, see Steeple. 

— Bablockhythe, ii. 211 ; iv. 188. 

— Bainton, in Stoke Lyne parish, i. 32. 

— Bampton, i. 39, 42 ; ii. 13, 20-1, 28, 
n6, 153, 2 94> 3 2 4 5 iii. no ; v. 14-6. 

castle, ii. p. xxviii, 20-1 : manor, 

ii. 21 : vicarage, ii. 20. 

— Banbury, i. 177, 260, 265, 276, 
307-8, 474, 506; ii. 107, 152, 316, 
380, 387, 446, 474; iii. 284, 312, 356, 
434- 

in the civil war, i. 52, 54, 60-3, 

65, 67-8. 

castle, i. 74: church, i. 265, 

276. 

— Barrowes, ii. 284. 

— Barton, see Steeple Barton. 

— Beckley, iii. 218. 

— Beechen-tree, i. 495 ; ii. 190. 

— Begbroke, i. 254 ; ii. 252, 459. 

— Bellositum, i. 310; iv. 13-4. 

— Bicester, Bister, Burcester, i. 33, 36, 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



*33 



England, by counties {continued) : — 

276, 319, 35°, 421; ii. 11, 123, 356, 
552, 565 ; iii. 264, 447; iv. 221. 
Oxfordshire: Binsey, i. 340, 407, 436, 
448, 459; ii. 119, 155, 163; iii. 34, 
61, 312, 332, 491. 

— Bircott, see Burcott. 

— Bix, ii. 130 ; iii. 496. 

— Blackbourton, i. 472. 

— Blackthorne, ii. 107. 

— Bladon, i. 281, 283, 362 ; ii. 247. 

— Blenheim palace, i. 168. 

— Bletchington, i. 309, 435-9; ii. 54, 
70, 282, 379, 402, 499, 556 ; iii. 137 ; 
iv. 156. 

— Bloxham, ii. 300. 

— Bold, ii. 283. 

— Brightwell, i.e. Baldwin Brightwell, 

i. 243, 245, 362 ; ii. 87, 229; iii. 362, 
402. 

— Brize-norton, i. 192 ; ii. 362 ; iii. 24. 

— Broughton, i. 65 ; ii. 227, 283. 

— Bruerne abbey, iv. 107. 

— Bucknell, i. 276, 319 ; iii. 220, 267, 
382. 

— Bullingdon green, i. 70, 100, 107, 
no; ii. 85, 483; iii. 249, 412; iv. 
69. 

hundred, iv. 177. 

— Burcester, iv. 221, i.e. Bicester, q. v. 

— Burcott, Bircott, iii. 136 ; iv. 51, 
53-4- 

— Burford, i. 65, 272, 440; ii. 195, 
283, 290, 310, 324, 529-30; iii. 23, 
195, 284, 383, 493 : a Burford saddle 
is a present for a king, ii. 530. 

— Carswell, see Caswell. 

— Cassington, Cassenton, i. 138, 151-2, 
178, 181, 191, 218, 234, 252, 281, 
283, 304-5, 317, 417, 419-20, 423-4, 
441, 443, 468, 475 ; ii. 34, 229, 552 ; 
»i. 33^ 239, 406. 

— Caswell, in Witney parish, ii. 494; 
iii- 37, 328 ('Carswell'). 

— Cerceden, see Sarsden. 

— Chadlington, i. 185 (' Chaddington') ; 

ii. 227, 364; iii. 41, 369. 

— Chalgrove, i. 101 ; ii. 43, 412. 

— Charlbury, Cherlbury, ii. 15, 372, 
390, 545 ; iii. 341, 434: market and 
fairs, ii. 404. 

school, i. 267 ; ii. 280. 

— Charlton-on-Otmoor, i. 444 ; ii. 130. 

— Chastleton, i. 263 ; ii. 147, 342, 364, 
389, 549 ; iii. 197. 

hills, ii. 284. 

— Checkendon, i. 32 ; ii. 28. 

— Cherwell, the, i. 91, 497; ii. 190, 
216, 474; iii. 97. 

— Chester Grange, near Bicester, i. 33. 

— Chesterton, i. 162, 349. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxfordshire : Cheyney lane, near Head- 
ington, i. 289, 412. 

— Chibney's farm, near Cuddesdon, 
iii. 8. 

— Chimney, i. 490; ii. 21, 88. 

— Chinnor, i. 101 ; ii. 397; iii. 265. 

— Chipping-Norton, i. 24, 59, 156 ; ii. 
263. 35 6 , 54 6 ; iii- 433-4' 4 8 7~8 ; iv. 
63; v. 3. 

— Chiselhampton, Chislington bridge, 

i. 101. 

— Churchill, ii. 311, 364. 

— Clanfield, i. 137. 

— Clifton, in Deddington parish, i. 213, 
215 ; ii. 107. 

— Clifton ferry, ii. 378. 

— Coat, see Cote. 

— Cobcot, i. 32-3, 36, 277. 

— Cockthorp, iii. 243. 

— Codslow, see Cutslow. 

— Cogges, i. 250, 253 ; ii. 562 ; iii. 
in. 

school, i. 253. 

— Colnham, see Culham. 

— Long Combe, i. 475 ; v. 5. 

— Cookoldsholt, iii. 487. 

— Combury, i. 263, 411, 414-5, 491-2, 

495, 499; S29 ! iii- 5 r , i79> 214, 
362 ; iv. 80-1. 

— Cornwell, ii. 39, 512. 

— Cote, Coat, in Bampton parish, i. 
42 ; iii. 136, 145, 296. 

— Cotslow, see Cutslow. 

— Cottisford, Cotsford, i. 50, 263, 319 ; 
v. 7. 

— Cowley, i. 107, 194, 214, 222, 386; 

ii. 96, 104, 538-9; iii. 122. 
green, i. 107. 

— Temple Cowley, i. 194, 386. 

— Cuddesdon, i. 120, 171, 177, 268, 
271, 415; ii. 205, 506, 562; iii. 8, 
2 59- 

warren, iii. 214. 

— (?)Cuffield, iii. 214. 

— Culham, Colnham, i. 42, 439 ; iv. 
89. 

bridge, i. 113. 

— Cutslow, Codslow, Cotslow, Cudes- 
low, i. 353; ii. 151, 177, I89-9 1 - 

— Cuxham, i. 232-3, 242-3, 245, 265, 
288-9, 468 ; iii. 123. 

— Darfield (?), ii. 118, 124: see Dorn- 
ford. 

— Deddington, i. 109, 474; ii. 377; 

iii. 106. 

— Denton, ii. 205, 524. 

— Dernford, ii. 124, 404 : probably 
Dornford in Wootton parish. 

— Ditchley, Dichley, i. 203, 273, 351 ; 
ii. 241, 492; iii. 330, 362. 



134 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxfordshire: Dorchester, i. 98, 214, 

222-6, 272, 278; ii. 482; iii. 145, 

r 5 1 , 259, 264. 
abbey, i. 223-5, 278; ii- 301; 

iv. 107. 

bishop of, i. 223, 225 : bishop's 

palace, i. 224. 
church, i. 214, 223-5, 278; ii- 

482 ; iii. 259. 
school, i. 108, 223-4; ii- 

— Dornford, see Dernford, Darfield. 

— Drayton, iii. 259. 

— Ducklington, iii. 243. 

— Duns-tew, i. 165. 

— Easome, i. 59 : possibly for Enstone. 

— Einsham, see Eynsham. 

— Einston, see Enstone. 

— Elsfield, i. 218; ii. 219, 240, 439, 

477, 499> 523. 5 2 9 5 ^ 59> 73, 85. 

— Emmington, ii. 137. 

— Ensham, see Eynsham. 

— Enstone : Church Enstone, i. 24-5 ; 
ii. 138, 364, 390, 414; v. 3, 4, 21. 

Neat Enstone, i. 24 ; v. 3, 21. 

wells, ii. 305, 336 ; iii. 336. 

see Easome. 

— Erdington, i.e. Yarnton. 

— Estcote, i. 458, i.e. Ascot. 

— Evenlode, the, ii. 283. 

— Ewelme, ii. 247, 546 ; iii. 136, 142. 

— Eynsham, Einsham, Ensham, i. 24-5, 
156, 226, 228-9, 3°5> 4 X 9> 5°3J ii- 
33, 299, 481, 511, 537; iii. 132, 
220; v. 3, 4, 18, 20-1. 

abbey, i. 24, 226, 228-9, 255, 

339; ii. 301; iii. 111; iv. 95, 220, 
260 ; v. 4. 

documents of, i. 286, 410; ii. 

112 ; iv. 95. 

— Fawler, i. 33; ii. 525. 

— Fifield, i. 459. 

— Foresthill, iii. 134, 176. 

— Foscott, ii. 283. 

— ■ Frice, Frees, i. 217-8. 

— Fritwell, iii. 136, 145. 

— Fulbrook, ii. 396 ; iii. 195. 

— Garsington,Gasingdon,i. 132,213-5, 
242-4, 249, 417; ii. 42, 44, 377, 
482, 546 ; iii. 38, 47, 72. 

— Gasingwell, Gazingwell, in Enstone 
parish, i. 24; v. 21. 

hedge, iii. 487. 

— Gaunt's house, i. 272. 

— Glympton, i. 275 ; ii. 40, 82, 87, 
133; iii. 90. 

— Godstow, i. 216, 220, 339, 343; ii. 
141 ; iii. 448, 491. 

nunnery, i. 217, 338-46; ii. 301, 

449 ; iii. 491 ; iv. 97, 107, 220. 
bells of, i. 346. 



England, by counties {continued): — . 

Oxfordshire : Godstow nunnery, docu- 
ments of, i. 346; ii. 119, 355; iv. 
96-7. 

bridge, i. 346 : toll bridge, i. 

343- 

fair, i. 343. 

— Goring, i. 233. 

— Gosford, i. 286. 

— — bridge, i. 303. 

— Grays, i.e. Rotherfield Greys, i. 253 ; 

ii. 20. 

— Hailey, Haley, i. 34; iii. III. 

— Halton, see Holton. 

— Hampton Gay, or Gayt, ii. 480-2 ; 

iii. 37, 256. 

— Hampton Poyle, i. 119, 190, 287, 
410; ii. p. viii, 127, 295 ; iii. 10. 

— Long Hanborough, i. 250 ; ii. 440; 

iv. 59. 

— Hanwell, i. 264-5 > ii- 316—7. 

— Hardwick, i. 263. 

— Harding, i. e. Harpden, iii. 337. 

— Hay ford, see Hey ford. 

— Hazeley, Great, i. 126, 181, 218, 
235-6 : Great or Little, i. 302. 

— Headington, Heddington, Hedindon, 

i. 183-4, 231, 288, 412, 420, 461, 464, 
467; ii. 119, 126-7, 475, 558; iii- 
142, 145, 195, 246, 307, 316, 352, 
380, 481. 

— — hill, i. 91, 289, 302, 412; ii. 
558. 

Wyke, iii. 246. 

Joan's of Headington, Jone's, a 

noted alehouse, i. 231, 235, 303 ; ii. 

h 47 ; iii- 33 6 - 

— Heath, Hethe, i. 276-7. 

— Henley-on-Thames, i. 50, 70, 134, 
239, 277, 302, 319; ii. 28-9, 100, 
121, 551 ; iii. 163, 263, 282. 

— Hey ford-ad-pon tern, i. 180; ii. 239; 
iii. 267. 

— Heyford-Warren, i. 204; ii. 150. 

— Heyford-Purcell, iii. 267. 

— Upper Heyford, i. 252. 

— Heyford, which ?, ii. 302. 

— Heythrop, iii. 488. 

— Hockley, i. 238. 

— Hockley-in-the-hole, iii. 122. 

— Holton, Halton, i. 184, 204, 213, 
215, 218-9, 226, 256, 331-2 ; iii. 
91-2, 403 ; iv. 104. 

— Holwell, i. 132. 

— Hooknorton, ii. 364. 

— Horsepath, ii. 85, 427 ; iii. 259, 426. 

— Ibstone, i. 223 (?), 424; ii. 229. 

— Tdbury, i. 186, 305 ; ii. 283. 

— Iffley, i. 214, 222, 416-7, 421, 433 ; 

ii. 115, 173, 189; iii. 136, 284, 362, 
448; iv. 34. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



135 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Oxfordshire : Ipsden, i. 229. 

— Ipston, i.e. Ibstone (?), i. 223. 

— the ' Isis,' i. 226; iii. 112. 

— Islip, i. 67, 107, 403 ; ii. 29, 148, 
286, 299, 413 ; iii. 151, 285. 

— Kiddington, i. 403 ; iii. 260. In iii. 
267 for ' Kiddyngton ' read ' Kidling- 
ton.' 

— Kidlington, i. 190, 218, 254, 286, 
353; ii. 87, 149-50, 201, 277, 488 ; 
iii. 8,5, 225, 267 ('Kiddyngton' in 
error). 

— Kingham, ii. 302. 

— Kirtlington, i. 34, 180, 193; ii. 230, 
549- 

— Langdell mead, i. 253. 

— Launton, i. 323. 

— Lea's rest, iii. 330. 

— Lewknor, i. 33. 

— Linam, i. e. Lyneham, hills, ii. 284. 

— Littlemore, i. 403; ii. 554; iii. 168, 
403 ; iv. 109. 

nunnery, i. 386, 403-4 ; ii. 301. 

muniments of, ii. 113; iv. 99. 

— Louse hall, i. 302-3 ; ii. 6. 

— Mapledurham, ii. 361-2. 

— Marston, Merston, i. 195-6, 214, 302, 
442; ii. 77, 94, 96, 112, 119, 215, 
556 ; iii. 25, 40, 73, 108, 182. 

— Medley, i. 167, 220, 318, 407; ii. 
43> 77~ 8 > 111 » »i. 61. 

— Middleton-Stoney, i. 276; ii. 205; 
iii. 308 ; iv. 64. 

— Milton, Great Milton, i. 27, 33, 36-7, 
41, 109, 162, 188, 218-9, 45 8 ; 

I 37-8 5 T 9°> 20 5» 3io, 5 62 5 v - 
9, 16 : Delafield's History of, ii. 

137. 

— Little Milton, i. 220. 

— Minster- Lovel, ii. 266, 324. 

— Mixbury, i. 263. 

— Mongewell, i. 134 ('Berks' in error). 

— Moore, i. 271. 

— Moreton, Moreton Hythe, Moreton 
S. Denys, i. 271. 

— Neat Enstone, i. 24 ; v. 3, 21. 

— Nethercourt, ii. 227. 

— Nettlebed, i. 100, 239-40, 337, 461, 
500 ; ii. 1, 306 ; iii. 3. 

— Newbridge, i. 272 ; iii. 312. 

— Newington, ii. 233 ; iii. 67, 368, 377. 

— Newnham, see Nuneham. 

— Noke, ii. 367. 

— North Aston, v. 132. 

— Northleigh, i. 250; ii. 29,43, 372-4; 
iii. in, 132, 189. 

— Northmoor, i. 271-2 ; ii. 20. 

— Northstoke, see Stoke. 

— Northweston, i. 408. 

— Nuffield, ii. 49. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Oxfordshire : Nuneham, Newnham, 
Nuneham- Courtney, i. 99, 218-9, 
234, 277 ; ii. 441, 451, 541 ; iii. 374, 
533- 

— Oddington, i. 266; ii. 273. 

— Ottendon, ii. 355. 

— Oxford, city, v. 112-30. 

archdeacons of, v. 130. 

bishops of, v. 130. 

— Payn's farm, i. 272; ii. 203; iii. 
111. 

— Piddington, iii. 96. 

— Piperd, see Rotherfield. 

— Pirton, Pyrton, iii. 11. 

— Postcombe, i. 27 ; v. 7. 

— Priest-end, Thame, i. 115. 

— Pudlicot, iii. 341. 

— Radcote, ii. 201 ; iii. 312. 

— Rawlins, Rauley, ii. 28-9. 

— Ricot, see Rycote. 

— Great Rollright, i. 477 ; ii. 106, 368 ; 
iii. 216. 

— Little Rollright, ii. 376. 

— Rotherfield Greys, i. 253 ; ii. 20. 

— Rotherfield Piperd, iii. 163. 

— Rousham, ii. 146-7 ; iii. 243, 303. 

— Rycote, Ricot, i. 115, 457 ; ii. 313 ; 
iii. 18, 54, 135, 152. 

— Sandford-on- Thames, i. 193, 210, 
386, 403-4; ii. 113, 123, 416; iii. 
47, 408. 

ferry, i. 107. 

priory, i. 386, 403 ; iii. 343 ; iv. 

99, 107, 109. 

— Sarsden, Cerceden, i. 216-7 ; ii. 212, 
310-1, 364; iii. 246, 313, 464, 473. 

— Shifford, ii. 88. 

— Shilton, ii. 477. 

— Shiplake, ii. 394. 

— Shipton-on-Cherwell, i. 267 ; ii. 27. 

— Shipton-under-Wychwood, ii. 463 ; 
iii. 341, 482. 

— Shirburn, Sherburne, ii. 54 ; iv. 97, 
159- 

— Shotover hill, i. 176, 203, 385, 412 ; 
ii. 483 ; iii. 16-7, 88, 208, 318. 

lodge, iii. 17. 

— Smallman's cross, i. 183-4. 

— Somerton, i. 263 ; iii. 86. 

— Souldern, i. 263, 305, 379, 424; ii. 
53- 

— Soundess, i. 39, 239-40, 337, 461 ; 
ii. 306; iii. 3, 154. 

— Southleigh, i. 250, 252. 

— Southstoke, ii. 28, 41. 

— Spelsbury, Spilsbury, ii. 492-3, 559. 

— Stadhampton, i. 500 ( £ Stadham ') ; 
ii. 96. 

— Standlake, Stanlake, i. 271-3 ; iii. 
117, 199. 



136 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by countios (continued) : — 
Oxfordshire'. Stanton Harcourt, i. 40, 
50, 21S-9, 252, 272, 500; ii. 19,96, 
249; iii. 24, 131, 264; iv. 304. 

— Stanton St. John, i. 49, 218, 255, 
265 ; ii. 70 ; iii. 81, 85. 

— Steeple Aston, i. 48, 264, 267 ; ii. 
40, 50, 79, 112, 280 ; iii. 267, 360. 

school, i. 145 : Radcliffe's hospital, 

i. 145. 

— Steeple Barton, Barton, i. 204, 271 ; 

ii. 364,446 ; iii. 97-8, ioo, 103, 123. 

— Stockhurst wood, i. 265 ; ii. 314, 
376- 

— Stoke, ii. 44 : perhaps Northstoke. 

— Stoke, Southstoke, ii. 28, 41. 

— Stoke Lyne, i. 32, 36-7, 184, 263-4, 

275-7, 3 8 o-i, 384, 434 5 J 47; iii- 
400. 

— Stoke Talmage, i. 32-4, 40, 51 ; ii. 
118. 

— Stokenchurch, i. 100. 

— Stonor, iii. 68. 

— Stow wood, i. 463 ; ii. 347. 

— Stratton Audley, i. 118, 421-2. 

— Studley priory, ii. 301 ; iv. 107, 109. 

— Swalcliffe, Swaclyve, i. 213-4, 305. 

— Swerford, Swarford, i. 233, 443 ; ii. 

133, 314-5, 364, 389 ; "i. 44- 

— Swinbrook, i. 224, 240 ; ii. 250, 324, 
495 ; iii. 242, 482. 

— Tackley, i. 174, 191, 252; iii. 267; 

iv. 237. 

— Tame, see Thame. 

— Taynton, Tainton, ii. 203 ; iii. nr. 

— Tetsworth, i. 26-7, 32, 36, 40, 45, 
47, 5 1 , 79, 107-8, 171, 184, 197, 263, 
277, 284, 329, 380,409,421,434; ii. 
100-1, 107, 117, 441, 524; iii. 189; 

v. 7, 16 : mentioned only because of 
Wood's family connexion. 

— Great Tew, i. 472 ; iii. 205. 

— Thame, Tame : mentioned because 
of Wood's family connexion, i. 33, 
35, 108, 277 ; ii. 28, 205 ; iii. 74. 

mentioned in connexion with the 

civil war, i. 58, 64, 66, 72, 87, 91, 

100-1, 1 14-5, 117, 119-24, 128. 
incidental mention, i. 107, 116, 

l6 °, 175, 389, 4°9 J 8t, 148, 4 8l ~2, 

555 5 ^ 37, 57, 400, 486. 
church, i. 107, 122-3, 408-9; ii. 

28, 119 ; iii. 74. 
abbey, i. 410; ii. 114, 355; iv. 

107, 109, 221, 260. 

mill, i. 117 : 'Priest End,' i. 115. 

park, (i) deer-park, i. 123; (ii) 

house, i. 58, 250, 410. 
vicarage, i. 107, 115, ir7, r20, 

122-3, 129. 
school, i. 51, 108-9, 123-4, I2 9» 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
171, 223 -4, 4°7, 4°9- 10 ; »• ll > 28 > 

52, u 6, 135 ; iii. 450. 
Oxfordshire: Thame, river, i. 224, 226, 

409. 

— Thames, river, i. 226, 368 ; ii. 97, 
363; iii. 86, 136, 330, 419; iv. 51, 

53, 69, 309. 

— the ' Three pigeons," iii. 491. 

— Thrup, ii. 368, 554. 

— Tusmore, Tustmor, ii. 133, 416. 

— Uxmore, i. 229. 

— the Vent, iii. 439. 

— Walcot, ii. 372. 

— Warborough, i. 278. 

— Wardington, ii. 142. 

— Watereaton, i. 39, 268. 

— Waterperry, iii. 2, 25. 

— Waterstock, ii. 136-8, 148, 341, 501 ; 
iii. 109, 402. 

— Watlington, Wattleton, i. 54, 146, 
233, 242-3 ; iii. 27, 143. 

park, iii. 68. 

— Wendlebury, Windlebury, i. 175 ; iii. 
242. 

— Weston-on-the-Green, i. 438, 459 ; ii. 
166, 229, 245 ; iii. 284, 325. 

— North Weston, i. 408. 

— South Weston, Weston near Thame, 

ii. 119, 351. 

— Wheatley, Whatley, i. 91, 479, 485 ; 

iii. 88, 318, 336 ; iv. 56. 

bridge, i. 176 ; ii. 146 ; iii. 438. 

— Whitchurch, i. 37, 332 ; iii. 124. 

— Whitfield, i.e. Wheatfield in South 
Weston parish, i. 33-4. 

— Whitney, see Witney. 

— Wickham, ii. 556. 

— Witney, Whitney, i. 24, 26, 34, 39, 
79, *36, 250, 253, 441, 459 ; ii. 324 ; 
iii. 37, 72, in, 195, 239, 284, 383; 
v. 3, 7, 20: blankets, i. 505. 

park, i. 39. 

— Wiveold, see Wyfold. 

— Wolvercote, i. 66, 88, 159, 215-7, 
233-4, 238, 305, 339, 344- 4 X 9, 457 5 
ii- 33, 87, 449; 111. 154, 192, 281, 
395, 4 6 4' 481, 49 1 - 

— Lower Wolvercote, i. 343. 

— Woodcot alias Rawlins, ii. 28. 

— Woodeaton, i. 26, 38-40, 50, 79, 
239-40, 387, 428 ; ii. 169, 171, 306-7, 
346 ; iii. 332 ; v. 7. 

— Woodstock, court at, i. 46, 116, 
373; iii. 227, 494; iv. 51-2, 55-6, 
81. 

in civil war, i. 59, 66-7 ; the devil 

of, i. 158. 

legend of fair Rosamond, i. 283, 

343-4 ; iv. 193. 
incidental mention, i. 204, 281, 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



137 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
283, 343, 362 ; ii. 3545 I 54 J 282, 
336, 379; iv - J 93- 

Oxfordshire : Woodstock : Old Wood- 
stock, ii. 345. 

park, i. 283, 495 ; ii. 150, 492-3 ; 

iii. 426. 

— — — ranger of, ii. 150-1, 465, 

492-3- , ... , ' 

horse-race at, 11. 405 ; iii. 391, 

509. 

lodge, ii. 150, 492-3. 

manor, ii. 203 ; iv. 177 : manor- 
house, i. 283. 
school, i. 320-1 ; iii. 85. 

— Woolvercot, see Wolvercote. 

— Wootton, Wooton, Wotton, ii. 190, 

373 5 iii- 39 1 - 
gate, well at, iii. 486-7. 

— Wroxton, i. 253, 350-1, 424; ii. 
413 ; iii. 160 ; iv. 259. 

— Wyfold, Wiveold, i. 27, 32, 40, 50-1, 
197, 319 ; ii. 100 ; v. 7. 

— Wyke, Headington, iii. 246. 

■ — Yarnton, Erdington, i. 151, 217-8; 
ii. 41, 189-90, 194, 356, 421 ; iii. 1, 
60, 73, 112, 134, 239, 281, 452. 

Rutland. 

— Cotsmore, i. 217-8. 

— Exton, iii. 301. 
Shropshire, Salop. 

natives of, i. 127, 136; ii. 154, 

215, 218 ; iii. 65, 162, 273, 486. 

incidental mention, i. 166, 194 

('Shrewsbury'), 235; ii. 435; iii. 
107, 158. 

archdeacon of, iii. 107, 205. 

— Abbey-foriat, i. 117, 274. 

— Alberbury priory, iv. 90. 

— Arcal, Little, i. 134. 

— Bildwas abbey, i. 342. 

— Boscobel, i. 327. 

— Boy cot, ii. 401. 

— Brand, i. 325. 

— Cardington, iii. 207. 

— Cructon, i. 265. 

— Cundore, ii. 333. 

— Doddington, i. 151. 

— Eyton, i. 216 : or in Herefordshire. 

— Henley, iii. 379. 

— Lidbury, i. 136. 

— Little Arcal, i. 134. 

— Ludlow, i. 41 ; iii. 377. 

— Morehouse, ii. 311. 

— Pontsbury, i. 235. 

— Richard's close, iii. 176. 

— Sandford, ii. 70. 

— Shadwell, iii. 179. 

— Shrewsbury, i. 117, 274; iii. 154. 
residents in, ii. 55 ('Salop'), 

439- 



England, by counties (contimied) : — 
Shropshire: Shrewsbury: mint (1642) 
at, i. 80 : corn -riot (1693) at, iii. 421. 

— Shynewood, iii. 94. 

— Tone-alton, i. 135. 

— Tongue-castle, i. 265. 

— Upton-cresset, ii. 404. 

Somerset, i. 195, 203; ii. 256; iii. 145, 

*57» 20 7, 34 8 - 

natives of, i. 158, 274, 333; h. 

421 ; iii. 251, 467. 

— Barwick, iii. 222. 

— Bath, mayor and aldermen of, iii. 
402 : recorder of, ii. 353 : rector of, 

ii. 412. 

residents in, ii. 350, 353 ; iii. 

431- 

incidental mention, i. 456 ; ii. 

24 x > 283, 353, 469; iii. 255, 268, 

332, 334, 4° 2 > 43 1 , 463- 
buddings in, ii. 350, 352-4, 408-9 ; 

iii. 268, 431. 

burials at, ii. 352-4, 3 66 > 5 01 5 

iii. 431. 

library, ii. 352-3. 

school, ii. 409. 

Wood's visits to, 1676, cost £15, 

ii. 350 : 1678, cost £8, ii. 404, 407- 
10, 412-3, 472. 

called ' the Bath,' i. 456 ; ii. 350, 

353' 407-8, 4 12 ; iii-. 332, 334, 463. 

— — archdeacon of, iii. 431. 

bishop of Bath and Wells, iii. 

360-1 : episcopal registers, iv. 113. 
called ' bishop of Wells,' ii. 

214, 397,447 5 iii- 366. 

Ralph of Shrewsbury, iv. 113. 

James Montague, ii. 353. 

— Arthur Lake, ii. 352. 

William Laud, i. 485 ; v. 57. 

William Piers, ii. 205. 

Robert Creighton, ii. 192, 253, 

353- 

Peter Mews, v. 62. 

Thomas Ken, v. 56. 

Richard Kidder, iii. 363, 371. 

— Bickmaller, ii. 26 2. 

— Bishop's Chew, ii. 283 ; iii. 14. 

— Bishop's Lydyard, i. 307. 

— Bridgwater, iv. 180. 

— Brinton, iv. 90. 

— Broomfield, iii. 125. 

— Bruton priory, iv. 90. 

— Butleigh, i. 461 ; ii. 258. 

— Chard, i. 35. 

— Chew, Bishop's or Great, ii. 283 ; 

iii. 14. 

— Churchill, iii. 123. 

— Compton Painsford, ii. 183, 225. 

— Dicheat, i. 274. 

— Dunster, ii. 283 ; iii. 337. 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued') \ — 
Somerset', Farley castle, i. 472. 

— Frome, iii. 440. 

— Glastonbury, i. 3 ; ii. 436; iii. 164, 
342 ; iv. 95, 282. 

— Hollow-way, ii. 409. 

— Kelston, ii. 353. 

— Lansdowne hill, ii. 241. 

— Lydiard S. Laurence, iii. 240. 

— Lyte's Cary, iv. 281. 

— Martock school, ii. 284. 

— Mells, ii. 321 ; iii. 440. 

— Peglinch, i. 406. 

— Pickmaller, ii. 262. 

— Sedgemoor, iii. 168, 170 ; iv. 80. 

— Shepton Mallet, iii. 420. 

— South Petherton, ii. 225. 

— Spargrove, ii. 353. 

— Speckington, ii. 225. 

— Swanswick, ii. 173. 

— Taunton, i. 306-7; ii. 521 ; iii. 164, 
173. 

'school, iii. 26. 

archdeacon of, iii. 12. 

— Temple Combe, ii. 408. 

— Tickew hall, i. 192. 

— Trent, i. 327 ; ii. 138. 

— Upton, iii. 467. 

— "Wells, i. 126, 158, 406; ii. 327, 
397, 409; iii. 12, 164, 166. 

bishop of, v. 137 : muniments of, 

iii. 166. 

cathedral, golden prebend of, 

iii. 12. 

dean of, i. 290, 365, 473 ; ii. 

192, 271, 327-8 ; iii. 78. 
canon or prebendary of, ii. 

352 ; iii. 2, 12, 260, 341, 415 ; iv. 293. 
chancellor of, ii. 115. 

— Widcombe, Whitcombe, ii. 409. 

— Wrington, i. 239 ; ii. 307, 550. 
Staffordshire, iii. 418. 

natives of, i. 34, 325 ; ii. 269, 

37' 5 iii- 251. 
Robert Plot's Natural History of, 

ii. 511 ; iii. 251. 
archdeacon of, iii. 24. 

— Barton-under-Needwood, ii. 412. 

— Bishbury, ii. 269. 

— Burton-on-Trent, i. 401 ; iii. 350 ; 

iv. 90, 100. 

— Compton, i. 34. 

— Drayton Basset, ii. 482. 

— Fulford, ii. 342. 

— Gerard's Bromley, iii. 114. 

— Kettlesbye, i. 34. 

— Lichfield, i. 99, 122 ; iii. 44, 335. 

cathedral, ii. 175 ; iv. 98. 

dean of, i. 12, 330, 332 ; ii. 2, 

175, 430 ; iii. 44-5 : dean and chapter 
of, iii. 397. 



England, by counties {continued) : — ■ 
Staffordshire : Lichfield cathedral : 

chancellor of, iii. 427; minor canon 

of, iii. 24. 

— Lichfield and Coventry, episcopal 
register, iv. 113. 

— — bishops of, ii. 175. 

Roger de Weseham (Westham), 

iv. 114. 

Roger de Northburge, iv. 113. 

Thomas Bentham, ii. 175. 

Robert Wright, i. 219, 234. 

■ John Hacket, i. 422. 

Thomas Wood, ii. 512 ; iii. 24, 

121, 220, 363, 387-8, 410. 

William Lloyd, v. 59. 

— Longdon, iii. 146. 

— Lynaston, ii. 269. 

— Mercia, bishops of, ii. 1,75. 

— Moseley, i. 305 ; ii. 226. 

— Newcastle-under-Lyne, ii. 398 ; iii. 

1 37» 379- 

— Okeover, iii. 91. 

— Oxley, ii. 269. 

— Roulston, Raulaston, Rollestone, i. 
244 ; iii. 350. 

— Sandwell, i. 256 ; ii. 412. 

— Stafford, iii. 27, 387; iv. 83: 
S. Thomas the Martyr, iv. 121. 

— Tamworth, iii. 204. 

— Wolverhampton, i. 400 ; iii. 265. 
Suffolk, i. 1 16, 230 ; ii. 552. 

— Bury S. Edmunds, Bury,S. Edmunds- 
bury, iii. 85 ; iv. 260. 

— Dunwich, iii. 374. 

— Euston, iii. 155, 344. 

— Fakenham magna, iii. 459. 

— Fressingfield, iii. 434. 

— Helmingham, iii. 459. 

— Somerby house, ii. 137. 
Surrey, i. 90; ii. 61 ; iii. 278. 
archdeacon of, iii. 310. 

natives of,i. 26, 134, 237 ; ii. 136, 

138, 246, 341 ; iii. 8 ; v. 5. 

militia of, ii. 450 : under-sheriff of, 

iii. 366. 

— Albury, ii. 183. 

— Ashted, i. 154. 

— Bagshot,i. 233. 
heath, iii. 348, 351. 

— Barnelms, ii. 115 ; iii. 423. 

— Belchworth castle, iv. 68. 

— Carshalton, i. 39. 

— Clapham, ii. 96. 

— Croydon, ii. 550. 
school, ii. 333. 

— Dorking, iv. 68. 

— Egham, iii. 134. 

— Epsom, iii. 401. 

— Farnham castle, iii. 115, 527. 

— Godalming, ii. 285; iii. 3. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



139 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Surrey : Guildford, i. 1 20 ; ii. 300, 392 ; 
iii. 418. 

— Ham, iii. 289. 

— Kingston-on-Thames, i. 79, 227 ; 
iii. 200, 380, 385. 

— Lambeth, v. 106. 

— Leatherhead, iii. 92. 

— Loseley, ' Loney ' in error, iii. 295. 

— Merton, iv. 99. 

— Mitcham, i. 119. 

— Newington S. Mary, ii. 501. 

— Reigate, i. 203. 

— Richmond, iv. 56. 

— Southwark, v. 108. 

— Walton-on-Thames, ii. 543, 560. 

— Wimbledon, ii. 445 ; iii. 96. 

— Yealing, i. 39. 

Sussex, i. 227, 232; ii. 169, 416; iii. 

18, 337, 359- 
natives of, i. 136, 180; ii. 255, 

257, 407, 562 ; iii. 28, 482. 

— Arundel, iii. 85. 

— Battle abbey, iv. 261. 

— Beachy head, iii. 333, 337. 

— Chichester, iii. 86, 168: native of, 
iii. 76 : ' Chichester ' in i. 75 is Brian 
Twyne's spelling for Cirencester, 
commonly called Cicester, in Glou- 
cestershire, q. v. 

school, i. 425. 

bishops of, registrar of, i. 476. 

Henry King, i. 109 ; ii. 171. 

— Peter Gunning, ii. 183. 

Ralph Brideoak, i. 328-9; ii. 

200, 309, 313, 417-8, 420 ; iii. 22. 
— Guy Carleton, i. 328-9; ii. 

420, 439 ; iii. 86, 92, 121, 152, 206, 

268. 

John Lake, v. 57. 

Simon Patrick, iii. 312-3, 

354, 366. 

Robert Grove, iii. 360, 366, 

371. 

cathedral, iii. 134. 

dean of, ii. 255, 420, 439 ; iii. 

206, 265, 291. 
chancellor of, iii. 134 ; canon of, 

ii. 246 ; precentor, ii. 228. 
archdeacon of, ii. 464 ; iii. 206. 

— North Chilham, iii. 215. 

— Cuckfield, ii. 253. 

— Hastings, ii. 417-8. 

— Horsham, ii. 244, 253. 

— Hurstmonceaux, i. 217. 

— Lewes, ii. 253 ; iii. 28 ; iv. 98. 

— Mayfield, iii. 219. 

— Midhurst, iii. 28. 

— Petworth, ii. 47; iii. 38, 218, 
364. 

— (?) Pickham, iii. 306. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Sussex : Preston, ii. 47. 

— Rotherfield, i. 213-4, 3 2 5- 

— Salvinton, i. 425. 

— Sele, i. 429. 

— Westbourne, iii. 218. 

— Withiham, ii. 213. 

— Wytham, iii. 370. 
Warwickshire, i. 400-1 ; ii. 367. 

— — Dugdale's Warwickshire, i. 5, 
209 ; ii. 8, 563. 

natives of, i. 134, 308; ii. 173, 

306, 309, 323 ; iii. 10, 360. 
high sheriff and under-sheriff, ii. 

4 2 3. 

— Amstock, ii. 494. 

— Aston, i. 184. 

— Austry, iii. 335. 

— Baddisley, iv. 102. 

— Barcheston, Barston, i. 477 ; ii. 320, 
370, 536 ; iii. 98-9. 

— Bickenhill, v. 3, 21. 

— Bickmersh, i. 138; ii. 342 ; iii. 98. 

— Bidford, i. 136. 

— Birmingham, Brimichan, i. 93, 184. 

— Blyth hall, ii. 371, 494; iii. 2. 

— Brailes, ii. 388 ; iii. 487. 

— Bucknell, v. 3. 

— Burmington, iii. 154. 

— Burton-Dorset, ii. 487. 

— Charlecote, Charlcot, ii. 484. 

— Charlton, ii. 370. 

— Cheriton, Cherinton, ii. 364, 484. 

— Chesterton, i. 192. 

— Coleshill, i. 48 ; ii. 350. 

— Long Compton, i. 477 ; ii. 227, 321, 
370, 388, 486, 499, 554 ; iii. 99 ; iv. 
292. 

— Compton-Verney, ii. 14a. 

— Coton, ii. 368. 

— Great C ought on, i. 106. 

— Coventry, ii. 115, 264, 301, 370, 

55 2 5 2 5 T , 335, 380. 

— Edgebaston, i. 305. 

— Edgehill, i. 59, 67-8, 82, 87, 103, 
167, 171. 

— Goodrest, i. 269. 

— Grange, iii. 243. 

— Hewell grange, iii. 118. 

— Honington, ii. 420, 465. 

— Idlecot, ii. 464. 

— Ipsley, ii. 197 ; iii. 372. 

— Kenilworth, Killingworth, i. 263. 

— Kineton, Kaynton, Keynton, i. 68, 
82. 

— Lapworth, i. 180 ; ii. 48 ; iii. 266. 

— Parkhall, iv. 290. 

— Pophills, i. 7, 53, 103. 

— Salford, ii. 401 ; iii. 338. 

— Sher bourne, iii. 104. 

— Skilts, ii. 41 5 ; iii. 26, 98. 



140 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Warwickshire: Snitfield, i. 239; iii. 99. 

— Southam, iii. 416. 

— Stratford-on-Avon, ii. 115, 367, 389 ; 
iii. 119, 327. 

— Strctton-on-the-fossc, i. 180; ii. 370. 

— Sutton, ii. 465. 

— Tachbrook, Tuchbroke, ii. 446. 

— Torbeck, iii. 118. 

— Uffeton, ii. 459. 

— Warwick, i. 52, 54, 134, 400, 445; 
ii. 46, 60, 344, 353, 366, 406, 493-4, 

5o3, 507. 
jail, ii. 388, 423 ; iii. 338. 

— Weston, Weston park, mentioned 
frequently because the house of 
Wood's friend Ralph Sheldon, i. 477 ; 
ii. 227, 240, 294, 316, 319-21, 341- 
342, 364-5, 368, 371, 376, 388, 401, 
403-4, 420, 423, 432, 445, 455, 
4 6 3~5> 4<57> 486, 493, 500, 543, 54 s , 
554> 559 5 Hi- 2 6, 9 6 ~ 8 > I02 -3, Ix 9> 
124/221,^269, 291, 429, 487-8; iv. 
292. 

— Weston-under-Wheathley (Wether- 
ley), v. 100. 

— Whichford, i. 166, 218 ; ii. 388. 

— Willington, ii. 370, 465. 

— Willoughby, iii. 216. 

— Wolford, ii. 39 ; iii. 160. 

Great Wolford, i. 141, 446 ; ii. 

481. 

Little Wolford, i. 105, 162 ; ii. 

368-9. 

— Wotton-Wawen, i. 106. 
Westmorland, i. 263-4. 

— Appleby, ii. 341 ; iii. 473. 

— Barton, i. 237. 

— Barton-Kirk school, i. 237. 

— Brougham, iii. 372. 

— Kendall, i. 126. 

— Kirkby-Kendall, i. 302. 

— Lowther, ii. 482. 

Wiltshire, i. 195 ; ii. 211, 482 ; iii. 45, 
118,361. 

John Aubrey's collections for, iv. 

192. 

high sheriff of, i. 195 ; ii. 151, 

2 95- 

archdeacon of, ii. 507, 559. 

natives of, i. 210, 317, 333, 400, 

416, 431 ; ii. 344 ; iii. 1, 60, 74, 220, 

243- 

— Alborne, ii. 353. 

— Alderton, ii. 140, 407. 

— Avery, iii. 51. 

— Great Bedwin, ii. 325-6. 

— Berwic, ii. 286. 

— Brinknorth, iii. 252. 

■ — Broadchalk, iii. 486. 

— Burbage, ii. 479. 



England, by counties (continued) : — 
Wiltshire: Cake, i. 198-9; ii. 352; 

iii. 374. 

— Chert, Chirton, i. 507. 

— Chippenham, Chipnam, i. 417. 

— Chisgrove, iii. 295. 

— Christian Malford, iii. 12, 415. 

— Cleve, ii. 269. 

— Crawley, iii. 92. 

— Cricklade, Creekladc, ii. 406, 411. 

— Dauntsey, iii. 362. 

— Devizes, the Vies, the Vize, i. 89, 

I0 3* . % . ! 

— Easton Piers, ii. 116. 

— Edmundston, i. 307 ; ii. 151. 

— Fisherton, i. 199; iii. 240. 

— Fovant, ii. 286. 

— Griggleton, ii. 337. 

— Hackleston, iii. 279. 

— Ham, ii. 354 (' Hainm' in error for 
Hamm), 415 ; iv. 75. 

— Hartham, ii. 241. 

— Highworth, i. 221, 443, 476, 486. 

— Kingston S. Michael, ii. 116. 
■ — Knighton, ii. 318. 

— Latton, ii. 411. 

— Lavington, iii. 282, 362. 

— Longleat, ii. 482 ; iii. 4. 

— Luggershall, iii. 476. 

— Maggot's mill, i. 278, 476, 486 ; iv. 
229. 

— Malmsbury, i. 90-2; ii. 116, 292, 
410-11, 472. 

abbey, i. 460; ii. 200 ; iii. 342-3, 

381 ; iv. 99. 

church, ii. 410-1. 

hundred, iii. 252. 

— Manningford Bruce, iii. 264. 

— Marlborough, i. 73 ; iii. 384. 

— Melksham, iii. 173. 

— Newport, ii. 411. 

— Ogburne, i. 137. 

— Pockshipton, ii. 320. 

— Salisbury, Sarum, i. 99, 195-6, 307, 
483; ii. 46, 53, 57-9, 114, 151, 337. 
540; iii. 40, 58, 122, 269, 285, 331 ; 

iv. 71. 

college at, ii. 283 : assizes, i. 195 : 

natives of, i. 151, 210; ii. 501. 

— Salisbury, archdeacon of, ii. 211; 
iii. 205. 

— Salisbury, bishops of, iii. 400. 

Edmund Audley, iv. 160. 

Robert Abbot, i. 162 ; ii. 369. 

Robert Tounson, ii. 415. 

John Davenant, ii. 130. 

Brian Duppa, i. 99, 324. 

Humphrey Henchman, i. 455. 

John Earle, ii. 50, 66. 

Alexander Hyde, i. 168 ; ii. 116. 

Seth Ward, v. 73-4. 



INDEX II. TOPOGRAPHICAL. 



141 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Wiltshire : Salisbury, bishops of : Gil- 
bert Burnet, v. 28-9. 

— Salisbury cathedral, iii. 400. 
golden prebend of, iii. 2. 

Sir Christopher Wren's survey of, 

ii. 275 ; iv. 239. 

library of, iv. 297, 310: muni- 
ments of, iii. 400. 

missal of, ii. 169 : primer of, iv. 

dean of, i. 363, 420 ; ii. 66, 114, 

309. 3*3, 340, 357, 559 5 i»- 205, 
360, 400. 

— — canon or prebendary of, ii. 286, 
507, 561 ; iii. 400, 484 : minor pre- 
bend, ii. 388. 

treasurer of, ii. 130, 483, 507 ; iii. 

207, 33i- 

— — chancellor of, iii. 205, 400 : 
chantor, precentor, of, ii. 250 ; iii. 
205. 

— Salisbury diocese, ii. 388. 

— Salisbury plain, i. 378, 461. 

— Sevenhampton, i. 183, 443. 

— Sherborne abbey, iv. 109. 

— Somerford magna, ii. 441. 

— Stonehenge, i. 461 ; ii. 181. 

— Stratford, i. 136. 

— Stratton, i. 135 ; iii. 288. 

— Tefford, i.e. Teffont abbey, ii. 113. 

— Tidcomb, i. 468. 

— Tidworth, Tedworth, i. 158, 468; 

ii- 53 ; iii- 357; 

— Trowbridge, ii. 245; iii. 182. 

— Westbury-on-the-plain, ii. 194. 

— Westhache, ii. 540. 

— Wishford, ii. 537. 
Worcestershire, ii. 216, 426, 504-5. 
connexion with Balliol college, 

ii. 308. 

Thomas Habington's collections 

for, iv. 275. 
natives of, i. 180; ii. 269, 296, 

499 ; iii. 2 ; iv. 148. 

— Adminton, ii. 563. 

— Astley, iii. 208. 

— Beoly, mentioned frequently because 
the property of Wood's friend Ralph 
Sheldon, i. 234, 310; ii. 170, 227, 

240, 342, 345, 373, 445, 45°, 455, 
464-5, 556 ; iii. 62, 97-9, 118, 288 ; 

iv- 95, 2 35- 

— Blockley, ii. 323, 413. 

— Cleve, ii. 305. 

— Dobshill, ii. 247. 

— Droitwich, iii. 367. 

— Eastham, iii. 366. 

— Eldersfield, ii. 247. 

— Elmley Lovet, iii. 154. 

— Evesham, i. 136; ii. 74; iv. 94. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Worcestershire: Ham castle, i. 418. 

— Hawley, i. 180. 

— Hollow, ii. 315. 

— King's Norton, ii. 321 ; iii. joi. 

— Lenchwick, i. 216. 

— Pershore abbey, ii. 342, 364; iv. 
107. 

— Ripple, i. 42 ; ii. 354. 

— Rock, ii. 216. 

— Rouslench, ii. 245. 

— Saltwich, iii. 429. 

— Staunton, iii. 242. 

— Stowlton, iii. 189. 

— Tredington, ii. 465, 563; iii. 189, 

317, 459- 

— Westheath, iii. 101. 

— Westwood, i. 313. 

— Wich, iii. 429. 

— Wodhall, ii. 315. 

— Worcester, i. 107, 194; ii. 174, 277, 
286, 461, 468, 473; iii. 2, 81, 151, 
174, 192, 205, 349; iv. 71. 

in the civil war, i. 66-7, 98. 

battle of (1651), i. 156, 167, 170, 

327; ii. 225, 241, 492; iii. 31, 84; 

iv. 63. 

Wood's visit to (1676), ii. 342 : 

corn-riot at (1693), iii. 422, 425. 

assizes, ii. 450; iii. 425 : fair, ii. 

342- 

S. Wolstan's hospital, ii. 342. 

King's school, i. 136, 166. 

— Worcester, archdeacons of, ii. 354; 
iii. 204-5. 

— Worcester, bishops of, iv. 267, 291 : 
episcopal registers, iv. 286. 

Adam de Orleton, iii. 159. 

Thomas Peverel, iv. 275. 

John Carpenter, i. 95. 

Hugh Latimer, ii. 461. 

John Prideaux, v. 66. 

George Morley, i. 347, 411, 414, 

435- 

John Gauden, i. 456. 

Robert Skinner, i. 117, 202, 482 ; 

ii. 195. 

Walter Blandford, v. 28. 

James Fleetwood, iii. 65. 

William Thomas, iii. 65, 67, 121, 

312, 320, 356. 
Edward Stillingfleet, iii. 312, 366, 

473, 4§3- 
William Lloyd, iii. 449. 

— Worcester cathedral, ii. 277, 342; 

iii- 3", 137, J 59, !9 2 ; iv - 2 75, 3°7- 

library of, ii. 342 ; iii. 240. 

dean of, i. 86, 126, 418, 476, 

480 ; ii. 318, 389 ; iii. 66-7, 71, 76, 

205, 360 ; iv. 240. 
canon of, ii. 342, 346, 412, 



142 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



England, by counties {continued') : — 
4 8 7> 5 01 > 54 6 > 557 ; 204-5, 252, 
257, 317, 389, 39 2 - 

Worcestershire : Worcester cathedral, 
chancellor of, iii. 205. 

— Worcester diocese, iii. 175. 

— Wychenford, ii. 246. 

Yorkshire, i. 102, 433; ii. 147, 302-3; 
iii. 218, 325, 392, 402, 492. 

Sir Thomas Widdrington's collec- 
tions for, ii. 13. 

natives of, i. 124, 136-7, 160, 

i94> 233, 386; ii. 13, 32, 378; iii. 
18, 71, 90, 348 ; iv. 196. 

— Allathorp, i. 1 34. 

— Barnborough, iii. 99. 

— Barnoldsweek, ii. 550. 

— Beverley, ii. 21-2. 

— Bilbrook, ii. 265. 

— Bishopsthorp, iii. 183-4, S^ 1 - 

— Brokenhill, ii. 303. 

— Cleveland, archdeacon of, ii. 229. 

— Croston, iv. 268. 

— Emsol, ii. 303. 

— Everingham, iii. 100. 

— Ferriebridge, ii. 295. 
■ — Gunthwaite, iv. 190. 

— Halifax, i. 267 ; ii. 237. 

— Hull, ii. 414 ; iii. 448. 

— Ingleby manor, ii. 169. 

— Jervaulx abbey, iv. 261. 
■ — Kirkstall abbey, iv. 97. 

— Ledston, i. 216. 

— Leeds, i. 102. 

— Lencherick, i. 233. 

— Marton, ii. 550. 

— Medhop hall, ii. 12, 414. 

— Medley, Methley, ii. 295, 302-4. 

— Melsonby, iv. 204. 

— Newton-grange, ii. 266. 

— S. Oswald's in Ridale, ii. 266. 

— Pontefract, Pomfret, ii. 147, 378. 
castle, ii. 231. 

Trinity college, ii. 174. 

— Richmond, archdeacon of, i. 274; 
ii. 423. 

— Rievaux abbey, iv. 250. 



England, by counties {continued) : — 
Yorkshire : Ripon, iii. 374. 

dean of, i. 363; ii. 286, 306, 

337-8 ; iii. 195. 
prebendary of, iii. 90. 

— Roche abbey, iv. 172. 

— Rydal, ii. 266. 

— Sherbourne, ii. 302. 

— Sowerby, i. 267. 

— Stanborough, Stanbrook, iii. 242. 

— Stittenham, iii. 49. 

— Thornborough, ii. 303-4. 

— Wakefield, ii. 416, 503. 

— Wath, iii. 90. 

— Woodrow, ii. 302-4. 

— York, i. 52, 54, 59; ii. 51, 58, 265, 
544; iii. 18, 97, 127, 157, 183, 257, 
340; iv. 59, 172, 289: assizes, ii. 
512. 

— — S. Leonard's hospital, iv. III. 
S. Mary's abbey, iv. III. 

— York, archbishops of, iii. 388 ; iv. 
114. 

visitors of Queen's college, Oxford, 

iii. 126-7, I 85' 

registers of, iv. Ill, 114, 155. 

Walter de Grey, i. 431. 

William de la Zouch, iv. 114. 

Alexander Nevill, iv. 114. 

John Kempe, iv. 114. 

Thomas Rotheram, iv. 1 14. 

Thomas Wolsey, iv. 155. 

Richard Neile, i. 125. 

John Williams, i. 154. 

Accepted Frewen, i. 347, 422. 

Richard Sterne, iii. 18, 36, 59. 

John Dolben, v. 41. 

Thomas Lamplugh, v. 57. 

John Sharp, iii. 366. 

— York minster, i. 387 ; iii. 18 ; iv. 
in. 

library, ii. 203 ; iv. 263. 

dean, i. 329 ; iii. 1, 2, 424 : dean 

and chapter, iii. 186; iv. in : sub- 
dean, ii. 229; iii. 186: precentor, 
chancellor, iii. 73: canon, iii. 15. 



INDEX III 



ACADEMICAL 

In this Index are brought together under the following heads all the important 
references to University matters and to the colleges : — 

Officers and servants of the University. 

Members of the University. 

Ceremonies of the University. 

Buildings and institutions of the University. 

Miscellanea Academica. 

The Halls. 

The Colleges. 



Officers and servants of the 
University. 

— Chancellor of the University : he is 
the official head of the University, as 
is seen in the official title, iii. 87 ; 
the vice-chancellor exercises his office 
in his name, ii. 520, 527 ; the vice- 
chancellor's court is held in his name, 

i. 84, 86; iv. 3, 46, 140 ; in the Uni- 
versity he takes precedence of the 
vice-chancellor, i. 411,414,495; ii. 
386. 

elected by Convocation, iii. 272 : 

the Crown sometimes interfering with 
the election, iii. 273: so also the 
Parliamentary visitors, iv. 62. 

admitted to office in a Convoca- 
tion ' extra Universitatem,' i. 346-7 ; 

ii. 167-8; iii. 275; iv. 57, 62-3, 65, 
72,81,139. 

his first visit to Oxford was an 

occasion of great ceremony and ex- 
pense, i. 412 ; ii. 380-2, 385 ; iv. 65, 
76 : there being 

(a) a procession of horse to 

meet him, i. 412 ; iii. 494. 

(b) a formal speech, or speeches, 

by the public orator, i. 412-4; ii. 
385, 387- 

(c) a multitudinous conferring 

of honorary degrees in a special Con- 
vocation, i. 41 1-2, 414, 438; ii. 
385-6 ; iii. 495; iv. 85. 



Officers and servants : Chancellor 
{continued*) : — 

(d) a speech at each college 

he visited, i. 413-5 ; ii. 385 ; iii. 494. 

(e) a banquet by the Univer- 
sity, i. 414; ii. 381, 386; iii. 496. 

dress, i. 495. 

■ powers : nominates the vice-chan- 
cellor, i. 86, 327; ii. 82, 252, 357, 
390 : decides on special points of the 
statutes, i. 435, 437 : sanctions special 
departures from the statutes, see 
' chancellor's letters,' infra. 

patronage : nominates principals 

of the halls, ii. 540-1 ; iii. 444, 456-7 : 
nominates the high steward, iii. 207 ; 
iv. 60 : nominates the under-steward, 
iii. 120: is visitor of Pembroke 
college, ii. 25. 

generally comes to Oxford on 

occasion of a royal visit, e.g. Claren- 
don for Charles II, i. 490-9 ; ii. 57-8, 
60 ; iv. 66 : Ormonde for William III, 
iii. 494-6 ; iv. 85. 

in his absence out of England his 

duties are performed by delegates 
nominated by himself, v. 64. 

during a vacancy the duties are 

discharged by the vice-chancellor, i. 
164; ii. 145. 

antiquities of ; once under control 

of the bishop of Lincoln, iv. 211 : 
during a vacancy the duties once dis- 



144 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Officers and servants: Chancellor 

(continued) :■ — 

charged by the senior doctor (' can- 
cellarius natus')> i. i <>4 . 

' chancellor's letters ' : letters 

addressed by the chancellor to Con- 
vocation, generally under pressure 
Irom the court or private appeal from 
Oxford, or request by bishops : — 

— (i) requiring recognition or 

pecuniary aid for foreigners, i. 154; 
ii. 112, 209, 327-8, 343; iv. 58, 

(ii) asking formal receptions 

for visitors at the court, i. 456 ; ii. 
209. 

(iii) asking honorary degrees, 

or relaxation or omission of statu- 
table requirements, for people; e.g. 
William, marquis of Hertford, i. 
328-30: Edward, earl of Clarendon, 

i. 381, 398, 411, 438-9, 500-2; ii. 
15 : James, first duke of Ormonde, 

ii. 173, 196, 209, 217, 262-3, 286 ? 
340, 380, 496, 498 ; iii. 79, 87, 90, 
95, 124, 215, 272: James, his suc- 
cessor, iii. 354. 

(iv) asking greater strictness 

in examinations and discipline, i. 464 ; 

ii. 173, 194; iii. 21-3. 

(v) directing the omission of 

the Act, ii. 39, 42, 79, ill, 195-6; 

iii. 190, 22T, 270, 304. 

(vi) trying to influence the 

election of M.P.s for the University, 

ii. 440, 460-1 ; iii. 135. 
this action was often much 

resented in the University, i. 381, 

438-9 ; ii. 196. 

— — catalogues of chancellors (and 
vice-chancellors), George Darrell's, 

iv. 129 : John Bell's, iii. 44 ; iv. 139 : 
Miles Windsore's, iv. 150, 227: Brian 
Twyne's, i. 430; iv. 150, 213, 226 : 
Thomas Walker's, i. 445 ; iv. 149 : 
Anthony Wood's, iv. 150. 

— chancellors : — 1 333, (?) Ralph Radyn, 

iv. 113. 

1506, William Warham, iv. 132. 

1564, 31 Dec-1588, Robert, earl 

of Leicester, iii. 456. 

1591-1608, Thomas, lord Buck- 
hurst, iv. 147. 

161 o, 10 Nov., Thomas, earl of 

Ellesmere, iv. 139. 

1 6 if, 12 Feb., William, earl of 

Pembroke, i. 187 ; iv. 55. 

1630, 28 Apr., William Laud, 

v. 57-8- 

1 641, 8 Apr., Philip, earl of Pem- 
broke, v. 65. 



Officers and servants : chancellors 

(continued) : — 
1643, 31 Oct., William, marquis 

of Hertford, v. 70. 
164S, 8 Mar., Philip, earl of 

Pembroke, replaced, v. 65. 
165$-, 4 Feb., Oliver Cromwell, 

v. 40. 

1657, 29 July, Richard Cromwell, 

v. 40. 

1660, 6 June, William, marquis 

of Hertford (duke of Somerset), re- 
placed, v. 70. 

1660, 15 Nov., Edward, earl of 

Clarendon, v. 37. 

1667, 20 Nov., Gilbert Sheldon, 

archbishop of Canterbury, v. 68. 

— — 1669, 26 Aug., James, duke of 
Ormonde, v. 64. 

1688, 23 Aug., his grandson and 

successor, James, duke of Ormonde, 
v. 64. 

— Vice-chancellor : the resident, acting, 
head of the University. 

nominated by the chancellor, v. 

143 : or by the chancellor's dele- 
gates, ii. 295 : for one year, but was 
often reappointed for two or three 
turns. 

■ his speech on assuming office, ii. 

83 ; iii. 311, 404 : or resuming office, 

i. 490; iii. 341, 432. 

his speech on quitting office, ii. 

356 ; iii. 311, 404 : it had something 
of an obituary character (1692), iii. 
404. 

his speech to welcome visitors to 

the University, i. 456-7, 493, 495; 

iii. 229. 

• vice-chancellor's 4 book,' i.e. his 

official copy of the statutes, iv. 66, 
127 : his ' remembrancer,' i.e. (?) syl- 
labus of his routine duties, iv. 211 ; 
official copy of the Bodleian cata- 
logue, iv. 147 : his key of the archives, 

iv. 124. 

vice -chancellor's clerk, i. 76: 

men, ii. 424, 474: uses the bedells 
as his messengers, i. 150, 333; ii. 48, 
93, 128, 503; iii. 86, 164-5. 

vice-chancellor's seat, in Convo- 
cation-house, ii. 1 59 : in the theatre, 

ii. 209, 518; iii. 17, 57: in the 
natural philosophy school, ii. 158: at 
S. Mary's, ii. 70 : at the University 
sermon in Christ Church, i. 87. 

is a visitor of the Ashmolean, iii. 

109 : has a veto on the use of the 
archives, i. 312 ; ii. 30; iii. 326; iv. 
124: has a veto on the Bodleian, 
ii. 71-2, 265 : is one of John Snell's 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



145 



Officers and servants : vice-chan- 
cellor {continued) : — 
trustees, ii. 459 : is a delegate of the 
Press, ii. 172, 204. 

presides at the installation of the 

chancellor, i. 347 ; ii. 167 ; iii. 275 : 
yields the chancellor precedence in 
Oxford, v. 143. 

as deputy of the chancellor, in- 
ducts principals of halls, ii. 540-2 ; 
iii. 94, 444, 446, 45 7i: receives resigna- 
tions of principals of halls, iii. 90 : 
ejects principals of halls, iii. 116. 

ecclesiastical functions : acts as 

ordinary of college chapels, &c, ii. 
215; iii. 125-6: takes action in 
heresy-cases, i. 445 ; ii. 66, 488-9, 
491; iii. 152,164,337-8,492: controls 
Oxford pulpits, especially S. Mary's 
(the University sermon), i. 302, 445 ; 

ii. 48 ; iii. 193 : drives out Romanists, 
&c, ii. 93, 313; iii. 29. 

disciplinary functions : has charge 

of the streets, i. 251, 490; ii. 159, 
215, 246; iii. 42-3, 244: deals with 
riotous conduct, ii. 139 ; iii. 41, 83, 
256 : hauls alehouses, ii. 83, 390 : 
controls the use of academical dress, 

iii. 255 : enforces academical dress, 
ii. 84, 503. 

as chief disciplinary officer 

issues numerous orders about dis- 
turbances and academical dress, i. 
I 74, 297, 336, 384; ii. 3, 83-4, 100, 
129, 225, 271, 298, 343, 387, 426, 
429. 

— takes joint action with the 

mayor of Oxford, ii. 40, 215, 222, 
246 ; iii. 244. 

judicial functions : takes cog- 
nisance of libels in the University, 

i. 488-9 : question as to his presiding 
over the curia cancellarii, 1642, i. 76, 
8 4~5> 163-4. 

— — financial functions : moneys re- 
ceived and paid passed through his 
account, which was audited at the 
end of each year, i. 75-6, 84-5, 89 ; 

ii. 189, 296 ; iii. 342, 404 ; iv. 60, 67, 
78, 124 : and the balance paid into the 
University chest, iii. 404 ; iv. 66. 

book of the vice-chancellor's 

accounts, i. 76-7 ; ii. 358 ; iv. 51-85, 
124-5,149. 

— — civic functions : has jurisdiction 
over privileged persons, iv. 53 : over 
booksellers, i. 157; ii. 236, 241: 
over barbers, ii. 328 : over coffee- 
houses, ii. 396, 463 : over carriers and 
the coach, ii. 153, 155, 196, 220-1, 
242, 245, 299. Controls the market, 

VOL. V. 



Officers and servants : vice-chan- 
cellor {continued') : — 
ii. 520, 530; appoints a clerk of the 
market, iv. 146. Fixes the price of 
ale, iii. 41 ; and of wines, ii. 120. 

examination functions : supervises 

examinations, ii. 277-8 : delivers the 
final speech in the comitia on Act 
Monday, ii. 266, 288 : has a veto on 
degrees, ii. 465. 

summons Convocation, i. 312 : 

presides over Convocation, ii. 61, 66, 
94, 119, 132, 157, 160, 194, 209-10, 
328, 348, 386, 495, 516, 522 ; iii. 
62-3, 325 : confers degrees in Con- 
vocation, ii. 62, 210. 315. 

presides over Congregation, iii. 

jurisdiction over external per- 
sons, e.g. heralds, iv. 53 : has a veto 
on plays, iii. 191 ; iv. 217. 

under the Laudian statutes exer- 
cises the chancellor's powers during 
a vacancy in that office, i. 164 ; ii. 
!45-. 

in his absence from Oxford was 

represented by a pro-vice-chancellor, 
v. 146. 

catalogues of, v. 144. 

— vice-chancellors : — 

1547, Walter Wright, iv. 125. 

1 556—7, Thomas Reynolds, i. 

304- 

1604, 14 July, John Williams, 

iv. 145. 

1607, 7 July, John King, iv. 147, 

173- 

161 1, 12 Aug., Thomas Singleton, 

iv. 150. 

1 61 6, 17 July, Arthur Lake, 

i. 422. 

1617, 18 July, William Goodwin, 

iv. 143. 

1632, 19 July, Brian Duppa, i. 

45- 

1634, 2< 5 J u ly> Robert Pinke, v. 

66. 

1636, 22 July, Richard Bayly, v. 

27. 

1638, 16 July, Accepted Frewen, 

iv. 57- 

1640, 28 July, Christopher Potter, 

i. 51 ; iv. 57. 
1 641, 7 Oct., John Prideaux, v. 

66. 

164!, 7 Feb., Tohn Tolson, v. 

72- 

1643, 18 Nov., Robert Pinke, v. 

66. 

1645, 29 July, Samuel Fell, v. 

44. 



146 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Officers and servants : vice-chan- 
cellors {continued} : — 
164k, *8 Feb., Edward Reynolds, 

i. 452. 

1650, 12 Oct., Daniel Greenwood, 

v. 46. 

1652, 26 Sept., John Owen, v. 

1657, 9 Oct., John Conant, v. 

39- 

— — 1660, 1 Aug., Paul Hood, v. 48. 
1661, 9 Aug., Richard Bayly, v. 

27. 

1662, 18 Sept., Walter Blandford, 

v. 28. 

1664, 1 Sept., Robert Say, v. 68. 

1666, 3 Aug., John Fell, v. 43. 

1669, 23 Sept., Peter Mews, v. 

62. 

1673, 3 Oct., Ralph Bathurst, v. 

27. 

1676, 9 Oct., Henry Clerk, v. 

38/ 

1677, 8 Oct., John Nicholas, v. 

63. 

1679, 5 Aug., Timothy Halton, 

v. 47. 

1682, 6 Oct., John Lloyd, v. 59. 

1685, 6 Oct., Timothy Halton, 

v. 47. 

1686, 30 Sept., John Venn, iii. 

197, 214, 219, 240. 
1687, 16 Aug., Gilbert Ironside, 

v. 49. 

1689, 27 Sept., Jonathan Ed- 
wards, v. 42, 

1692, 4 Oct., Henry Aldrich, v. 

23-4- 

1695, 4 Oct., Fitzherbert Adams, 

v. 23. 

— pro -vice-chancellors, deputy-vice- 
chancellors, nominated by the vice- 
chancellor on his admission, iii. 469 : 
during the vice-chancellor's absence 
from Oxford, his duties were dis- 
charged by one of them, i. 52-4, 56-7, 
59, 77, 84-6, 187, 320; ii. 224, 258, 
476; iii. 72, 86, 97, 132, 424 : when 
the vice-chancellor was required to be 
in two places at once, the defect of 
nature was made good by a pro-vice- 
chancellor, i. 492 ; iii. 478: functions 
personally distasteful to the vice- 
chancellor were discharged by a pro- 
vice-chancellor, iii. 305 : incidental 
mention, iii. 329, 334. 

— proctors : — 

elected by colleges according to 

the Caroline cycle, i. 260, 433, 435 ; 

ii. 132: small number of voters at 
election of, iii. 89. 



Officers and servants : proctors 
{continued} : — 

1649, the cycle disregarded, i. 

433> 435 : 1662, the cycle restored, i. 
433, 435, 437- 

disputed elections, (i) as to the 

necessary number of terms' standing 
of the candidate, i. 307, 310, 313-4; 
(ii) between Balliol and the Halls, ii. 
129, 131 -3; (iii) between All Souls 
and the Halls, ii. 222. 

admitted to office in Convocation 

generally on the second Wednesday 
after Easter, ii. 105, 245, 311, 343, 
449> 537 5 'ii- 13, 14 3 . l8 3> 217, 266, 
Soi, 330, 386, 421, 450, 482. 

after admission to office, the out- 
going proctors escorted their successors 
to their colleges, ii. 34, 76, 234, 261 : 
and then there was an entertainment 
in the hall of the new senior proctor's 
college, i. 314; ii. 76, 261-2 : possibly 
also in that of the junior, ii. 262. 

a proctor dying in his year of 

office was succeeded by a fresh election 
from the same college, iii. 370, 386 : 
but this might move up the junior to the 
senior's place (because of terms' stand- 
ing), iii. 386. A proctor's funeral, 
i. 197-8 ; v. 10. 

dress, 'formalities,' iii. 48, 226: 

proctors' gowns and hoods were the 
state dress of Masters of Arts, i. 494-5 ; 
iii. 226-7. 

proctors' 'books,' i.e. their official 

copies of the statutes, ii. 355. 

proctors' ' black book,' i.e. register 

of punishments, i. 46 ; ii. 10, 97 ; iii. 
68, 438 ; iv. 46,49, 137. 

■ duties : collection of certain dues 

and defraying of certain charges, as 
seen in the book of proctors' accounts, 
i. 77 ; iv. 51, 55-6, 125-6. 

control of the schools, iii. 132. 

clear the taverns, at 9 p.m., of 

town and gown, i. 163 ; ii. 128, 388 ; 
iii. 407 : walk the streets at night 
and deal with riotous conduct, ii. 56, 
270, 381-2, 399, 403 ; iii. 42-3, 92, 
202, 241 : hence in frequent conflict 
with townsmen, i. 163; ii. 128, 
381-4, 388. 

can stop Congregations, ii. 19 ; 

and are necessary to make a Con- 
vocation, ii. 167 ; iii. 381, 404; iv. 81. 

■ entertain the Cambridge visitors 

to the Act, ii. 165. 

nominate the Terrae Jilii, see 

infra under ' Act ' ; nominate the 
Praelector Musices, ii. 564 ; are visi- 
tors of the Ashmolean, iii. 109. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



147 



Officers and servants : proctors 

{continued) : — 
proctors' men, ii. 382 ; iii. 407 ; iv. 

70 : armed with staves, iii. 407. 

— senior proctor announces the result 
of votes in Convocation, i. 411,500; 

ii. 209, 502-3, 547 : announces the 
proctorial delegates, e. g. for a royal 
visit, i. 490. 

— — his seat in the Natural Philosophy 
school, ii. 158. 

his books and keys, iv. 62, 66, 1 24, 

I I2 7- 

speaks for the University on occa- 
sion of a royal visit to the Bodleian, 
i. 496-7 ; ii. 15 ; iii. 234-5. 

delivers a formal speech in Con- 
vocation when going out of office, ii. 
10, 34, 234, 261; iii. 43, 92, 183, 
386, 421, 450. This speech was 
partly of an obituary type, iii. 386, 
450. 

— junior proctor nominates the collec- 
tor in Austins, i. 197. 

— his books and key, iv. 66,124,127. 
delivers a formal speech at the 

end of determination : this was at 
first in S. Mary's, but from 1669 
onwards in the Theatre, ii. 8, 34, 311, 
462 ; ixi. 90, 137. 

— proctors, catalogues of: Francis 
Babington's, iv. 127 : George Dar- 
rell's, iv. 129: John Bell's, iii. 44; 
iv. 139: Miles Windsore's, iv. 150: 
Brian Twyne's, i. 430; iv. 150, 213 : 
Thomas Walker's, iv. 149 : John 
Lamphire's,iii. 262 : Anthony Wood's, 
iv. 150: anon., iv. 126. 

— pro-proctors, ordinary, two appointed 
by each proctor, i. 163; ii. 210, 
381-2, 400; iii. 24, 40, 42, 301, 381, 
404, 439, 511 : they discharged proc- 
torial duties in walking the streets, 
&c, i. 163; ii. 381-2, 400; iii. 40, 
42, 511. One of them delivered a 
speech at the Act on Act Monday, i. 
347, 406, 466 ; ii. 90; iii. 24, 222. 

special, appointed in varying 

numbers to preserve order on royal 
visits, &c, i. 492, 496 ; ii. 207, 209 ; 

iii. 47, 228. 

— heads of houses, meeting (usually 
on Monday), had financial and dis- 
ciplinary powers, and the initiative in 
University business, i. 85, 102, 320, 
3 2 8, 37 1 , 439, 464; »• 3°, 84, 144, 
159, 162, 309, 491, 513, 522 ; iii. 
6l -3> 138, 140, 2 97 5 iv - 52, 56-8, 
74> 76. 

— registrar : spelt ' registrary,' i. 77, 
167 ; ii. 27, 459 ; iii. 63, 132 ; iv. 14 : 



Officers and servants : registrar 
{continued) : — 

' registerary,' i. 76 : ' regester,' i. 302 : 
'register,' i. 372; ii. 423; iv. 57, 
64-5, 72-3, 75, 81, 203. 

duties : writes and keeps the 

current registers of Convocation and 
Congregation, ii. 343, 393; iii. 152; 

iv. 14, 22, 134: he therefore attends 
all Convocations 'extra Universita- 
tem,' iv. 57, 65, 72, 81. 

reads letters in Convocation, 

iii. 63 ; iv. 72. 

writes and keeps the books of 

vice-chancellors' and proctors' ac- 
counts, i. 76-7 ; ii. 358. 

travels and is otherwise em- 
ployed on University business, i. 372, 
416 ; iv. 64, 75. 

writes out diplomas, iv. 73. 

catalogue of, iv. 1 50. 

1608-29, Thomas French, ii. 

27 ; iv. 193. 

1629-51, John French, i. 76-7, 

158, 167 ; iv. 57, 134, 203. 

1651-60, William Whitting- 

ham, i. 167, 302, 304. 

1660-1701, Benjamin Cooper, 

v. 39- 

— deputy-registrar, i. 1 58. 

— keeper of the archives, i. 242 ; ii. 7 ; 

iv. 122, 124, 142. 

Brian Twyne, v. 72. 

Gerard Langbaine, v. 57. 

John Wallis, v. 73. 

Bernard Gardiner, iv. 124. 

Philip Bliss, iv. 142. 

John Griffiths, iv. 142. 

T. Vere Bayne, iv. pp. v, vi, 1. 

— public orator, elected by Convoca- 
tion, i. 329 ; ii. 392, 395, 423, 446. 

dress, in proctor's robes, i. 414 : 

claim to a canonry of Christ Church, 
i. 414. _ 

duties : in the University's name 

to deliver speeches of welcome in 
Latin to kings and princes, and in 
English to queens and princesses, i. 
68, 77, 1 16, 41 1-4, 495 ; ii. 57-8, 60, 
68, 157, i59-6o, 385, 5 J 8, 527; "i- 
17, 48, 52, 180, 234. 

to deliver a Latin speech at 

University funerals, i. 481 ; ii. 66 ; 
iii. 161, 379: speeches of thanks, e.g. 
to Parliament, ii. 62 : in acknowledge- 
ment of a benefaction, iv. 72 : speech 
on coronation day, iii. 141. 

to deliver a Latin speech when 

presenting honorary M.A.s, ii. 495 ; 
iii. 6 : grand-compounder M.A.s, iii. 
346-7 : and at admission of some 



L 2 



148 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



( )FFICERS AND SERVANTS : public 
orator {continued) : — 
honorary D.C.L.s, ii. 99, 210, 315, 
386-7, 518; iii. 57 (by deputy). 

to write letters, in Latin, of 

thanks, &c, i. 165, 188; ii. 119-20, 
194, 323; iii. 57, 96, 291 ; iv. 72. 

to convey a letter of thanks to 

a benefactor, iv. 68. 

— — — in his absence he appointed 
a deputy, to speak for him, i. 68 ; 
ii. 68, 99, 315, 446; iii. 57, 346-7, 
495 : to write for him, iii. 57, 96 : to 
convey letters for him, iv. 68. 

1594, Thomas Wenman, i. 39. 

I 597> Thomas Cole, i. 180. 

1629-45, William Strode, i. 68, 

77, 116; iv. 144. 
1645-8, Henry Hammond, iii. 

379- 

1648-60, Ralph Button, i. 165, 

188. 

' 1660-77, Robert South, v. 71. 

1677-9, Thomas Cradock, ii. 392, 

395> 446. 

1679-1712, William Wyatt, v. 83. 

— pro-orator, iv. 68 : see supra. 

— high steward, i. 475; iii. 198, 207, 
323 ; iv. 60, 66, 139, 213. 

court of the, iv. 139. 

— under-steward, iii. 120 ; iv. 66, 210. 

— solicitor, or attorney, ii. 199 ; iv. 

76, 78, 137- 

— coroner, i. 401 ; ii. 281. 

— members of Parliament, burgesses 
for the University, i. 188 : catalogue 
of, iv. 213. 

1 654, one member only summoned, 

i. 188. 

1660, Apr., i. 312-3. 

1661, Apr., i. 398, 431. 

1674, Jan., ii. 279. 

1679, Feb., ii. 442-3. 

Apr., ii. 460-1. 

1681, Jan., ii. 515, 522. 

1685, March, iii. 135, 163, 188. 

Nov., iii. 171. 

^88, Dec, iii. 287. 

1689, Jan., iii. 296, 317. 

1690, Feb., iii. 325-6, 490. 

1695, O ct -> "i- 49 1 - 

John Selden, v. 68. 

John Mills, i. 312. 

Sir Thomas Clayton, v. 38. 

Laurence Hyde, v. 67. 

Heneage Finch, sen., v. 64. 

Thomas Thynne, i. 279, 441 ; iii. 

323- 

Heneage Finch, jun., v. 44. 

John Edisbury, ii. 440-3. 

Sir Leoline Jenkins, v. 56. 



Officers and servants : members of 

J'arliament {continued) : — 
Charles Perrott, of S. John's, ii. 

460-1, 515-6, 522 ; iii. 135, 188. 

George Clarke, iii. 168, 171, 232. 

Sir Thomas Clarges, iii. 287, 

2 9 6 > Z l 7t 323, 325-6, 49°- 
Sir William Trumbull, iii. 491. 

— bedells, satire on the, i. 223 ; iv. 138. 

six in number, walk in the Uni- 
versity procession, i. 412, 482, 495; 
ii. 160, 527 ; iii. 17. 

their dress, i. 412. 

their silver staffs or maces, 

]■ 4 8 > I57> 495 5 527; iii- 229; 
iv. 62 : these are, by custom, sur- 
rendered to the king when he comes 
to Oxford, i. 495 ; iii. 229. 

duties : are ushers of Convo- 
cation, ii. 57 ; and so five of their 
number are sent to make a Convoca- 
tion, 'extra Universitatem,' iv. 57, 
64-5, 72, 81. The sixth was prob- 
ably left in Oxford to escort the 
pro- vice-chancellor. 

one or more walk before 

the vice-chancellor, i. 390 ; ii. 209 : 
before the University preacher, i. 48 : 
before the determining bachelors on 
Ash Wednesday, i. 149 : before a 
grand-compounder, iii. 346. 

act as messengers and agents 

of the University, iii. 56, 322, 495; 
iv. 62, 66, 75: as messengers of the 
vice-chancellor, v. 144 : execute war- 
rants and arrests, i. 333; ii. 128: 
collect various dues, i. 76 : take part 
in the Act, iv. 138 : in the Encaenia, 
iv. 72. 

— £ bedells' books,' copies of 

the statutes, &c, for their guidance, 

iv. 1 30-1, 138-9, 220-1. 
three 'esquire bedells,' i. 76, 494; 

ii. 527 ; iii. 227 : their gold chains, i. 

494; iii. 227 : their silver-gilt maces, 

ii. 527. 

three 1 yeomen bedells,' i. 76, 84, 

492 ; ii. 527; iii. 56, 227-8. 

esquire bedell of Theology, i. 27, 

157, 202, 215, 329 ; ii. 48, 231-3, 
347-8, 544; iv. 139; v. 8. 

— — inferior, or yeoman, bedell of 
Theology, i. 76, 157, 436; ii. 128; 

iii. 314, 322 ; iv. 69; v. 12. 

esquire bedell of Law, i. 132, 150, 

T 57> 254, 391; ii. 180, 232-3, 268; 

iii. 180, 202-3, 229, 339, 351, 356, 
391-2 ; iv. 72, 123, 136, 139. 

he had charge of the matricu- 
lation register, i. 132, 150 ; iii. 202-3; 

iv. 136. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



149 



Officers and servants : bedells (con- 
tinued) : — 

his place was intended by the 

Laudian statutes to be an endowment 
for the director of the University 
press, the ' architypographer,' i. 254; 
ii. 180, 231-3; iii. 351. 

inferior, or yeoman, bedell of Law, 

i. 76, 84; ii. 95, 245 ; iii. 406. 
esquire bedell of Arts and Medi- 
cine, i. 157; ii. 92, 94-5, 128, 164, 
218-9, 322 ; iii. 44, 227, 337 ; iv. 62, 
139- 

inferior, or yeoman, bedell of 

Arts and Medicine, i. 76, 157, 333; 

ii. 8o, 82, 474, 476, 494; iii. 337~ 8 > 
35i- 

— — catalogues of bedells : — John 
Bell's, iv. 139 : Anthony Wood's, iv. 
150. 

— verger, virgifer, i. 412, 482, 492, 495 ; 
ii. 160, 527 ; iii. 227-8 ; iv. 57, 64-5, 
72 : staff or mace of, i. 157. 

— bellman, i. 72, 417, 490-1. 

— bedell of beggars, iii. 63 ; his coat of 
office, iv. 79. 

otherwise called ' marshal of the 

beggars,' i. 466; iii. 63. 

— workmaster, probably the same as 
the preceding, i. 466; iii. 63. 

— readers, i. e. persons appointed to 
discharge the old lecture-duties of the 
Regents (Reg. Univ. Oxon. II. i. 95.) 

grammar-reader, ii. 322. 

logic speech, ii. 395. 

rhetoric-lecture, ii. 121. 

— professors, iv. 209 ; see in the index 
of names, under the names of indi- 
vidual professors. 

Regius professor of Divinity pre- 
sents graduates in his faculty, i. 426 : 
presents for honorary degrees in his 
faculty, with a speech, iii. 36, 326 : 
his action in heresy-cases, i. 445 ; ii. 
489; iii. 61-3, 164: presides over 
the Divinity disputations in the Ves- 
peries, i. 221; ii. 489: lectures, i. 
361 ; ii. 488 : called * Doctor of the 
chair,' i. 445 ; ii. 51. 

Lady Margaret professor of Di- 
vinity, iii. 61. 

— — Busby's proposed catechetical 
lecturer in Divinity (1682), iii. 10-1, 
14, 21-2, 43. 

Regius professor of Civil Law 

presents graduates in his faculty, iii. 
15 : presents for honorary degrees in 
his faculty, ii. 518, with a speech, 

ii. 62 (by deputy), 210 (by deputy) ; 

iii. 23 : lectures, i. 361. 

— — Regius professor of Medicine, 



Officers and servants : professors 
{continued) : — 

patent for, ii. 546 ; presents graduates 
in his faculty, iii. 14-5 : presents for 
honorary degrees in his faculty, ii. 
518, with a speech, ii. 57, 495 (by 
deputy) : lectures, i. 361 ; ii. 161 : is 
a visitor of the Ashmolean, iii. 109. 

Regius professor of Hebrew, iii. 

375- 

Regius professor of Greek, i. 282, 

361, 427 ; iii. 131. 
Savilian professor of Geometry, 

ii. 161 ; iv. 148 : of Astronomy, iv. 148. 

— — Sedleian professor of Natural 
Philosophy, ii. 161. 

Whyte's professor of Moral Philo- 
sophy, i. 427; iii. 207, 217. 

— — Camden's professor of Ancient 
History, iii. 263 ; iv. 263. 

Heather's professor of Music, i. 

2 °4-5> 2 57, 4 2 °> 4 2 7 5 22 5> 3*5 >' 
v. 60: deputy-professor, i. 316. 

— — Heathers ' praelector musices,' 
who gave the music-lecture, or music - 
speech, on Act Saturday, i. 207 ; ii. 
564 ; iii. p. vii ; iv. 77, 143. 

— — — this was statutably in the 
Music School, i. 207 ; ii. 547 ; iii. 24, 
53, 92, 105 : but Dr. John Fell, if 
the lecturer was of Christ Church, 
obtained the Sheldonian theatre for 
it, causing much heart-burning, ii. 
455> 49°' 497,547-8, 564; iii. 59-60, 
105. Afterwards the Sheldonian was 
more generously granted, iii. 427. 

Laudian professor of Arabic, iii. 

2 ; v. 66. 

professor of Botany, ii. 178, 202 ; 

iii. 49. 

professor of Chemistry, iii. 55, 

3H' 333-4- 
operator in Chemistry, ' the 

University chemist,' iii. 55, 227. 
deputies of professors, i. 316, 361, 

402 ; ii. 161, 210. 
inaugural lectures of professors, 

i. 248, 402, 407 ; ii. 201-2, 343, 488 ; 

iii. 219, 267, 296, 333, 382. 

— clerk of the University, i. 168 : clerk 
of the schools, ii. 237. 

— clerks of the market, i. 372 ; ii. 530 ; 

iv. 146, 212. 

— bailiff of the University, a bedell 
serving temporarily as clerk of the 
works, iv. 79. 

— architypographer, see top of col. i. 

— University carpenter, iii. 305. 

— University carrier, v. 127. 

— University engraver, sculptor, ii. 153, 
160, 313; iii. 26, 54, 394; iv. 83-4. 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Members of the University, of 
various grades : see also infra under 
the colleges. 

— armigeri filius, ii. 318. 

— baronetti filius, ii. 84-5, 288. 

— batler, ii. 84-5. 

— benefactors, i. 187, 325, 376, 431 ; 
ii. 163 ; iii. 87, 90 ; iv. 67-9, 79, 
138, 150. 

— commoners, ii. 84-5, 487; iii. 141, 
257- 

— compounder, iii. 219. 

— Craven exhibitioners, i. 460 ; iv. 67. 

— determining bachelors, i. 149, 175, 
268; ii. 5, 129, 309, 401, 517; iii. 
37, 88, 179, 257, 478-9; iv. 135. 

— Divinity, graduates in, i. 492 ; ii. 
489; iii. 13 ; iv. 136. 

— equitis aurati filius, ii. 84-5, 288, 
318-9. 

— fellow-commoners, iii. 6. 

— freshmen, i. 133, 138; iii. 95, 513; 
iv. 60. 

— generosi fdius, i. 131. 

— gentlemen-commoners, i. 149, 173, 
290, 299, 492, 496, 501 ; ii. 84-5, 
164; iii. 138, 141, 181, 257, 300. 

— graduates, catalogues of, ii. 92 ; iv. 
135-6- 

— grand-compounders, ii. 508; iii. 13, 
22, 36, 346. 

— inceptors, i. 153, 173, 320, 443; ii. 
194, 35 6 > 547-8, 563 5 iv. 143: cata- 
logues of, ii. 334, 564; iii. 13; iv. 
136, 139 bis. 

— — inceptors in Arts, ii. 288-9, 
318-9; iii. 366. 

— — senior inceptor (i.e. in Arts), 
senior in the Act, ii. 194, 351 ; iv. 
143- 

— Law, students in, S.C.L., ii. 85, 
300 ; iii. 300 ; iv. 143. 

graduates in, iv. 136. 

— Medicine, students in ; entered on 
the physic line, ii. 85, 300. 

graduates in, iv. 136, 139. 

— Music, graduates in, iv. 135. 

— noblemen, i. 412 ; ii. 84-5 ; iii. 6, 16, 
2 57- 

sons of noblemen, academic privi- 
leges of, i. 206. 

— privileged men, i. 246, 437 ; iii. 323 ; 
iv. 59, 129, 205. 

catalogues of, iv. 150. 

are under the sole jurisdiction of 

the University, ii. 128 ; iii. 311; iv. 

53, 142. 

being taxed by the University 

authorities, not by the city, i. 102 ; 
ii. 512 ; iv. 210, 217. 

take orders from the vice- 



Mkmrf.rs : privileged men (conl.) : — 
chancellor about cleaning the streets, 
i. 490 ; about fortifying the town, 

serve in the University militia, 

i. 52-5, 102 ; iii. 148, 152 ; iv. 70. 

— their military equipment, i. 

52-4 ; iv. 56. 

■ the king's conniving at the 

attempt to enroll them in the city 
militia, i. 95-6, is resented by the 
University, i. 102 ; iv. 59. 

their wills are proved in the 

vice-chancellor's court, iv. 142, 205. 

— regent masters, i. 153; ii. 299, 356, 
359, 489, 5 T 3 5 iv. 152, 212. 

catalogue of, iv. 143. 

— semi-commoners, iv. 169. 

— servitors, i. 291 ; ii. 84-5, 164, 300, 
487 ; iii. 181, 189, 197. 

— sophister , senior, 111. 132. 

— tutors, ii. 173. 

Ceremonies of the University. 
The Act :— 

— The Act proper, held in July, meant 
the final, but mostly formal, exercises 
for the degrees of M.A. and of Doc- 
tor in the faculties, i. 266 ; ii. 351 ; 
iii. 222 ; iv. 143, 211. 

Up to 1664, ^ was ne ld in S. Mary's, 
v. 114; from 1669 onwards, in the 
Sheldonian theatre, ii. 165, 195 ; v. 
151. 

— it extended over three days : — 
(i) ' Act Saturday,' i. 207 ; ii. 

288 ; iii. 191 : the proceedings on the 

Saturday included : — 
(a) the ' music-lecture,' ' music- 
speech,' in the Music School, v. 149, 

or in the Theatre, v. 149. 
(b) certain disputations called 

the Vesperies, Vespers, Vesperiae, i. 

221, 320; ii. 165, 343, 489, 564; iv. 

143, 211. 

(c) a speech by a Tei-rae filius, 

ii. 351, 548, 563-4; iii. 24, 105, 
427. 

(d) the ' Vesper supper, ii. 

194, provided up to 1670 by the 
' senior in the Act,' iv. 143. 

(ii) 'Act Sunday,' iii. 18, 305, 

427, when the University sermons 
at S. Mary's were preached by incep- 
tors in Theology, v. 119. 

(iii) ' Act Monday,' i. 406, 483 ; 

ii. 288; iii. 393: the proceedings on 
the Monday included : — 

(a) certain disputations called 

the Comitia, i. 320; ii. 165, 309, 

351- j . 
to serve as respondent in 



INDEX III. 

Ceremonies : the Act {continued') : — 
these was sometimes accepted in lieu 
of other exercises for a Doctor's degree, 
e. g. in Divinity, i. 331 ; in Law, ii. 
16. 

the Comitia seem some- 
times called the ' Act ' in a narrow 
sense, as opposed to the Vespers, iv. 
143, 211. 

(b) a speech by a pro-proctor, 

v. 147, who seems to have been called 
' umbra,' i. 266 ; iii. 24. 

(c) a speech by a Terrae filius, 

i. 406, 483; ii. 266-7, 288 > 35 x > 4 8 9> 
54 8 > 5 6 3-4 ; iii- 2 4> 6 °, io 5. 4 2 7- 

(d) a speech by the senior in 

the Act, ii. 351. 

— — — (e) a speech by the vice- 
chancellor, ii. 266, 288. 

— special dress of those taking part in 
the Act, i. 173. 

— ' creation,' i. e. entering upon Mas- 
ter's or Doctor's degree at the Act, 
iv. 138. 

— printed notices and programmes 
issued about the Act, ii. 165, 225, 
351 ; iii. 60. 

— notices of rowdyism at the Act, i. 
175; ii- 22 5> 547. 563; iv. 63. 

— Cambridge visitors at the Act, v. 97. 

— at the Act time, and then only, pro- 
fessional actors were allowed, i. 220, 
255> 2 79> 4°5-6; 15, ^5> 226, 
265,490; iii. 105, 191-2. 

— at the Act, shows of many kinds, 
rope-dancers, freaks, jugglers, &c, 
exhibited, as at a fair, i. 255,299, 321, 
405 ; ii. 15, 226, 548 ; iii. 191. 

— at the Act (attracted especially by 
the plays, iii. 105), there was a 
great concourse of people, ii. 42, 

79. l6 5. 35i, 4° 8 ; iii- 19°. 39 1 - 

— excellence of the Acts held in the 
Puritan time, i. 300. 

— Acts mentioned : — 
1651, ii. 563. 

1652, i. 173, 175 ; iv. 63. 

1655, i. 336 ; ii. 563. 

1656, i. 207. 

1657, i. 221 ; ii. 563. 

1658, i. 256. 

1660, none, i. 320; ii. 563. 

1661, i. 347, 356, 358, 406, 443, 

460 ; ii. 563-4. 

1662, none, i. 443 ; ii. 563. 

1663, i. 483 ; ii. 563. 

1664, ii. 16, 19, 90, 563-4. 

1665, none, ii. 39, 42, 564. 

1666, none, ii. 79, 81, 564. 

1667, none, i. 331 ; ii. 11 1, 564. 

1668, none, ii. 564. 



ACADEMICAL. 151 

Ceremonies : Acts mentioned {con- 
tinued) : — 

1669, the 'great' Act, on occa- 
sion of opening the Sheldonian Thea- 
tre, ii. 164-5, i 95 j 35 i j 564; iii- 4 2 7; 
iv. 71-2. 

1670, none, ii. 195, 198, 239, 

564. 

1671, ii. 225-6, 564. 

1672, ii. 248, 564. 

1673, ii. 266, 564. 

1674, ii. 266, 288, 290, 293, 564. 

1675, ii. 318 (where Wood men- 
tions only the ' Encaenia '), 564. 

1676, ii. 342, 351, 564. 

1677, ii. 378-9, 400, 564. 

1678, none, ii. 408, (?) 564. 

1679, 455> 5 6 4- 

1680, ii. 489, 491, 497, 564. 

1681, ii. 574-8, 564. 

1682, iii. 24. 

1683, iii. 60. 

1684, iii. 105. 

1685, none, iii. 147, 151, 427. 

1686, none, iii. 190-1, 427. 

1687, none, iii. 221-2, 427. 

1688, none, iii. 270, 427. 

1689, none, iii. 304-5, 427. 

1690, none, iii. 332, 427. 

1691, none, iii. 367, 427. 

1692, none, iii. 391, 393, 427. 

1693, iii. 427. 

1694, none, iii. 458. 

— Terrae filii, one ' senior ' and one 
'junior,' iii. 18: — two inceptors in 
Arts (on one occasion, 1669, an in- 
ceptor in Medicine is noted as an 
unusual thing, ii. 564), who made 
speeches, one on Act Saturday, v. 1 50, 
and one on Act Monday, v. 150. 
Their speeches (ii. 10, 563 ; iii. 222 ; 
iv. 143) were full of personalities, and 
often of mere filth, i. 221, 256, 443; 

ii. 351, 548 : which, as the following 
list will show, often earned expulsion 
or abject apology. Specimens of 
these speeches are found, ii. 266-7 ; 

iii. p. vii. One was appointed by the 
junior proctor, ii. 564 ; the other, 
by the senior proctor, iii. 108. In 
the Puritan time, the Terrae filii were 
kept well in hand, i. 300, 336 ; and it 
was proposed (1657—8) to abolish 
the office, i. 258 ; ii. 98. 

the word is used generally of 

the 'comic man' of a company, i. 
152. 

— catalogue of Terrae filii : — 
1651, ii. 563. 

1655, i. 336; ii. 5 6 3- 

1657, i. 22i ; ii. 563. 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Ceremonies : Terrae fdii {con- 
tinued} : — 

1658, i. 256: one expelled, one 

apologized. 

1661, i. 347, 406-7, 443 ; ii. 563 : 

one apologized. 

1663,1.483; ii.464, 563 ; iii. p.vii. 

1664, ii. 19, 26, 563 : both pun- 
ished. 

1669, ii. 166, 564 ; iii. p. vii : both 

expelled. 

1671, ii. 226, 564: one apolo- 
gized. 

1673, ii. 266-7. 

1674, ii. 288, 564. 

1675, 564. 

1676, ii. 351 : one expelled, one 

apologized. 

1677, ii- 4°°* 

1679, ii. 456, 550. 

1680, ii. 489. 

1,681, ii. 548. 

1682, iii. 24-5, 198 : one apolo- 
gized. 

1683, iii. 60, 108. 

1684, iii. 105-6 : both expelled. 

1693, iii. 427, 439. 

— special ' Acts,' also called Comitia 
(ii. 384), i.e. performances like the 
Encaenia, infra, were celebrated on 
special occasions ; e. g. in 1670, at 
the prince of Orange's visit, ii. 209- 
10 : in 1677, on the chancellor's visit, 
ii. 384, 387, and so called ' the 
Chancellor's Act/ iv. 76 : in 1689, 
on coronation day, iii. 304. 

University banquet : an elaborate lun- 
cheon or dinner given by the Univer- 
sity to the king, princes, the chan- 
cellor of the University, and, in one 
case, to a benefactor. 

— 1649, t0 Fairfax and Cromwell, iv. 
62 : in the Bodleian. 

— 1 66 1, to the chancellor (Clarendon), 

i. 414 ; iv. 65 : in the hall of S. John's. 

— 1663, to Charles II, i. 490, 497 ; iv. 
66-7 : in the Selden end of the Bod- 
leian. 

— 1677, to the chancellor (Ormonde), 

ii. 381, 386 ; iv. 76 : in the hall of 
Magdalen college. 

— 1683, to the duke and duchess of 
York, iii. 52 ; iv. 78 : in the upper 
room of the Ashmolean. 

— 1687, to James II, iii. 234-7 '■> iv. 81 : 
in the Selden end of the Bodleian. 

— 1688, to princess Anne, iv. 82 : at 
Christ Church. 

— 1690, to Elias Ashmole, iii. 334; 
iv. 83 : in the upper room of the 
Ashmolean. 



Ceremonies : University banquet {con- 
tinued) : — 

— 1695, to William III, iii. 495 ; iv. 
85 : in the Sheldonian. 

to the chancellor (the younger 

Ormonde), iii. 496 ; iv. 85 : in the 
hall of All Souls. 

— in 1 66 1 and 1677, the place is the 
hall of the vice-chancellor's college. 
In 1688, the hall of the vice-chan- 
cellor's college, Wadham, and in 
1695, Lincoln, were perhaps thought 
too small, and so Christ Church and 
All Souls chosen. 

Comitia, v. 150-1. 
Academical dress : — 

— statutes about, iv. 211. 

— plates of, ii. 302, 304. 

— chancellor's, i. 495. 

— the three sets of robes of a doctor, 
iii. 227 : the velvet cap of a doctor, 
ii. 527. 

velvet sleeves of a D.D., i. 494 : 

satin sleeves of D.C.L., and of M.D., 

i. 494 : square cap of a D.D., i. 417 : 
plush cap of a D.C.L., ii. 210. 

the ' scarlet ' of doctors was worn 

on all state occasions, i. 87, 412, 417, 
482, 494-5 ; ii. 60, 159-60, 207-9, 
527 ; iii. 17, 48, 51, 128, 226, 231, 237, 
496. 

was worn by honorary D.C.L.s 

and M.D.s at their admission, ii. 62, 

209-10, 386, 510. 
by noblemen taking honorary 

M.A., i. 414. 
by grand-compounders, iii. 

346. 

— proctors' dress, used by M.A.s on 
state occasions, v. 146 ; and by the 
public orator, i. 414. 

— masters of Arts' dress, generally 
spoken of by Wood as their ' formali- 
ties,' i. 269, 356, 359, 482 ; iii. 48, 
128. 

— bachelors of Arts' dress, i. 149, 356 ; 

ii. 84. 

— student in Civil Law : half-sleeved 
gown, ii. 84 ; iii. 300 : square cap, ii. 
85, 300 ; iii. 300. 

— student in Physic : square cap, ii. 
300. 

— noblemen's dress : a coloured gown, 
ii. 84 ; iii. 442 : a round velvet cap, 
with silver or gold band, i. 412 ; ii. 
85- 

— baronets' and knights' dress : gown, 
with silver or gold buttons, ii. 84 : 
round velvet cap, with silver or gold 
band, ii. 85. 

— gentlemen-commoners' dress, i. 149 : 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



x 53 



Ceremonies: Academical dress {con- 
tinued) : — 

half-sleeved gown, with buttons, ii. 
84 : caps changed at different times — 
round cap, with band, ii. 85 : round 
silk cap, ii. 164, 300; iii.181 : square 
cap, ii. 300; iii. 181, 300. 

— scholars on a foundation, ii. 84. 

— commoners : a gown, distinguished 
from the servitor's by buttons, ii. 84, 

487 : round cap, without band, ii. 85, 

488 ; afterwards, a round mohair cap, 
ii. 300. 

— batlers : a gown, with a square cape, 

ii. 84 : round cap, without band, ii. 
85. . 

— servitors : a gown, with a round 
cape, ii. 84, 487 : round cap, without 
band, ii. 85, 164, 300, 488: iii. 181. 

— mourning- gown : — a gown without 
distinction of rank or degree, ii. 304 ; 

iii. 92, 257 : used primarily in token 
of mourning, i. 198 ; ii. 85, 102 ; 
iii. 133: forbidden (1666) to be 
used on ordinary occasions, ii. 85 : 
but in general use in the University, 
1670-93, ii. 304, 502-3 ; iii. 92, 300, 
424 : the authorities exerted them- 
selves to banish it, ii. 502-3 ; iii. 300, 
424. 

— chronological notices : — 

1650-59, the Independents refuse 

to wear academical dress, i. 268, 356, 
359: insisting especially on 'hat' 
rather than the academical ' cap,' i. 
359> 369- 

■ 1660-6, attempts to enforce the 

use of academical dress, i. 336, 356, 

359 5 72. 
1662, the gown worn even on 

a country walk, i. 457. 
1666, John Fell restored the old 

Oxford patterns, i. 356, 359 ; ii. 

83-5 5 iv - 6 9- 

1670-93, frequent neglect of 

academical dress, ii. 212, 304, 428, 
502-3; iii. 92, 300, 424. 

Egg Saturday, Festum Ovorum, i.e. the 
Saturday before Ash Wednesday : on 
this day were presented those B.A.s 
who proposed completing their degree 
by determination in the ensuing 
Lent, i. 268; ii. 309, 517; iii. 6, 7, 
37, 88, 179, 257, 298, 478-9. 

— in old days the candidates had given 
an entertainment on this day, ii. 5. 

— up to 1679, an entertainment was 
given to the candidates by the ' col- 
lector,' ii. 401, 447. 

The Encaenia : — 

— (i) a literary and musical perform- 



Ceremonies : the Encaenia (cont.) : — 
ance at the opening of the Sheldonian 
theatre, in 1669, ii. 162, 165 (' dedi- 
cation of the theatre '), 194; iv. 72. 

the music was composed ex- 
pressly for the occasion, ii. 165. 

— (ii) in 1670, it was ordered that 
there should be an annual perform- 
ance of this kind, ii. 194, on the 
Friday before the Act. In practice, 
however, it was held only in those 
years in which an Act (v. 150) was 
celebrated. 

1671, ii. 225. 

1672, ii. 248. 

1673, ii. 266 (Wood mentions 

the Act only). 

1674, ii. 288. 

1675, ii. 318-9. 

1676, ii. 351. 

1677, ii. 378, 384; iii. 108; iv. 

76. 

1679, »• 456- 

1680, ii. 490. 

1681, ii. 547. 

1682, iii. 23. 

1683, iii. 60. 

1684, iii. 105. 

1693, iii. 427. 

the pieces, Latin, recited on these 

occasions were often on contempo- 
rary themes, ii. 288, 319, 456, 490; 
iii. 105. 

the pieces recited were published 

under the names of the reciters, ii. 
384 ; iii. 108 : but, for the most part, 
composed by their tutors, ii. 318-9; 
iii. 23. 

— — the music was often written 
expressly for the occasion, e. g. by 
Henry Aldrich, v. 23; by Matthew 
Lock, iv. 73. 

the music, in the vice-chan- 
cellor's accounts and elsewhere, is in- 
correctly described as ' at the Act,' 
e.g. 1669, ii. 225 ; 1671-3, iv. 73, 84. 

printed papers relating to the 

Encaenia, ii. 248, 288; iii. 23, 60, 
105 ; iv- 73. 76. 

— (iii) similar, or slighter, perform- 
ances were given on special occa- 
sions, e.g. in 1677 at the chancellor's 
visit, ii. 384, 387; iv. 76, but then 
called an Act or Comitia : in 1682, 
at the visit of the Morocco ambas- 
sador, iii. 17 : 1683, at duke of York's 
visit, iii. 52 : 1685, on coronation 
day, iii. 141 : 1689, on coronation 
day (called then Encaenia), iii. 
301 : 1695, at William Ill's visit, 
iii. 495- 



*54 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Ceremonies {continued) : — 

University funerals : — 

— old ceremonial at funeral of a doctor, 
i. 417. 

— funeral of a proctor, i. 197-8 ; v. 10. 

— funeral of a regius professor, i. 484. 

— funerals of bishops in Oxford, with 
an academical attendance, i. 479- 
83, 485; ii. 66; iii. 261-2. 

— funeral of Sir Leoline Jenkins, iii. 
158, 161-2. 

University plays : exhibited by members 
of, and at the charge of, the Uni- 
versity, 1605, iv. 200 ; 1636, iv. 56. 

University present: — 

■ — when great personages visited the 
University, it was the custom to 
make them a present. This was 
done also at court, especially when 
the University paid its respects at 
"Woodstock. After the University 
press got under weigh through Dr. 
John Fell's insistence, the present 
was generally one or more of its 
folios, richly bound. These volumes 
were also freely presented at court. 

a Bible, i. 490, 493 ; iii. 54, 224, 

495 5 i v - 5 r - 2 > 5 6 > 61, 66, 77, 81-2. 
In 168 1 and 1687, the Bible is noted 
to be from the Oxford press, ii. 528 ; 
iii. 234. 

a Common Prayer Book, iii. 495. 

king James I's works, v. 49. 

king Charles I's works, v. 31. 

Anthony Wood's Hist, et Antiq. 

Univ. Oxon., ii. 289-90 ; iii. 46 ; iv. 

74- 

— — David Loggan's Oxonia Illus- 
trata, v. 59. 

Thomas Hyde's Catal. libr. im- 
press, in Bibl. Bodl., iv. 74. 

— — Humphrey Prideaux' Marmora 
Oxon., iv. 70. 

Wood -t- Loggan, ii. 315-6, 518; 

iii. 54. 

Wood + Loggan + Hyde, ii. 323. 

Wood + Loggan + Hyde + Pri- 
deaux, ii. 376, 518. 

books, not specified, ii. 387 ; iv. 

56, 63, 70-1, 77-8. 

rich gloves were also presented, 

according to the then common cus- 
tom, i. 103, 490, 493 ; iii. 224, 234; 

iv. 5i-3, 5576, 58, 62, 65-6, 81. A 
relic of this is the University present 
of a pair of gloves to the judge of 
assize. 

silver plate, iv. 61, 67-8, 72. 

tips in money to servants at 

court, messengers, and the like, iv. 52, 
55-6, 58-9, 61, 65, 73-4, 76, 18, 84. 



Ceremonies {continued) ■. — 

University processions, manner of, great 
and small, i. 412, 482, 495-6; ii. 
160, 527; iii. 16-7, 226-30. 

University sermons: — 

— vice-chancellor escorted to them by 
bedells, ii. 424 : and so the pro-vice- 
chancellor, iii. 305. 

— preacher escorted by a bedell, i. 48. 

— by special preachers, v. 119. 

— bidding prayer before, i. 445. 

— at S. Mary's church, v. 119 : — 
ordinary, (i) on Sunday mornings, 

v. 119 ; (ii) on Sunday afternoons, v. 
119; (iii; on Church holy-days, v. 
120. 

Easter sermons, v. 1 20. 

Low Sunday, v. 120. 

Latin sermons, v. 120. 

Act Sunday, v. 119. 

Gunpowder plot, v. 49. 

King's (Charles I's) fast, v. 

ST- 

Restoration day, v. 36. 

on special occasions : — 

the coronation day, v. 120. 

fast-days, v. 1 20. 

thanksgivings, v. 1 20. 

assize sermons, v. 120. 

at University funerals, v. 1 20. 

— at S. Peter's in the East, v. 122. 

— at Christ Church, Merton, New 
college, see infra under these col- 
leges. 

— procedure in case of ' heresy ' in the 
University sermon : — 

— — (i) complaint to the vice-chan- 
cellor, i. 445 ; ii. 66, 488-9, 491 ; 
iii. 152, 492. 

— — (ii) copy of the sermon asked 
for, ii. 488-9, 491. 

(iii) sermon tried by Regius pro- 
fessor of Divinity and certain resident 
D.D.s, i. 445 ; ii. 448, 489, 491 ; iii. 

244- ' j 

(iv) apology before the heads of 

houses, ii. 448, 491 ; iii. 156. 

— procedure against Arminian, ii. 448 : 
Calvinist, i. 445 ; ii. 66 : and Ro- 
manist preachers, ii. 488, 491 ; iii. 
152, 156. 

University speeches : — 

— annual or ordinary : — 

by the vice-chancellor, at end or 

beginning of year of office, v. 144: 

at the Act, v. 151. 
by the senior proctor, on going 

out of office, v. 147. 
by the junior proctor, concluding 

determination, v. 147. 
by the ' senior in the Act,' ii. 351. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



J 55 



Ceremonies : University speeches {con- 
tinued ) : — 

by a pro-proctor at the Act, v. 

147. 

by the Terrae Jilii at the Act, v. 

151- 

by a member of Christ Church at 

the visitation of the Bodleian, v. 28. 

by the senior collector at ' deter- 
mination,' i. 149 ; iii. 137. 

the music ' speech,' v. 149. 

— on special occasions : — 

— — by the vice-chancellor, to wel- 
come visitors, v. 144. 

by the senior proctor, at a royal 

visit, v. 147. 

— — by the public orator or his 
deputy, to welcome visitors, v. 147 : 
presenting for honorary degrees, at 
University funerals, on coronation 
day, v. 147-8. 

by the Regius professors of Divinity, 

Law, Medicine, or their deputies, pre- 
senting for honorary degrees in their 
faculties, v. 149. 

inaugural speech, i.e. lecture, by 

a new professor, v. 149. 

— — by Bodley's librarian in the 
library to visitors, v. 159. 

University verses, addresses, letters . of 
thanks : — 

— on occasion of all events in the royal 
family, the University used to print 
(after 1669, at the Theatre press, ii. 
171) copies of ' verses ' in Latin (and 
occasionally other languages) to be 
presented at court. These verses 
were sometimes burlesqued, i. 189, 
440; ii. 221. The selection of them 
caused jealousies, iii. 133. 

1630, to Charles I, on the birth 

of Charles II, iv. 52. 

1632, to Charles I, on recovery 

from an illness, iv. 52. 

1633, to Charles I, on his return 

from Scotland, iv. 52. 

on birth of James, duke of 

York, iv. 52. 

1635, on birth of princess Eliza- 
beth, iv. 56. 

1636, on birth of princess Anne, 

iv. 56. 

1638, ' Charisteria,' to Henrietta 

Maria, on birth of a daughter (who 
died 163I), iv. 56-7. 

— — 1640 (entered under 1639), 
' Horti Carolini Rosa Altera,' on birth 
(8 July, 1640) of Henry, duke of 
Gloucester, iv. 57. 

1641, ' Eucharisteria,' on Charles 

I's return from Scotland, iv. 57. 



Ceremonies : University verses, &c. 
{continued) : — 

1641, entered under 1642, ' Tlpo- 

reAeta Anglo-Batava,' on the mar- 
riage of William II, prince of Orange, 
and Mary, daughter of Charles I, i. 
76 ; iv. 58. 

1643, on queen Henrietta Maria's 

return from abroad, i. 103 ; iv. 59. 

— — 1654, to Oliver Protector, on 
peace with Holland, i. 189; iv. 63. 

— — 1660, to Charles II, on his 
restoration, iv. 64. 

on the death of Henry, duke 

of Gloucester, i. 332 ; iv. 64. 

on the death of Mary (sister 

of Charles II), princess of Orange, 
iv. 65. 

1662, to Charles II, on his mar- 
riage, i. 440 ; iv. 66. 

1668, on the death of Henrietta 

Maria, the queen-mother, ii. 171 ; iv. 
7 2 -3- 

1670, on the death of Henrietta 

(sister of Charles II), duchess of 

Orleans, ii. 198 ; iv. 73. 
on the death of Anne, duchess 

of York, ii. 220-1 ; iv. 73. 
1685, on the death of Charles II, 

iii. 133 ; iv. 80. 

— — 1688, on the birth of James 
Francis Edward, prince of Wales, iii. 
272 ; iv. 81. 

1689, on the coronation of Wil- 
liam and Mary, iii. 301 ; iv. 82. 

— — 1690, on William Ill's return 
from Ireland, iii. 339, 344 ; iv. 83. 

— — 1694, on tne death of queen 
Mary, iii. 477, 479 ; iv. 85. 

— on occasion of great public events, 
the University presented addresses 
(seldom mentioned by Wood) to the 
sovereign : — 

I 653, to Oliver Cromwell, on his 

becoming Protector, iv. 63. 

1660, to Charles II, on his re- 
storation, i. 319 ; iv. 64. 

1683, to Charles II, on the failure 

of the Ryehouse plot, iii. 64-5. 

1685, to James II, on his acces- 
sion, iii. 132-3 ; iv. 80. 

— — 1688, to William, prince of 
Orange, on his coming into England, 
iii. 291. 

1694, to William III, on the 

death of Mary, iv. 85. 

— formal letters of thanks, Sec, in the 
University's name, were in Latin, ii. 
14: penned by the public orator, v. 
147. 

Vesperies, v. 150. 



156 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Ceremonies (continued) : — 
Minor ceremonies and observances : — 

— Absolution Saturday, the day for can- 
celling the 15. A. degree of those who 
had failed to determine, i. 149-50. 

— answering under bachelor, i. 1 74-5 ; 
iv. 126. 

— Ash Wednesday, procession of de- 
termining bachelors to the schools, 

i. 149: Latin sermon at S. Mary's, i. 

I 49- .... 

— Austin disputations, i. 197 ; ii. 428, 

430 ; iii. 404 ; iv. 143. 

— circuiting, visiting, ii. 351, 547. 

— 'collectors' of the determining 
bachelors, i.e. those of their own 
number who took charge of the rota- 
tion of disputants, and collected fees, 

ii. 401, 447. The senior collector 
delivered a speech at the end of 
determination, i. 149 ; iii. 137 : and, 
up to 1679, gave an entertainment on 
Egg Saturday, v. 153. 

— ' collector' in Austins, a B.A. who 
had similar duties in the Austin dis- 
putations, i. 197. 

— commemoration, iii. 23. 

— coursing, i. 242-3, 297, 300 ; ii. 75, 
83, 129, 244, 402 ; iii. 37. 

— ' creation,' ' create,' used in a specific 
sense, of degrees conferred outside 
the statutable qualifications, i. 328-9, 
335, 349, 35 1 , 381, 443 > 209; 

iii. 6, 36, 57, 215, 238. This was 
customary at the chancellor's state 
visit, i. 41 1, 438 ; and at a royal visit, 
i. 496, 500-1 ; iii. 46, 54. 

— ' day of my life in Oxford,' a, i. 234. 

— declamations, i. 177, 197, 464; iii. 
88 ; iv. 66. 

— degrees : — 

in absence, iii. 15, 79, 87. 

— — by accumulation, ii. 196 : also 
called by cumulation, ii. 546. 

— — denying, iii. 19 : more strictly 
' denying the grace for a degree,' i. 
478; ii. 534, 546; iii. 19, 315, 
447- 

— — by diploma, i. 334, 398 ; ii. 
173-4, 497 5 iii- 5 6 > 9°, 95 5 

6 5- 

— — ad eundem, ii. 497-8, 548; iii. 
109, 241, 382, 520. 

honorary, v. 143, 147-9, x 5 2 , J ^°' 

standing for, ii. 534 : technically 

'standing for the grace,' ii. 60, 351, 

518, 546 ; iii. 6. 

— determination, v. 147, 150, 153, and 
supra. 

— disputations, i. 163, 297, 300; ii. 
129, 209; iii. 37, 44 j iv. 128. 



Ceremonies : minor cere??ionics {con- 
tinued) : — 

verses explanatory of the theses 

to be disputed, ii. 210. 

— examinations, notices of, i. 167, 206 : 
register of, i. 206 ; iv. 149. 

for B.A., i. 175. 

for M.A., i. 186. 

in Latin and Greek, ii. 277-8. 

felt to be tending to be formal 

(1673), ii. 278. 
said to be insufficient (1683), iii. 

44 ; (1692), iii. 404. 

— examiners, entertainments to, i. 207. 

— exercises done by others, i. 242-3 ; 
ii- 318-9, 516. 

— faculty, choice of a, i. 206. 

— generals, answering, i. 163; iii. 131. 

— king's letters, i. e. orders from king 
to confer degrees or other favours on 
his nominees, i. 328-9, 333-4, 346 ; 

ii. 232, 494. 

— Lent exercises, ii. 100; iii. 404: 
Lent disputations, iii. 37 ; i.e. deter- 
mination. 

— masses, i. 325, 376-7, 431. 

— matriculation, i. 131, 464; ii. 173, 
263; iii. 7, 90, 137, 215, 246. 

registers of, i. 132, 150; ii. 263 ; 

iii. 202-3, 396; iv. 136-7. 

— non-placet society, ii. 502. 

■ — oaths, required of members of the 
University, i. 139, 155, 165, 173-4, 
207. 

of the mayor of Oxford to the 

University, v. 119, 124. 
of the high-sheriff of Oxfordshire, 

v. 132. 

— precedence at S. Mary's, v. 118. 
of Law and Medicine, iii. 14-5, 

85. 

— Responsions, i. 163. 

— S. Scholastica's day, v. 119. 

— ' scio,' the custom, i. 207, 503; ii. 
16, 454, 5 l8 5 iii- 82, 119, 142, 144. 

— studies, an M.A.'s rule for his, i. 
234- 

— subscription to the XXXIX Articles, 
ii. 215 ; iv. 137. 

to the Act of Uniformity, iv. 137. 

— terms, transferring, iii. 127 : omission 
of terms sanctioned, iii. 22. 

— testimony, i. e. a certificate from the 
professor allowing a candidate to 
graduate in his faculty, iii. 1 1 . 

— wall-lectures, i. 177, 464; iii. 404. 
Buildings and institutions of the 

University: — 
Apodyterium, vestry (atrium) of Con- 
vocation-house : — 

— position of, ii. 63, 529; iii 238. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



157 



Buildings and institutions : Apo- 
dyterium (continued} : — 

— building of, 1635-6, iv. 53-5. 

— academical use of: — 

robing room for persons gradu- 
ating, ii. 209, 518 : as it still is. 

waiting-room for the vice-chan- 
cellor and doctors before Convocation, 

iii- 337- 8 > 38i. 

place of meeting of the heads 

of houses, ii. 491, 513; iii. 140, 297; 
v. 147. 

of the committee of D.D.s 

investigating a charge of heresy, ii. 
448, 49 1 - 

of the delegates of the vice- 
chancellor's accounts, i. 75, 80. 
of other delegacies, ii. 207 ; 

iii. 224. 

of University commissioners 

of the poll-tax, ii. 403 ; to receive 
oaths of allegiance, iii. 445. 

the vice-chancellor's court was 

held there, ii. 517 ; iii. 428-9 ; iv. 2, 
55 : as it still is. 

— external use : for the courts of law, 
ii. 65. 

Ashmolean Museum, Ashmole's Re- 
pository : — 

— history of : — 

1677, Elias Ashmole offers the 

University his curios, ii. 391. 

1678, purchase of the site, iv. 78. 

1679, laying of the foundation 

stone, ii. 451 ; iii. 55. 
1679-83, progress of the building, 

ii. 452, 530; iii. 54-5; iv. 78-80. 
1683, Ashmole's curios placed 

there, iii. 39, 55 ; iv. 78. 
formal opening, iii. 52, 55-6; 

iv. 149. 

1690, visit of Elias Ashmole, iii. 

334; iv. 83. 

— benefactors of, iii. 56, 90 ; iv. 70. 

— visitors of, ii. 32 ; iii. 78, 109 : an- 
nual visitation of, iii. 109. 

— staff of:— 

keeper, ii. 32 ; iii. 39, 52, 55 ; iv. 

S3- 

underkeeper, iii. 55. 

professor of Chemistry, iii. 55, 

333-4- 

demonstrator of Chemistry, iii. 

55- 

— structure of: — 

in the basement, the chemical 

laboratory, iii. 52, 55, 75; iv. 78-9. 

on the ground floor, the ' natural 

history,' or ' experimental philosophy,' 
school, iii. 52, 55, 75, 78, 333- 

on the upper floor, the museum 



Buildings and institutions : Ash- 
molean museum {continued') : — 
of curios, iii. 52, 55-6, 334, 440 ; iv. 
78-9 : sometimes used for the Uni- 
versity banquet, v. 152. 

— keeper's rooms, iii. 56. 

— library, iv. 83 : — 

(i) books on chemistry, iii. 55. 

(ii) books on natural history, iii. 

(iii) books and MSS., especially 

of history and antiquities : — 

Elias Ashmole's, iv. 83. 

Sir William Dugdale's, iii. 180, 

190, 499. 

John Aubrey's, iv. 191. 

Anthony Wood's, i. 6-9, 77, 

248; ii. 32; iii. 499, 501, 503; iv. 

85, 225. 

Martin Lister's, iv. 79. 

Lhuyd's catalogue of MSS. in, 

iv. 83. 

donors to, i. 8-9. 

books and MSS. stolen from, i. 

6-7, 9> M7 ; ii- 3 2 5 iii- 453- 
transferred to the Bodleian (i860), 

i. 7, 11. 
Bodleian library : — 

— called Bodley's library, i. 210; ii. 
71 : Bodleian library, iii. 503. 

— almost always called ' the public 
library,' i. e. the University library 
as opposed to college libraries, i. 165, 
182, 189, 209, 319, 424, 432 ; ii. 73, 
22 7-8, 235, 493; iii. 29, 109, 236, 
282, 501 ; iv. 22, 26 : et alibi. 

— called 'our Vatican,' ii. 529. 

— plan of, ii. 63-5. 

— Brian Twyne's history of, and col- 
lection of deeds relating to, iv. 147, 
209. 

— founder and foundation, v. 28. 
founder's statutes, iv. 147, 221. 

— benefactors, i. 165, 222, 228, 248-9, 
402 ; ii. 124, 204, 235, 275, 316, 
507; iii. 365, 426, 501, 503; iv. 
52, 74, 76, 84, 147-8. 

■ — fees payable to, ii. 51. 

— curators of, iv. 147 : annual visi- 
tation of on Nov. 8, iii. 29, 109, 
472 ; iv. 147 : visitation day changed 
for special reason, iii. 496. 

— account books of, iv. 147. 

— catalogues of printed books : — 

early MS. catalogue, iv. 147-8. 

1674, issue of the printed cata- 
logue, under Thomas Hyde's name, 

ii. 323- 

this catalogue was sometimes 

the University present, ii. 376, 518 ; 
iv. 74. 



158 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Buildings and institutions: Bod- 
leian library {continued') : — 

— catalogues of MSS. : — 

1697, included in the general 

catalogue of MSS. in England and 

Ireland, ii. 222 ; iii. 342. 
1 proposals for this catalogue 

had been on foot as far back as 1666, 

ii. 71-2. 

MS. catalogue of MSS., i. 6, 10. 

— catalogue of readers in, i. 258; ii. 
21, 5 2 , 70, 74. M 6 > I 4 8 , 158, 201, 
203, 233, 265, 271, 280, 286, 305, 
307, 349, 350, 483; iv. 148, 198. 

■ — incidental mention of MSS. there, 
ii. 48, 204, 507 : Jesus college MSS. 
deposited there, i. 430 : MSS. for- 
merly in college libraries now there, 

i. 424 : loss, or mislaying of, MSS., 
iv. 147. 

— some MS. collections now there : — 
Thomas Allen (Digby), i. 249 : John 
Aubrey, iv. 191 : Ashmole, ii. 64 : 
barbers' company, ii. 329 : Bodley, 

ii. 64 : charters, i. 7 : Kenelm Digby 
(Allen), i. 249 : Dodsworth, ii. 235 : 
Douce, ii. 64 : Dugdale, i. 6 : Fair- 
fax, ii. 235 : Gough, ii. 137 : Hatton, 
ii. 231: Richard James, ii. 124 ; iv. 
197 : Langbaine, iii. 501 ; iv. 200 : 
Laud, iii. 235, 287 ; iv. 57 : Leland, 
i. 222: Thomas Marshall, ii. 316; 
iv. 74, 147 : Oriental, ii. 64; iv. 83, 
148 : Rawlinson, ii. 64 : Selden, i. 
210: Anthony Wood, ii. 64; iii. 342 ; 
iv. 228-50. 

■ — incidental mention of printed books, 

i. 165; ii. 275, 361; iii. 365, 405, 
430; iv. 22, 26, 74, 76, 235 : chained 
books, iv. 60 : old division of books, 
Arts, i. 182 ; Law, Divinity, i. 426. 

— some collections of printed books, 

ii. 64 : Barlow, iii. 426 : Bliss, i. 200 ; 
ii. 235: Malone, iii. 119: Thomas 
Marshall, ii. 316 ; iv. 74, 147 : 
'Mather,' i. 6: old plays, iii. 119: 
Selden, i. 210,415: Anthony Wood, 
i. 6, 200. 

— thefts from, i. 335. 

— incidents in the history of : — 

1597? foundation, v. 28. 

1599? giving of statutes, iv. 147. 

1600, beginning of first register 

of benefactors, i. 147. 
1602, first record of readers, ii. 

483; iv. 148, 198. 
1605, state visit °f J am es I, ii. 

4 8 3- 

■ 1610, beginning of official re- 
gister of admissions of readers, iv. 
148. 



Buildings and institutions: Bod- 
leian library {continued) : — 

1 610, laying foundation stone of 

east wing (over the Proscholium), iv. 
139, M7- 

161 3, notes of the visitation, iv. 

147. 

— — — beginning of the official 
account-books, iv. 147. 

1614, ii. 483. 

■ 1633, gift of books by Sir Henry 

Wotton, iv. 52. 

1638, Laud's gift of MSS., iy. 57. 

1642, suspicion of attempt to 

plunder, i. 72. 

1 65 2, 'Anthony Wood begins to 

use, i. 182, 189, 209, 222; ii. 71-2. 

1653, beginning of an account- 
book of, for the Puritan period, iv. 
147. 

1656, endeavour to secure John 

Selden's library, i. 209-10. 
1659, arrival of Selden's library, 

i. 282, 415 ; iv. 335. 

1660, purged of Commonwealth 

books, i. 319. 
1671, purchase of Hatton MSS., 

ii. 231. 

bequest of Dodsworth and 

Fairfax MSS., ii. 235. 

1674, issue of catalogue of printed 

books, v. 157. 

1676, beginning of the second 

book of accounts, iv. 147. 

1680, distribution of Whig mani- 
festoes, ii. 493. 

1682, beginning of official list of 

foreign readers, iv. 148. 

1683, purchase of Oriental MSS., 

iv. 83. 

1685, Thomas Marshall's bequest, 

ii. 316; iv. 74, 147. 

1688, Obadiah Walker's books 

are stored there, iii. 282. 

— — — Charles Hatton's gift, iv. 
147. 

1691, purchase of MSS. from 

Anthony Wood, iii. 342 ; iv. 83. 

— — — Thomas Barlow's bequest, 

iii. 426 ; iv. 84. 

1691-2, purchase of Oriental 

MSS., iv. 83-4, 148. 

1692, refusal to purchase more 

from Wood, iii. 404; iv. 83. 

1693, beginning of second re- 
gister of benefactions, iv. 147-8. 

new shelving, iii. 426; iv. 

84 : i. e. the galleries in Duke Hum- 
phrey, described in ii. 161. 

— — — Wood expelled from, iii. 
485- 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



159 



Buildings and institutions: Bod- 
leian library (contimied) : — 
1695, Anthony Wood's bequest, 

iii. 501, 503. 

1697, catalogue of MSS., v. 158. 

1791, purchase of early editions, 

iv. 148. 

i860, taking over of the Ash- 

molean library, i, 7, 1 1. 

— the chief show-place of the Uni- 
versity : — 

1658, Wood shows it to his 

visitors, i. 240. 

1661, Maurice of Nassau, i. 402. 

— the chancellor (Clarendon), 

1662, crown-prince of Denmark, 

i. 456. 

1663, Charles II, i. 496. 

1665, the chancellor of Cam- 
bridge, ii. 57. 

1669, Cosmo de Medici, ii. 158, 

161. 

1670, the prince of Orange, ii. 

209. 

1671, lord-lieutenant of Ireland, 

ii. 224. 

1675, prince of Neuburg, ii. 315. 

1681, George, of Hanover, ii. 

518. 

Charles II, ii. 529. 

1682, Morocco ambassador, iii. 

18. 

1683, duke of York, iii. 51. 

1693, a German prince, iii. 423. 

1695, duke Schomberg, iii. 487. 

— the University banquet (v. 152) 
there : — 

1649, to Fairfax and Cromwell, 

iv. 62. 

1663, to Charles II, i. 497; iv. 

66. 

1687, to James II, iii. 224, 

234-6; iv. 81. 

— speeches there : — 

— — speech by senior proctor to the 
king : 1663, to Charles II, i. 496 ; ii. 
16 : 1687, to James II, iii. 234-5. 

speech by the librarian to visitors, 

1665, ii. 57 : 1669, ii. 161 : 1670, ii. 
209: 1682, iii. 18: 1683, iii. 51. 

— annual speech by a member of 
Christ Church (Dr. John Morris' 
foundation), v. 28. 

— librarians : — 

— ■ — Thomas James, v. 55. 

John Rouse, i. 174. 

Thomas Barlow, v. 26. 

Thomas Lockey, v. 59. 

Thomas Hyde, v. 48-9. 

1768, John Price, ii. 291, 373. 



Buildings and institutions : Bod- 
leian library [continued) : — 

1813, Bulkeley Bandinel, ii. 373. 

i860, H. O. Coxe, i. 6, 7, 11. 

— old divisions, &c. : — 

Arts library, i. 182 ; iv. 139. 

called specifically 'the Bodleian' 

proper, ' Bodley's library,' ii. 65 ; iii. 

235- 

galleries in, ii. 71, 73. 

'archives,' i. e. locked cases in, 

i. 222 ; ii. 161 ; iv. 147. 

the globes, i. 496; iii. 235. 

■ — librarian's study, ii. 361 ; iii. 

236. 

bust of Charles I, iv. 57. 

— the closet, some lock-fast room 

or cupboard, iv. 57. 

staircase, ii. 63-4. 

Duke Humphrey's library, ii. 65 ; 

iii- 235. 237 ; iv. 57. 
galleries in, iii. 426 ; iv. 84. In 

ii. 161 the note is in error : the gallery 
spoken of is the picture gallery, infra 
p. 161. 

Selden's library, the Selden end, 

v. 68. 

originally called Laud's library, 

ii. 214, from the Laud MSS. placed 
in the gallery there, iii. 235, 237. 

coin-room, i. 238, 415, 457 ; 

ii. 161, 529; iii. 506: cp. i. 188; 

iii. 90. 

— modern divisions, &c, i. 7, 10, 258 ; 

ii. 63-4, 161. 

Congregation, ordinary degrees conferred 
there, iii. 13, 15. 

— certain dispensations granted in, ii. 
160. 

— the University address read there, 

iii. 291. 

— formal apologies read there, iii. 59, 
87. 

— registers of, iv. 133-5 '■> v - J 47- 
Congregation- house, ii. 454 ; iv. 55 : the 

same as Convocation-house, by which 
name it is generally called. 

— Old Congregation-house, v. 118. 
Convocation, the governing body in the 

University, v. 144-8. 

— elects the chancellor, iii. 272. 

— is held ' extra Universitatem ' to 
admit the chancellor to office, v. 143. 

— admits to office the vice-chancellor, 
iii. 75, 108: and the proctors, v. 
146. 

— elects members of Parliament for the 
University, ii. 443, 461 ; iii. 135, 171, 
325 : the public orator, v. 147 : be- 
dells, iii. 314: Camden s professor of 
history, iii. 262. 



i6o 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



BUILDINGS and institutions: Con- 
vocation (continued) : — 

— has the decision as to accepting new 
foundations, iii. 10-1, 14, 21, 87, 
109. 

— grants the more important dispen- 
sations, ii. 157, 160, 502 ; iii. 13, 59, 
87, 109. 

— honorary degrees are conferred there, 

i. 502 ; iii. 6, 36, 46, 54, 57, 90, 108, 
142 ; v. 143. 

— incorporations take place there, ii. 
57- 

— letters to and from the University are 
read there, i. 320, 501 ; ii. 502 ; iii. 
75, 109, 132. 

— registers of, i. 320, 502-4 ; iv. 133-5 ; 
v. 147. 

— bell, v. 119. 

Convocation-house, the new Convoca- 
tion-house, i. 57, 282, 326,457; ii. 
57, 63, 66, 157, 160, 315, 386-7; iii. 

238.' 

— building of, iv. 53-5. 

— door, i. 320 ; ii. 248 : door into the 
Divinity school, v. 161. 

— vice-chancellor's seat in, ii. 159 : 
registrar's desk, ii. 157 ; iv. 55. 

— undergraduates excluded from, ii. 
34- 

— special use of, by the law courts, i. 
83 : by Parliament, ii. 60, 529, 531-2, 
534; iii. 238. 

— vestry of, v. 1 56. 

Marmora Oxotiiensia, the Oxford Mar- 
bles, i. e. Greek and Roman remains, 

ii. 529; iv. 69-70: Humphrey Pri- 
deaux' catalogue of, ii. 376, 518 ; iv. 
70. 

John Selden's, acquired 1660, i. 

320, 351 ; ii. 248 ; iv. 69. 
Arundel (or Howard's, i. 320), 

acquired 1667, i. 320; ii. 119-20, 

248 ; iv. 69. 

— — Pomfret, acquired 1755, iii. 
394- 

individual stones acquired 1668- 

91, by purchase or gift, ii. 162-3; lw ' 
69-70. 

University press : — 

— before 1669, engaged in printing the 
University 'verses,' v. 155 ; Univer- 
sity notices (' programmas'), &c, iv. 
62-3, 65, 67, 69, 70. 

in 1 641-3 issued many proclama- 
tions for Charles I, v. 30. 

— — there was a customary tip 
to the printers when at work on 
these verses and proclamations : — 
2s, 6d., iv. 57, 63-4: 5*., iv. 59, 
64-5. 



Buildings and institutions : Uni- 
versity press (continued) : — 

— after 1669, the University press was 
' at the Theatre,' ii. 170, 332-3, 342, 
449» 529, 554; iii- 189, 299, 477. 

the actual work-room was in the 

basement of the Shcldonian, ii. 532 ; 
iv. 69 : there was also ' the little 
printing-house,' formerly ' Tom Pun's 
house,' just south-west of the (171 2) 
Clarendon Building, ii. 172, 203; 

iv. 69 : ' the printing-house,' iv. 70, 
84-5 : 1 the warehouse,' ii. 331. 

workmen: compositors, ii. 226, 

261, 264: corrector of the press, v. 
127 : printers, v. 58, 128, 161. 

customary tip to the printers, 

5 s ; iv - 73- 

books printed: Bibles, ii. 170, 

449, 477; iii. 234: Testaments, ii. 
483 : catalogues of books printed 
there, i. 19; ii. 479, 497; iii. 464: 
University verses, v. 155 : University 
notices, iv. 73, 81 : large paper copies, 

ii. 289. 

have the imprint ' e typogr. 

Sheldoniano,' ii. 171 : and an engrav- 
ing of the Sheldonian, ii. 378. 

licensing of books, iii. 86, 329. 

rules for orthography, ii. 1 70 ; 

iii. 12. 

managed nominally by a Univer- 
sity delegacy, ii. 172, 203-4, 289 ; iv. 
73 : but, in reality, by Dr. John Fell, 

v. 43. 

— some chronological notes : — 
1 518, iii. 344: a C C has dropped 

out of the text. I regret thus person- 
ally supplying an additional instance 
to the list in F. Madan's Early Oxford 
Press, p. 11. 

1646, subsidized by the London 

printers not to print Bibles, iv. 219. 

1660, funds provided for printing 

Arabic and Greek books, i. 316. 

1669, the first book finished off at 

the Theatre, ii. 171. 

1672, farmed out to delegates, ii. 

170. 

1673, many of the press-workers 

are ' Galli,' ii. 267 : cp. ii. 260-1; iii. 
189, 299. 

1678, farmed out to delegates, ii. 

170. 

privilege of printing Bibles is 

leased to some London booksellers, 
ii. 170, 477, 483. 

1679-80, hence the University 

press is assailed by London (i. e. the 
king's) printers, ii. 474, 477, 483. 

1684, suit raised by the king's 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



161 



Buildings and institutions : Uni- 
versity press {continued) : — 
printers against the University press, 
iii. 95, 105, 112. 

1686, Romanist attempts to secure 

the University press, ii. 198, 201-2 ; 
v. 73- 

1687-8, Obadiah Walker's Ro- 
manist press at University college, v. 
73- 

1692, farmed out to London book- 
sellers, iii. 381-2, 404. 

— University printers mentioned : — 
architypographer, v. 149. 

John Lichfield, flor. 1630, iv. 52 ; 

and (unnamed) 1634, iv. 52. 
Leonard (the first) Lichfield, 

1 1657, v. 58. 
Henry Hall, flor. 1642-69, i. Ill, 

441 ; iv. 59, 62, 73. 
Anne Lichfield, widow of Leonard 

supra, f 1671, v. 58. 
William Hall, f 1672, i. 421, 452 ; 

ii- 33> 85, 222. The reference in ii. 

331 is in error for ' John ' Hall. 

... Barnes (?), 1669, iv. 73. 

Thomas Bennet, 1669, iv. 73. 

Moses Pit, flor. 1680, a lessee of 

the Oxford press, i. 286; ii. 170, 

489, 556; iii. 2, 27, 138; iv. 77 

(< Pitts 

Leonard (the second) Lichfield, 

f 1686, v. 58. 

Henry Cruttenden, f 1694, i. 19; 

ii. 553 ; iii. 26, 86, 470. 

Leonard (the third) Lichfield, flor. 

1687, v. 58. 

John Hall, f 1708, 331 (' Wil- 
liam ' in error) ; iv. 16, 22-3, 28, 34, 
70, 73. 80-2. 

The Old Schools, iv. 148-9. 

The Divinity School, i. 320 ; ii. 63, 120, 
162-3. 

— building of, 1453, iv. 148. 

— carved roof of, i. 209; ii. 528; iii. 
51- 

— door into Convocation-house, ii. 442, 
460, 528 ; iii. 238. 

— north door, built 1668, ii. 131; iii. 
51 ; iv. 70-1. 

— the Regius professor of Divinity's 
seat in, i. 479 ; iv. 70-1 : the respon- 
dent's seat in, i. 484 : upper and lower 
pulpits in, iii. 161. 

— academical use of : — 

for the Regius professor's lectures, 

ii. 488. 

for Divinity disputations, i. 360 ; 

ii. 131. 

occasionally for B. A. disputations, 

i. 175; ii. 517. 

VOL. V. 



Buildings and institutions : the 
Divinity School (continued) : — 

as robing-room for degrees in the 

Theatre, ii. 210 : still so used at Com- 
memoration. 

for University funerals, i. 479-81, 

484; iii. 161. 

as voting-place for M.P.s for the 

University, ii. 442-3, 460. 

— a show-place, i. 457 ; ii. 528 ; iii. 51, 
238. 

— used by Parliament, ii. 60 ; by the 
law courts, ii. 65. 

The 16 1 8 Schools, 'the New Schools :— 

— subscribers to the building of, i. 78 ; 
iv. 148-9. 

— architect of, i. 160. 

— laying foundation-stone of, iii. 44; 
iv. 139. 

— supposed instability of, i. 251; iv. 
62. 

— statue of James I at, ii. 529 ; iii. 51 : 
sundials at, iv. 57 : coats of arms at, 

i. 313 ; iv. 64. 

— 1660, repairs of, i. 316 ; iv. 66. 

— annual accounts of receipts and ex- 
penditure, iv. 66, 125, 149. 

— incidental mention, ii. 214; iii. 407 ; 
iv. 28, 57. 

— gates of (' doors' of), ii. 528. 
great gate, great east door, i. 484 ; 

ii. 209-10; iii. 161, 235, 239. 

■ gate, i. e. the south gate probably, 

iii. 84. 

gate, not said which, used for 

posting University notices, ii. 351 ; 
iii. 429. 

— quadrangle of, i. 172 ; ii. 209, 529; 
iii. 63, 84, 161, 235, 338. 

a place for publicly burning books 

condemned by the University, iii. 63, 
338- 

— tower, i. 70, 326 ; ii. 64, 265 ; iii. 
407 ; iv. 64. 

called ' the University tower,' i. 

384 ; ii. 283 ; iii. 276. 

contains the University archives 

and other MS. collections bearing on 
the history and antiquities of the Uni- 
versity, i. 150, 326,429; ii. 1 1-2, 30, 
32, 265, 283, 301 ; iii. 202-3, 276, 
326 ; iv. 122-4, 203, 211. 

— vault, iii. 407 : the note is perhaps 
in error ; the proscholium may be 
meant. 

— proscholium, ii. 63, 120, 351, 529; 
iii. 368 ; iv. 139. 

— the gallery, the long gallery, the 
picture gallery, i. e. the third story, i. 
402,457 ; ii. 57, 64-5, i6i(where delete 
note 3, as in error), 239, 300, 529. 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Buildings and institutions: the 

1618 Schools {continued) : — 
coin-room, v. 159. 

— acadcmic.nl use of : — 

meeting-place of the University on 

some ceremonial occasions, i. 492 ; 
iii. 228. 

University funerals, i. 484 ; ii. 66 ; 

iii. 161-2. 

— — muster-place of the University 
militia, i. 54-5, 57 : the University 
armoury was there, iv. 80. 

disputations and other degree- 
exercises held there, i. 98, T49, 167, 
175, 177, 186, 197, 297, 300 ; ii. 158 ; 
iii. 88 : frequented by senior graduates, 

i. 349 : often accompanied by riots, i. 
29 7 > 300, 384- 

of the Divinity faculty held 

there when the Divinity school was 
closed, ii. 131-2. 

professors' lectures there, ii. 158, 

161, 395 5. iii- 2 67- 

— ceremonial use, in connexion with 
distinguished visitors, i. 456-7, 496 ; 

ii. 156-61, 209-10, 376, 528-9; iii. 
51,234-5,487. 

— external use : — 

1642-3, as the royal arsenal and 

store-houses, i. 70, 74, 83-4, 98. 
1643, for meeting of the law 

courts, i. 83. 
1665, for meeting of the law 

courts, ii. 51, 62, 65-6. 
1665, for meeting of Parliament, 

ii. 60, 66. 

1 68 1, for meeting of Parliament, 

i. 172 ; ii. 529-30 ; iii. 84. 

— Anatomy and Medicine, school of, 

ii. 63-4: Regius professor of Medicine 
lectures there, ii. 161. 

museum there, i. 240, 457 ; ii. 

161, 529. 

— Astronomy school, i. 83 ; ii. 60, 63-5, 
5I7-. . 

— Divinity, or Theological, school, v. 
161. 

— Experimental Philosophy school, iii. 
333 ; v. 157. 

— Geometry school, ii. 60, 63-5, 158, 
161, 5*7, 53i, 534- 

— Greek school, see Languages. 

— History school, ii. 63, 65 ; iii. 267. 

— Jurisprudence, see Law. 

■ — Languages school, ScholaLinguarum, 
i. e. Greek and Hebrew, ii. 63-4, 161 : 
called also the Greek school, ii. 60, 
^3-5j 517; iii- I3 1 : and the school 
of Tongues, ii. 64, 158. 

the speech on Dr. John Morris's 

foundation, in praise of Sir Thomas 



Buildings and institutions : the 
16 1 8 Schools (continued) : — 
Bodley and of Hebrew literature, was 
spoken here, v. 28. 

— Law school, Jurisprudence school, i. 
74, 98; ii. 63-5, 132. _ 

— Logic school, i. 74 ; ii. 63. 

— Mathematical library, i. e. Sir Henry 
Savile's, ii. 60. 

— Medicine, see Anatomy. 

— Metaphysic school, ii. 63. 

— Moral Philosophy school, ii. 63, 65, 
53 2 - 

— Music school, i. 83 ; ii. 63. 
gallery in, i. 316. 

organ in, ii. 161 ; iii. 162. 

weeklymusical performances there 

(on Thursdays), i. 223,316; ii. 69, 235. 

annual ' music-lecture ' there (on 

Act Saturday), v. 149 : unless trans- 
ferred to the Sheldonian, v. 149. 

concerts arranged there, by the 

' University music,' for distinguished 
visitors, and on state occasions, i. 316 ; 

ii. 158, 161, 210. 

— Natural History school, iii. 52, 55, 
78; v. 157. 

— Natural Philosophy school, i. 83, 149, 
167, i75> x 77> !86, 197 ; ii. 63, 65, 
158, 161 ; iii. 88. 

— ' Old ' school, ii. 63. 

— Rhetoric school, i. 84 ; ii. 60, 63-4. 

— Theology, see Divinity. 

— Tongues, see Languages. 
Sheldonian, the Theatre : — 

— site of, i. 204, 320 ; iv. 71-2. 

— designed by Sir Christopher Wren, 
v. 83. 

— the gift of Gilbert Sheldon, v. 68. 

— building of, ii. in, 120, 564; iv. 69, 
71-2, 125. 

the painted roof of, ii. 164, 266, 

529; iii. 239, 494. 

stone-carver of, ii. 160. 

vice-chancellor's seat in, ii. 518; 

iii. 51 : senior proctor's seat, iii. 52 : 
senior Terrae filius 1 seat, iii. 18. 

music-gallery in, ii. 210, 248, 387 ; 

iii- 52. 

organ in, 1669, temporary, iv. 71. 

new organ, built 1671, ii. 223, 

386, 518; iii. 51-2, 141. 
view of Oxford from the top, ii. 

529- 

north gate of, iii. 239. 

engraving of, David Loggan's, iv. 

68 : for the title-pages of books, ii. 

378- 

— endowment of, ii. 165, 192, 194; iv. 
72. 

— yearly accounts of, iv. 125, 149. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



163 



Buildings and institutions: Shel- 
donian, the Theatre {continued) : — 

— curators of, ii. 197 ; iii. 207 : especi- 
ally Dr. John Fell, v. 43. 

— formal opening of, 1669, ii. 162, 165 ; 

iv. 71-2. 

— academical use of : — 

— — the Encaenia held there, v. 153. 

the Act kept there, v. 150-2. 

the music-lecture on Act Saturday 

occasionally there, v. 149. 

used for great University functions, 

honorary degrees, Sec, ii. 209-10, 
3*5- 386-7, 495, 5 T 8, 532 ; iii. 17-8, 
47, 5 1 " 2 , H 1 , 3C- 1 , 494-5 ; i y * 7 6 - 

degree- exercises in, iii. 137, 300; 

v. 147. 

the University press, in the base- 
ment, v. 160. 

Convocations and Congregations 

occasionally held there, ii. 517. 

— a show -place, ii. 158, 160, 224, 529; 

i». 57, 2 39, 487-. 

— incidental mention, ii. 200, 255, 278, 
280, 451-2,479; iii. 257-8; iv.69, 70. 

Vice-chancellor s Court, Curia Cancel- 
larii : — 

— from 1642 generally presided over by 
a legal assessor, i. 76, 84-5, 106, 
157-8, 163-4, 256, 273, 452 ; ii. 128, 
132; iii. 415,428-9,484-5; iv. 7, ii, 
13, 21, 29-36, 40-6, 59. 

— registrar, registrary, of, ii. 194, 264; 

iii. 64, 485; iv. 2, 37, 44,46. 

— proctors in, ii. 56, 348 ; iii. 428 ; iv. 
2, 11. 

— apparitor-beadle, iii. 407, 429 ; man- 
datory, iv. 2, 3, 16, 20, 34-5, 42, 46. 

— registers of, i. 385, 417 ; iv. 140-2. 

— generally held in the apodyterium, 
v. 157 : but the minor proceedings 
were often gone through in the vice- 
chancellor's rooms, iii. 428 ; or in 
the assessor's rooms, iii. 415, 428. 

— procedure in, iii. 407, 428 ; iv. p. v, 
1-46 : the form • stipulatio,' iii. 409 ; 

iv. 2, 20. 

— jurisdiction in cases of breach of the 
peace, ii. 381, 383-4; iii. 256: of 
libel, iii. 407 ; iv. p. v, 1-46 : over 
taverns, ii. 128: in probate of wills, 
i. 350 ; iv. 142, 212. 

Miscellanea Academica : — 

— arms of the University, i. 82, 188, 
462 ; ii. 411 ; iii. 131, 147, 276. 

— calendar, iv. 128-9, I 3 I , 205. 

— charters, i. 77 ; iii. 322, 415 ; iv. 60, 
64, 212, 219. 

— chest, iii. 404 ; iv. 58, 126, 150. 

the mathematical chest, iv. 124. 

of three keys, iv. 123. 



Miscellanea Academica (cont.) : — 

— chest of five keys, iv. 126, 182. 
Kempe's chest, i. 77. 

— coins, the University collection of, 
v. 159. 

— collections : — 

to defray law-charges of defend- 
ing the University privileges, i. 159. 

for the Piedmontese, i. 198. 

for Huguenots, iii. 11. 

for Scotch Episcopalians, iii. 355. 

for converted Jews, i. 422. 

for Roger L'Estrange, iii. 26. 

for foreigners, i. 76, 155 ; ii. 271, 

307 ; iv. 74, 76. 

for paving the streets, ii. 217, 519 ; 

iii. 25. 

for burnt-down Northampton, iv. 

74- 

— conflict, the great, I354, * v - I0 7> 
151, 186, 206, 208, 305. 

— cross, the great University, iv. 126. 

— militia, the University, consisted 
nominally (like that of the county, 
v. 132) of a regiment of foot and a 
troop of horse, iii. 145. 

— — ' privileged persons ' served in 
this, as well as ' members of the 
University,' v. 150 ; and were required 
to have arms ready, i. 52-4 ; iv. 56. 

the University had an armoury, 

iv. 77, 82 ; and some colleges had 
armouries, i. 53-4, 56, 61, 63. 

1639, mustered on proclamation 

of war with Scotland, iv. 56. 

1642, August, called out on be- 
half of Charles I, i. 52-9, 430; iv. 
222 : Sept., disarmed by Parliament, 
i. 61, 63-5. 

equipment, helmet with back- 

and breast-piece, i. 53 : pike, i. 53-5, 
57, or halbert, i. 54, 57, or musket, i. 
53-4 : used the drums and flag of the 
Cooks' Company, i. 55. 

^ a regiment of foot, at first 300 

strong, i. 54, then 400, i. 55, and 
afterwards still larger, i. 56 : also, a 
company of archers, i. 59. 

1643-4, called out by Charles I 

to garrison Oxford, i. 69, 93, 96, 100, 
129, 430 ; iv. 222. 

a regiment of foot, at first 400 

strong, i. 102, afterwards 600, i. 107 : 
colonel, the earl of Dover, i. 106-7, 

497- , / 

— — 1651, a 'troop (? of horse), 
raised on news of Charles IPs inva- 
sion, i. 167 ; iv. 63 : they had colours 
of their own, i. 1 70. 

1655, mustered on occasion of the 

Cavalier rising in the West, iv. 63. 



M 2 



164 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Miscellanea Academica : militia 

(contimied) : — 
1 66 1, intended muster on alarm 

of civil war, i. 379. 
1667, mustered when the Dutch 

fleet was in the Thames, iv. 69. 
1678, intended muster on alarm 

of the popish plot, ii. 416 ; iv. 77. 

— — 1685, mustered on occasion of 
Monmouth's invasion, iii. 145-52, 
183, 250, 533; iv. 80: the charges 
being met by a tax on people graduat- 
ing, iii. 151. 

— — — equipped with muskets and 
pikes, iii. 146, 149, from the royal 
arsenals at Windsor and London, iii. 
146 ; iv. 80. 

— a troop of horse, iii. 145-7, 

151-2; iv. 80: with cap tain, lieutenant, 
cornet, iii. 146, trumpeters, iv. 80. 

— a regiment of foot, i. 145-6, 

comprising six companies, each with 
captain, lieutenant, ensign, iii. 146- 
52, in uniform, iii. 152. Each com- 
pany had its colours, iii. 146-51 ; iv. 
80 : some had also drums, iii. 150-1 ; 
iv. 80. 

• 1688, mustered in prospect of the 

Dutch invasion, iv. 82. 

— music, the University, i. 205, 212 ; 
iv. 218. 

■ they played on wind instruments, 

ii. 210 ; iii. 230. 

they played at colleges, iii. 210 : 

possibly this explains the 'music- 
day ' at a college, ii. 75. 

— — they were partly paid by sub- 
scription, ii. 479. 

— Notitia Acad. Oxon., iii. 139. 

— patronage, of the lectureship in S. 
Giles, Oxford, ii. 543 ; iii. 329 : of 
Seiston, Leic, ii. 550. 

— plate, iv. 84, 126, 152 : communion- 
plate, iv. 51. 

— ' precinct' of the University, iv. 217-8. 

— privileges, i. 77, 384; ii. 7-8, 128; 

iii. 89; iv. 59, 61, 186, 208, 210, 
212, 217-9 ! v « I ^3- 

exemption from heralds' visita- 
tions, i. 45 ; iv. 52-3. 

— — collects the taxes from its own 
members, iii. 319. 

control of streets, ii. 58, 515; 

iii. 42 ; iv. 210. 

night-watch, v. 121. 

censorship of press, iii. 164, 329. 

control of market, ii. 128, 520. 

jurisdiction over barbers, ii. 328. 

right to felons' goods, ii. 125 ; 

iv. 68, 70, 76, 210, 217 ; and especi- 
ally suicides' goods, v. 130. 



Miscellanea Academica : privileges 

{continued) : — 
frankpledge, view of, iv. 210-1, 

217. 

leet-court, iv. 140, 212, 217-8. 

jurisdiction in probate of wills, v. 

150, 163. 

— property, iv. 208-9. 

— punishments : — 
r- fine, iii. 41. 

■ — — asking pardon in Congregation 
on bended knees, i. 47, 246, 256, 
407; iii. 87; v. 151-2, 159. 

suspension from a degree, i. 46 ; 

ii. 97 : i. e. not allowed to graduate 
till a specified time. 

stopping regency, ii. 19. 

expulsion, i. 256, 488 ; iii. 68, 72, 

96, in, 429; iv. 44-6, 50, 212. 

— — discommoning, i. 158, 488; ii. 
85, 278, 295, 383, 400; iv. 212, 217. 

— seal, ii. 392, 517 ; iv. 46, 152. 

— • — affixed to diplomas, and pro- 
tected by a silver box, ii. 153 ; iv. 52, 
56-8, 60, 62, 65-6, 69, 72-4, 79, 81-2. 

— statutes, iv. 127-31. 

Laudian code, iv. 55-6, 66, 128, 

130-1. 

called also the Caroline statutes, 

ii. 132. 

— — Statuta Aularia, i.e. University 
rules for the halls, iii. 116 ; iv. 130-1. 

manner of passing new statutes, 

ii. 309. 

— studies, some : — 

anatomy, iii. 387; v. 219. 

architecture, ii. 61. 

canon law, i. 187; iii. 109, 215; 

iv. 136. 

chemistry, i. 472-5 ; iii. 55-6, 

75 5 V- 1 57- 

civil law, i. 187, 210, 332. 

globes, the, i. 496. 

grammar, ii. 322 ; iv. 135. 

logic, i. 162, 230 ; ii. 1. 

mathematics, i. 473, 508 ; ii. 63, 

183, 375 5 iii- 29. 

optics, ii. 31 8. 

the new philosophy, ii. 429; iii. 56. 

the old philosophy, ii. 1 ; iii. 56. 

rhetoric, i. 464; ii. 121 ; iii. 44; 

iv. 135. 

— visitation : — 

by the archbishop of Canterbury, 

iv. 55> *44> 20 9- 
by Henry VIII's commissioners, 

i. 424 ; iii. 219; iv. 144, 152, 209. 
by Edward VI's commissioners, 

iv. 130, 209. 
by Mary Tudor's commissioners, 

iv. 129-31, 144, 209. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



165 



Miscellanea Academica: visitation 
(continued) : — 

by Elizabeth's commissioners, i. 

419, 424; iv. 144, 209. 

by the Parliamentary visitors, i. 

16, 130, 133, 141-4, 153, 155- 161-2, 
166-7, 174. 204, 268, 287, 3°7< 3 2 3> 
327-8» 33o, 333, 365. 394> 435, 445 5 

ii. 95, 484, 508, 552 ; iii. 202-3 ; iv. 
60, 62, 144, 215, 286. 

— — by Charles II's commissioners, 
v. 33- 

The Halls : — 

— heads of the halls nominated by the 
chancellor of the University, v. 143 ; 
and admitted to office by the vice- 
chancellor, v. 145. 

— heads of the halls were often non- 
resident, ii. 56. 

— statutes for, v. 164. 

— the University is trustee for, iii. 189, 
457- 

— graduates of, have a turn for the 
proctorship, ii. 132, 222. 

S. Alban hall : — 

— events : — 

I 549» place in disputations, iv. 129. 

1605-12, census of, iv. 151. 

1 661, disrepute of, i. 402. 

1663-82, question as to parish 

boundary through, i. 510; ii. 223-4; 

iii. 15-6, 46. 

1664, decaying condition of, ii. 19. 

1673, picks up under Narcissus 

Marsh, ii. 264, 468. 
1674, weekly music-meetings at, 

i. 275 ; ii. 264. 
1675, epidemic of small-pox, ii. 

320. 

1679, the hall again decays, ii. 

440, 468-9. 
1688, has bonfire for the queen's 

pregnancy, iii. 255. 

— principals : — 

1625, Richard Zouch, v. 84. 

1661, Giles Sweit, i. 402, 447. 

1664, Thomas Lamplugh, v. 57. 

1673, Narcissus Marsh, v. 60. 

1679, Thomas Bouchier, v. 28. 

— vice-principal, ii. 130; iii. 15, 46, 
194 : tutor, ii. 469. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
135, i37> 203, 233, 319, 503, 510; 
»• n6, 133, 334, 351, 512, 550; iii. 
15-6, 160, 166, 178, 226, 315; iv. 
151 ; v. 15-6. 

commoner, i. 476, 478; ii. 139,320. 

batler, ii. 285, 320, 468. 

servitor, ii. 320. 

— servants: butler, i. 146, 511; ii. 
187, 468 (' and manciple') : cook, i. 



The Halls: S. Alban hall {cont.)-.— 
425, 448 : under-cook, i. 447: bed- 
maker, ii. 468. 

— customs : required to attend Merton 
college services, as the parish church, 
on surplice days, i. 51 r. 

buried in the north transept of 

Merton college chapel, being the 
parish church, i. 476, 478; ii. 130, 
J 39, l8 7, 285, 320 : or, for poorest 
members, in Merton college church- 
yard, ii. 320. 

— buildings : — 

— — principal's lodgings, i. 510; ii. 
223-4. 

buttery, i. 510-r ; ii. 468. 

kitchen, i. 511 ; ii. 224. 

■ quadrangle, i. 511 ; iii. 16. 

gate, ii. 224 ; iii. 15-6, 46. 

— incidental mention, i. 45, 447 ; ii. 
156, 462 ; iii. 384. 

Broadgates hall, v. 113. 
S. Edmund hall : — 

— events : — 

1605-12, census of, iv. 151. 

1670, flourishing state of, under 

Thomas Tully, ii. 337. 
1674, riot by undergraduates of, 

ii. 299. 

1678, Protestant zeal of, ii. 422. 

1680-2, building of new chapel 

and library, ii. 485 ; iii. 11-2 ; iv. 

77, 170. 

1683, small-pox in, iii. 81. 

1684-6, disputed election to the 

principalship, iii. 90, 94, 115-6, 126, 

185 ; iv. 190. 

— principals : — 

1632, Adam Airay, i. 444. 

1658, Thomas Tully, ii. 306, 

337- 

— — 1676, Stephen Penton, ii. 308, 
338, 446, 548; iii. 24, 90, 129. 

1684, Thomas Crosth wait, iii. 90, 

94, IJ 5~6, 185- 
1685, John Mill, v. 62. 

— vice-principals : — 

Daniel Potenger, iii. 67. 

Andrew Allam, v. 24. 

White Kennet, v. 57. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
441; ii. 138, 150, 244, 334, 351, 

549, 557-8, 561; iii- 9, I2 , 39, 
81, 83, 85, 91, 106, 129, 174, 178, 
208, 218, 282, 368, 386, 408, 447; 
iv. 151, 169. 

gentlemen-commoners, i. 42 ; ii. 

74, 561 ; iii. 168, 255 ; iv. 169. 

upper-commoner, ii. 75. 

semi-commoner, iv. 169. 

— — commoner, ii. 2-3, 132, 377. 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The HALLS,: S. Edmund hall (con- 
tinued) : — 

bailor, battcllar, ii. 521, 534; iv. 

169. 

servitor, ii. 548; iv. 169. 

— buried in S. Peter's in the East, the 
parish church, ii. 3, 74, 138, 150, 
548. 

— chapel, ii. 485; iii. 11-2: marriage 
in, iii. 194. 

— common-room, iii. 4. 

— library, ii. 485. 

— buttery books, iv. 169 : plate, ii. 74 ; 
iv. 170. 

— benefactors, iv. 170. 

— manciple, i. 20; iii. 119, 280. 

— degree fees, iii. 106. 

— incidental mention, i. 168, 188. 
Gloucester hall : — 

— events : — 

1560, code of statutes, iv. 159. 

j 560-1 640, frequented by Ro- 
manist students, i. 419-20, 465. 

1605-12, census of, iv. 151. 

1626-47, flourishing, ii. 398. 

1658 (circ), a play acted there, i. 

1660, a play acted there, i. 350. 

167 1, bishop Warner's exhi- 
bitioners, ii. 226. 

— — 1675-8, decay of, ii. 304, 364, 
398 ; iii. 1. 

1677, proposal to make it a col- 
lege for Greeks, ii. 379. 

1687, burglary at, iii. 241, 249. 

1692, repairs, iii. 399. 

— — — revival of the college for 
Greeks scheme, iii. 399, 426. 

— — 1698, Greek students at, iii. 426. 

— principals : — 

1626-47, Degory Wheare, iii. 

398- 

1662-92, Byrom Eaton, ii. 398 ; 

iii. 220, 241, 249, 330, 390, 426. 
1692, Benjamin Woodroff, v. 82. 

— deputy of principal, iii. 390. 

— tutor, i. 419. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
249, 251, 319, 342, 419-20, 424; ii. 
203, 275 ; iii. 263, 440; iv. 147, 151. 

gentlemen-commoners, ii. 541-2 ; 

iii. 85. 

— buildings : — 

principal's lodgings, iii. 241. 

chapel, ii. 398. 

hall, ii. 398 : refectory, i. 336. 

great gate, iii. 241. 

— plate, iii. 241. 

— buried in S. Thomas', the parish 
church, ii. 542 : but see Wood's City, 
iii. 325. 



The Halls: Gloucester hall {con- 
tinued") : — 

— incidental mention, i. 91 ; ii. 236; 
iii. 284, 321 ; iv. 159. 

Hart hall : — 

— events : — 

— — 1549, place in disputations, iv. 
129. 

1605-12, census of, iv. 151. 

— — 1663, new buildings, i. 475. 

1663-5, l ax discipline, ii. 56. 

1676-7, fever, ii. 359. 

collections towards a history of, 

i. 248 ; iv. 159. 

— principals : — 

1599, John Eveleigh, i. 279. 

1604, Theodore Price, i. 355. 

1622, Thomas lies, i. 154. 

1660, Timothy Baldwin, i. 328. 

1663, John Lamphire, v. 57. 

— 1688, William Thornton, iii. 262. 

— vice-principals, ii. 24 ; iii. 28, 77, 
35 2 > 443- 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
510; ii. 219, 232, 288, 377, 415, 
561; iii. 59, 216, 264, 345, 379, 
479- 

— principal's lodgings, i. 475 ; iii. 262. 

— buried in S. Peter's in the East, ii. 24, 
4*5- 

— butler, iii. 450. 

— incidental mention, i. 170, 431 ; ii. 
494. 

Magdalen hall : — 

— events : — 

— foundation of, iii. 456. 

1605-12, census of, iv. 151. 

1 66 1, Puritan feeling in, i. 413, 

415. 

lax discipline, i. 414. 

1675, small-pox in, ii. 320. 

1680, the fellows of Magdalen 

college wish to recover the right to 
nominate the principal, ii. 540-2 ; 
iii. 457. 

1683, empty, iii. 37. 

1694, the fellows of Magdalen 

college try at law to recover their 
right, iii. 444, 446, 455-7 ; iv. 163. 

burglary at, iii. 465. 

— principals, iii. 456. 

— — 1646, John Wilkinson, i. 161. 
1648, Henry Wilkinson, i. 147-8, 

188, 238, 407, 413-5, 427, 440, 453; 

ii. p. viii ; iv. 163. 

1662, James Hyde, ii. 91, 512, 

540. 

1681, William Levet, v. 58. 

1694, Richard Adams, iii. 444, 

446. 

— tutor, ii. 475. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



167 



The Halls : Magdalen hall {con- 
tinued) : — 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 37, 
130, 134, 263, 348, 415, 427, 502; 

ii. p. viii, 47, 116, 225, 274, 296, 

3 2 3, 475. 54°, 54 2 , 55 2 ; Hi- 19* 6 °> 
77, 108, 171, 219,232, 237,312,332, 
389, 446, 514. 

exhibitioner, iii. 457. 

commoner, ii. 77. 

— buildings, iii. 456. 

principal's lodgings, iii. 446. 

refectory or hall, iii. 446. 

library, i. 413 ; ii. p. viii ; iii. 457. 

buttery, iii. 465. 

gates, ii. 540, 542 ; iii. 446. 

— site, iii. 456. 

— plate, iii. 457, 465. 

— benefactors, iii. 79, 189, 443, 457 ; 
iv. 80. 

— buried in S. Peter's East church, ii. 77, 
296, 540. 

— incidental mention, i. 500; ii. 323; 

iii. 533; iv. 25, 163. 
S. Mary hall : — 

— 1549, place in disputations, iv. 129. 

— 1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

— principals ; — 

1660, Martin Lluellin, i. 316. 

1664, Joseph Crovvther, i. 23; ii. 

132, 421 ; iii. 317. 
1690, William Wyatt, v. 83. 

— vice-principal, iii. 394. 

— members, incidental notices of, i. 48, 
i 34j 3 2 9> 4 86 > 5°9; 3 6 > 2 49> 34°, 
35 0 - 1 , 43i, 456, 468, 489, 546, 550; 
iii. 16, 60, 142, 157, 328, 393. 

■ gentleman-commoners, i. 226 ; iii. 

3 6 - 

— buried in S. Mary's church, ii. 41. 

— incidental mention, ii. 468 ; iii. 352. 
New Inn hall, New Inn : — 

— 1605-12, census of, iv. 151. 

— 1643, the mint there, i. 80-1, 95. 

— 1662, ejection of Puritans, i. 454-5, 
499 : 

— principals : — 

1626, Christopher Rogers, i. 65, 

453,499; ii. 177. 
1663, William Stone, i. 478; ii. 

173, 346, 421 ; iii. 108. 
1684, Thomas Bayley, iii. 107, 

380. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
127, 130-1, 137-8, 508; ii. 218, 
322,469, 5485558; iii- 7 6 > IIT > 2 79> 
458. 

— butler, iii. 145. 

— gate, i. 1 90-1. 

— incidental notices, i. 48, 84, 111, 
190-1 ; ii. 469, 482 ; iii. 85. 



The Colleges. 

Wood has given, in the course of 
his notes, few general indications of 
the college life of his own time, from 
which we might draw parallels or 
contrasts to the present day. The 
following are some of the more salient 
points. 

— music : — 

In the period 1649-75 there were 

numerous private music-meetings in 
different college rooms, the members 
of the music club probably enter- 
taining the club in rotation, i. 212, 
2 75> 2 9 8 , 4 2 3> 455- These meetings 
were apparently on Fridays, i. 242 
('cider'), 275 : but are found also on 
other days, e. g. Tuesday, i. 469 ; 
Thursday, i. 237. 

Some of these had a more perma- 
nent character, meeting regularly at 
the same college, e.g. at Magdalen 
college, i. 205 ; and at Exeter (and 
subsequently, S. Alban hall), i. 275. 

Similar meetings appear to have 
been held officially, and paid for by 
the colleges, ii. 75. At these 'the 
University music ' was perhaps in- 
vited to play, v. 164. In particular, 
Wood mentions, 1684, a 'music- 
night,' iii. 88; 1685, 4 our -music- 
night,' iii. 131 ; 1686, 'music-night,' 
iii. 178; 1687, ' music-night,' iii. 209; 
which we may conjecture to have 
been a meeting of this sort at 
Merton. 

Music was a feature at set college 
entertainments, ii. 490 ; iii. 210. 

Four colleges only, Christ Church, 
S. John's, Magdalen, and New college, 
are mentioned as having music at 
their chapel services, i. 204-5, 347> 

356-7- 

— processions : — 

horseback procession to meet a 

new head, i. 385 ; iii. 143, 208, 436. 
his college escorts a lecturer to 

the schools, iii. 434. 
there is a procession of the colleges 

to S. Mary's on certain days, iii. 

140. 

— bell-ringing on queen's birthday, 
iii. 421. 

— speeches : — 

at the reception of a new head, 

(i) by a member of the college, (ii) 
by the new head, ii. 542. 

at the reception of distinguished 

visitors, i. 496-8; ii. 17-8, 59, 
i57» 160, 385; iii. 47-51, 53, 208, 
211. 



t68 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges {continued) : — 

— verses : — 

of welcome recited to distinguished 

visitors, i. 497-8; ii. 59, 160; iii. 48, 
50-1, 53- 

— — of condolence on the death of 
members, i. 426 ; v. 28. 

— entertainments : — 

at the reception of a new head, 

i. 393- 

on occasion of the admission of 

the proctors, v. 146. 

' gaudies,' i. e. a better dinner than 

usual, ii. 75 ; iii. 533. 

on certain thanksgiving days, 

e.g. Gunpowder plot, iii. 169; Re- 
storation day, iii. 267 ; king's ac- 
cession, iii. 179,209; king's birthday, 
iii. 279; and specially appointed 
thanksgivings, iii. 271. 

— sickness : — 

cases of severe, or infectious, ill- 
ness Went out of college into rooms, 
of apothecaries, i. 191 ; ii. 249 : of 
physicians, ii. 205, 402 : of college 
servants, i. 287 ; ii. 36 : of Oxford 
relatives, ii. 310; iii. 468. 

— the passing bell : — according to the 
universal custom of the country, a 
bell was tolled on receipt of the news 
of the death of a member of a college. 
This was sometimes the bell of the 
parish church, see references in All 
Souls and Corpus Christi ; sometimes 
the bell of the college itself, see 
references in Christ Church, Magdalen 
college, Merton, New college. 

— heads : — 

see supra, Procession, Speeches, 

Entertainments. 
■ sometimes kept boarders, e. g. 

Sir Thomas Clayton, i. 440; Dr. 

John Fell, v. 44. 
impaled the college arms, ii. 

317. 

Wood and his friends disliked 

married heads, i. 395-8 ; ii. 44, 185, 
2 7 J > 297, 540; iii. 436. 

— fellows : — 

by examination, i. 147 ; ii. 343. 

jocular ceremonies at end of year 

of probation, iii. 513. 

— tutors : — 

had control of their pupils' purses, 

ii. 429 : see the illuminative verses in 
Roxburghe Ballads, ix. p. xciii*. 

wrote verses and exercises for 

their wealthy pupils, i. 243 ; iii. 50-1, 
53; v. 153. 

— M.A.s. :— 

did not associate with B.A.s, 



The Colleges {continued) \ — 

i. 389, 465 ; nor with undergraduates, 
i. 423. 

— scholars : — 

■ often nominated by individual 

fellows, i. 135, 162, 285. 
often chosen by preference from 

sons of college tenants, i. 134-6. 

— undergraduates : — 

had to ' cap ' the fellows, i. 299, 

300. 

had to stand bare-headed in pre- 
sence of an M.A., i. 291, 299; ii. 
468 ; iii. 256. 

— — see chamber fellows, v. 169. 
— freshmen, see infra under Halls'. 

— chapels : the vice-chancellor acted 
as their ordinary, iii. 125; v. 145. 

— halls : — 

the places for posting University 

notices, ii. 206-7, 298, 387, 426 ; iii. 
140, 224. 

up to the Restoration, were on 

certain days the general common- 
room of the college, with charcoal 
fires, i. 133, 140: carol-singing, iii. 
513: Sec, 

special note may be taken of 

the ' fresh nights' in hall, i. 423 ; ii. 
96; iii. 513. These were the 'ini- 
tiation' of freshmen^ i.e. admission 
to the rank of seniors, culminating 
on Shrove Tuesday, i. 138, 140-1. 
The chief feature was buffooning 
speeches, i. 133, 138-40, under penal- 
ties of tucking, i. 134, 139, or drink- 
ing salted beer, i. 139. — At the first 
coming of freshmen there was in 
Brian Twyne's time a ceremony called 
'salting' them, iv. 60. 

hats seem to have been worn in 

hall when the M.A.s were absent, 
iii. 256. 

the ' grace-cup ' at the high table, 

i. 95, gave the signal for concluding 
meals, i. 300; iii. 256 (by impli- 
cation). 

hours of meals : — 

the morning draught, i. 154, 

388. 

breakfast, in" hall, at 9 a.m., 

i. 389. 

dinner, in hall, at 11 a.m., 

ii. 239; iii. 126, 141, 161, 166, 253, 
278. 

bread and beer, at 3 p.m., 

i. 298. 

supper, in hall, at 6 p.m., i. 

138. 

— common-rooms : — 

the ' common fire' was originally 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



169 



The Colleges : common-rooms {con- 
tinued') : — 

in the hall, iii. 514 : after the Resto- 
ration the M.A.s shared their fire 
in a room called the common-room, 
iii. 3, 4. See the notices under 
Merton common-room, which are 
doubtless typical. In 1678 Wood 
says men spent ' whole afternoons' in 
them, i. e. till 5 p.m., when the 
coffee-honses opened, ii. 429. 

— rooms : — 

the general arrangement was that 

of a ' chamber,' i. e. a large living 
and sleeping room shared by two or 
more students, with some small closets 
(' studies ') in which they did their 
reading, i. 396 ; ii. 4. Hence the 
frequent mention of ' chamber- fellows,' 
i- I35> l6 3, 201 ; iii. 253. 

— gate :— 

a hatchment was often put over 

the gate on the death of the head or 
other member, i. 351, 445 ; iii. 6, 212, 
216. 

■ — bonfires were often made, iii. 166, 
255> 368, 372-3, 4 2 4 ? 4 § 8; spon- 
taneously (e.g. iii. 31, 48), or by 
order from court (e. g. iii. 72, 271). 

in a quadrangle, i. 101 ; iii. 129, 

141, 149, 166, 533. 

in the street before the college 

gate, i. 304; iii. 129, 141, 161, 232, 
4°5> 533- 

November 5 was so observed, 

iii. 406. 

— punishments : — 

putting out of commons, i. 166 ; 

ii. 18. 

suspending from fellowship, i. 

166 ; ii. 18. 
ejection from fellowship, iii. 291, 

298. 

rustication, ii. 139. 

whipping, ii. 139. 

— visitors : — 

proposal to appoint only lay visi- 
tors, iv. 217. 
appeal to visitor, iii. 69, 126. 

— oddities : — 

ejected fellows marry jointures, iii. 

76, 533- 

undergraduates escort an expelled 

person out of Oxford, iii. 106. 
All Souls College. 

— events : — 

1437, foundation, iii. 232. 

1549, place in disputations, iv. 

128. 

1 574 (circ), Romanist sympathies, 

iii. 365. 



The Colleges : All Souls {cont.) : — 

1605-12, census, iv. 15 t. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81, 94. 

1656, members of, frequent the 

coffee-house, i. 201. 

1660, visited by Charles II's com- 
missioners, i. 336. 

1 66 1, entertains the chancellor of 

the University, i. 411, 415. 

1663, residence of the chancellor 

during the royal visit, i. 494-5, 499. 

viewed by Charles II, i. 497-8. 

1666, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments and registers, ii. 75-6. 

favouritism at a fellowship 

election, ii. 93-4. 

1669, viewed by Cosmo de Medici, 

ii. 160. 

— , viewed by Elias Ashmole, 

ii. 164. 

1670, viewed by the prince of 

Orange, ii. 208. 
1672, flooded by a rain-tempest, 

ii. 249. 

1676, scourge of small-pox, ii. 

355- 

1680, the visitor issues injunctions 

against corrupt resignations, ii. 500. 

1 68 1, quarters of the archbishop 

of Canterbury ; consecration of a 
bishop in the chapel, ii. 521. 

1682, viewed by the Morocco 

ambassador, iii. 17. 

Tory demonstration at, iii. 

3i- 

1683, viewed by the duke of 

York, iii. 49. 
1685, rejoicings on accession of 

James II, iii. 129. 
leads the way in the University 

militia raised against Monmouth, iii. 

146-7, 151-2. 
1687, mandate to elect the king's 

nominee warden, iii. 208. 
bonfire in honour of James 

II's visit, iii. 232. 

the festive warden, iii. 243. 

1688, illumination for the queen's 

pregnancy, iii. 255, and for the birth 

of the' prince of Wales, iii. 271. 
dispute between the warden 

and a chaplain, iii. 263, 404, 447. 
Romanist sympathies in, iii. 

2£5> 264. 

■ — mandate to appoint the king's 

nominee to a benefice, iii. 274. 

1 691, ejection of non-juring fel= 

lows, iii. 374. 

1696, entertainment of the chan- 
cellor of the University, iii. 494, 496. 



170 WOOD'S LIR 

The Colleges : At.l Souls {cont.) : — 

1698, dispute l)Clwccn the warden 

and a chaplain, ii. 272. 

— founder, iii. 232 ; iv. 153. 

— visitor (archbishop of Canterbury), 

ii. 272, 500: iii. 263, 404, 447. 

— wardens : — 

1 57 1, Robert Hoveden, ii. 213 ; iv. 

153. , , 

1636, Gilbert Sheldon, v. 68. 

1648, John Palmer, i. 148, 303-4, 

306-7; ii. 26, 151, 192 ; iv. 61. 

1660, Gilbert Sheldon, v. 68. 

1661, John Meredith, i. 380,415, 

497; ii. 42, 127. 
1665, Thomas Jeames, v. 55. 

— subwarden, iii. 337. 

— fellows, catalogue of, iv. 153. 

incidental mention of, i. 26-7, 33, 

I37> 148, 177, l86 > IQI -3, 204, 214, 
232, 236, 273-4, 282, 316, 348, 354, 
406,-7, 413, 415, 445, 456, 468, 
497-8; ii. 8, 36, 43, 56, 89, 91, 123, 
136, 138, 189-90, 205, 222, 225, 239, 
245. 253, 259, 273-4, 320-1, 325, 
346, 355, 360, 362, 403, 457, 544; 

iii. 49, 87-8, 94, 109, 118, 146, 148, 
154, 192, 200, 216, 222, 243, 263, 271, 

337. 354, 365, 374, 49^494 5 iv. 128, 
271 ; v. 7. 
probationer-fellows, iii. 513. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
69, 136, 201, 229, 241, 243,259, 290, 
314, 3*6, 335, 4 o6 > 4!8> 427, 433, 
445, 4 6 °, 465, 473, 49°, 49 6 , 5°o, 
502, 509 ; ii. 22, 48, 96-7, 151, 210, 

255, 279, 334, 4 6 4, 474, 5 2 i, 558, 

564; m. 41, 59, 68, 83, 85-6, 127, 

136, 146, 171, 179, 183, 190, 208, 

221, 224, 232, 252, 255, 264, 306, 

308, 311, 343, 365, 375, 428, 432, 

444, 446, 45°, 475, 47§» 482-3, 487, 
495, 50L 

— chaplains, i. 434; ii. 212, 258, 272, 
372 ; iii. 29, 166, 263, 353, 404, 407, 

447, 477- 

— clerks, i. 203. 

— servitors, i. 135 ; ii. 248. 

— servants, i. 202 : butler, iii. 254. 

— ■ customs: — 

the mallard, iii. 512-3. 

fellowship election on All Souls' 

Day (Nov. 2), ii. 93, 325 ; iii. 88, 

374, 513- 

fellowship by purchase, i. 354 : 

corrupt resignations, ii. 500. 
bell of college rings for death of 

fellow, ii. 253. 

— — bell of S. Mary's, the parish 
church, rings for death of fellow, v. 
119. 



AND TIMES. 

The Colleges : All Souls {cont.) :— 

— buildings : — 

— the chapel, ii. 164, 521 ; iii. 17, 49, 
263. 

pinnacles of the chapel, i. 432. 

— the painting in the chapel, ii. 

164. 

burials in the chapel, i. 191, 236, 

273-4, 282, 306 ; ii. 36, 42, 123, 
273-4, 321, 355, 372, 457 5 281. 

burials in the ante-chapel, i. 406-7, 

435 5 34 6 > 457 5 "i- I54» 207, 337, 
354- 

— the hall, i. 415 ; ii. 249 ; iii. 31, 513. 
dugs allowed in, ii. 239. 

— library, iii. 29 ; iv. 159, 198. 

— treasury, ii. 75 ; iv. 90, 152. 

— common-room, iii. 487. 

— warden's lodgings, i. 415, 432, 495 ; 
ii. 75 ; iii. 207-8, 459, 494. 

dining-room of, iii. 243, 405. 

— buttery, ii. 249. 

— kitchen, ii. 249. 

— cellar, iii. 31. 

— sun-dial, ii. 239. 

— quadrangle, i. 432 ; ii. 249 ; iii. 31, 
146-7, 494 (' court'). 

— cloister-door, into chapel, ii. 355. 

— Stafford's alley, iii. 494. 

— the tower, ii. 75 ; iv. 152. 

— the gate, great gate, i. 63, 415 ; iii. 
31,125,232,271,494. 

carving over, i. 63. 

back gate, iii. 485. 

warden's gate, iii. 271. 

— arms of the college, i. 306 ; ii. 42. 

— statutes, iii. 232. 

— muniments, ii. 75-6; iv, 90, 152. 

— site, iv. 153. 

— Oxford property, iv. 153. 

— plate, i. 81, 94. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— incidental notices, i. 55, 159, 168, 
201, 260, 303, 384, 432, 494-5; ii. 
116, 125, 155, 162, 209, 223, 254, 
469; iii. 21, 42, 83, 88, 161, 365, 

393, 487.494; iv- 7, ii; 38,43. 
Balliol college : — 

— founder and foundress, i. 315; iv. 
153. 

i — benefactors, ,iv. 154. 

— events : — 

1549, place in disputations, iv. 

129. 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1636, coffee, ii. 334. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81, 94-5. 

1649, no regent master in, i. 153. 

.1665, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments, ii. 45. 



INDEX III. 

The Colleges : Balliol (cont.) : — 

1666, bishop Warner's benefac- 
tion, ii. 89. 

1668, election of a proctor, ii. 

129, 132-3. 

publication of Henry Savage's 

history of the college, ii. 136. 

1675, research of endowments, ii. 

308. 

styled ' Worcester ' college, ii. 

308. 

1676, suicide, ii. 341. 

1679, J onn Snell's benefaction, ii. 

459- 

murder, ii. 470, 483. 

1680, execution at the gate, ii. 

483. 

1683, viewed by the duke of York, 

«i. 53- 

1685, iorms part of a company in 

the University militia against Mon- 
mouth, iii. 150, 152. 

1 691, ejection of non-juring fel- 
lows, iii. 377. 

— masters, ii. 459. 

1 580, Edmund Lilly, i. 39. 

1637, Thomas Laurence, iv. 59. 

165 1, Henry Savage, v. 68. 

1672, Thomas Good, ii. 247,308, 

339, 403, 447 (displaced a year). 
1678, John Venn, ii. 403, 448 ; 

iii- 53, i97> 214, 219, 240. 

— — 1687, Roger Mander, iii. 241, 
369. 

— vice-master, ii. 132: tutor, ii. 339: 
logic-reader, ii. 132. 

— fellows, catalogue of, ii. 46 ; iv. 154. 

impossibility of ascertaining early 

fellows, ii. 46. 
incidental mention of, ii. 36, 55, 

22 9, 2 94> 3 26 > 339-4°, 348 5 »i- m, 
125. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
J 53, 177-8, 184, 314-5, 330, 335, 
351, 401, 461, 501-2; ii. 304, 354, 
474, 47 6 , 563; iii- 1°, 26, 35, 53, 
117, 120, 136, 150, 213, 218, 220, 
308-9, 361, 368, 370, 386 ; iv. 75, 
154, 226. 

— fellow-commoner, ii. 262. 

— gentlemen-commoners, i. 113, 171, 
178-9, 183, 215 ; iii. 213. 

— commoners, ii. 262, 311, 315, 341; 
iii. 150. 

— servitors, i. 135 ; ii. 470, 483. 

— butler, ii. 198. 

— buildings : — 

— the chapel, ii. 46; iii. 54; iv. 153. 
altar, ii. 246. 

commoners' seat, iii. 1 1 7 : batlers' 

seat, iii. 125. 



ACADEMICAL. 171 

The Colleges : Balliol {cont.) :— 
burials in, ii. 246, 315, 339-4° > 

iii. 117, 125. 

the college also buried in the 

parish church, S. Mary Magdalen, i. 
171, 178-9, 183, 215; ii. 36, 247, 
262, 311 ; and in S. Mary Magdalen 
■churchyard, ii. 341. 

— hall, i. 209. 

— master's lodgings, ii. 46. 

— library, i. 209, 318 ; ii. 28T ; iv. 198, 
202. 

MSS. in, i. 318; iii. 368 ; iv. 104, 

118, 133, 278. 

— treasury, ii. 46. 

— Caesar's lodgings, ii. 341. 

— gate, ii. 483. 

— terrace, iii. 1 20 ; iv. 80 : elms, ii. 433. 

— heraldic glass in, i. 209. 

— plate, i. 8 1, 94 : communion-plate, i. 
95- 

— account-books, ii. 46 : buttery books, 

iv. 154. 

— muniments, ii. 45-6, 48, 84; iv. 153. 

— fresh nights, i. 141. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— close connexion with Worcestershire, 
ii. 308. 

— Balliofergus, v. 68. 

— incidental mention, i. 119, 159, 335, 
466 ; ii. 565 ; iii. 227, 239. 

Brasenose College : — 

— founders, i. 145. 

— benefactors, i. 145 ; ii. 280, 357, 366, 

457- 

— events : — 

I 549, place in disputations, iv. 

129. 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1637, Puritan feeling in, ii. 238. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81,94. 

1648, governed by the Parlia- 
mentary visitors, i. 135. 

1660, visited by Charles II's com- 
missioners, i. 336. 

1662, claims its old place in the 

proctorial cycle, i. 433, 435, 437- 

1664, sudden death, ii. 9, 26. 

1666, Wood peruses the cartulary 

of the college, ii. 84. 

1667, ill-feeling about a fellow- 
ship election, ii. 107. 

1669, great entertainment at the 

Act, ii. 165. 

1670, visit of the prince of Orange, 

ii. 208. 

1671, foundling, ii. 233. 

1676, epidemic, ii. 359. 

1683, viewed by the duke of York, 

iii. 53- 



172 WOOD'S LIFE 

The Colleges : Brasenose (cont.) : — 

1692, expulsion of a non-juror, 

iii. 382. 

— principal, a visitor of the Ashmolean, 
iii. 109. 

1 614, Samuel Radcliffc, i. 48, 

145, 160 ; iv. 154. 

1648, Daniel Greenwood, v. 46. 

1660, Thomas Yate, v. 83. 

1 68 1, John Meare, ii. 540; iii. 

106, 223, 330. 

— vice-principal, ii. 208, 233 ; iii. 53. 

— junior bursar, ii. 84. 

— steward, ii. 514, 537, 539. 
—fellows, i. 135, 142, 267, 274, 322, 

336, 387, 39o, 4°5 5 ». 9. 5§> !°7> 

134, 166, 188, 195, 202, 246, 347, 

349, 366, 388, 419, 440, 443, 448, 

454, 4 6 7, 479. 539 ; *«• 2 , 184, 20 4» 
213-4, 217, 475 5 iv. 154- 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
33, ,112, 160, 165, 203, 267, 270, 
314, 316, 332, 384, 387, 405-6, 437, 
501-2; ii. 26, 117, 119, 188, 218, 
238, 260, 263, 270, 274, 280, 289, 

359, 392-3, 4 01 , 442, 496, 49 8 , 514, 
563-4; iii. 57, 78-9, 105, 107, 112, 
119, 142, 168, 174-5, 177, 183, 186, 
197, 207, 215, 219, 245, 267, 284, 
297, 37 1 , 386, 402, 407, 411, 420, 
4 2 7, 474-5- 

— gentlemen-commoners, ii. 214, 372, 
380. 

— commoners, ii. 198, 430, 457; iii. 
307,470. 

— servitors, iii. 12, 72. 

— customs : — 

fresh-nights, i. 141 ; ii. 96 ; iii. 513. 

■ pittance to a preacher on first 

Sunday in October, ii. 48. 
bell of S. Mary's church rings 

out for death of members, v. 119. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel, ii. 9 ; iii. 53. 

■ burial in chapel, ii. 388. 

■ bury also in S. Mary's, their 

parish church, i. 145, 336, 405 ; ii. 9. 
■ — cloisters, iii. 53 : cloister-door, iii. 

■ — — burials in cloisters, i. 267 ; ii. 
198-9, 214, 289, 347, 359, 366, 388, 
448, 467, 514, 539; iii. 2, 38, 120, 
306-7, 470. 

■ burials of members of the princi- 
pal's family in the south cloister, ii. 
289, 539- 

— principal's lodgings, i. 390 ; ii. 57, 
289, 480. 

— treasury, iv. 154. 

— buttery, ii. 233. 

— quadrangle, ii. 233. 



AND TIMES. 

The Colleges : Brasenose (cont,):— 

— new buildings, ii. 106. 

— muniments, ii. 84 ; iv. 154. 

— plate, i. 81, 94-5. 

— arms, i. 145. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— patron of Steeple Aston school, i. 
145. 

— incidental mention, i. 159, 168; ii. 
176, 254, 422; iii. 234, 347. 

Christ Church : — 

— residence of the royal family when 
in Oxford : — 

■ ^36, Charles I and court, i. 46; 

iv. 56. 

1642, Charles I and court, i. 68, 

72, 81, 95, 98-100, 103, 112. 
1663, Charles II and court, i. 

494-7, 499- 
1665, Charles II and court, ii. 46, 

48, 58, 60-1, 67-8. 
1670, prince of Orange, ii. 208, 

211. 

1 68 1, Charles II and court, ii. 

511, 514, 522-3, 526-32. 
1683, duke and duchess of York, 

iii- 47-9, 5h 54- 

1687, James II, iii. 230-4, 527. 

1688, princess Anne, iv. 82. 

— ceremonial receptions of distinguished 
visitors : — 

1642, Charles I, i. 68. 

1643, queen Henrietta, i. 103. 

1661, Edward, earl of Clarendon, 

i. 415. 

1663, Charles II, i. 492, 494-5, 

497- 

1664, George Morley, bishop of 

Winchester, ii. 17. 

— — 1665, the chancellor of Cam- 
bridge, ii. 57. 

Charles II and James, duke of 

York, ii. 58. 
Anne, duchess of York, ii. 

61. 

1669, Cosmo de Medici, ii. 157, 

160. 

1670, the prince of Orange, ii. 

208. 

1677, the chancellor of the Uni- 
versity (Ormonde), ii. 385. 

1 68 1, George of Hanover, after- 
wards George I, ii. 518, 524. 

Charles II, ii. 527-8. 

1683, duke and duchess of York, 

iii. 48. 

■ 1687, James II, iii. 230-1, 234. 

— entertainments to distinguished visi- 
tors : — 

1 66 1, Edward, earl of Clarendon, 

i.41 1 , 4 T 5. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



173 



The Colleges : Christ Church 
(continued) : — ■ 

1662, the crown-prince of Den- 
mark, i. 457. 

— — 1665, the chancellorof Cambridge, 

ii. 58. 

1677, the chancellor of the Uni- 
versity (Ormonde), ii. 385-6. 

1680, the son of the Count Pala- 
tine of the Rhine, ii. 495. 

1682, the Morocco ambassador, 

iii. 18. 

1683, the king of Sweden's bro- 
ther, iii. 57. 

1690, Elias Ashmole, iii. 334. 

1694, the chancellor of the Uni- 
versity (Ormonde), iii. 495. 

— ceremonial leave-takings of distin- 
guished visitors : — 

1663, Charles II, i. 499. 

1683, duke and duchess of York, 

iii. 54. 

— events : — 

1525, Cardinal Wolsey's college, 

ii. 113-4, 2 7 2 5 iv - r 55-6- 
1528, imprisonment of reformers 

in, i. 387. 

1532, king Henry VIII's college, 

ii. 114; iv. 155-6. 

1546, the cathedral church of 

Christ, iv. 1 56. 

1549, place in disputations, iv. 128. 

1549 onwards, orders of the go- 
verning body, iv. 156. 

1554, plays acted at, iv. 156. 

1605-12, census of, iv. 151. 

1636, two plays acted before 

Charles I, iv. 56. 

1642, Aug., drill-ground of the 

University militia, i. 54. 

Sept., Christ Church forms a 

half-company of the University mi- 
litia for Charles I, i. 58, 62. 

disarmed by Parliament, i. 

61, 63-4. 

plate impounded by Parlia- 
ment, i. 61, 63. 

Nov., used by Charles I partly 

as arsenal and cattle-pound, i. 71. 

1643, Jan., plate taken by Charles 

I, i. 81, 94. 

Feb., thanksgiving for royalist 

victory, i. 87. 

July, another thanksgiving, i. 

102. 

1648, expulsions and appoint- 
ments by the Parliamentary visitors, 
i. 130, 144, 161, 287; ii. 196. 

1649, no regent master in, i. 

153- 

1657, Puritan feeling of, i. 359. 



The Colleges : Christ Church 
{continued) : — 

— — 1657, dilapidations during the 
Puritan domination, i. 445. 

1660, March, ejection of Inde- 
pendents, i. 307. 

disputed election to the 

proctorship, i. 307, 310, 313-4. 

Nov., resumption of church 

services, i. 347, 356-7. 

John Fell installed dean, 

i. 348. 

1 66 1, Jan., affront to the surplice, 

i. 35 6 > 35 8 -9> 38o; iii. p. vii, 514. 
March, chapter of accidents, 

i. 308, 387-8. 

1661-2, building of north side 

of the great quadrangle, i. 432, 445 ; 

ii. 90. 

1662, Christ Church allowed the 

proctorship, i. 433, 435, 437. 

1664, plays acted by students, 

ii. 2, 148. 

a Portuguese convert there, ii. 

1664-6, evil reports of, ii. 2-4, 

13, 9 6 - 

1667, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments, ii. 1 1 2-4, 118. 

■ 1668, riotous members, ii. 139. 

Christ Church men frequent 

Short's coffee-house, ii. 147. 

1669, fire, ii. 175. 

1670, the Broad Walk planted, 

ii. 188. 

1672, scourge of fever, ii. 253-5. 

1672-8, building at, ii. 175, 421. 

■ 1673-9, controversy as to church 

in which Christ Church canons should 

preach University sermons, ii. 274, 

283, 441-2. 
1676, a French convert at, ii. 

337- 

conjunction of deanery and 

bishopric, ii. 336. 
1677, visits of the archbishop of 

Rheims, ii. 376, and the duke of 

Ormonde, ii. 385-6. 

— ■ — 1678, the new philosophy at, ii. 
429- 

1679, Christ Church and Mag- 
dalen college combined carry Uni- 
versity elections, ii. 443, 446. 

1680, Great Tom recast, ii. 484, 

490, 497 ; iii. 95 : and Christ Church 
bells rehung, ii. 497. 

riotous members, ii. 542. 

1680-5, flourishing state of under 

John Fell, ii. 509 ; iii. 202, 257. 

1681-2, jealousy of other colleges, 

ii. 559; iii. 11, 22, 24, 59. 



174 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges: Christ Church 

(continued) : — 
1683, outbreak of small-pox, iii. 

81. 

. 1684, expulsion of John Locke, 

iii. 117. 

1685, a part-company of the Uni- 
versity militia against Monmouth, iii. 
148-9, 152. 

1685-6, prominent in the cele- 
bration of James II's birthday, iii. 
166, 198. 

— — 1686, a Romanist made dean, iii. 
197, 201-2 : and Christ Church con- 
sequently deserted by all except 
foundation men, iii. 202, 257. 

1687-8, dean Massey's Romanist 

chapel at, in the old hall of Canter- 
bury college, iii. 215, 224, 232, 244, 
260, 264, 285, 334. 

1687, summoned before James 

II's ecclesiastical commission, iii. 
225,' 241. 

1688, fire, iii. 252. 

rejoicings for the queen's preg- 
nancy, iii. 255 : and for the birth of 
the prince of Wales, iii. 268. 

1689, feasting on the installation 

of a Protestant dean, iii. 304. 

— — 1 69 1, benefaction of bishop 
Thomas Wood, iii. 363. 

1694, observance of John Fell's 

anniversary, iii. 460. 

— deans : the dean is a curator of the 
Ashmolean, iii. 109 ; and nominates 
the Bodleian speaker, iii. 29, 365 : 
catalogue of deans, iv. 156, 196. 

!53 2 > John Higden, i. 387; iii. 

43- 

1605, John King, iv. 147. 

161 1, William Goodwyn, i. 120; 

ii. 90 ; iv. 143. 
1629, Brian Duppa, i. 44, 386; 

iv. 130. 

1638, Samuel Fell, v. 44. 

— — 1648, Edward Reynolds, v. 67. 
165 1, John Owen, v. 65. 

1660, Edward Reynolds, again, 

v. 67. 

1660, George Morley, i. 347. 

1660, John Fell, v. 43-4^ 

1686, John Massey, v. 62. 

1689, Henry Aldrich, v. 23-4. 

— subdean, i. 87 ; iii. 201. 

— canons, dine in hall on occasions of 
ceremony, iii. 460 : dine together, ii. 
90 : nominate to studentships, i. 47 : 
have turns to preach before the Uni- 
versity, ii. 274, 283, 441 : catalogue 
of, iv. 156, 196. 

incidental mention of, i. 45-6, 



The Colleges: Christ Church 

(continued) : — 

68, 1 16, 130, 141, 147-8, 154-5, 161, 
197, 221, 231, 283, 286, 307, 328-9, 
347, 39°, 4 r 4, 43°, 437, 445, 472, 
4 8 3-4, 5o7; «• 2, 16, 44, 55, 90-1, 
93, 9 6 , "3-4, I2 7> 154, J 75, ^7, 

2U, 254, 256, 274, 283-6, 317, 398, 

4 o8 r 441-2, 454-5, 495, 5M> 517, 
549, 55 6 , 559, 5 6 5 5 »»• 3-6, 9, 29, 
39, 4 8 , 78, 85, 109, 196, 199, 201, 
230-1, 241, 252, 304, 368, 371, 375, 
398,460, 533; iv. 110,155,195; v. 9. 

— students, incidental mention of, i. 
47, 53, 126, 137, 143-4, 166, 171-2, 
185, 231, 234, 242-3, 268, 287, 295, 

3"> 347, 4 T 4-5> 459, 484, 494, 497, 
508-9; ii. 2, 7, 57, 82, 127, 148-50, 
157-8, 169, 196/215, 235, 240, 248, 
250, 252, 271, 282, 285, 310, 376, 

385, 4 r 5, 446, 464, 5 12 , 5H, 5*7, 
540, 542, 554; iii. 3, 17, 33, 48, 97, 
117, 188, 198, 223, 253, 445, 460; 

Westminster students, ii. 376 ; iv. 

156. 

junior students, i. 274. 

— undergraduate student, ii. 158. 

— members, incidental mention, i. 19, 
32, 43, 62, 68, 126, 144-5, J 53, ^5, 
169, 189, 191, 202, 207, 222, 246, 
288, 303, 310, 313-4, 316, 321, 329, 
33i, 333, 335, 346-7, 35o, 354, 
357-9, 36i, 364, 368-9, 386, 398, 
410, 413, 427-8, 437, 44°, 457, 459, 
472-4, 483-4, 490, 500, 502, 509; 
ii. 2, 17, 26, 68, 96, 99, 117-8, 124, 
158, 161, 172-3, 176, 180, 193, 199, 
209-10, 227-8, 232, 255-6, 273, 277, 
288, 294, 304, 318-9, 322, 326, 334, 
337-8, 343, 35 2 -3, 362, 376-7, 383, 
389-90, 394-5, 413, 422, 431, 435, 
442-3, 45 1 , 454, 456, 460, 467, 479, 
485, 49°, 494, 496, 49 8 > 5°7, 
512-4, 526, 541, 544, 547-8, 554, 

558, 563-5; iii- P- vii, 1 1-3, 18-9, 
24, 29, 32, 40, 48, 52, 57, 60, 72, 
76-7, 79-8i, 85, 87, 92, 105-6, 116, 
119, 121-2, 124, 127, 134, 142, 145, 

154, l6 9, 171, l8 3, 193, x 99, 217, 
223, 231, 246, 272, 301-2, 310, 314, 
316, 319, 322, 327, 331, 333-4, 337, 

345-6, 349, 35 r , 363, 375, 3 8 5, 393, 
402, 406, 412, 421, 423, 427, 431, 

434, 45°, 458, 468, 472, 481, 483, 
494, 496; iv. 143, 155-6, 268. 

— auditor, iv. 95. 

— treasurer, i. 410 ; iv. 103. 

— noblemen, ii. 28, 329, 509, 542 ; iii. 
16, 202, 257, 272, 277. 

— canon-commoner, iii. 48, 52, 57. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



J 75 



The Colleges : Christ Church 
(continued) :— 

— fellow-commoner, i. 9; ii. 188. 
gentlemen-commoners, ii. 105, 176-8, 
249, 269, 421, 460, 542 : iii. 65, 85, 
202, 220, 223, 246, 257, 483. 
upper-commoner, ii. 385. 
commoner, i. 42, 194; ii. 14, 248; 

iii. 13, 242. 

freshmen, ii. 462 ; iii. 253. 
servitor, ii. 3, 318; iii. 393. 
chapter-clerk, ii. 112-3, 268, 325-6 ; 
iii. 406 ; iv. 155, 190. 
petty-canon, ii. 246. 
chaplains, i. 483; ii. 3, 4, 13, 66, 
195, 246, 255, 554; iii. 116, 183, 
244, 327 ; iv. 156-7. 

— Romanist chaplains (1687-8), iii. 
215, 260, 278, 285. 

organist : Edward Low, v. 59. 

— Richard Goodson, iii. 24. 
master of the choristers, i. 151. 
choir, i. 358, 482 ; ii. 90. 

— singing-men, i. 205, 358, 385; 

ii. 158. 

— choristers, i. 151, 194, 358 ; ii. 4; 

iii. 162 ; iv. 156. 
servants, iv. 156. 

— butler, i. 459 ; iii. 94. 

— cook, ii. 149-50. 

— verger, ii. 55, 377 ; iii. 201. 

— bedmaker, ii. 10, 195. 

— sexton, iv. 52. 

— beadmen, iv. 156. 

— dean's man, iii. 244. 
cathedral, a show-place, iii. 18, 

49. 

<> hour of service : morning, at 10 

a.m., i. 390, 392, 496 ; about 11 a.m. 
(later than usual), ii. 208-9 : after- 
noon, 4 p.m., ii. 386 ; iii. 443. 

distinguished visitors taken to the 

service : ii. 208-9 ( tne prince of 
Orange) ; ii. 386 (the duke of Or- 
monde) ; iii. 48 (princess Anne). 

bishop's chair, ii. 208 : dean's 

stall, i. 87 ; iii. 201 : subdean's stall, 
i- 87-. 

— — high altar, i. 106 : canopy over 
communion table, i. 388. 

banners, i. 378. 

monuments, i. 93. 

S. Frideswyde's, i. 385-6. 

lady Montacute's, i. 385-6. 

bishop Robert King's, i. 104, 

241, 417. 

William Goodwin's, i. 120; 

ii. 90. 

Alexander Gerard's, i. 120. 

John Weston's, i. 484 ; ii. 

285. 



The Colleges : Christ Church 

{continued) : — 
lord Grandison's, i. 104 ; ii. 

72. 

Sir John Smyth's, i. 106. 

Edward, lord Lyttelton's, iii. 

379- 

organ, 1. 347, 356-8, 484. 

pictured glass, i. 60, 241. 

installation of bishop, iii. 199 : of 

dean, i. 348 ; iii. 201, 304 : of arch- 
deacon, ii. 14: of canon, ii. 162, 285, 
338, 456 ; iii. 4, 5. _ 

University services there during 

1633 repairs to S. Mary's, iv. 52. 

thanksgivings, 1643, i. 87, 102. 

ordination, 1661, i. 388. 

touching for the king's evil, 

Charles II, i. 496-7 ; ii. 532 : James 
II, iii. 232, 234. 

the duchess of York's lecture, 

1665, ii. 67. 

sermons, ii. 92, 272 ; iii. 19. 

before the University, by dean 

and canons preaching in their cathe- 
dral turns, ii. 274, 283, 441-2 ; iii. 
279, 305; iv. 189 : on Ascension day, 
iii. 331. Wood does not mention 
the University sermon at Christ 
Church on Christmas day and Good 
Friday. 

— before the king, Charles I, i. 

102 : Charles II, i. 495; ii. 522, 
531-2- 

marriages in, ii. 552 ; iii. 197. 

burials in, iv. 156: see the plan 

at the end of Wood's City, ii. 

— part of church not men- 
tioned in the Life, or on the plan : 
burials of students, i. 287; ii. 250; 
iii. 33 : of ex-student, iii. 443 : of 
relative of a canon, iii. 39. 

nave, burials in, of student, ii. 

415 : of chaplains, ii. 255, 554 : of 
commoner, ii. 14. 

south aisle of nave, burial in, 

ii. 178 (a gentleman-commoner). 

north aisle of nave, burials in, 

i. 120-1 (gentry); iii. 371 (canon). 

choir, i. 385-6, 484, 495-6; 

wainscot of, i. 388. 

burials in (east end of), of 

noblemen, i. 82, 106. 

aisle on south side of choir, 

called 'bishop King's aisle,' i. 241: 
burials there, of nobility and gentry, 
i. 103-6, no, 125, 378; ii. 72; iii. 
188 : of a canon, i. 417. 

aisle on north side of choir, 

burials there, of nobility and gentry, 
i- 93? 95? l °3> H2, 120: of canons, 



176 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges : Christ Church 

{continued} : — 

i. 483 4, 507 ; ii. 154, 211, 254, 285, 
408, 455 : of students, i. 47 ; ii. 127 : 
of relatives of canons, i. 483, 507. 

' middle north aisle,' i. e. that 

between the preceding and the divi- 
nity chapel, i. no: burials there, 
i. 103, 154 (wrongly described as 
next choir) ; ii. 90, 308. 

divinity chapel, i. 386 ; iii. 201. 

Latin prayers there, 8 a.m., 

9 p.m., iii. 192. 

— — ■ — burials there, of gentry, i. 104; 
of canons, i. 116, 141 ; of organist, 

i. 151 ; of dean, iii. 192; of relatives 
of members, i. 110, 151. 

south transept, i. 459. 

— — north transept (confusedly called 
by Wood 'north transept or aisle 
joining to choir'), burials in, of 
nobility and gentry, i. 105, 110-3, 
124-5, r 45> °f student, iii. 437 ; of 
chaplain, ii. 246. 

— west aisle of north transept, 

burial in, iii. 246. 

— churchyard, i. 104. 

— cloisters, i. 286 ; ii. 112. 

— chapter-house, i. 96. 

— spire, i. 101. 

— dean Massey's Romanist chapel, v. 
62, 174: chaplain, v. 175. 

_ hall, i. 96, 358, 432, 484; ii. 157, 
160; iii. 117. 

— — a show-place, i. 497 ; iii. 18, 
48-9. 

1643, the Maundy Thursday ser- 
vice there, i. 93. 

1664, Christ Church play acted 

there, ii. 2. 

1 665, opening of Parliament there, 

ii. 48, 60. 

1666, proctor's cake and wine, 

ii. 76. 

1677, entertainment of duke of 

Ormonde, ii. 386. 

1680, entertainment of Count Pala- 
tine of the Rhine, ii. 495. 

1689, dean Aldrich's installation 

feast, iii. 304. 

1694, a venison dinner, iii. 460. 

hall-stairs, ii. 160; iii. 48. 

— library, iii. 29, 314,443. 

— treasury, i. 286, 410; ii. 112-4, 118; 

iv - 95, 99- IOO > 10 3, !°9> x 55- 

— dean's lodgings, i. 495 ; ii. 57-8, 159, 
208, 247, 259, 518; iii. 18, 48-9, 57, 
192, 230-1, 234; iv. 143. 

hall of, ii. 17: dining-room of, 

iii. 48, 231, 233. 

chapel royal there, i. 495. 



The Colleges: Christ Church 

{continued) : — 
royal presence-chamber there, i. 

495, 499; 527. 

— canons' lodgings, i. 46, 91, 96, 286, 
43 2 > 4 8 4, 494, 5°7 5 «• 60, 90, 175-6, 
256 ; iii. 39, 196, 252. 

gardens of, i. 46, 61, 91, 96. 

— Peckwater's Inn, i. 71 ; ii. 259. 

— ■ — Peckwater quadrangle, i. 358 ; ii. 
76 ; iii. 148. 

— Canterbury college, v. 1 1 3 : hall of, 
v. 174. 

Canterbury quadrangle, iii. 232. 

gate of, gate by Oriel, i. 484 ; 

ii. 157, 209; iii. 20, 49. 

— great quadrangle, i. 46, 61, 432; ii. 
175-6 ; iii. 231,^52. 

' Mercury' there, iii. 494. 

bonfires there, i. 101 ; iii. 151, 

166, 198. 

1642, drill -ground of the Uni- 
versity militia, i. 54, 58. 
the king's cattle-pound, i. 

I 1 - 

— muster-place of the king's 

troops, i. 73. 
1 66 1, reception of Edward, earl 

of Clarendon, i. 415. 
1663, reception of Charles II and 

court, i. 494. 
1665, reception of the chancellor 

of Cambridge, ii. 57. 
1677, reception of James, duke 

of Ormonde, ii. 385, 
1 68 1, reception of Charles II, ii. 

526. 

— ' all the quadrangles,' ' every quad- 
rangle,' i. e. the preceding three, i. 
484 ; ii. 76 ; iii. 49. 

— chaplains' quadrangle, ii. 195. 

— bachelors' quadrangle, ii. 175. 

— choir school-room, i. 358. 

— cellar, i. 61. 

— gate, great gate, great west gate, 
i. 46, 61, 95, 492, 494; ii. 207, 385, 
421 ; iii. 48, 226, 228, 230-I, 278, 
533- 

tower over, ii. 421, 497. 

— garden wall, i. 96. 

— walks, i. 474, 476 ; ii. 529 ; iii. 217, 
377- 

deep pool at, ii. 77. 

Broad walk, ii. 188. 

— meadow, v. 114. 

— stables, ii. 188. 

— bells, i. 101 ; iii. 255, 268, 301 : ten 
bells, ii. 497, 526. 

— 'Great Tom' bell, brought from 
Osney abbey, i. 184: recast, 1653, 
i. 185 : recast, 1680, ii. 484, 490 ; 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



177 



The Colleges : Christ Church 
(continued) : — 

iii. 95 : hung by itself in the gateway 

tower, ii. 497. 
rung on occasion of a victory, iii. 

151 ; of a thanksgiving, iii. 255 ; on 

the king's birthday, iii. 95, 198, 240. 
rung for installation of a canon, 

ii. 162. 

rung as passing-bell for death of 

a canon, ii. 455; iii. 371 : of a stu- 
dent, ii. 282 ; iii. 33, 412, 436 : of a 
member, iii. 188 : of a courtier, ii. 72. 

— site, i. 353. _ 

— fabric-rolls, iv. 156. 

— statutes, iii. 241. 

— muniments, i. 286, 410; ii. 112-3, 
118, 122, 128 ; iv. 95, 99-100, 103-4, 
155-6, 198, 207. 

— buttery-book, i. 307; iii. 231, 233. 

— arms, iii. 192. 

— plate, i. 61, 63, 81, 94-5. 

— property, i. 286; ii. 113-4, 354; iii. 
283; iv. 155-6. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— voting power of, i. 335. 

— MS. collections about : Leonard 
Hutten's, i. 386; iii. 119; iv. 156, 
195-6: Richard Washburne's, iv. 
156: John "Willis's, ii. 113. 

— Wood's chapter on, ii. 271-3. 

— incidental mention, i. 159, 241, 353, 
371-2, 432, 466; ii. 4, 13, 55, 75-6, 
89-90, 272, 474; iii. 42, 56, 149, 
24 6 , 26 3, 533 5 iv. 100. 

Corpus Christi College : — 

— founder of, iv. 92, 157. 

— benefactors, ii. 255 ; iii. 108. 

— visitor, ii. 16, 18; iii. 533. 

— events : — 

1549, place in disputations, iv. 

128. 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1642, supplies part of the Uni- 
versity militia for Charles I, but is 
disarmed by Parliament, i. 58, 61, 63, 
65. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81, 94. 

1659, a fast held there, i. 279. 

1660, visitation by Charles II's 

commissioners, i. 336. 
1664, visitation by the visitor 

(bishop of Winchester), ii. 18. 
1665, Wood allowed access to its 

MSS., ii. 47. 
quarters of the duke and 

duchess of Monmouth, ii. 58; iii. 

64. 

1667, Wood peruses its cartulary, 

ii. 122. 



The Colleges : Corpus Christi 
(continued) : — 

1670, viewed by the prince of 

Orange, ii. 208. 

1672, fever, ii. 254-5. 

1677, robbery, ii. 379. 

1 68 1, requisitioned as part-quar- 
ters for the court, ii. 511, 514, 522-3. 

1683, reception of the duke of 

York, iii. 49. 

— expunging of Monmouth's 

name from the books, iii. 64. 

1687, small-pox, iii. 216. 

1694, fever, iii. 451. 

— president, marriage of, i. 154. 

1568, William Cole, i. 180. 

1598, John Reynolds, i. 304, 460 ; 

iv. 197. 

1607, John Spenser, i. 154, 180. 

1614, Thomas Anyan, i. 154; ii. 

p. viii, 308. 
1640, Robert Newlin, iii. 258 ; 

iv. 204. 

1648, Edmund Staunton, i. 147 ; 

ii. 97, 224, 226 ; iv. 61. 

1660, Robert Newlin, restored, 

i. 285, 328, 428 ; ii. 122 ; iii. 72, 231, 
2 5 8 , 475, 4 8 °; iv - 204. 

1688, Thomas Turner, ii. 272 ; 

iii. 258, 265, 317, 345, 490. 

— vice-president, ii. 47. 

— bursar, i. 304. 

— steward, i. 180, 184; iii. 480. 

— fellows, incidental mention of, i. 26, 
29, 44, 136, 180, 192, 248, 274, 277, 
281, 304, 419, 425, 429-30, 460; ii. 
6, 46, 49, 58, 94, 171, 195, 232, 243, 
255, 257, 319, 347- 8 , 357, 360, 379, 
387, 553 J i"- 24, 79, 216, 222, 451 ; 

iv. 20, 146, 157, 202, 276: v. 8, 13. 
catalogue of, ii. 46; iv. 157. 

— scholars, incidental mention of, i. 196, 
23 2 , 453, 483 ; ii- 23, 317, 204, 244, 
379 ; iii. 10, 72, 172. 

— ?nembers, incidental mention of, i. 26, 
78, 136, 169, 230-1, 248-9, 266, 314, 
316, 319, 323, 325, 330, 379, 442, 
459, 4 6l 5 25, 94, 96, 103, 121, 
130, 288, 337, 352, 354-5, 372, 380, 
422, 428, 431, 451, 497, 540, 543, 

54 s , 558, 5 6 4; m - 38 : 49, 6o , 80, 
121, 139, 183, 199, 299,351-2, 386, 
433- 443, 458, 475, 493 5 iv. 76, 91, 
93, 98, 121, 143, 197, 215, 226, 263; 

v. 5. 

the great bell of Merton college, 

i. e. S. John Baptist parish church, 
rung as passing-bell for death of 
members, v. 178. 

— gentlemen-commoners, i. 508 ; ii. 
222. 



VOL. V. 



N 



178 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Tmc Collkgks : CUKI'US ClIRIStI 

{continued) : — 

— chaplain, iii. 8, 60 : clerk, i. 7<S : 
chorister, i. 134, 136; iii. 4. 

— servitor of president, i. 428. 

— servants : — 

cook, senior cook, i. 338, 449 ; ii. 

244. . 

under-cook, 1. 449. 

head butler, senior butler, ii. 258, 

359- 

manciple, ii. 244. 

groom, ii. 349, 359. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel, ii. 255 ; iii. 49 : monuments 
in, ii. 171. 

burials in chapel, i. 197, 450 ; ii. 

255 ; iv. 203 : some are definitely said 
to be in ' the choir,' i.e. chapel proper, 

i. 277; ii. 171 : others in the outer 
chapel, ii. 222, 319; iii. 222, 258. 

— cloister, iii. 49: burials in, i. 232, 
281-2, 450 ; ii. 103. 

burials in north cloister, i. 453 ; 

ii. 23, 104, 243, 317; iii. 60, 172 : in 
south cloister, i. 184; ii. 121 : in east 
cloister, ii. 258, 359. 

— library, MSS. in, i. 116, 315, 322; 
ii- 34. 47, !99> 3°* I i"- 3^7 5 iv. 9 8 > 

IOO, IO3-6, IO9, I2T, I93, I98, 215, 
219, 227, 230, 255, 285, 303. 

— — bequests to, iii. 116, 443; iv. 
203. 

old catalogue of, iv. 221. 

— treasury, iv. 156. 

— president's lodgings, i. 154; iii. 20, 
258, 490. 

— gate, iii. 277, 408 : great gate, iii. 
49 : back gate, iii. 20, 49. 

the cylinder, iv. 276. 

— bachelors' garden, ii. 387. 

— summer-house, iii. 20. 

— stables, i. 154, 449. 

— brewhouse, i. 154. 

— plate, i. 81, 94-5, 329 ; ii. 255. 

— site, iv. 156: in S. John Baptist 
parish, i. 450, and therefore Merton 
college great bell rings for the death 
of members, ii. 130, 204, 337, 360. 

— property, i. 449; ii. 349: proportional 
valuation, ii. 565. 

— muniments and registers, ii. 122; iv. 
156. 

— heraldic glass, i. 209. 

— Wood's chapter on, ii. 268. 

— incidental mention, i. 91, 103, 159, 
168, 219, 389-90, 499; ii. 94; iii. 
393, 408; iv. 215. 

Exeter College : — 

— founder's statutes, iv. 158. 

— visitor, i. 456 ; v. 72. 



The Colleges : Exeter (cont.) : — 

— benefactors, ii. 396; iv. J 58. 

— events : — 

1.549, place in disputations, iv. 

129. 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1613, verses on death of John 

Petre, i. 426. 
1633, sell to the University the 

site of the Convocation-house, iv. 53. 
1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81, 94. 

1650-60, good repute of, ii. 56. 

1659-63, music-meetings, i. 275, 

455- 

1662, ejections of nonconformist 

fellows, i. 453. 

1665, fight between Exeter and 

Queen's, ii. 56. 

1665-7, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments and registers of, ii. 44-5, 107; 
iv. 158. 

1665-6, bad state of, ii. 56, 96. 

1672, new buildings, ii. 396 ; iv. 

158. 

1676, fever, ii. 359. 

1680, Whig sympathies of some 

fellows, ii. 516, 522. 
1682, sell to the University a site 

for the Ashmolean, iv. 78. 

— — 1683, reception of the duke of 
York, iii. 52-3. 

1690-3, dissensions, visitations by 

the visitor, and consequent law-suit, 
i. 16; iii. 325, 328, 332, 334, 340, 
345-6, 35 2 > 36o, 364, 425, 435, 452, 
474, 477, 479- 

— rectors, ii. 107, 488 ; iv. 158 : cata- 
logue of, iv. 158. 

1570, Robert Newton, iv. 158. 

161 2, John Prideaux, v. 66. 

1649, John Conant, v. 39. 

1662, Joseph Maynard, i. 219, 

455-6 ; ii. 43-5, 56. 

1666, Arthur Bury, v. 29. 

1690, William Painter, iii. 338, 

425 ('Richard' in error), 477. 
[1695, Samuel Conant, iii. 477; 

an election annulled.] 

— sub-rector, i. 444 ; ii. 44 ; iv. 158 : 
dean, ii. 44 : bursars, iv. 158. 

— fellows, incidental mention of, i. 274, 
304, 425, 427, 453; ii. 45, 83, 155, 
217, 236-7, 261, 264, 362, 399, 516; 
iii. 142, 173, 256, 440, 488. 

catalogue of, i. 453 ; ii. 45 ; iv. j 

158- w 

— members, incidental mention, i. 76, 
133-4, 148, 186, 333-4, 427, 473, 
508; ii. 34, 83, 96-7, 128, 304, 319, 
351, 483, 497-8, 506, 522, 546; iii. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



179 



The Colleges : Exeter {cont. ) : — 
6, 8, 15, 67, 80, 95, 119, 147, 208, 
21 7> 2 55> 2 77> 303, 305> 329, 35 2 > 
355. 362, 375. 380, 385. 393, 4 X 5, 
420,444,471,489,496. 

— fellow-commoner, iii. 6; iv. 158. 

— gentleman-commoner, ii. 290 ; iii. 
222. 

— commoner, ii. 237, 290 ; iii. 358-9 ; 
iv. 158. 

— bible-clerk, ii. 18. 

— batler, iv. 158. 

— servitor, ii. 399 ; iv. 158. 

— poor scholar, ii. 246. 

— butler, i. 302 ; iii. 120. 

— rector's man-servant, ii. 43. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel, i. 432 ; ii. 396 ; iii. 53 ; iv. 
158. 

anomalous position of communion 

table, iii. 53. 

election of rector in, iii. 338. 

burials in, ii. 155, 217, 237, 290, 

358-9, 362 ; iii. 173, 222, 488. Exeter 
buried also in the parish church, 
S. Michael's, ii. 237, 358 : Wood's 
City, iii. 287. 

— library, ii. 21, 45 ; iv. 198. 

— muniment-room, ii. 44; iv. 158. 

— 1 Prideaux' Connexion,' ii. 522. 

— rector's lodgings, ii. 44. 

— outbuildings, ii. 452. 

— quadrangle, iii. 53. 

— gate, gatehouse, ii. 44, 396 ; iii. 6 ; 
iv. 158. 

— back gate, iii. 52. 

— account-books, registers, and statutes 
of, ii. 45, 107 ; iv. 158. 

— muniments of, ii. 43-4; iv. 158. 

— site of, ii. 522. 

— plate of, i. 81, 94-5. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— advowsons, ii. 236-7, 488. 

— relations with Hart hall, iv. 159. 

— the west country college, ii. 56. 

— incidental mention, i. 159, 432, 456; 
ii. 399; iii. 37, 139, 152, 347. 

Hertford College, v. 116. 
Jesus College :■ — 

— foundation, iv. 159. 

— benefactors, ii. 221 ; iii. 159, 163, 
183; iv. 159. 

— events : — 

— — 1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, i. 

81, 94. 

1668, Wood peruses the cartulary 

of, ii. 141. 

1683, the principal, being vice- 
chancellor, marches out with armed 
escort to rescue a pro-proctor, iii. 43. 



The Colleges: Jesus {continued) : — 
1683, reception of the duke of 

York, iii. 53. 
1685, state funeral of Sir Leoline 

Jenkins, iii. 161-2. 
1688, cold reception of the birth 

of the prince 'of Wales,' iii. 268. 

— principals : — 

1602, John Williams, iv. 145. 

1620, Francis Mansell, ii. 35 ; iii. 

162. 

1648, Michael Roberts, ii. 449. 

1657, Francis Howell, i. 148, 427 ; 

ii. 483-4. 

[16— , Seth Ward, i. 363.] 

1660, Francis Mansell, restored, 

i. 328, 382 ; ii. 35 ; iii. 163 ; iv. 159. 

1661, Sir Leoline Jenkins, v. 56. 

1673, John Lloyd, v. 59. 

1686, Jonathan Edwards, v. 42. 

— fellows, incidental mention of, ii. 226, 
416; iii. 158, 162-3, !79, 2I 3! iv. 

w> 

— scholars, iii. 163 ; iv. 159. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
108, 246, 293, 334, 346, 406, 430, 
457; ii. 116, 192, 262, 273, 444,460, 
53i, 556, 5 6 4 5 iii- 2 4. 29, 43, 60, 64, 
90, 92, 121, 131, 148, 158, 161-2, 
166, 175, 254, 368, 395, 424, 482. 

— bursar, iv. 59. 

— gentlemen-commoners, ii. 15, 487; 

iii. 43. 

— commoner, ii. 487. 

— servitors, ii. 6, 416, 487 ; iii. 162. 

— manciple, ii. 220: cook, ii. 5-6: 
under- butler, ii. 235. 

— btiildings : — 

— chapel, burials in, ii. 35, 226,416; 

iii. 158, 162-3, 179, 212-3, 296. Jesus 
college buried also in S. Michael's 
church, ii. 15 : see Wood's City, iii. 
298. 

— hall, bow-window of, iii. 53. 

— library, i. 10; ii. 221; iii. 307; iv. 
235. 

MSS. in, i. 23, 430 ; ii. 221 ; iv. 

104, 107, 119, 159, 221, 249, 275-6, 
286, 308. 

— treasury, iv. 159. 

— principal's lodgings, iii. 41, 212. 

— new, or inner, quadrangle, iii. 53, 
159. 163. 

— ■ gate, iii. 212. 

— plate, iv. 81, 94. 

— muniments and registers, ii. 141, 221 ; 

iv. 159. 

— advowsons, iii. 159, 163. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— incidental mention, i. 1 59, 466 ; ii. 
75, 487, 565 ; iii. 152, 200; iv. 169. 



N 2 



i8o 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges {continued) : — 
S. John's College : — 

— founder, i. 485 ; ii. 83, 322, 510. 
founder's kin, ii. 322. 

— benefactors, i. 479, 485 ; ii. 83. 

— visitor, ii. 16, 18 ; iii. 533. 

— events : — 

1555, foundation, ii. 83; iv. 170. 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1636, entertainment of Charles I, 

i. 46 ; iv. 56. 
1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81, 94. 

1660, restoration of Church ser- 
vices, i. 347, 356, 358. 

visited by Charles II's com- 
missioners, i. 336 

1661, entertainment of Edward, 

earl of Clarendon, i. 411, 414. 

1662, ejection of nonconformist 

fellows, ii. 6. 

1,663, ceremonial funerals of arch- 
bishops Juxon and Laud, i. 476, 479, 
482-5. 

— — — receptions of James, duke of 
York, i. 496, and of Charles II, i. 498. 

1664, visitation by Morley, bishop 

of Winchester, ii. 18. 

1667-8, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments of, ii. 83-4, 118. 

1669, f ata * accident, ii. 150. 

viewed by Cosmo de Medici, 

ii. 160. 

1670, entertainment of the prince 

of Orange, ii. 211. 
1676, consecration of the side 

chapel, ii. 340-1. 
1677, viewed by the archbishop 

of Rheims, ii. 376. 

1682, evil report, iii. 3. 

viewed by the Morocco am- 
bassador, iii. 17. 
1684, congratulations to Peter 

Mews on his obtaining the see of 

Winchester, iii. 116. 
1685, in the University militia 

against Monmouth, iii. 150, 152. 
1686, rejoicings for defeat of the 

Turk, iii. 196. 
1688, quarters of the bishop of 

Winchester (Mews), iii. 532. 

— presidents: trustee of John Snell's 
will, ii. 459. 

161 1, William Laud, v. 57. 

162 1, William Juxon, i. 475-6, 

479-80, 485; ii. 115. 

1633, Richard Baylie, v. 27. 

1648, Francis Cheynell, v. 37. 

1650, Thankful Owen, v. 65. 

1660, Richard Baylie, restored, v. 

27. 



The Colleges : S. John's (cont.) : — 

1667, Peter Mews, v. 62. 

1673, William Levinz, v. 58. 

— vice-president,!. 485 ; ii. 219, 322. 

— dean, i. 147. 

— fellows, incidental mention of, i. 
151, 250, 414, 427, 483, 485, 496, 
498 ; ii. 6, 12, 83, 94, 140, 145, 188, 
203, 271, 322, 329, 348, 377, 431, 

44<5, 51 &, 544, 55 1 ; "i- I2 , 45 1 7 8 , 
88, 155, 188, 310, 370, 480; iv. 170. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
157, 250, 290, 316, 330-1, 361, 4*6, 
427, 470, 485 ; ii. 96, 160, 222, 234, 
241, 244, 251, 318-9, 404, 428, 448, 

460, 537, 543/563-4; P- vii , 3, 
15, 23, 40-1, 51, 60, 76-7, 83, 121, 
127, 150, 169, 208, 225, 245, 303-4, 
3 2 9-3°» 337, 34°> 349, 3 68 , 374, 4° 8 , 
415, 447, 464, 485, 489 ; iv. 6t, 143. 

— gentlemen-commoners, i. 496, 498 ; 

ii. 160, 188, an, 322 ; iii. 150. 

— servitor, iii. 464. 

— organist, i. 204. 

— choir, i. 205, 482. 

— singing-man, i. 205. 

— manciple, iii. 8. 

— cook, iii. 236. 

— brewer, ii. 242. 

— buildings : — 

chapel, i. 482, 498 ; iii. 3, 51. 

marriages in, ii. 381, 540. 

burials in, i. 476, 479, 483-5, 

498; ii. 12, 145,322,329. S.John's 

college buried also in S. Mary Magd. 

church, ii. 188 : Wood's City, iii. 

299. 

the organ of, i. 347,.35 6 > 35 8 5 

iii. 51 : musical service at, i. 496. 
outer chapel, burial in, iii. 45. 

— — side-chapel, consecration of, ii. 
341 : burials in, ii. 115, 144, 340. 

chancel, i. 485 : rail of communion 

table, i. 483 : high altar, i. 476, 485 : 
altar hangings, iii. 51. 

— cloisters, inner quadrangle, newest 
quadrangle, i. 432; ii. 211; iii. 51 : 
statue of Charles I there, ii. an. 

— library, i. 46, 432, 498 ; ii. 160, 211 ; 
iii. 51 ; iv. 198. 

— treasury, ii. 83. 

— president's lodgings, i. 414, 532-3. 

— common-room, iii. 3. 

— tower, ii. 118 ; iv. 170. 

— gate, i. 414 ; ii. 118 ; iii. 51. 

— back gate, i. 485 ; ii. 21 1 ; iii. 51. 

— wall, i. 56. 

— walks, i. 55, 72 : grove, i. 432, 485 ; 
ii. 272; iii. 51. 

— terrace, ii. 425 (implied) ; iii. 120. 

— arms, i. 476, 480, 485 ; ii. 114. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



181 



The Colleges: S. John's (cont.): — 

— plate, i. Si, 94-5. 

— property, i. 271 ; ii. 118-9. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— muniments, ii. 7, 83-4, 118; iv. 97, 
131, 170. 

— Joseph Taylor's MS. History of, ii. 
83. 

— incidental notices, i. 56, 159, 371 ; 

ii. 219, 254, 278, 425, 455 ; iii. 415, 
532. 

Lincoln College:— 

— founder, iv. 161. 

— benefactors, ii. 121, 316, 536-7; iv. 
154, 161. 

— visitor, the bishop of Lincoln, has 
patronage of one fellowship (for a 
native of Oxfordshire), i. 472; iii. 
68-9, 72, 131. 

— events : — 

1 549, place in disputations, iv. 

129. 

1605-12, census, iv„ 151. 

1637, Puritan feeling in, i. 46. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81,94. 

1644, strangers resident in, iii. 94. 

1645, mandate from Charles I to 

elect his nominee fellow, i. 453. 

— — 1648, governed by the Parlia- 
mentary visitors, i. 240, 333. 

1659, hair-breadth escape, i. 288. 

1660, dissensions between Presby- 
terians and Independents, i. 332, 362. 

visitation by Charles IPs com- 
missioners, i. 333, 336, 434. 

fracas, i. 333-4 ; iv. 64. 

1 66 1, opposition to the surplice, 

i. 380; iii. 514. 

1662, ejection of nonconformist 

fellows, i. 453. 

1665, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments, ii. 38. 

1666, scourge of small-pox, ii. 78. 

1 666-7, Wood peruses the registers 

of, ii. 121. 

1675, small-pox, ii. 321. 

1683, viewed by the duke of 

York, iii. 53. 

dissensions between Whigs 

and Tories, iii. 69, 71-2. 

1685, contest for the rectorship, 

iii. 142. 

a part-company of the Univer- 
sity militia against Monmouth, iii. 
149, 152. 

— rectors : — 

1620, Paul Hood, v. 48. 

1668, Nathaniel Crewe, v. 39. 

1672, Thomas Marshall, v. 60. 

1685, Fitzherbert Adams, v. 23. 



The Colleges : Lincoln (cont.) : — 

— sub-rectoi, ii. 38, 121, 178-9; iii. 
514 ; iv. 161. 

— bursar, ii. 38, 536-7. 

— claviger, ii. 38. 

— steward, ii. 536-7. 

— fellows, catalogue of, ii. 46 ; iv. 
160-1. 

— — incidental mention, i. 37, 134, 
228, 239-40, 268, 274-5, 281, 288, 
295> 3°2> 331-3- 390, 434. 453, 472 ; 
»• *7> 25, 38, 46, 121, 172, 178, 257, 
321, 431,501, 548, 550; iii. 109, 139, 

I7 1 , l8 3- 343, 5H- 

of Oxfordshire birth, see visitor 

supra. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
37> 44, 46, 105, 196, 246, 256, 281, 
29° 5 3H> 327, 334, 362, 381, 434, 
444, 45o, 473, 49°; »• 8 9, 244, 283, 
468, 565 ; iii. 60, 66, 68-70, 85, 121, 
209, 249, 255, 279, 281, 307, 310, 
342, 349, 386, 430; v. 5, 8. 

— scholars : — 

Traps', ii. 78, 550. 

Marshall's, ii. 316. 

— fellow-commoner, ii. 538. 

— gentlemen-commoners, i. 155, 299, 
300; ii. 75; iii. 85, 514. 

— commoners, i. 155, 401 ; ii. 252, 446, 
548; iii. 105, 108, 150, 171, 216, 221. 

— servitor, ii. 550. 

— cook, ii. 338, 476. 

— customs : — 

procession to receive new head, 

iii. 143. 

— — grace-cup, i. 30a 

lunch on Ascension day to All 

Saints' and S. Michael's parishioners 
beating the bounds, iii. 21. 

— — Michaelmas day sermon in S. 
Michael's church, iii. 70. 

buried in All Saints' church in 

the principal chancel, called ' the 
college chancel,' i. 155, 228, 401 ; 
ii. 26, 89, 141, 321 ; iii. 221 ; v. 112. 

— ■ — buried also in the principal chan- 
cel, called ' the college chancel,' in 
S. Michael's church, ii. 178, 257; v. 
121. 

— buildings : — 

chapel, i. 300 ; iii. 53. 

hall, i. 209, 300, 401 : fellows 5 

table, i. 300. 
library, i. 84, 228, 300; ii. 316, 

355; iv. 161, 198, 271-2. 

rector's lodgings, ii. 132. 

■ tower, ii. 38-9 ; iv. 160. 

treasury, ii. 38. 

gate, i. 333. 

— garden, ii. 106. 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges: Lincoln (cont.):-— 

— chest of three keys, ii. 38. 

— plate, i. 8l, 94; ii. 75. 
• property, i. 273. 

— heraldic glass in, i. 209. 

— music-day, ii. 75. 

— account-books, ii. 46 ; iv. 160 : 
buttery-books, i. 300. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— muniments, ii. 38; iv. 160. 

— registers, i. 159, 299; ii. 38, 121, 
316 ; iv. 160. 

— Wood's chapter on, ii. 264. 

— incidental notices, i. 159, 288, 410, 
432, 466; ii. 4, 17, 105, 358, 565. 

S. Mary Magdalen College :— 

— founder, i. 131 ; ii. 68, 79; iii. 456, 
521, 533; iv. 162-3. 

— — founder's crozier and mitre, i. 131. 

— benefactors, iii. 435, 519. 

— visitor, the bishop of Winchester, i. 
4745 l6 , 540 ; iii. 518, 522, 525-7, 
532-3; iv. 162. 

— events : — 

14585 foundation, ii. 68 ; iii. 518, 

522. 

1466-72, building, iv. 162. 

1549, visitation by Edward VI' s 

commissioners, iv. 144. 

1549, place in disputations,iv. 128. 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1642, plate impounded, and arms 

seized by Parliament, i. 61, 63. 

1642-4, the grove made an artil- 
lery-park, i. 68, 107. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, i. 

81,94. 

— 1644, mandate from Charles I to 

elect his nominee president, iii. 518. 

1646, abstraction of the founder's 

crozier, i. 131. 

— — 1648, expulsions by the Parlia- 
mentary visitors, i. 268 ; iii. 76. 

1649, pictured glass taken down, 

i. 161. 

1656, weekly music-meeting, i. 205. 

1657, a row of elm-trees planted 

near the gate, ii. 479 : but rooted up in 
1660 by the restored fellows, ii. 479. 

1660, restoration of ejected fellows, 

iii. 76. 

— restoration of Church services, 

i- 347, 35 6 -7, 37o- 
hostility to the surplice, i. 347, 

35 6 > 358, 466- 
1 66 1, residence of the chancellor 

of the university (Clarendon) during 

his state visit, i. 41 1-5. 
— mandate from Charles II to 

elect his nominee president, i. 460, 489. 
1662-3, torn by faction, i. 420, 



The Colleges : S. Mary Magdalen 

{continued) : — 

460, 473-4, 4 8 6-9, 49 x > 5°7 5 »• 563 5 
iii. 525 ; iv. 163. 

1663, flooded by the Cherwell, i. 

474- 

reception of Charles II, i. 497. 

1 664, visitation by Morley, bishop 

of Winchester, ii. 17-8 ; iii. 526. 
1665, reception of the chancellors 

of Oxford and Cambridge, ii. 58. 

— — 1665-6, quarters of the French 
ambassador while the court was in 
Oxford, ii. 46, 59, 66. 

1666, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments and registers, ii. 78-9. 

1667, reduction of the allowance 

for commons, ii. 124 ; iii. 519, 522. 

scourge of small-pox, ii. 124. 

1669, viewed by Cosmo de Medici, 

ii. 157, 160 : and by Elias Ashmole, ii. 
164. 

1670, scourge of small-pox, ii. 205. 

viewed by the prince of Orange, 

ii. 208. 

1672, the cloisters flooded, ii. 249. 

fever, ii. 254. 

1 677, entertainment of the duke 

of Ormonde, ii. 381, 385-6. 
1678, inquisition for Romanists, 

ii. 424, 431. 

— — 1679, Magdalen joined with 
Christ Church can carry University 
elections, ii. 443, 446. 

1680, planting of the row of elm- 
trees from the gate westwards, ii. 479. 

the fellows wish to recover the 

patronage of Magdalen hall, ii. 540-2 ; 

iii. 457. 

— — 1682, viewed by the Morocco 
ambassador, iii. 17. 

— — — collection for Roger L'Es- 
trange, iii. 26. 

1683, reception of the duke and 

duchess of York, iii. 50. 

— — 1685, a part-company of the 
University militia against Monmouth, 
iii. 147, 152. 

1687, 29 March, the death of the 

president (HenryClerke), on March 24, 
is known in Oxford, iii. 216, 526. 

9 April, Anthony Farmer pre- 
sents a mandate from James II for 
his admission to the presidentship, 
iii. 217, 233, 517, 525-6: the college 
petitions against it, iii. 517, 526. 

15 April, John Hough elected 

president, iii. 218, 517, 526. 

— 22 April, James II remon- 
strates with the college for its dis- 
obedience, iii. 218, 527. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 183 



The Colleges : S. Mary Magdalen 
^continued) : — 

1687, 30 May, the college is cited 

before the king's ecclesiastical com- 
mission, iii. 221, 246, 527. 

6, 13, and 22 June, appear- 
ances before the commission, iii. 222, 
246-7 : at the session on 22 June the 
commission quashes the election of 
president, deposes the vice-president, 
and expels one fellow, iii. 247-8, 519, 
527. 

24 June, the sentence of the com- 
mission is announced in Oxford, iii. 
247. 

1 and 8 July, fresh summonses to 

appear before the commission, iii. 248. 

29 July, appearance before the 

commission : the mandate for Parmer 
is withdrawn, iii. 223, 248. 

2 Aug., the sentence (passed 

22 June) of the commission is nailed 
on the chapel door, iii. 248, 527. 

14 Aug., James II issues a 

mandate for the election of bishop 
Samuel Parker to the presidentship, 
iii. 224, 248, 515, 517-8, 520, 527. 

27 Aug., this mandate is pre- 
sented in Oxford, iii. 515. 

■ — 3 Sept., a second mandate is 

issued, iii. 248. 

4 Sept., James II personally 

orders the admission of Parker, iii. 
225, 233, 248, 527. 

5 Sept., the fellows send a 

petition to th e king, iii. 2 3 3-4, 248,527. 

(?) Sept., the college pawns its 

plate to find funds for law expenses, 
iii. 258. 

19 Oct., the college is cited to 

attend visitation by the ecclesiastical 
commission, iii. 248. 

21 Oct., first session of the 

commission, iii. 249, 515-9, 528. 

— 22 Oct. , second session : Hough 

is expelled from the presidentship, iii. 
2 49, B*9- 2 °i 528-9. 

25 Oct., third session : Parker 

is put into possession of the president- 
ship : one fellow is expelled, iii. 249, 
521-2, 528-9. 

26 Oct., fourth session, and 

27 Oct., fifth session, iii. 522, 528. 

— — 28 Oct., sixth session : the 
fellows refuse unreservedly to acknow- 
ledge Parker as their president ; one 
fellow is suspended, iii. 249, 523, 528. 
16 Nov., final session, admis- 
sion of two Romanist fellows, iii. 523, 
525 : expulsion of 25 actual fellows, 
iii. 249-50, 254, 258, 263, 523-30. 



The Colleges : S. Mary Magdalen 
{continued) : — 

1687,10 Dec, the demies are insub- 
ordinate to the new authority, iii. 245. 

1688, 9 Jan., admission of six 

Romanist fellows, and 11 Jan., ad- 
mission of four more Romanist fellows, 
iii. 253, 530: none of whom are 
matriculated or wear academical 
dress, iii. 255, 257. 

16 Jan., expulsion of 14 demies 

for insubordination, iii. 254, 256, 531. 

— — — 18 (?) Jan., expectation of 
Romanist services in chapel, iii. 
2 53-4. 264. 

— — — 29 Jan., rejoicings for the 
queen's pregnancy, iii. 255. 

31 Jan., expulsion of three more 

demies for insubordination, iii. 256, 
53i. 

Feb., the riotous demies are 

haled to the vice-chancellor's court, 
iii. 256 : the Romanist fellows are 
insulted on the street and in the 
college grounds, iii. 257 : the college 
is deserted by undergraduates of in- 
dependent means, iii. 257, 530: the 
tenants refuse to renew their leases, 
iii. 258, 530. 

2 March, admission of four 

more Romanist fellows, iii. 258. 

20 March, death of Parker, the 

intruded president, iii. 261. 

24 March, solemn funeral of 

Parker, iii. 261-2. 

28 March, the Church services 

are stopped, iii. 262. 

— — — 31 March, admission of a 
Romanist president and seven Roman- 
ist demies, iii. 262. 

22 April, public beginning of 

Romanist services, iii. 264. 
23 April, celebration of James 

IPs coronation, iii. 265. 

— — — 25 April, dispute as to S. 
Mark's day sermon before the Univer- 
sity, iii. 265, 270. 

— 1 May, omission of the May- 
day service, iii. 266. 

— 1 June, admission of two more 

Romanist fellows, iii. 267. 

— 10 June, rejoicings for the birth 

of the prince of Wales, iii. 268. 

— 15 June, the Romanist presi- 
dent comes into residence, iii. 269,274. 

24 June, the Midsummer day 

sermon before the University, iii. 270. 

1 July, the thanksgiving for the 

birth of the prince of Wales, iii. 271. 

— — — 10 July, Romanist confirma- 
tion in the chapel, iii. 272. 



184 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges : S. Mary Magdalen 

(continued) : — 
[688, 3 Aug., expulsion of one 

Protestant fellow and resignation of 

another, iii. 273 -5. 
27 Sept., expectation that the 

ejected president and fellows are to 

be restored, iii. 278, 531. 
— 16-19 Oct., preparations for 

their restoration, iii. 531-2. 
20 Oct., the visitor comes to 

Oxford to reinstate them, iii. 279, 

but leaves, 21 Oct., without doing it, 

iii. 280, 532. 
25 Oct., the visitor does re- 
instate them, iii. 532-3. 
1689, May, a great ordination in 

the chapel, iii. 303. 
July, rejoicings for the birth of 

a Protestant heir-presumptive, iii. 

306. 

T690, fire, iii. 344. 

1690-3, observance of days in 

honour of William III, iii. 339, 432. 

1692, expulsion of a nonjuring fel- 
low, iii. 397. 

— — 1694, attempt to recover the 
patronage of Magdalen hall, iii. 444, 
44 6 , 455" 8 ; iv, 163. 

— — 1694-5, illuminations for William 
Ill's victories, iii. 475, 490. 

1695, entertainment of the chan- 
cellor of the University (Ormonde), 

iii. 495-6. 

1698, theft of the chapel plate, ii. 

272. 

— presidents, Wood's catalogue of, ii. 
313; iv. 163. 

royal interference with elections, 

i. 489 ; iii. 515. 
elected in chapel, iii. 518 ; iv. 

162 : confirmed by the visitor, iii. 

526 : installed in chapel, iii. 521. 
1626, Accepted Frewen, i. 75 ; 

iv. 57, l6 3- 

1644, John Oliver, v. 64. 

1648, John Wilkinson, i. 161, 

188, 407. 

1650, Thomas Goodwin, i. 148. 

1660, John Oliver, restored, v. 

64. 

t66i, Thomas Peirce, v. 65. 

1672, Henry Clerke, v. 38. 

1687, John Hough, v. 48. 

Samuel Parker, v. 65. 

1688, Bonaventure Gifford, v. 46. 

John Hough, restored, v. 48. 

— vice-president, ii. 157 : Francis 
Drope, ii. 230: Charles Aldworth, v. 
24 : Robert Charnock, v. 37. 

— bursar, ii. 479 ; iii. 258, 531-2. 



The Colleges : S. Mary Magdalen 
{continued) : — 

— dean, ii. 34. 

dean of Arts, iii. 531. 

dean of Theology, iii. 531 : Theo- 
logy lecturer, iii. 249 : Divinity reader, 
iii. 92. 

— steward, i. 142, 231-2; ii. 397, 519; 

iii. 519. 

— fellows, incidental mention of, i. 
29, 30, 127, 144, 148, 161, 198, 223, 
231-2, 236, 261, 285, 388, 413, 433, 
440, 465, 473, 488, 491, 497,. 507 ; 
ii. 17, 26, 39, 58, 112, 120, 124, 141, 
154, J 57, 165, 197, 205, 208, 215, 
225, 228-30, 243, 255, 280-2, 336, 
345> 39 2 , 397> 4° 2 , 4 2 7> 44 6 , 4 6 9> 
479, 5 OI > 5i6, 54°- 2 , 555, 557 5 Hi- 
43, 5°, 7 6 , 9 2 , 9 6 , i«> J 47> l8a > 
187, 218, 233, 246-50, 253-6, 263-5, 
268-71, 273, 275, 278-9, 332, 416, 
436, 456-7, 492, 515-8, 520-33; 

iv. 162-3 ; v. 12-4, 16. 
probationer-fellow, ii. 205. 

— demies, incidental mention of, i. 138, 

28 5, 347, 4 l8 > 472 ; ii- 9, I2 °> I2 4> 
310, 323, 494, 540 ; iii. 27, 150, 217, 
245, 250, 254, 256-7, 262, 264, 276, 
5 I 5,5 2l , 5 2 5, 53o-3; iv. 162. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
37, 60, 126, 143, 165, 175, 184, 186, 
205, 221, 229, 254-5, 2 93, 3H, 
33o-i, 370, 378, 381. 387, 4 2 7, 4 2 9, 
435, 463, 465, 473, 47 8 , 487-8, 49° 5 
ii. 42, 96, 146, 157, 160, 183, 270, 
2 73, 277, 2 8o, 288, 304, 318, 322, 343, 
372, 388, 392, 395, 424, 431, 442-3, 
446-7, 475, 498, 516, 544-5, 547-8, 
558, 563-4; 12, 14, 16-7, 41, 50, 
58, 71, 86, 92, 105, in, 147, 169, 
178, 187, 208, 214-5, 233, 245, 
248, 262-3, 267, 271, 274, 301, 337, 
344, 362, 364, 382, 406, 421, 439, 
446, 450, 455-6, 477, 488, 520, 532-3 ; 
iv. 197, 203. 

— schoolmaster: John Allibond, ii. 
1 41 -2 ; iii. 523 : Richard Reeves, ii. 
275; iii. 253-4; v. 66-7: James Car- 
kess, i. 500 : Thomas Collins, ii. 
275; iii. 246, 253, 324. 

— usher, i. 500 ; iii. 253. 

— chaplain, i. 285; ii. 219, 323;' iii. 
5 J 5, 521, 53 2 ; v. 11. 

— organist, i. 427; ii. 157; iii. 50, 

5 J 9> 5 22 , 5 2 7- 

— clerk, i. 131, 268, 285 ; ii. 252, 
323; iii. 106, 185, 266, 515, 521. 

— chorister, i. 285; ii. 216, 323; iii. 
245, 261, 266, 484, 515, 521-2. 

— noblemen, iii. 257. 

— fellow-commoner, i. 445. 



INDEX III. 

The Colleges : S. Mary Magdalen 
{continued) : — 

— commoner, i. 238; ii. 218; iii. 257, 
530. 

— poor-boy, ii. 275. 

— servants, iii. 455, 515, 521. 

butler, ii. 235 ; iii. 523. 

cook, ii. 244. 

porter, i. 220; iii. 7, 527 : under- 

porter, iii. 521-2. 

— customs : — 

on S. Mark's Day the University 

sermon is in this chapel, iii. 265, 
270 : so also on Midsummer day, iii. 
270, the University sermon is preached 
from the stone pulpit in the outer 
quadrangle. 

— — May-day service on Wolsey's 
tower, iii. 266. 

Christmas day alms, iii. 522. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel, i. 220, 432-3; ii. 17, 208; 
iii. 254, 521, 527. ' 

painted glass of, i. 161 ; iii. 17. 

painting in, ii. 164 ; iii. 17. 

service-books of, iii. 435. 

service, hours of : morning, 10 a.m., 

ii. 17; iii. 249, 262, 265, 272, 515, 
520, 532 : afternoon, 3 p.m., iii. 249, 
268, 272 : evening, 9 p.m., ii. 272. 

bell tolled for service, iii. 254, 

262, 265. 

special services, notices of : an 

ordination, iii. 303 : election of presi- 
dent, iii. 233, 518 : marriages, iii. 7, 
172, 216: University sermons, supra : 
Romanist services, Jan. 1688, threat- 
ened, iii. 254, 262 : Apr. 1688, begun, 

iii. 264-5, 26 8, 271-2. 

burials in, but probably in the 

outer chapel {see infra), i. 198, 231-2, 
236, 285; ii. 205, 228, 281, 336, 
345, 402, 446 ; iii. 182. 

seats, president's, iii. 532 ; vice- 
president's, iii. 532 ; fellows', iii. 254. 

pavement, iii. 254. 

plate, ii. 272 : vestry, ii. 272. 

altar, ii. 272. 

pulpit, iii. 265, 270. 

a chief Oxford show-place, i. 413 ; 

ii. 157, 160, 164, 208; iii. 17, 50. 

■ organ, i. 347, 356-7 : played 

while visitors were viewing the chapel, 

ii. 157, 208 ; iii. 50. 
screen, iii. 43. 

— chapel proper, called ' the choir,' 

iii. 265. 

— outer chapel, iii. 254, 532 ; iv. 161. 

pulpit in, ii. 218 ; iii. 265. 

monuments in, iii. 43, 92, 262. 

burials in, i. 417; ii. 112, 197, 



ICADEMICAL. 185 

The Colleges : S. Mary Magdalen 
{continued) : — 

215, 218, 323, 501 ; iii. 43, 76, 92, 
261 : see also supra. 

west door, i. 412-3; iii. 248: 

west window, i. 161. 

— the old chapel of S. John Baptist 
hospital, iii. 522. 

— hall, i. 413; ii. 17, 381, 386; iii. 
249, 256, 271, 515-6, 531-3. 

— — high table, iii. 532 : demies' 
table, iii. 256. 

hall-stairs, iii. 271. 

— common-room, iii. 249-50, 516, 
519-25. 

— library, i. 429; iv. 121, 133, 142, 
198, 201, 203. 

— president's lodgings, i. 413 ; iii. 249, 
261, 462, 516, 520-1, 523, 533. 

— — founder's room in, iii. 533 : 
stained glass in, iv. 163. 

— organist's lodgings, iii. 527. 

— exchequer, ii. 79. 

— treasury, i. 131; ii. 79; iv. 106, 
162. 

— cloister, i. 356, 413, 432, 466; ii. 
160, 208, 249; iii. 17, 50, 257, 261 : 
called ' the quadrangle,' i. 432-3, 
445 ; iii. 147, 533 : < the great quad- 
rangle,' ii. 208; iii. 216. 

dials and statues in, i. 432-3. 

— chaplains' quadrangle, i. 55 ; iii. 
344- 

— kitchen, iii. 257. 

— kitchen-yard, ii. 519. 

— churchyard, ii. 216, 310, 323; iii. 
27, 270; called 'the quadrangle,' i. 
412 : ' the cemetery,' ii. 120, 124. 

burials in, ii. 120, 124, 216, 310, 

323 ; iii. 27. 
stone pulpit in, iii. 270. 

— founder's tower, i. 445 ; iv. 161. 

— Wolsey's tower, i. 55 ; ii. 473 ; iii. 
266, 344, 475, 490. 

— wall, about the grove, i. 291 ; ii. 
216-7 5 I ^ 2 ~S- 

— grove, i. 68, 107; ii. 216; iii. 257, 
328. 

burial of a suicide there, iii. 276. 

— walks, i. 474, 497 ; ii. 557 : called 
the water- walks, iii. 50, 257. 

the great oak in, i. 497 : Dover 

pier, i. 497 : watering- bridge, i. 
497- 

— watering-place (beside Magdalen 
bridge), ii. 519, 524. 

— 4 all the great gates,' i. e., at least, 
both the outer-gate, and the gate 
under founder's tower, iii. 523. 

gate under founder's tower, i. 

445 ; iii. 216. 



i86 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges : S. Mary Magdalen 

{continued} : — 
outer-gate, i. 412-3; ii. 17, 58, 

157, 216; iii. 7, 50; iv. 163. 
. — — — citations and other notices 

affixed there, iii. 248-9, 279, 524, 

5 2 7> 53°, 532. 
founder's gate, iv. 163. 

— back gates : — 

gate of grove, near Magdalen 

hall, iii. 256-7, (?) 465. 
gate, next Magdalen bridge, ii. 

5I9- 

door from kitchen-yard into walks, 

iii. 257. 

door from cloister into walks, iii. 

257, (?)465- 

— bells, iii. 255, 268, 306. 

great bell, rung for service, iii. 

254, 262, 264-5, 2 7°> 2 7 2 - 
rung as passing-bell for death 

of members, ii. 205,557; iii. 76, 171, 

261, 269, 332. 

little bell, rung for service, iii. 

262, 264-5, 2 7°- 

— school, iii. 456 : master and usher 
of, v. 184. 

— statutes, iii. 233, 456, 515-8, 521, 
527 ; iv. 162. 

— muniments, ii. 78-9, 354 ; iv. 90, 
106, 161-3, 207. 

— cartulary of S. John Baptist hos- 
pital, ii. 78, 354 ; iv. 106, 162 : and 
of Brackley hospital, ii. 34 ; iv. 90. 

— registers of, ii. 79 ; iii. 89, 456, 
515, 518-9 ; iv. 162. 

— buttery-book, iii. 273-4, 5 2 ° -I > 525, 

532; 

— obits, and commemoration of bene- 
factors, iii. 435. 

— property, i. 272 ; ii. 222, 349, 354; 

iv. 75 : Oxford tenants, iii. 533 : 
leases, iii. 519 : fines, iii. 258, 519 : 
rent-roll, iii. 457 ; iv. 162 : audit, iii. 
530. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— site of, iii. 456. 

— plate of, i. 61, 81, 94; ii. 66; iii. 

258, 531 : chapel plate, ii. 272. 

— seal of, ii. 540, 542 ; iii. 518. 

— arms of, i. 161, 272. 

— heraldic glass in, i. 209. 

— the great 1687-8 struggle, pamphlets 
on, i. 16; iii. 246, 276, 280: MS. 
accounts of, iii. 514, 516 ; iv. 163. 

— incidental mention, i. 82, 159, 168, 

234, 37*> 432-3, 435» 4^6, 499 5 
68, 76, 136, 264, 427; iii. 7, 194, 
301, 321, 368. 
Merton College : Anthony Wood's 
college : — 



The Colleges : Merton {cont.) : — 

— founder, i. 217; ii. 41 1 ; iii. 27. 

— visitor, i. 383, 389, 398; ii. 313; 
iii. 93 ; v. 102. 

— benefactors, ii. 356, 401, 500. 

— events : — 

— 1266, granted S. Peter's rectory by 
Henry III, i. 217. 

— 1418 (?), warden and several fellows 
abroad with Henry V, iv. 305. 

— ■ 1549, place in disputations, iv. 128. 

— 1550, robbed by Edward VI's com- 
missioners, i. 424. 

— 1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

— 1642, headquarters of the Parlia- 
mentary troopers, i. 60 : disarmed 
by Parliament, i. 61, 63-4. 

— 1643, plate taken by Charles I, i. 
81, 94. 

reception of queen Henrietta, i. 

103. 

— 1643-6, court of queen Henrietta 
there, i. 91, 103, 105, no, 130. 

— 1646, looting by (j Parliamentary) 
soldiers, i. 130. 

— 1648-50, governed by the Parlia- 
mentary visitors, i. 133-8, 140-1, 
144, 147, 162-3, 166-7; v. 10. 

— 165 1, dissensions in, i. 167. 

defacement of the choir of the 

chapel, i. 309. 

— 1655, fall of the roof of the outer 
chapel, i. 199. 

— 1656, bells recast, i. 211-2, 219; 
h- 332, 5i5- 

— 1658, attends the funeral of the 
rector of Haseley, i. 236. 

— 1659, further defacement of chapel, 
and theft of brasses from chapel, i. 
309- 

— 1660, re-introduction of Church ser- 
vices, i. 313. 

— 1 66 1, intrusion of Sir Thomas Clay- 
ton into the wardenship, v. 38. 

subsequent discord between Clay- 
ton and the fellows, i. 395-8 ; com- 
plaints of petticoat-government, i. 
395-8 ; and sympathy of other col- 
leges, i. 391, 394. 

— 1665, Wood peruses the muniments 
of, ii. 36. 

Sept., reception of the chancellors 

of Oxford and Cambridge, ii. 58. 

— formal reception of queen 

Katherine, by the College, ii. 59 ; 
University, ii. 60 ; and City, ii. 60. 

— — Nov., state funeral of bishop 
Earle, ii. 51, 66. 

— 1665-6, queen Katherine keeps 
court "at, i. 396 ; ii. 45-6, 58-60, 68, 
70, 73- 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



187 



The Colleges : Merton {cont.) : — 

— 1665-6, lady Castlemaine quartered 
at, ii. 53, 67, 70. 

— 1666, Febr., formal leave-taking of 
queen Katherine by the University 
and City, ii. 68. 

Wood again peruses the muni- 
ments, ii. 77. 

— 1667, defeated in a lawsuit with the 
city, ii. 107, 125. 

— 1667-72, is in debt, i. 397-8. 

— 1668, outbreak of small-pox, ii. 133. 

— 1670, viewed by the prince of Orange, 
ii. 208. 

— 1 67 1, joins in laying out what is now 
Long Wall street, ii. 216-7. 

— 1671-3, repaving and wainscotting 
of the chapel, i. 450; ii. 233-5, 256, 
274: during these repairs the chapel 
services were in the college hall, cele- 
brations in S. Peter's in the East, ii. 
256, 274. 

— 1672, repaving of the hall, ii. 244. 
flood at, ii. 249. 

— 1675, scourge of small-pox, ii. 324. 

— J 675— 7, dissensions between the 
warden and fellows, i. 398; ii. 313, 
379- 

— 1676, intrigues at a fellowship elec- 
tion, ii. 343. 

— 1679, inquisition for Romanists, ii. 

439-4°- 
an epidemic at, ii. 470. 

— 1680, Wood peruses the old account- 
books, ii. 478. 

great entertainment at a ' varying,' 

ii. 490. 

an epidemic at, ii. 497-8. 

1 refitting of the common-room, ii. 

500. 

bells recast, ii. 508, 515. 

— 1681, bells rehung, ii. 515. 

ejection of a Whig fellow, ii. 

511. 

suicide at, ii. 557. 

Charles II requisitions the college 

as part of the quarters of the court, 

«• 5 IT , 5i4> 522-3, 532. 

— 1683, reception of the duke of York, 

iii. 49. 

scourge of small-pox, iii. 81. 

— 1684, election of a proctor, iii. 89. 
mandate from Charles II to elect 

his nominee fellow, iii. 93. 

intrigues at a fellowship election, 

iii. 95. 

— 1685, illuminations at the proclama- 
tion and at the coronation of James II, 
iii. 129, 141 : and a part-company of 
the University volunteers against Mon- 
mouth, iii. 149, 1 5 1-2. 



The Colleges : Merton {cont.) : — 

— 1685, great entertainment at a 'vary- 
ing,' iii. 155. 

— 1688, coldness at the thanksgiving 
for the birth of the prince of Wales, 

iii. 271. 

— 1693, fellowship election, iii. 424. 
contest for the wardenship, iii. 

432-3, 435-6. 

— wardens : — 

I 4 I 7, Robert Gilbert, iv. 305. 

142 1, Henry de Abendon, i. 211 ; 

ii- 235, 332. 

1483, Richard Fitzjames, ii. 235. 

1545, Thomas Reynolds, i. 304. 

1585, Sir Henry Savile, i. 160, 

396, 454; ii. 63, 239, 335, 544; iii. 

216, 431 ; iv. 148, 164. 

162 1, Sir Nathaniel Brent, v. 28. 

1645, William Harvey, i. 314; ii. 

350; iii. 318. 
1646, Sir Nathaniel Brent, restored, 

v. 28. 

1652, Jonathan Goddard, v. 46. 

1660, Edward Reynolds, v. 67. 

■ 1 66 1, Sir Thomas Clayton, v. 38. 

1693, Richard Lydall, v. 60. 

— sub-warden, i. 323 ; iii. 393,435 ; iv. 
163-4: deputy of, i. 390, 392. 

John Greaves, i. 189: Thomas 

Jones, i. 212 ; ii. 332 : Peter Nicolls, 
v. 63 : Alexander Fisher, v. 45 : 
Robert Whitehall, v. 74 : George 
Roberts, ii. 343, 348 : Nathaniel 
Wight, v. 74 : Robert Huntingdon, 
v. 48 : John Conant, v. 39. 

— tutor, i. 133, 167. 

— bursars, i. 396, 398, 446, 464, 467, 
474; ii. 8-10, 34, 36, 237, 337, 344, 

447, 469, 5 IO > 52i, 557, 561 ; m- 34, 
184. 

deputy-bursar, ii. 557. 

— principal of the postmasters, i. 138. 

— senior dean, i. 392 ; ii. 359 ; iii. 172. 

— steward, i. 1 79-80 ; ii. 6, 2 1 2 ; iii. 393. 

— rhetoric reader, ii. 379 ; iii. 75. 

— fellows, catalogue of, ii. 287 ; iii. 142 ; 

iv. 2, 36, 163-4. 

incidental mention of, i. 12, 27, 

29, 33, 35, 133-8, 144, H7> l62 , 
166-7, l6 9> 1 80-1, 197, 217, 235, 
240, 243, 254, 323, 325, 349-5°, 353, 
383, 386-7, 389-98, 4°5, 4°7, 416, 
424, 427, 430, 446, 469, 471, 511; 

47, 5°> 58-9, 66, 144, l6 4> 200, 
233-4, 294, 3°°, 345, 35 1 , 37°, 382, 
384, 386, 398, 401, 413, 420, 422, 454, 
500-1, 504, 511, 550, 554, 559-60; 
iii. 15-6, 19, 21, 24, 49, 95, 149, 187, 
197, 204, 225, 253, 312, 330 ; iv. 131, 
272, 3°3, 3°5 5 v - 8 , IO > I2 > *4- 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges : Merton {con/.)-.— 

probationary fellows, i. 136, 147 ; 

ii. 511. 

bachelor-fellows, i. 162, 243, 

389- 90 ; iii. 424. 

— post?7iasters, incidental mention of, i. 
53, l 3Z~ s > J 62-3, 166, 240; ii. 133, 
236, 284, 324, 470; iii. 149, 367; iv. 
164 : nominated by individual fellows, 
i- I33> 3 3<5-7, 162. 

Eton postmasters, i. 134-7: pro- 
postmasters, i. 135-7. 

— clerks, Bible clerks, i. 135-7, 162-3, 

389, 391 ; ii. 125 ; Hi. 91. 

— chaplains, incidental mention of, i. 
in, 130, 146, 318, 366-7, 402, 446, 
511 ; ii. 38-9, 56, 191, 261, 420, 422, 
454, 470. 545, 554; 21, 26, 67, 75, 
96, 141 ; iv. 190. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 59, 
76, 93, no, 130, 134-8, 140, 144, 146, 
157, 160, 164, 170, 174, 176, 183, 192, 
221 , 2 33, 2 43, 2 4 8 -5°> 2 54> 2 6o, 266, 
2 79, 3° 2 , 3°4, 3 J 3, 3 2 3, 3 8 7, 399, 
407, 416, 418, 427, 433, 435-6, 440, 

443, 454, 4 6 7, 49° ,' 47, 93, 147, 
160, 183, 219, 232-4, 255, 289, 304, 

315, 319, 3 2 9, 333, 346, 354, 356, 
386, 428, 548, 557, 563, 565 ; iii. 34, 
75, 81-2, 84, 89, 94, 105, 119, 123, 
131, 137, H 2 , 153, 160, 168, 173, 
180, 185, 268, 272, 295, 330, 337, 
377, 384, 406, 419, 491, 493 ; iv. 
216 ; v. 15-6. 

— fellow-commoner, i. 135; ii. 335; 

iii. 14. 

— gentleman-commoner, i. 137, 190, 
232; ii. 28-9, 145, 215, 332, 347-8, 
403, 470, 497, 499; iii. 184, 191. 

— bachelor-commoner, i. 140. 

— commoner, i. 135-6; ii. 299, 492; 
iii- 97, 165, 367. 

— servitor, i. 136, 138; ii. 148, 284, 
344- 

— servants, i. 136, 138, 140, 147, 450; 

ii. 56; iii. 393: under-servants, ii. 
247. 

cook, i. 138-9, 448, 461 ; iv. 34 : 

under-cook, i. 448 ; iii. 21. 
manciple, i. 443, 449 ; ii. 447. 

— — butler, upper butler, i. no, 147, 
288, 389, 448, 467, 471, 487; ii. 1, 
8, 78, 126, 206, 251, 299, 313, 456; 

iii. 109, 120, 144, 168, 188: under- 
butler, i. 392, 448; ii. 98, 313; iii. 
no. 

groom, i. 392, 447. 

porter, ii. 44, 146, 497-8 ; iii. 21. 

drawer, iii. 435 : drawer of beer, 

iii. 165. 
sexton, ii. 249. 



The Colleges : Merton (conl.) : — 

carpenter, iii. 178. 

gardener, ii. 557. 

common-room man, or boy, i. 

461, 463, 467; ii. 33, 131, 147, 177, 

190. 

— customs : — 

' fresh ' nights, i. 133, 138-40 ; iii. 

513 : culminating on Shrove Tuesday. 
' grace ' nights, entertainment to 

the B.A.s, i. 465 ; ii. 5, 506, 561 

(' a grace '). 
' black ' nights, entertainment to 

the B.A.s, ii. 359, 490 ; iii. 172. 
'varying,' ii. 490; iii. 155, 306, 

336. 

on Christmas day the fellows dine 

with the warden, i. 397. 
the University sermon on the first 

Sunday in August is in Merton chapel, 

ii. 44, 386. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel : serves also as parish church 
of S. John Baptist parish, v. 117: and 
so of S. Alban hall, i. 511 ; v. 165 : 
incidental mention of, ii. 205, 249 ; 

iii. 202. 

the pre-Merton church, ii. 332. 

ground-plans of the present build- 
ing, i. 450-1. 
16 50,Church services discontinued, 

i. 163: 1660, resumed, i. 313. 
special services :— state funeral of 

bp. Earle, ii. 51, 66 : University 
sermon, ii. 44, 386 : duchess of York's 
lecture, ii. 67: marriages, v. 117: 
installation of warden, i. 392-3. 
burials in : — 

in the choir, wardens, fellows, 

and ex-fellows, i. 104, 133, 167, 309, 
3 2 5, 349-50, 4 2 7, 45°-!; 5 1 , 66, 
H4, 2 3 2 ~5- 

in the south transept, chaplains, 

postmasters, and other members of the 
college, i. 199, 240, 450 ; ii. 38-9, 

133, 19 1 , 2 99, 324, 454 5 iii- 2 4, 153 ■ 
and some members of the court, i. no, 
146. 

under the tower, parishioners 

(including members of S. Alban hall, 
v. 165), i. 27, 78, 229, 428, 449-50; 

ii. 130, 236, 320, 347-9; iii. 245. 
in the north transept (called 

' the parish aisle,' i. 24, no), parish- 
ioners, including members of Anthony 
Wood's family and some members of 
S. Alban hall, i. 24-7, 29-31, 78, 
197-8, 243, 450, 476 ; ii. 100-1, 104-5, 

139, l8 7, 537 ; iii- IIQ , 499, 5°3 ; v. 
8-1 1, 13, 15-7: also some members 
of the court, i. 105, no, 146. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



The Colleges : Merton (coni.) : — 

Merton college buried also in 

S. Peter's in the East, ii. 28-9. 
parts of : — 

the choir or chancel, i. 450-1 ; 

iii. 49 : see burials supra. 
high altar, i. 104 ; ii. 51, 215, 

233-5. 

old stone coffins in, i. 345 ; ii. 

235- 

monuments in, ii. 235 : brasses 

in, i. 309. 

1659, 167 1, deformation of, i. 

3°9> 45°- 

1671, repaying of, i. 450; ii. 

2 33-5 3 256, 274. 

wainscot, ii. 234, 256, 274. 

chaplain's desk, i. 325. 

allocation of pews in, i. 450 : 

the warden's seat, i. 392. 

screen, ii. 233. 

the tower, i. 211, 219 ; ii. 25, 332, 

504 ; iii. 141, 
ringers' gallery in, ii. 332 : 

called ' the belfry,' i. 219. 

burials under, see supra. 

the south aisle of the outer 

chapel : — 

monuments and brasses in, i. 

199. 

burials in, see supra. 

the north, or ' parish,' aisle of the 

outer chapel : — 
north door of, iii. 49, 499 : 

carving over, iii. 27. 

— . burials in, see supra. 

Anthony Wood's monument 

in, iii. 499, 505. _ 

— churchyard, burials of servitors and 
servants in, ii. 146, 148, 344, 498 : 
and of poor parishioners, v. 117. 

— vestry-yard, burial of suicide in, ii. 
557- 

V- hall, i. 133, 138, 163, 197, 383, 389, 
390; ii. 244, 256, 274 ; iii. 435. 

high table, i. 138. 

declaiming desk, i. 133. 

— library, i. 135, 147, 424; iii. 178, 
215, 368 ; iv. 198, 303, 309. 

— common-room, i. 146 ; ii. 561 : gene- 
rally called ' common chamber ' by 
Wood, ii. 33, 82, 98, 131, 187, 237, 
2 59> 279, 500 ; iii. 129, 144, 152, 168, 
187, 197. 

refitted, ii. 500. 

Wood's noticesof his own member- 
ship extend from 1662, i. 461, 463-4 
to 1686, iii. 197. 

here was the ' common fire,' i. 

461, of wood, the charge for which 
was divided among the members, i. 



The Colleges : Merton (cont.) : — 
464, 474; ii. 8, 34, 237, 299, 337, 

344, 447> 469, 4 8 5, 521, 561 ; iii- 34» 
184. 

the charge for candles was paid 

in the same way, i. 461, 463, 467 ; ii. 
556, 561 ; iii. 184. 

and tobacco-pipes, ii. 469, 556; 

iii. 184. 

and the attendant, ii. 8, 33, 131 : 

tip given to (Harry Freeman), ii. 
177, 190, 198. 

— gallery, ii. 490 : query, of the war- 
den's lodgings, see infra. 

— exchequer, i. 392 ; iv. 163-4. 

— treasury, ii. 77, 249; iv. 163 : lower 
treasury, ii. 249. 

— treasury vault, i. 389. 

— tower, v. 189-9. 

— bells, originally five, in 1657 cast 
into eight, i. 21 1-2, 219, 232 ; ii. 332, 
515: recast in 1680, ii. 508, 515; 
iii. 49. 

rung in honour of a new warden, 

iii. 435-6. 

the old great, or tenor, bell, i. 

* 211 ; ii. 332. 

the great bell rung as passing-bell 

for members of Merton, ii. 351, 401, 
413 : and also, being the bell of the 
parish church, for parishioners of 
S. John Baptist parish, ii. 349 ; v. 
117, including members of Corpus 
Christi college, v. 178. 

— warden's lodgings, i. 141, 391-8; ii. 
58-9 ; iii. 89, 93, 245, 436. 

dining-room of, i. 393 ; iii. 436 : 

painted glass in, iii. 436. 

gallery of, i. 395-6 ; (?) ii. 490. 

parlour of, i. 396-7. 

furniture of, i. 395, 398. 

hall of, ii. 59 ; iii. 436. 

warden's garden and summer- 
house, i. 396. 

— exchequer chamber, i. 163: bay-tree 
chamber, i. 147, (?) 396. 

— quadrangles, iii. 49. 

first quadrangle, i. 147, 163, 396 ; 

iii. 151. 

great quadrangle, i. 133, 396. 

bonfire there, iii. 129, 149. 

little or old quadrangle, i. 163 ; 

iii. 149. 

bachelors' quadrangle, ii. 249 : 

? the preceding. 

— all the gates, i. 393. 

— gate, gate-house, great gate, i. 147, 
290, 3S9-90, 393, 508 ; ii. 59, 208 ; 
iii. 49, 151. 

wicket of, i. 28, 390, 398. 

carving over, ii. 411 ; iii. 27. 



190 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges: Merton (cont.)\ — 

— back-gate, in. 20. 

— buttery, i. 389 ; iii. 94. 

— cellar, i. 165, 389 ; ii. 249, 313. 

— garden, i. 395-6, 447 ; ii. 77 ; iii. 20. 
wall, iii. 20-1, 37. 

mount, i. 395 ; iii. 20, 37. 

— orchard, i. 405, 441, 510 ; ii. 77. 

— warden's garden, i. 396. 

— stables, i. 393, 396, 447 ; ii. 140. 
stableyard, i. 447. 

— sewage, i. 96. 

— miscellanea : — 

— property of, i. 137, 243, 245, 449 ; 
iii. 20, 246. 

including the rectory of S. Peter's 

in the East, i. 217; and Holywell 
manor, i. 397; ii. 127, 216-7, in 
which they keep court, iii. 27, 76, 
165, 198. 

and the property leased to the 

Wood family, v. 77, 80-2. 
-tenants of, i. I34~7> 21 1 > 395~ 6 5 

ii- 5, 2l6 , 332- 

— muniments of, ii. 36, 77; iv. 115, 
163-5, 2 °7, 2I 6- 

registers, i. 162, 288; ii. 234; iv. 

164. 

account-books, ii. 478. 

buttery-book, i. 133; ii. 163. 

— plate, i. 81, 94, 135. 

— beer of, i. 139. 

— are custodians of S. John Baptist 
parish, ii. 223 ; iii. 15-6, 20-1. 

— control S. Alban hall, ii. 223-4; 
15-6. 

— coats of arms in, i. 209. 

— (?) music-meeting at, 1684-7, v - J ^7- 

— the bay-tree, i. 147, 396. 

— ' Merton pool,' ii. 287. 

— writers of, iv. 221. • 

— Anthony Wood's collections towards 
a history of, i. 385; ii. 287, 478; iii. 
142, 181, 501 ; iv. 236. 

— incidental mention, i. 2, 43, 46, 69, 
86, 91, 159-60, 168, 197, 229, 232, 
242, 258, 280, 290, 371, 433, 435, 

447, 474, 497, 499 ; 8 9, 156, i59> 
163, 227-8, 254, 257, 267, 385, 565; 

iii. 26,47, 268 > 2 7 2 , 384, 5°!, 533; 

iv. 40 ; v. 8, 13, 16. 
New College : — 

— founder, iv. 166. 

founder's kin, ii. II, 220, 269. 

— benefactors, i. 459 ; ii. 318. 

— visitor, ii. 16, 18 ; iii. 533. 

— site, i. 459 ; ii. 82 ; iv. 167. 

— building of, iv. 166. 

— events : — 

1549, place in disputations, iv. 

128. 



The Colleges : New Coll. (cont.) :— 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1642, Aug., volunteers for Charles ; 

I, i- 53, 56. 
Aug. -Sept., drill-ground of the 

University militia, i. 53, 56, 58. 

— — — Sept., plate impounded by 
Parliament, i. 61, and the college dis- 
armed, i. 61, 63; wanton damage by 
soldiers, i. 64. 

1642 Nov.- 1 643 Apr., Charles I's 

magazines there, i. 69, 74, 83, 98. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, i. 

81, 94- 

1649, expulsions and appointments | 

by the Parliamentary visitors, i. 201, 
204; ii. 552. 

1651, the citadel of the Parlia- 
mentary garrison, i. 170. 

1655, fatal accident at, ii. 305. 

— — 1659-62, music-meetings at, i. 

1660, ejected fellows replaced by 

Charles II's commissioners, ii. 552. 
restoration of Church services, 

i. 356-7. 

sickness at, i. 347, 349-50, 

461. 

1662, scourge of small-pox, i. 461, 

4 6 3- 

1663, reception of Charles II and 

court, i. 498 ; iv. 67. 
1664, visitation by the visitor 

(bishop Morley), ii. 18. 
1665, reception of the chancellors 

of Oxford and Cambridge, ii. 58. 
consecration of a bishop in the 

chapel, ii. 67. 
1665-6, quarters of the Spanish 

ambassador, ii. 46, 59, 67-8, 71, 

327- , 

1666-7, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments, ii. 80-2, 103, 119. 
1 669, viewed by Cosmo de Medici, 

ii. 157, 160. 

1670, viewed by the prince of 

Orange, ii. 211. 

1672, fever, ii. 254. 

1673, Romanist sympathies in, 

ii. 269-70, 275. 
1675, plate stolen, ii. 71, 325, 

327, 371, 390. 
1676, building of the archway 

over New college lane, ii. 340. 

— — 1680, viewed by the prince of 
Hanover, ii. 518, 524. 

1681-2, rivalry with Christ Church, 

ii. 559; iii. 24. 

1682, evil report of, iii. 3. 

1682-4, building of the garden 

front, iii. 5. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



191 



The Colleges : New Coll. {cont.) : — 

1682, viewed by the Morocco am- 
bassador, iii. 17. 

1683, reception of the duke and 

duchess of York, iii. 50 : and of the 
bishop of Rochester, iii. 80. 

1685, takes part in the University 

militia against Monmouth, iii. 147-8, 
151-2. 

1688, reception of the bishop of 

Winchester, iii. 533. 
1691, loyalty to William III, iii. 

373- 

1695, discovery of the reredos, iii. 

488. 

— wardens : — 

1599, George Rives, iv. 173. 

1 61 3, Arthur Lake, i. 422. 

261 7, Robert Pincke, v. 66. 

1649, George Marshall, i. 2 21, 264. 

1658, Michael Woodward, v. 83. 

1675, John Nicholas, v. 66. 

■ 1679, Henry Beeston, v. 27. 

i860, J. E. Sewell, i. 492 ; iv. 166. 

— sub-warden, ii. 119. 

— bursar, i. 94, 493 ; iv. 166. 

— steward, i. 177 ; ii. 220, 460. 

— steward of the hall, iv. 166. 

— schoolmaster : — John Maynard, i. 49: 
John Davies, i. 49, 94 : Matthew 
Finch, ii. 52 : BennetHobbs, ii. 327 : 
Robert Woodward, ii. 559 : James 
Badger, iii. 492. 

— fellows, catalogue of, ii. 46; iv. 166. 

incidental mention of, i. 31, 35, 

49, 108, 124, 151, 183-4, J 99, 204, 
240, 244, 252, 261, 274, 278, 289, 
303-4, 346-50, 379, 388, 425, 428-9, 
458-63,471; ii. 11, 18, 27, 46, 52, 
58-9, 80, 82, in, 162, 167, 177-8, 

195, 198, 220, 251, 255, 269, 273, 
288-9, 305, 308, 317-8, 320, 324, 
327, 33i, 346, 348, 374, 415, 446, 
460, 484, 489, 507, 552, 558 ; iii. 10, 
12, 26, 34, 50, 85, 115, 119, 123, 147, 

196, 225, 227, 365-6, 370, 375, 398, 
468, 505 ; iv. 2, 152, 269. 

probationary fellows, i. 29 ; ii. 

33i, 461. 
founder's kin, v. 190. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
55, 60, 152, 201, 226, 240, 274, 290, 

314, 3 2 9-3o 5 347, 38i 5 4°9, 4". 4 J 3, 
425-6, 440, 472, 490; ii. 25, 34, 127, 
183, 250, 273, 292, 304, 319, 331, 

339> 343, 39 1 , 395> 4°2, 4 2 3> 435> 
442, 460, 513, 521, 531, 544; iii. 2, 
7, 13-4, 24, 38, 45, 50, 67, 77-8, 85, 
90, 96, 121, 123, 147, 160, 171, 177, 
182, 186, 197, 220, 249, 266, 287, 
296, 299, 301, 307, 331, 382, 391-2, 



The Colleges : New Coll. {cont.) : — 
402, 419, 425, 428, 430, 432, 450, 
464, 468, 485. 

— chaplains, i. 31, 49, 151, 445 ; ii. 55, 
183, 351 ; iii. 38, 209, 423, 489 : pro- 
chaplain, iii. 38. 

— nobleman, iii. 469. 

— gentleman-commoner, ii. 394. 

— clerk, i. 135, 462 ; ii. 305. 

— organist, ii. 157, 499, 501 ; iii. 24, 
450- . 

— chorister, i. 290 ; ii. 305. 

— singing-man, i. 290. 

— servants : — 

— — cook, ii. 325, 327. 
manciple, ii. 325. 

butler, ii. 325 : under-butler, i. 

506. 

porter, ii. 81, 325. 

barber, ii. 327. 

bailiff, iv. 165. 

groom, ii. 331. 

the warden's man, i. 414. 

— customs : — 

— — Ascension day service on the 
tower, i. 290 ; and at S.Bartholomew's 
hospital, i. 289-90. 

the fellows wear surplices on cere- 
monial occasions, ii. 211; and wait 
turns for rooms, ii. 27. 

— ■ — the University sermon is there on 
Lady- day, ii. 531. 

the Winchester examination, i. 

226 ; iii. 226. 
' progresses ' through the estates, 

iv. 167. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel, i. 49 ; ii. 67. 

high altar, iii. 488. 

reredos, iii. 488. 

organ, i. 356-7 ; ii. 157 ; iii. 17, 

50- 

pulpit, i. 133. 

west door, i. 462 ; iii. 262. 

one of the show-places of Oxford, 

ii. 59, 157 ; iii. 17, 50 ; iv. 67. 
the services show-services, to which 

visitors are taken, ii. 211, 518. 

hours of service, 10 a.m., ii. 518 ; 

5 p.m., ii. 211 (perhaps only on this 
occasion). 

burials in, i. 124, 133, 177; iv. 

166 : some of them perhaps in the 

outer chapel. 
burials in the outer chapel, ii. 31 7 ; 

iii. 362. 

— cloister, i. 170; ii. 28. 

in 1642 made Charles I's arsenal, 

i. 69, 74. 

New college school in a room off 

the east cloister, v. 192. 



192 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges : New Coll. (con/.) : — 

burials in, but in which arm not 

stated by Wood, i. 278, 303, 445 ; ii. 
17S ; iii. 365. 

north cloister, burials in, i. 346, 

349-5o, 379; »• 52, 55, 127, 162, 
167, 325, 327, 346; iii. 115: monu- 
ment in, ii. 55. 

west cloister, burials in, i. 31, 

471 ; ii. 177, 255, 318, 320, 479 
(' north-west') ; iii. 45, 123, 417, 468 : 
monuments in, ii. 479 ; iii. 45. 

south cloister, burials in, i. 347, 

349; ii. 103,107,484,489,499, 501 ; 
iii. 10, 34: monument in, ii. 107, 
489. 

east cloister, burials in, i. 429, 

462-3; ii. 416; iii. 366 ('north- 
east'). 

— school, in a room off the east cloister, 
i. 49, 53, 69, 429 ; ii. 327, 479. 

1641-4, Anthony Wood at, i. 49, 

53,69,93-4,129,199. 
masters of, v. 191. 

— hall, i. 69 : M.A.'s table in, i. 
151. 

— library, i. 238, 424; ii. 213-4; iii- 
506 ; iv. 201. 

— treasury, iv. 165. 

— warden's lodgings, i. 64 ; ii. 340 ; iii. 
74, 506 ; iv. 219. 

stables, ii. 340. 

garden, i. 170. 

archway over street, ii. 340. 

— choristers' chamber, i. 69. 

— buttery, ii. 325. 

— kitchen, ii. 27. 

— common-room, built 1684, iii. 5, 
398. 

— private chapel of the Spanish am- 
bassador, ii. 59. 

— tower, i. 69, 74, 290. 

— — great bell, rung as passing-bell 
for members, iii. 182, 225, 370. 

— great quadrangle, i. 53, 56, 58 ; iii. 
5, 5o. 

garden gate of, iii. 5. 

— garden quadrangle, iii. 5. 

— gate, gate-house, ii. 18, 59, 211. 

— back-gate, towards Queen's, ii. 211 ; 
iii. 50. 

— wall, ii. 216, 325. 

— garden, iii. 5. 

— bowling-green, iii. 147. 

— miscellanea : — 

— muniments of, ii. 80-2, 103 ; iv. 
T65-6. 

bursars' rolls, i. 94, 493 ; iv. 165. 

account-books, ii. 103 ; iv. 165. 

register of admissions, the proto- 

collons, i. 199; iv. 166. 



The Colleges : New Coll. (cont.) : — 

cartularies, i. 458 ; ii. 80-2 ; iv. 

166. 

— statutes of, ii. 119 ; iv. 165. 

— plate of, i. 61, 81, 94-5, 151 ; ii. 71, 

325, 3 2 7> 37 I » 39°- 

— arms of, i. 133; ii. 317. 

— coats of arms in, i. 209. 

— armoury (bows and arrows), i. 493. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— ' mother' to Magdalen college, ii. 68. 

— privilege at Salamanca, ii. 68, 327. 

— New college butts, i. 492-3. 

— the mulberry tree, ii. 305. 

— incidental mention, i. 117-8, 151, 
159, l68 , 371, 411, 426, 466 ; ii. 25 ; 

iii. 142 ; iv. 77, 219. 
Oriel College : — 

— events : — 

I 549, place in disputations, iv. 

129. 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1640, building of chapel, i. 210. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81,94. 

1659-62, music-meetings, i. 275. 

1660, Charles IPs commissioners 

meet there, i. 318. 

visitation by Charles II's com- 
missioners, i. 336. 

1 66 1, repairs S. Mary's chancel, 

iv. 65. 

1665-6, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments and registers, ii. 37, 88. 
1669, viewed by Cosmo de Medici, 

ii. 160. 

1670, viewed by the prince of 

Orange, ii. 208-9. 

1672, fever, ii. 251, 254. 

1676, fever, ii. 359. 

1679, embezzlement of college 

money, ii. 451. 
1683, reception of the duke of 

York, iii. 49. 
1692, expulsion of a non-juror, iii. 

384-5- 

— provosts : — 

1326, Adam de Brome, v. 118. 

1621, John Tolson, v. 72. 

1644, John Saunders, i. 62, 166, 

179, 181, 210. 

1653, Robert Say, v. 68. 

1 69 1, George Royse, iii. 377. 

— dean, ii. 88 ; iv. 168. 

— treasurer, ii. 37; iii. 352 ; iv. 167. 

— bursar, ii. 451. 

— steward, ii. 537. 

— fellows, catalogue of, iv. 168. 

incidental mention of, i. 62, 135, 

174, 180, 210, 232, 236-7, 273, 279, 
382, 416, 427, 462; ii. 5, 49,94, 108, 



INDEX Iff. 

The Colleges : Oriel (cont.) : — 
130, 184, 208, 246, 251, 359, 365, 
372-4, 381, 383, 386, 45:, 481, 496 ; 
iii. 119, 189, 462, 475. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
116, 167, 210, 246, 295, 325, 378, 
410, 416, 439, 462 ; ii. 79, 148, 232, 
245, 26T, 273, 276, 289, 318, 329, 

35°, 355, 359, 4°3, 4°6, 447, 494 5 
iii. 7, 19, 44, 49, 60, 77, 89, 92, 119, 
121, 132, 143, 332, 360, 372, 384-6, 

39 1 1 469- 

— gentleman-commoner, i. 338. 

— commoner, i. 210 ; iii. 28, 108, 376. 

— servitor, i. 48 ; ii. 287 ; iii. 95. 

— butler, i. 210; iii. 376. 

— cook, iii. 417. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel, i. 210, 449 ; iii. 20. 

burials in chapel, i. 174, 179, 181, 

210, 382, 449; ii. 49, 127, 184, 359, 
374, 496; iii. 28, 189, 376; iv. 168. 

burials in the outer chapel, ii. 251, 

and, no doubt, several of the preced- 
ing. 

— ■ Oriel buried also in S. Mary's 

chancel, i. 325, 338; ii. 261: and 
churchyard, ii. 287. 

— hall, ii. 373. 

— library, iv. 198, 201. 

— treasury, i. 454; ii. 37 ; iv. 106, 167. 

— provost's lodgings, i. 102 ; ii. 263-4: 
iii. 39. 

— ball-court, i. 449 ; iii. 20. 

— wood-house, i. 449. 

— gate, iii. 20. 

— miscellanea : — 

— site, i. 449. 

— benefactors, ii. 359; iii. 189, 434. 

— property, ii. 350, 405 ; iii. 28. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— plate, i. 81, 94-5. 

— muniments and registers, i. 454 ; ii. 
37, 88; iv. 131, 167-8. 

— incidental mention, i. 159, 168, 266, 

325, 354, 39°, 449, 499 5 59, 5 6 5- 
Pembroke College : — 

— events : — 

— 1643, residence of the secretary of 
state, i. 85. 

plate taken by Charles I, i. 81, 

94. 

many members serve in Charles I's 

army, i. 106 ; iv. 168. 

— 1662, ejection of nonconformists, i. 
453- 

— 1664, ejection of the master, ii. 25. 

— 1668, Wood peruses the muniments, 
ii. 129. 

— 1692-4, has a reputation for Low 
Church, iii. 379, 443. 

VOL. V. 



CADEMICAL. 193 

The Colleges : Pembroke {cont.) : — 

— masters : — 

1624, Thomas Clayton, i. 75, 84, 

96, 132 ; iv. 284. 

1647, Henry Wightwick, ii. 25. 

Henry Langley, i. 130-1, 147, 

423, 500; ii. 1, 97, 244, 462. 
1660, Henry Wightwick, restored, 

i. 379; ii. 25. 

1664, John Hall, v. 46-7. 

— fellows, i. 383, 453 ; ii. 70. 

■ — members, i. 3, 78, 106, 375 ; ii. 383, 

4 22 , 449, 5° 6 , 5 J 9> 54 6 ; 4, 2 9, 

80, 109, 264, 366, 428, 472, 481. 

— gentleman-commoner, i. 173. 

— commoner, i. 325. 

— cook, i. 385. 

— butler, promus, i. 385 ; ii. 95. 

— miscellanea : — 

— the visitor is the chancellor of the 
University, ii. 25. 

— has no chapel of its own, but uses 
an aisle in S. Aldate's church, iii. 54 : 
buried in S. Aldate's church, i. 132 ; 

ii. 70. 

— statutes, ii. 27 ; iv. 168. 

— library, iv. 283. 

— muniments, iv. 168. 

— plate, i. 81, 94. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— incidental mention, i. 78, 159, 234, 
311, 336, 429, 466; ii. 565; iii. 467; 
v.5. 

Queen's College :— 

— founder, i. 95 ; iv. 168-9. 

the founder's horn, i. 95, 499 ; iii. 

50 ; iv. 67. 

— benefactors, ii. 438 ; iv. 169. 

— visitor, iii. 126. 

— events : — 

1549, place in disputations, iv. 

129. 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 

1642, plate impounded and the 

college disarmed by Parliament, i. 61. 
1643, plate taken by Charles I, i. 

81, 94. 

— — 1657-63, music-meetings there, i. 

231,275,469- 
1660, bonfires for news of a free 

Parliament, i. 303-4. 
1663, reception of Charles II, i. 

498-9. 

1663, Queen's fights Exeter col- 
lege, ii. 56. 

1666, Wood thwarted in his wish 

to peruse the muniments of, ii. 78, 80. 

1670, viewed by the prince of 

Orange, ii. 211. 

1672, fever, ii. 251, 254. 

1678, new buildings, ii. 438. 



194 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges : Queen's (cont.) : — 

1679, Queen's mcn poshed on in the 

Church by a Queen's secretary of 
state, ii. 438, and a Queen's clerk of 
the council, ii. 471. 

1 68 1, the fellows retire to Denton 

to make room for Parliament, ii. 524. 

1682, viewed by the Morocco am- 
bassador, iii. 17. 

1683, viewed by the duke of York, 

iii. 50. 

1685, appeals to the visitor, iii. 

126-7. 

t686, an appeal to the queen -con- 
sort (patroness of the college), iii. 
185. 

1688, thanksgiving for the queen's 

pregnancy, iii. 255. 
1691, expulsion of a non-juror, iii. 

375- 

— provost : a trustee under John Snell's 
will, ii. 459. 

1626, Christopher Potter, i. 51, 

75, 77, 8 4, 86, I2 5-6, 237 ; iii. 111 ; 

iv. 57. 

1646, Gerard Langbaine, v. 57. 

1658, Thomas Barlow, v. 26-7. 

1677, Timothy Halton, v. 47. 

— fellows, catalogue of, iv. 169. 

incidental mention of, i. 29, 243, 

273, 307,365, 444, 498; 251, 448, 
524; iii. 27, 137, 375; v. 10, 13. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
99, 137, I 5 2 > l86 , 189, 231, 238, 246, 
250, 256, 274-5, 290, 296, 302, 314, 
316, 328, 346-8, 364-5,388, 394, 400, 
412, 434, 441, 468-9, 472; ii. 25, 97, 
139, 158, 161, 196-7, 233, 263, 278 (in 
error for 'Trin.'), 305, 312, 337, 344, 
361, 379, 39°, 4 2 9» 447> 47 1 , 4 8 5, 
537, 544, 552-3, 564 J iii- J o, 12, 18, 
24, 38, 5°, 66, 79, 91, 97, 116, 121, 
132, 147, 207, 219, 252, 254-5, 263, 
270, 301, 307-8, 328, 332, 334, 353-4, 
368, 37i, 382, 385-6, 399, 406, 422, 
424, 453-4, 474, 478, 486; iv. 94, 
197. 

— bursar, iv. 84. 

— chaplain, iii. 308 ; iv. 169. 

— taberdar, i. 352 ; iv. 169. 

— fellow-commoner, ii. 344; iv. 169. 

— gentleman-commoner, ii. 23, 130, 
257- 

— commoner, i. 200, 238; ii. 123, 423; 
iii. 8, 188, 197 ; iv. 169. 

— batler, iv. 169. 

— servitor, iv. 169. 

— chorister, i. 352. 

— servants, ii. 494. 

butler, i. 382 ; ii. p. vii, 474, 

476. 



The Colleges: Queen's {cont.) :— 

cook, ii. 244. 

manciple, i. 352, 382. 

— customs : — 

— the boar's head, i. 351-2. 

— Hampshire progress, ii. 541. 

— bell of S. Peter in the East, the 
parish church, is rung as passing-bell 
on the death of a member, iii. 254. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel, i. 498 ; iii. 1 7, 50. 

citations affixed to chapel-door, 

iii. 126. 

marriages in, i. 243 ; ii. 552 ; v. 

10. 

burials in, i. 126, 237, 274; ii. 

251, 423, 447. 

— — — Queen's buried also in S. 
Peter's in the East, i. 200, 307, 400 ; 

ii. 197. 

— hall, iii. 17, 50 ; iv. 144. 

stained glass in, iii. 50. 

high table, i. 352. 

— — hour of supper, 6 p.m., ii. 211. 

— library, i. 498 ; ii. 225 ; iv. 96, 198, 
201. 

— provost's lodgings, ii. 80, 202, 249; 

iii. 126-7. 

— kitchen, i. 352. 

— - quadrangle, iii. 50. 

— new (1678) buildings, ii. 438. 

— gate, ii. 211; iii. 50 ; iv. 168 : closed 
at supper-time, ii. 211. 

— garden, i. 170. 

— grove, i. 432. 

— wall, i. 170. 

— miscellanea : — 

— property, ii. 80, 524. 

— muniments, ii. 78, 80. 
obital-book, i. 435 ; ii. 80. 

— statutes, ii. 106. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— plate, i. 61, 81, 94-5 : the founder's 
horn, v. 193. 

— beer, i. 498-9 ; iii. 17. 

— the devil's hand, i. 498. 

— the four Potters, i. 1 26. 

— is the ' North ' college, ii. 56. 

— patron of S. Edmund's hall, iii. 12, 
90,116,457. 

— incidental mention, i. 77, 159, 168, 
170, 18S, 201 ; ii. 36, 212, 438 ; iii. 

152, 3*9- 
Trinity College : — 

— founder and foundress, i. 424 ; iii. 
364- 

— benefactors, iii. 450 ; iv. 171. 

— visitor, i. 365 ; ii. 16; iii. 291,449, 

533. 

— events : — 

1605-12, census, iv. 151. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



195 



The Colleges : Trinity (cont.) : — 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, i. 

81, 94. 

— — 1649, ejections by the Parlia- 
mentary visitors, i. 365. 

1660, visitation by Charles IFs 

commissioners, i. 336, 365. 

1664, visitation by the visitor (bp. 

Morley), ii. 16, 18. 

1665, new buildings, iv. 171. 

1666, Wood peruses the muni- 
ments, ii. 74. 

1673, Wood pays weekly visits to 

the president (Bathurst), ii. 258. 

proctor's cake and wine at, ii. 

261-2. 

— — 1678, the 'new philosophy' 
studied at, ii. 429. 

1683, viewed by the duke of 

York, iii. 53. 

1685, the college is full, iii. 138. 

serves in the University militia 

against Monmouth, iii. 149, 152. 
1686, Romanist sympathies in, iii. 

182, 303. 

1688, rejoicings for the restoration 

of the fellows of Magdalen, iii. 533. 

expulsion of Romanist fellows, 

iii. 291,303. 

— — 1690, a grand-compounder, iii. 
346. 

— — 1691, demolition of the old 
chapel, iii. 364. 

1694, consecration of the new 

chapel, iii. 449. 

— presidents : — 

1599, Ralph Kettell, i. 145 ; ii. 

74, 118, 372 ; iv. 171. 

1648, Robert Harris, v. 47. 

1658, William Hawes, i. 282. 

1659, Seth Ward, v. 74. 

1660, Hannibal Potter, not men- 
tioned in Wood's Life. 

1664, Ralph Bathurst, v. 27. 

— fellows, catalogue of, ii. 74 ; iv. 171. 

required to take B.D., iii. 291. 

incidental mention of, i. 122, 130, 

136, 229, 244, 350, 365, 424 ; ii. 74, 
91, 261, 330, 336, 545 ; iii. 139, 291. 

— scholars, i. 93, 122, 129-30, 147 ; ii. 
39, 487 ; v. 9-10. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 2, 
37, 93, 122, 129, 133, 165, 167, 186, 
190, 221, 230, 243-4, 256, 281, 

3°7, 33°, 334> 35°> 365, 379> 4°6-7, 
424, 460, 466 ; ii. 80, 96, 154, 210, 
216, 250, 255, 267, 288, 318, 338, 

35 2 > 357> 37 2 > 4 J 5> 4 2 3, 53 2 , 5 6 3 ; 
iii. 6, 15, 22, 26, 40, 52-3, 60, 75-7, 
85, 88, 149, 182, 209, 215, 219, 245, 
2 53> 303» 3 2 7> 33 8 > 349> 354> 35 6 > 



The Colleges : Trinity {cont.) : — 
361, 366, 368, 374-5, 406, 439, 449, 
455, 492 ; iv. 193. 

— - — list of members, Arthur Charlet's 
' Nomenclator,' i. 158 ; iv. 171. 

— fellow-commoner, i. 351. 

— gentleman-commoner, i. 147, 158, 
173; ii. 151; iii. 28, 30, 91, 138, 
149, 216, 310. 

— commoner, ii. 186, 226, 229; iii. 105. 

— butler, promus, ii. 91. 

— custom, fellowship election on Trinity 
Monday, iii. 303. 

— buildings : — 

— the old chapel, iii. 364. 
screen of, i. 424. 

marriages in, i. 307; ii. 151. 

burials in, i. 129, 264-5, 350 ; ii. 

74> 9 1 , 33o. 
Trinity buried also in S. Mary 

Magdalene parish church, ii. 80, 330; 

iii. 91. 
vault of, iii. 364. 

— the new chapel, iii. 449. 

— hall, ii. 261-2 ; iii. 347, 450. 

— library, iv. 171. 

— common-room, iii. 346. 

— president's lodgings, ii. 26 ; iii. 449. 

— old quadrangle, iii. 53. 

— new quadrangle, iii. 53 ; iv. 171. 

— grove, iii. 53-4, 149. 

— gate, i. 129 ; iii. 53, 138, 533. 

upper gate, iii. 369. 

back gate, iii. 53. 

— old glass in, iv. 193. 

— statutes, ii. 74; iv. 171. 

— cartulary, ii. 74; iv. 171. 

— muniments, iv. 170-1. 

— plate, i. 81, 94-5. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— Wood's chapter on, ii. 186. 

— incidental mention, i. 129, 133, 147, 
159, 168; ii. 116; iii. 80; iv. 118. 

University College : — 

— visitor = the University of Oxford, iii. 
297-8. 

— benefactors, i. 306; iv. 172. 

— events : — 

1549, place in disputations, iv. 

129. 

1605-12, census of, iv. 151. 

1642, plate impounded by Parlia- 
ment, i. 62, 64. 

1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81,94. 

1648, ejections by the Parliamen- 
tary visitors, i. 445 ; ii. 52. 

1649, no regent master in, i. 153. 

1657, new buildings at, i. 210. 

1660, visitation by Charles IPs 

commissioners, i. 445. 



196 WOOD'S LIFE 

The Colleges : University {con- 
tinued} : — 

1662, accident in chapel, i. 445. 

1664, acted at, ii. 2. 

1665, play acted at, ii. 28. 

Wood peruses the muniments, 

ii. 39. 

1 665-6, during the presence of the 

court in Oxford, University college is 
occupied by strangers, ii. 50-], 66. 

1666, consecration of the new 

chapel, ii. 74. 

Wood writes his chapter on, ii. 

93- 

— — 1670, viewed by the prince of 
Orange, ii. 208. 

— — 1674, ejection of a Romanist 
fellow, ii. 276. 

1678, Obadiah Walker, the master, 

is accused of Romanism, ii. 422. 

1679, inquisition for Romanists, 

ii. 439-40- 

1680, Obadiah Walker, and others 

of the college, accused of Romanism, 

ii. 488-9, 491. 

1682, viewed by the Morocco 

ambassador, iii. 17. 
1683, viewed by the duke of York, 

iii. 49. 

1685, illuminates on accession of 

James II, iii. 1 29. 

members of the college take 

the lead in the Romanist movement 
in the pulpit, iii. 152, 156, 165, and 
in the press, iii. 164-5. 

1686, members of the college are 

the first to make open profession of 
Romanism, iii. 176-7, 182-5. 

1686-8, Obadiah Walker's, the 

master's, house is the centre of the 
Romanist movement, iii. 177, 182, 
186,197,209,213,255. 

1686, the master opens a Ro- 
manist chapel, iii. 182, 194 : see infra, 
p. 197. 

— — 1686-7, ^e master prints Ro- 
manist books, iii. 198, 201-2, 209: 
and, in 1687, sets up a press for this 
purpose in his house, iii. 209, 218, 
282. 

1687, a statue of James II is put 

up, iii. 209-12. 
reception of James II, iii. 231, 

233- 

the college appears before 

James II's ecclesiastical commission, 
iii. 240. 

1688, illuminates for the birth of 

the prince of Wales, iii. 271. 

— — — the Romanist master and 
fellows leave Oxford, iii. 282, 285. 



AND TIMES. 

The Colleges: University {con- 
tinued) : — 

— — 1689, formal expulsion of the 
Romanist master and fellows, iii. 
297-8. 

— masters : — 

1509, Ralph Hamsterley, iv. 172. 

1609, J°hn Bancroft, iv. 172. 

1632, Thomas Walker, ii. 52. 

1648, Joshua Hoyle, i. 188. 

1655, Francis Johnson, i. 148; 

ii. 97, 145. 

— — 1660, Thomas Walker, restored, 

i- 445J »• 5 2 5 iv- 56, 149- 
1665, Richard Clayton, i. 406; 

»• 53, 145- 

1676, Obadiah Walker, v. 72-3. 

1689, Edward Ferrar, iii. 305, 

354-5- 

1691, Thomas Bennett, iii. 355, 

39°- 

1692, Arthur Charlett, v. 36-7. 

S. Mary's bell tolled for the 

death of the master, iii. 390. 

— bursar, ii. 39. 

— steward, ii. 277. 

— fellows, catalogue of, iv. 172. 

incidental mention of, i. 157, 237, 

473, 498; 28, 34, 143, 263, 276, 
344, 389, 416, 422, 503 ; iii. 96, 152, 
156, 183, 231, 336, 377 ; iv. 128, 172, 
204. 

— members, incidental mention of, i. 
J 53, i75> 275, 330, 370, 406, 472; 

ii. 25, 96, 124, 145-6, 157, 201, 353, 
377, 486, 488, 490-2, 503, 506, 537 ; 

iii. p. vii, 44, 75, 77-8, 82, 147, 165, 
176-7, 213-4, 217, 233, 245, 270, 

284, 297-8, 343, 353, 390, 424, 427, 
434, 474> 49 2 > 494 5 77, 172. 

— nobleman, iii. 210, 442. 

— fellow-commoner, iii. 49. 

— gentleman-commoner, i. 212 ; iii. 210, 
233- 

Romanist gentleman-commoner, 

in 1687, iii. 214. 

— commoner, ii. 100. 

— servitor, ii. 145, 422. 

— Romanist chaplains, in 1687 : — 
Edward Umberston, i. 152; iii. 213, 
240, 264: . . . Wakeman, iii. 276, 

285, 298. 

— buildings : — 

— old chapel, demolished 1668, i. 188, 
209-10, 445, 472 ; ii. 148. 

burials in, i. 188, 213 : and in its 

outer chapel, i. 237. 

— new chapel, consecrated 1666, ii. 
74; iii. 49, 210, 297. 

dedication of, ii. 74; iii. 197. 

outer chapel, iii. 176. 



INDEX III. ACADEMICAL. 



197 



The Colleges: University {con- 
tinued') : — 

statue over door, iii. 197. 

burials in, ii. 344 ; iii. 96, 336, 

377 : first burial in the inner chapel, 

ii. 263. 

— Obadiah Walker's Romanist chapel, is 
opened in 1686, and becomes a centre 
of tumult, iii. 182, 194, 196, 213, 
223-4, 2 33, 245, 273-4, 298; dis- 
mantled, 1688, iii. 285 : chaplains of, 
v. 196. 

— hall, i. 209-10; iii. 210. 

desk, iii. 210: high table, iii. 

210. 

common-room, 1687, iii. 210, 

298. 

treasury, iv. 126, 148, 171. 

old library, ii. 148. 

library, ii. 486 ; iii. 83, 282 ; iv. 

149, 198. 

master's lodgings, iii. 194, 209, 

271, 282, 285. 
■ — Romanist press in, iii. 209, 

218, 282. 

passage from quadrangle to, 

iii. 194. 

old quadrangle, ii. 148. 

new buildings, 1668, ii. 148. 

quadrangle, ii. 148 ; iii. 194, 

209-10, 231, 233, 271. 
street-front, iii. 129, 210, 231, 

271. 

tower, ii. 39; iii. 129. 

gate, gate-house, iii. 35, 129, 196, 

209-10, 233, 245, 271. 
statue of king Alfred over, 

iii. 35- 

statue of James II over, on 

the quadrangle side, iii. 209-10. 

— miscellanea : — 

— arms of, i. 188. 

— coats of arms in, i. 209. 

— stained glass in, i. 241. 

— plate of, i. 62, 64, 81, 94. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— commemoration days, iii. 1 77. 

— muniments, ii. 39; iv. 171, 207, 225. 

— the forged charter, ii. 261. 

— collections about, i. 248. 

— Wood's history of, ii. 93. 

— incidental notices, i. 124, 159, 290, 
466, 472 ; ii. 25, 50, 66, 156, 254, 
299; iii. no, 152. 

Wadham College : — 

— founder, i. 259 ; ii. 256. 

— foundress, ii. 402 ; iv. 173. 
founder's kin, ii. 405. 

— events : — 

1608, contemplated foundation of, 

i. 259. 



The Colleges : Wadham (cont.) : — 
1 6 10, foundation of, ii. 256, 402 : 

laying foundation-stone of, iii. 44 ; iv. 

139 : building of, iv. 173. 
1643, plate taken by Charles I, 

i. 81, 94. 

1645, occupied by gentry during 

the siege of Oxford, i. 1 24. 

1648, appointments by the Parlia- 
mentary visitors, i. 135. 

1652, dispensation allowing John 

Wilkins, the warden, to marry, i. 
363- 

1659-62, music-meetings there, 

i. 275. 

1663, visit of the chancellor (Cla- 
rendon), i. 491. 

reception of Charles II, i. 498. 

1666, fatal accident, ii. 77-8. 

Wood peruses the muniments, 

ii. 78. 

1670, viewed by the prince of 

Orange, ii. 211. 

1672, scourge of fever, ii. 253-4. 

1673, proctor's cake and wine, 

ii. 262. 

1676-7, scourge of fever, ii. 359- 

60, 365. 

1678, death of (? the last) scholar 

of the first foundation, ii. 402. 

1682, viewed by the Morocco 

ambassador, iii. 17. 

1683, viewed by the duke of York, 

iii. 50. 

1685, in the University militia 

against Monmouth, iii. 149, 152. 

— warden : — marriage forbidden by 
statute, i. 363. 

161 7, William Smith, ii. 127. 

1648, John Wilkins, v. 74. 

1659, Walter Blandford, v. 28. 

1665, Gilbert Ironside, v. 49. 

1689, Thomas Dunster, iii. 313. 

— sub- warden, iv. 173. 

— fellows, catalogue of, iv. 173. 
incidental mention of, i. 9, 37, 

135, 326, 498; ii. 133, 185, 195, 197, 

261, 320, 357, 365, 4°2, 405, 443. 

45 1 , 5oi, 547 5 ^ i49» i94> 

488; iv. 173. 

— scholars, ii. 77-8, 256, 360, 402, 502. 

— metnbers, incidental mention of, i. 
116, 202, 231, 258, 264-5, 282-3, 

307, 3H, 3i6, 323, 4° 6 , 4H» 476, 
496; ii. 34, 125, 166, 189, 217, 226, 
334, 346, 375, 39i, 43i, 473, 484, 
559, 56i, 5 6 4; 1U - x 5, 4 1 , 5°, 52, 
66, 72-3, 76-8, 93, 121, 218, 240, 
252, 260, 262, 265-7, 303, 330, 345, 
359, 3 6 9, 396, 39 8 » 4 01 " 2 , 4 I 3» 4 2 7, 
432, 439, 445. 4 6 4, 479, 5 QI - 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



The Colleges: Wadiiam (cone.) :— 

— fellow-commoner, ii. 254; iii. 87; 
iv. 173. 

— gentleman-commoner, i. 274; ii. 
105, 123; iii. 73-4, 201. 

— commoner, i. 274; ii. 18, 77, 171, 
217, 252, 254, 360; iii. 150, 399, 
480; iv. 173. 

— manciple, ii. 237. 

— bedmaker, iii. 399. 

— buildings : — 

— chapel, iii. 31, 321. 

— — marriage in, iii. 124. 

burials in, i. 124, 126, 326; ii. 

I33> 217, 252, 468 ; iii. 41 ; iv. 173. 

— in the inner chapel, ii. 357. 

in the outer chapel, i. 264 ; 

ii- i7 J > 357, 3 6 °, 3^5 ; «*• 73~4> 201, 
402. 

— cloisters, burial in, ii. 237. 

— hall, i. 432. 

— common-room, ii. 267 ; iii. 367. 

— treasury, iv. 173. 

— warden's lodgings, i. 257 ; ii. 296. 

— gate, ii. 34, 211 ; iii. 50. 

— back-yard, i. 492. 



The Colleges: Wadiiam (cont.): — 

— back-gate, ii. 139. 

— miscellanea : — 

— plate, i. 8 1 , 94-5. 

— proportional valuation, ii. 565. 

— registers, ii. 78 ; iv. 173. 

— statutes, ii. 78; iv. 173. 

■ — muniments, ii. 167 ; iv. 173. 

— incidental mention, i. 55, 159-60, 
168, 432, 466, 491-2; ii. 34; iii. 
227. 

— from the Rev. R. B. Gardiner I have 
received corrections of Wood's notices 
of Wadham names in City, iii. 220-2. 
' T. M. 1662,' p. 221, and Thomas 
Mathew, i66f, p. 220, refer prob- 
ably to Thomas Matthews, a chap- 
lain. 1 H. S.' p. 221 is Stacey, not 
the other names suggested. ' D. M.' 
is Daniel Malam, head butler. In 
'R. A. 24 June 1663,' p. 222, Wood 
has probably misread the year, and 
the reference is to Robert Arnold, 
one of the original scholars, who died 
(or was buried) 24 June, 1635. 



INDEX IV 



MATTERS 

In this Index are brought together under heads the references to a number of 
subjects mentioned in these volumes. Some are of general interest, as throwing 
light on the conditions of social or intellectual life in Wood's times : others are of 
merely personal interest, as bringing out the pursuits which chiefly appealed to 
Wood himself. 



Almanacs : — 

— writers of, i. 21 ; ii. 543. 

— Anthony Wood's collection of, 1629- 
95, i. 7, 10-4, 283, 354, 420, 431 ; 
iii. 176. 

— the Oxford almanac, 1694, iv. 84. 

— Romanist, i. 13 ; iii. 131, 176. 
Ambassadors from England : — 

— to France, i. 269; ii. 176, 432, 559; 
iii. 163. 

— to Spain, i. 267 ; iii. 377. 

— to Holland, ii. 296; iii. 302 : at the 
Hague, iii. 117. 

— to Germany, ii. 492. 

— to Sweden, i. 188 ; iii. 38, 462. 

— to Hungary, iii. 253. 

; — to Russia, iii. 281, 372. 

— to Turkey, i. 168 ; iii. 30, 372, 376, 
378, 4°°~i> 47°> 482, 484. 

— to the diet at Ratisbon, iii. 121. 

— to the conference at Nimeguen, iii. 
163. 

— chaplains to, i. 267 ; iii. 377, 462, 
482. 

Ambassadors to England : — 

— from France, ii. 46, 59, 66 ; iii. 
126. 

— from Spain, i. 77, 80 ; ii. 46, 59, 67, 
71. 

— from Brandenburg, ii. 287-8. 

— from Denmark, i. 71 ; iii. 441. 

— from Sweden, ii. 287. 

— from Poland, iii. 142. 

— from Portugal, ii. 289, 414. 

— from Morocco, ii. 2, 5, 11, 16-8, 
427; iv. 77. 



Ambassadors to England (cont.) : — 

— from the Pope, ii. 506; iii. 171-2, 
219, 222, 266, 279, 323. 

state-entry of an ambassador, iii. 

222. 

Amusements : — 

— angling, i. 176, 220, 407,416,433, 
444> 5°7- 

— backsword, watching a match at, 
i. 388, 454. 

— bathing, iii. 156. 

— bear-baiting, iii. 325. 

— bell-ringing, i. 178, 219; v. 5. 

— billiards, ii. 96. 

— birding, ii. 185 ; iii. 245 : abirding- 
piece, iv. 59. 

— boating, for which Wood generally 
uses the phrase 'in the water,' i. 221, 
249, 401, 441, 444, 486; ii. 77-8, 
82, 108, 112. 

— bowls, iii. 154: the bowling-green 
at New college is mentioned, iii. 147. 

— boxing, iii. 510. 

— cards, i. 507 ; ii. 68, 96, 230, 254, 
342 ; iii. 254: cribbage, ii. 146. 

— carols, singing, i. 18, 423. 

— catches, singing, v. 74. 

— chess, i. 407. 

— Christmas sports, i. 423. 

— cock-fighting, ii. 439. 

— coursing the hare : it is odd that 
there is no allusion to this then most 
popular sport. 

— dancing, i. 190, 212 ; iii. 178. 

— dice, ii. 96. 

— duck, hunting a, ii. 249. 



200 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Amusements {continued) : — 

— fishing, see angling. 

— fives : the ball-court at Oriel is men- 
tioned, i. 449 ; iii. 20. 

— football, i. 78 ; ii. 56, 97 ; iv. 69 ; 
v. 5. 

— fox-hunting, i. 495 ; ii. 358 ; iii. 67 : 
see hounds. 

— ' fresh ' nights, v. 168. 

— gaming, i. 196; iii. 3, 377. 

— horse-racing, i. 441 ; ii. 152, 465, 
496, 529-30 ; iii. 391. 

— hounds, the, ii. 313 : see fox-hunting. 

— May-day games and observances, i„ 
299> 3M> 360; iii. 421. 

Maypoles, i. 49, 299, 317 ; ii. 

192 ; iii. 421. 

— monsters, see shows infra. 

— morris-dancers, i. 299, 317, 360. 

— nutting, i. 176 ; ii. 135. 

— plays, see Plays infra.. 

— rackets, v. 122. 

— ringing, see bell-ringing 

— rowing, see boating. 

— running, i. 78. 

— shovel-board, ii. 96 ; iii. 349. 

— shows, generally exhibited at the Act 
time, v. 151. 

— — freaks : — as 

— dwarfs, ii. 140, 445. 

. giants, ii. 226, 548. 

— monstrosities, i. 17, 299; hu- 
man, ii. 378, 445 ; iii. 156, 273, 420 : 
animal, iii. 60. 

— — sleight of hand, &c. : — 

— drolls, i. 299. 

mountebanks, iii. 59. 

jugglers, iii. 275. 

rope-dancers, i. 213, 299, 321, 

405. 

Turk dancing, i. 255. 

menageries : — 

lion and camel, ii. 15. 

sea leopard, ii. 92. 

performing monkeys, i. 416. 

strange beasts, iii. 218, 280. 

— — foreigners, a negro, ii. 425. 

mechanical : — 

puppets, iii. 191. 

wax- work, i. 441. 

groaning elm-board, iii. 29. 

brazen head, iii. 221. 

wonderful spits, ii. 560. 

— skittles, ii. 96. 

— tennis, v. 123. 

— wakes, i. 175, 299 ; ii. 139, 388, 418. 

— walking, i. 183, 234, 303, 503 : joined 
with a call at a country ale-house, 
e. g. at Cumnor, v. 93 ; Binsey, v. 
133; Botley, ii. 97; Headington, v. 
134; Marston, v. 135. 



Amusements {continued) : — 

— Whitsun ales, i. 255, 299, 475 ; ii. 
54?- 

— window-breaking, ii. 2, 542; iii. 42, 
120, 220, 240, 304, 307, 344, 355, 
489. 

— wrestling, i. 78 ; v. 5. 

Arms, coats of: the large number of 
references amply proves Wood's pen- 
chant towards heraldry. 

— arms given without indication of the 
name to which they belong, i. 1 18-20, 
123, 150, 211, 272, 378, 459, 462, 
4 8 3 5 36, 51-2, 7 2 ~3, 9 X > 203, 215, 
310, 468, 501 ; iii. 94, 110, 244, 251, 
258, 260, 461, 530. 

— Abingdon, earl of, ii. 525. 

— Adkins, i. 254. 

— Aid rich, iii. 39. 

— Aldworth, ii. 108. 

— Alford, i. 112. 

— Alfred, king, iv. 251. 

— All Souls college, i. 306 ; ii. 42. 

— Alston, ii. 138. 

— Anyan, ii. 308. 

— Arden, ii. 230. 

— Asteyne, ii. 25, 269. 

— Aucher, iii. 10. 

— Austen, ii. 25. 

— Aylworth, i. 236. 

— Baber, i. 1 58. 

— Baker, ii. 257. 

— Banks, ii. 29. 

— Barry, iii. 37. 

— Bartlett, ii. 289, 539. 

— Bateman, i. 124. 

— Bath priory, ii. 409. 

— Bath and Wells, see of, i. 485. 

— Bayly, i. 236 ; ii. 114, 144. 

— Bendlowes, ii. 360, 362. 
-— Bennett, ii, 501. 

— Bernard, iii. 429. 

— Berry, i. 41. 

— Bertie, ii. 525. 

— Bessels, ii. 21. 

— Blagrave, ii. 236. 

— Blake, iii. 213. 

— Blaxstone, ii. 142. 

— Blount, ii. 72. 

— Boat, i. 317. 

— Bogan, i. 281. 

— Bohun, earl of Hereford, ii. 135. 

— Bold, ii. 347-8. 

— Bosvile, ii. 538. 

— Boswell, ii. 402. 

— Boteler, ii. 169. 

— Bowdler, i. 127. 

— Bowell, iii. 242-3. 

— Brabrooke, ii. 41. 

— Brainthwaite, i. 118. 

— Brasenose college, i. 145. 



INDEX IV. 



MATTERS. 



Arms, coats of (contimted) : — 

— Bray, iii. 23. 

— Brent, i. 104. 

— Brett, ii. 219. 

— Bridgman, ii. 423. 

— Broderick, ii. 49. 

— Broker, iii. 379. 

— Brome, ii. 107. 

— Brouncker, i. 125. 

— Browne, ii. 402. 

— Bruton, ii. 236. 

— Budden, iii. 122. 

— Bull, i. 406. 

— Burdet, iii. 37L 

— Burke, iii. 188. 

— Burt, iii. 74. 

— Bury, i. 41. 

— Busby, ii. 294. 

— Butler, ii. 289. 

— Canterbury, see of, i. 475-6, 479-81, 
485- 

— Carew, ii. 72. 

— Carter, ii. 482. 

— Castillion, iii. 365. 

— Cave, ii. 137. 

— Chamberlayne, iii. 328. 

— Chaworth, i. 125. 

— Cheriton, i. 419. 

— Chesterman, ii. 269. 

— Chetham, iii. 257. 

— Chetwind, ii. 249. 

— Chetwood, i. 276. 

— Christ Church, iii. 192. 

— Church, ii. 366. 

— Clapham, i. 119. 

— Clark, i. 124 ; iii. 65. 

— Clayton, i. 132 ; ii. 245, 537. 

— Clerk, i. 408; iii. 216. 

— Clutton, ii. 218. 

— Cobb, i. 271. 

— Cole, ii. 414. 

— Collier, ii. 245. 

— Cook, iii. 242. 

— Corbet, i. 235. 

— Cottrell, iii. 245. 

— Coventry, ii. 482. 

— Cracroft, i. 232. 

— Cradock, ii. 446. 

— Creed, i. 483. 

— Creswell, iii. 461. 

— Croft, i. 125. 

— Croke, ii. 240 ; iii. 137. 

— Cross, i. 231-2 ; ii. 345 ; iii. 125. 

— Cutler, iii. 242. 

— Dalgarno, iii. 225. 

— Danvers, earl of Danby, ii. p. viii ; 
iv. 64. 

— Darrell, i. 141. 

— Davenant, ii. 130. 

— Day, ii. 46-7. 

— Dayrell, i. 191. 



Arms, coats of (continued} :- 

— de la More, i. 272. 

— Denton, ii. 107. 

— Dickenson, ii. 200. 

— Dolben, ii. 307. 

— Dolling, ii. 290. 

— Dormer, iii. 461. 

— Doylly, i. 241. 

— Drewry, ii. 255. 

— Drope, iii. 43. 

— Dugdale, ii. 494. 

— Dunch, iii. 186. 

— Duncombe, ii. 184. 

— Durham, see of, iii. 212. 

— Earle, ii. 51. 

— Eaton, iii. 220. 

— Eldred, i. 124. 

— Eliot, iii. 8. 

— England, i. 241 : see royal. 

— Escott, i. 114. 

— Eure, i. 252. 

— Eveleigh, i. 279. 

— Evet, ii. 315. 

— Exton, iii. 76. 

— Farmer, ii. 218. 

— Fell, i. 150; iii. 82. 

— Fermour, i. 113; ii. 218. 

— Ferrar, iii. 355. 

— Feteplace, iii. 233. 

— Fisher, ii. 233-4. 

— Fitzherbert, i. 254; ii. 252. 

— Fletcher, ii. 365. 

— Flexney, i. 242. 

— Fludd, i. 271. 

— Fogge, i. 403. 

— Foulis, ii. 178-9. 

— France, i. 241. 

— Frankish, ii. 538. 

— Fryar, ii. 234. 

— Fyfield, i. 459. 

— Gage, i. 113. 

— Gardiner, i. 119; ii. 211. 

— Gelson, ii. 257. 

— Gifford, i. 188. 

— Gloucester, deanery of, i. 4' 

— Glyde, iii. 2 1 5-6. 

— Good, ii. 339-40. 

— Greenfield, i. 421. 

— Greville, i. 445. 

— Groker, iii. 379. 

— Grosvenor, i. 325. 

— Guillim, iii. 117. 

— Guise, iii. 68. 

— Gwynne, iii. 73. 

— Hales, ii. 306. 

— Halton, ii. 80. 

— Hanks, v. 17. 

— Hanns, ii. 415. 

— Harborne, i. 251-2. 

— Harcourt, i. 252, 272 

— Harris, i. 264-5. 



202 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Arms, coats of {continued') : — 

— Hart, iii. 39. 

— Haselwood, i. 246. 

— Heale, i. 155. 

— Heath, i. 1 1 8-9. 

— Helc, iii. 197. 

— Hereford, see of, i. 476, 480. 

— Heme, iii. 143. 

— Hickmote, ii. 105, 274. 

— Hodges, iii. 177. 

— Hody, i. 212-3. 

— Holloway, ii. 220, 250, 308; iii. 
266. 

— Holman, i. 275. 

— Holt, i. 183-4; ii- 2 73- 

— Holyday, i. 417. 

— Hood, ii. 141. 

— Hopkyns, v. 20. 

— How, ii. 537. 

— Howell, iii. 429. 

— Howson, i. 181. 

— Hoyje, i. 188. 

— Huband, ii. 197. 

— Huggins, iii. 205. 

— Hunt, ii. 225. 

— Hyde, i. 200; ii. 41, 380, 540. 

— lies, i. 154. 

— Isham, ii. 309. 

— Izod, iii. 218. 

— Jackson, ii. 310. 

— James, iii. 207. 

— James, of Astley, iii. 207. 

— Jarvois, ii. 36. 

— Jenkins, iii. 158, 162. 

— Jennings, i. 236. 

— Jeukes, ii. 415. 

— S. John's college, v. 180. 

— Jones, ii. 414 ; iii. 81-2, 196. 

— Jourdain, iii. 383. 

— Jourden, ii. 396. 

— Juxon, i. 475-6, 479-81. 

— Keyt, ii. 380. 

— king's, see royal. 

— Kingsmill, ii. 496. 

— Kirke, ii. 295. 

— Knight, ii. 135, 345; iii. 220. 

— Kyberge, ii. 350. 

— Lamphire, iii. 262. 

— Lamplugh, ii. 130. 

— Lane, ii. 245. 

— Langbaine, i. 237 ; iii. 391. 

— Langdale, i. 442. 

— Laud, i. 484-5. 

— Law, ii. 257. 

— Lee, ii. 220; iii. 24. 

— Leigh, ii. 309. 

— Lench, iii. 429. 

— Lenthall, i. 353. 

— Levet, iii. 218. 

— Levinz, i. 104 ; ii. 36 ; iii. 416. 

— Lincoln, see of, i. 145. 



Arms, coats of (continued} : — 

— Lingen, i. 178. 

— Lloyd, iii. 212. 

— Lockey, ii. 455. 

— London, see of, i. 476, 480, 485. 

— Long, ii. 135. 

— Longueville, i. 408. 

— Loveday, iii. 7. 

— Lovet, i. 219 ; ii. 310. 

— Low, iii. 240. 

— Lowe, i. 151, 198, 211. 

— Luddington, ii. 200. 

— Ludlow, ii. 311. 

— Lydall, i. 229 ; ii. 43. 

— Lyford, i. 470 ; ii. 3. 

— Magdalen college, i. 161, 272. 

— Mansell, ii. 35. 

— Marshall, iii. 138. 

— Martin, i. 211, 231 ; ii. 73 ; iii. 220. 

— Matthews, ii. 354. 

— Maund, i. 349. 

— Mayne, ii. 254. 

— Mayot, iii. 36. 

— Medhop, i. 198, ail; ii. 12; iii. 
186. 

— Meese, i. 260. 

— Meredith, i. 378 ; ii. 42. 

— Metcalf, i. 124. 

— Meyrick, i. 378. 

— Mill, ii. 468. 

— Moore, or More, i. 272. 

— Morris, i. 141. 

— Morton, ii. 201. 

— Myddelton, ii. 214. 

— Napier, i. 191 ; ii. 230. 

— Nelthorp, i. 196. 

— New college, i. 133 ; ii. 31 7. 

— Newlin, iii. 258. 

— Newton, ii. 9. 

— Nicholett, iii. 366. 

— Nicolls, ii. 401. 

— Nixon, i. 438. 

— Norreys, ii. 166. 

— Nourse, ii. 169. 

— Noy, ii. 479. 

— Ofley, i. 233. 

— Okeover, iii. 91. 

— Oldfield, i. 236-7. 

— Osbaldston, i. 185 ; iii. 41, 379. 

— Oxford, City of, i. 462, 491 ; iii. 
226. 

trade-gilds, iii. 228. 

Tailors' Company, iv. 187. 

colleges of, iii. 276 ; iv. 52. 

see of, iii. 192, 262. 

University of, v. 163. 

— Packer, ii. 188. 

— Parker, ii. 261-2. 

— Paul, ii. 447; iii. 362. 

— Paynton, ii. 440, 549. 

— Peacock, iii. 44. 



INDEX IV. 

Arms, coats of (continued} : — 

— Pelham, ii. 215. 

— Penn, iii. 8. 

— Percy, i. 145. 

— Perrott, ii. 43, 373 ; iii. 189. 

— Petty, ii. 100; iii. 74. 

— Peyton, i. 151 ; ii. 440. 

— Phesant, iii. 261. 

— Pigot, ii. 447. 

— Pink, i. 133. 

— Pocock, iii. 371. 

— Polhill, ii. 41. 

— Pollard, i. 234. 

— Poole, i. 120. 

— Pope, i. 350. 

— Porter, i. 238. 

— Potter, i. 125, 238. 

— Powell, i. 215, 403; ii. 133; iii. 
179. 

— Poyle, i. 287. 

— Price, ii. 198. 

— Prichett, ii. 510. 

— Pudsey, ii. 499. 

— Purefoy, ii. 264, 396. 

— Quatermain, i. 409. 

— RadclifTe, i. 145, 160. 

— Raleigh, i. 317. 

— Reynell, iii. 222. 

— Reynolds, i. 234. 

— Rither, ii. 144. 

— Robinson, ii. 114, 144. 

— Rogers, iii. 92. 

— Rous, ii. 166. 

— Rowney, iii. 459. 

— royal arms, king's arms, i. 241, 
313-4, 491; ii. p. viii; iii. 226; iv. 
64. 

— Sackville, i. 132. 

— St. Clere, i. 113. 

— St. David's, see of, i. 485 ; iii. 212. 

— St. John's college, v. 180. 

— St. Lowe, Saintloe, ii. 318, 540. 

— Salisbury, see of, ii. 51. 

— Sandys, ii. 225, 246. 

— Saunders, i. 179, 282, 382. 

— Savage, ii. 246. 

— Say, iii. 242, 376. 

— Schelderup, ii. 200. 

— Sclavis, ii. 349. 

— Scudamore, i. 132. 

— Seaman, ii. 127. 

— Sedley, ii. 169. 

— Sheldon, i. 234; ii. 28, 380, 475; 
iii. 104. 

— Sherard, iii. 6. 

— Shergrave, i. 211. 

— Shillingford, iii. 218. 

— Simpson, i. 116. 

— Skipp, i. 171. 

— Smith, i. 127, 231, 248, 470; ii. 149, 
236, 250, 284; iii. 139, 143. 



MATTERS. 203 

Arms, coats of (continued) : — 

— Smith, of Lambeth, iii. 28. 

— Smith, of Oxford, iii. 30, 33. 

— Smithes, ii. 307. 

— Smyth, bishop, i. 145. 

— Snell, ii. 459. 

— Southby, ii. 198. 

— Southcote, iii. 68. 

— Spark, ii. 330. 

— Sprigg, i. 177. 

— Stafford, duke of Buckingham, ii. 
135- 

— Standard, ii. 205. 

— Stanley, ii. 415. 

— Stedman, iii. 166. 

— Stephens, iii. 10. 

— Stevenson, i. 438. 

— Strange, ii. 416. 

— Street, iii. 225. 

— Stringer, i. 198. 

— Strode, i. 116. 

— Sunbank, i. 237. 

— Sunnybank, i. 237 ; ii. 105, 274. 

— Sutton, i. 145. 

— Swayne, i. 110. 

— Sweeting, ii. 262. 

— Symmes, iii. 222. 

— Sympson, i. 116. 

— Tame, ii. 406-7. 

— Taverner, ii. 306-7. 

— Thomas, ii. 263. 

— Thompson, iii. 255. 

— Thorp, ii. 99-100. 

— Throgmorton, ii. 123. 

— Thynne, ii. 482. 

— Tilliard, i. 202. 

— Tounson, ii. 415. 

— Townley, ii. 416. 

— Townsend, i. 178-9. 

— Tracy, ii. 344. 

— Trevor, iii. 246. 

— Tucker, ii. 108. 

— Tully, ii. 337. 

— Turner, iii. 139. 

— University college, i. 188. 

— Upton, iii. 201. 

— Vaughan, i. 154. 

— Vaux, i. 306. 

— Venn, iii. 240. 

— Wakeman, i. 191. 

— Walker, ii. 52. 

— Wallis, ii. 508 ; iii. 216. 

— Walter, i. 217. 

— Wardour, i. 127. 

— Warncourt, ii. 234. 

— Warren, ii. 347. 

— Washbonrne, ii. 246. 

— Way, ii. 358-9. 

— Weekes, i. 211, 255, 442. 

— Wenman, iii. 184, 328. 

— Wentworth, i. 1 79. 



204 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Arms, coats of (continued) : — 

— West, ii. 127, 295 ; iii. 225. 

— Weston, ii. 284. 

— Whistler, i. 332. 

— White, i. 211, 255 ; iii. 1 n. 

— Wilcox, ii. 325 ; iii. 461. 

— Wilkins, ii. 231-2. 

— Wilkinson, i. 161, 188. 

— Williams, i. 409 ; ii. 354. 

— "Willis, ii. 325. 

— Willoughby, ii. 264. 

— Wilmot, i. 127. 

— Winchcomb, ii. 367. 

— Windebank, iii. 7. 

— Withers, ii. 394. 

— Wolsey, iii. 192 ; iv. 155. 

— Wood, i. 5, 278 ; ii. 100, 178, 192, 
202, 216, 234, 249, 331, 473, 476; 

iii. 94, no, 428 ; iv. 13-4, 19, 21, 24, 
2 9-3 r > 33, 40; v. 17, 20. 

— Woodhull, i. 290 ; ii. 89. 

— Woodward, ii. 317. 

— Worcester, deanery of, i. 476, 480. 

— Wright, i. 200 ; ii. 12, 127 ; iii. 186. 

— Wroughton, i. 317. 

— Wyche, i. 378. 

— Wykeham, ii. 282. 

— Yate, ii. 539. 

— Yerbury, iii. 182. 

— Zouch, iii. 39, 242, 376. 

— coats of arms : — 

— at Banbury, i. 276. 

— at Bath, ii. 352. 

— at Bledlow, Bucks, i. 161. 

— at Bristol, iii. 175. 

— at Buckland, Berks, ii. 405. 

— at Chadlington, Oxon, ii. 227. 

— at Cirencester, ii. 406-7. 

— at Dorchester, Oxon, i. 223, 272. 

— at Fairford, i. 323-4; ii. 406. 

— at Meysey-Hampton, i. 323. 

— at Northmoor, i. 272. 

— at Notley abbey, Bucks, ii. 135. 

— at Osney, i. 241. 

— in Oxford churches, &c, i. 209, 241, 
243 ; iv. 187, 193. 

— in Oxfordshire churches, &c, i. 215 ; 

iv. 237-8. 

— at Rewley, i. 241. 

— at Sandford, Oxon., i. 403. 

— at Stanton Harcourt, i. 272. 

— at Thame, i. 109, 407, 409; ii. 52. 

— at Warkworth, Northts, i. 276. 

— at Waterstock, ii. 136-7. 

— at Wolvercote, i. 419. 

— at Woodstock, i. 283. 

— MSS. containing coats of arms, ii. 
208, 268; iii. 102, 104, 175; iv. 263, 
297 : see infra under Heralds. 

— ' false ' coats of arms, i. 211 ; iii. 39. 

— coats of arms at funerals. By this 



Arms, coats of (continued) : — 

time heraldry had become a hand- 
maid of the undertaker, and the most 
common use of armorial bearings was 
attachment to the coffin-pall. Wood 
generally makes a note of this point. 
Funerals ' with scutcheons,' ' with 
escocheons,' are mentioned, i. 78, 
104, 181, 197-8, 350, 382, 484; ii. 
51, 100, 130, 144, 184, 234, 236, 
320, 337, 344; iii. 7, 66, no, 161, 
417; v. 17. Wood even takes the 
trouble to notify their omission. 
Funerals 'without escocheons' are 
noticed, i. 154, 325, 338, 379,401,429; 
ii. 15, 205, 318, 322, 346, 360, 374, 
401 ; iii. 6, 45, 207, 221, 366. To 
this place belong also the notices of 
the hatchment over the gate of the 
deceased person's house or college, 

ii. 540; v. 169 ; and over the grave 
in church, i. 211 : as also of streamers 
with coats of arms over the grave in 
church, i. 378, 476, 485 ; iii. 192. 

Army : — 

— equipment : — 

defensive armour, 1642, i. 53 ; 

1683, iii. 62. 
bows and arrows, 1642, i. 59, 

493. Archers, 1642, i. 59. Archers 

in 1691, iii. 371 ; archaic. 

— — pike, i. 53-5, 82; iii. 123. 

— — halbert, i. 54, 156 : halberdiers, 
i. 57; ii. 551. 

_ — musket, i. 53-4, 82, 118 ; ii. 433 : 
musketeers, i. 57; iii. 31. 

— — carbine, i. 113: carbineers, iii. 
271. 

pistols, of cavalry, i. 82, 115, 

1 1 7-8 ; iii. 210. 
uniform : red coats, i. 103 ; ii. 

407-8, 433, 470; iii. 380: russet 

coats, i. 67 : blue coats, i. 64, 66-7, 

103. 

— — antients, colours, i. 66, 68, 82, 88, 
93, 99, 122; iii. 371. 

drums, i. 55, 99 ; iii. 371 : drum- 
mer, i. 81, 85 ; iii. 31. 

kettle-drums, of cavalry, iii. 271. 

trumpets, of cavalry, i. 280 ; iii. 

243, 271. 

— drill and tactics, i. 21. 

— Chelsea hospital for invalids, iii. 5. 

— customs : — 

drummer as messenger, i. 81, 85 ; 

trumpeter as messenger, i. 75, 83; 
blindfolding a messenger, i. 81, 83, 
85- 

the press-gang, iii. 321, 388. 

drums beating for recruits, i. 61 ; 

iii. 144-5, 321. 



INDEX IV. 

Army : customs (continued) : — 
military funeral, i. 82; iii. 257, 

firing volleys at a soldier's grave, 

i. 82 (shot) ; iii. 371 (arrows) : firing 

cannon at funeral, ii. 462. 
firing salute in honour of king, 

iii. 210, or at toast of king's health, 

iii. 271. 

— punishments : — 
branding, i. 82. 

the wooden-horse, i. 83 : see note 

to Scott's Old Mortality. 

running the gauntlet, i. 66. 

execution, for desertion, iii. 100: 

for murder, i. 91. 

— fortification, ii. 134. 



— the army of the Long Parliament 
and the Commonwealth : — 

1(142, Aug., forces pushed forward 

to Banbury and Warwick, i. 52, 54. 

skirmish at Brackley, i. 

56. 

Sept., forces at Aylesbury, i. 

58-9. 

Sept .-Oct., general rendezvous 

at Oxford, i. 60-7. 
Oct., battle of Edgehill, i. 

67-8. 

Nov., troops between Oxford 

and London, i. 70-1. 
Dec, troops in Berks, Bucks, 

Oxon, i. 73-5. 

action at Winchester, i. 83. 

1643, Jan., troops at Cirencester, 

i. 81, 87-8. 
Jan. -Apr., siege of Reading, 

i- 5> 97-9. IO °- 
Feb.-Mar., forces in the west, 

i. 90-2, and north, i. 88. 
forces in Bucks and Oxon, 

i. 87, 92. 

May, forces expected to march 

west, i. 99. 

— — — June, forces at Thame, i. 
100-1. 

July, actions in the north, i. 

102, and in the west, i. 103. 

1644, March, action in Hamp- 
shire, i. 106. 

Apr., army marches past Ox- 
ford westwards, i. 107. 

1645, skirmishing in Bucks and 

Oxon, i. 1 13-8, 120-4. 

1646, siege of Oxford, and out- 
lying king's posts, i. 127-8. 

: 1646-9, forces garrison Oxford, i. 

I2 9, 131, 143, 146- 

1647, unpopular in London, i. 

227. 



MATTERS. 205 

Army: of the Long Parliament, &c. 

{continued') : — 
1649, grenadiers at the execution 

of Charles I, iii. 177. 
mutiny in the Oxford garrison, 

i. 155 ; iv. 62. 
army leaders visit Oxford, iv. 

69. 

1650, garrison at Wallingford, i. 

164-5. 

forces in Ireland, i. 17 1-2 ; v. 

10. 

— — 1651, victory at Worcester, i. 
156. 

garrison in Oxford, ii. 563. 

1654, in Oxfordshire, i. 190. 

1655, suppress the rising in the 

west, i. 195-6. 
1658-9, garrison in Oxford, i. 259, 

280, 288. 

— — 1659, suppress a rising in the 
west, i. 2S0. 

1660, Monk's declaration for a 

'free' Parliament, i. 303, 311. 

incidental mention, i. 137, 184, 

225, 270, 294, 408 ; ii. 231, 306, 
341- 



— army under Elizabeth, i. 269. 

under Charles I, v. 32. 

under Charles II, v. 36. 

under James II, v. 54. 

under William III, v. 77. 

Ballads, Wood's collection of, i. 18, 
48, 402, 418, 430, 468 ; ii. p. vii, 
148, 426, 434, 436, 461 ; iii. 4, 292-4, 
299 ; iv. 228. 

— with reference to incidents at Oxford, 

i- 358-9, 4 88 ~9> 504; ii- 39 J > 533~5; 
iii. p. vii, 506; iv. 228; v. 168. 

— on Charles I and II, James II, 
William III, Monmouth, v. 31, 36, 
5 X > 53- 63, 75-6. 

— ballad-maker, i. 352 ; ii. 148. 

— ballad-singer, i. 352. 

contemptuously, iii. 358. 

Bells — at Canterbury, i. 185. 

— at Cassington, i. 178. 

— at Cirencester, ii. 407. 

— at Fairford, ii. 407. 

— at Godstow, i. 346. 

— at Lincoln, ii. 438. 

— at Osney, i. 184-5. 

— at Westminster, i. 185. 

— in Oxford : — 

All Souls, ii. 253. 

Christ Church, v. 176-7. 

Holywell church, i. 397. 

S. John Baptist church, ii. 332, 

360; v. 189. 



206 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Bells : in Oxford {continued') : — 

Magdalen college, v. 186. 

S. Martin's church, v. J 1 8. 

S. Mary's church, v. 119. 

Mcrton College, v. 189. 

S. Michael's church, v. 121. 

New college, v. 192. 

S. Peter's in the East church, v. 

122. 

— bell-ringing, as an amusement, i. 178, 
219; v. 5. 

— bells tolled at funerals, iii. 94, 412. 
-on occasion of a royal funeral this 

was done, by order, everywhere, iii. 
480. 

— the great bell of a church or college 
was tolled on receipt of the news of 
the death of a parishioner or member, 

ii. 470. This was called 1 the passing- 
bell,' ii. 74. Instances are i. 282 ; ii. 
219, 287, 554 ; iii. no, 135, 185, 215, 
241, 351, 382, 390, 443; v. 119, 168. 
In time of pestilence this was some- 
times forbidden because of the funk it 
caused, iii. 81, 451 : a modern Oxford 
parallel was provided in the influenza 
epidemic of 1893-4. 

— bells rung to call people together : — 

at hour of church service, v. 185. 

town-council to elections, iii. 280; 

v. 118. 

the city, v. 125. 

the University, v. 119. 

— bells rung in honour of elections or 
entry on office : — 

of the chancellor of the Univer- 
sity, iv. 62-3. 

— — of the head of a college, iii. 
435-6- 

of a canon of Christ Church, ii.162. 

— bells rung on state occasions : — 
on the king's birthday, iii. 166, 

240, 279, 406, 434, 493 : Jacobite 
bell-ringing, 1691, on James II's 
birthday, iii. 491. 
on ' proclamation day,' or c ac- 
cession day,' iii. 130 : and afterwards 
on its anniversary, called often ' in- 
auguration day,' iii. 179, 209, 256, 

3 2 5, 4*5, 479 5 iv - 82 - 

on ' coronation day,' iii. 141 ; iv. 

65 : and afterwards on its anniversary, 

iii. 265, 359, 386, 420, 449, 483. 
on receipt of the news of the 

king's landing from over-sea, iii. 334, 

339, 373, 4°5. 433, 472, 49 1 » ™ 84: 

and to over-sea, iii. 332. 
on a royal visit, ii. 526; iii. 4, 

49, 230, 289; iv. 67, 77. 
on birth of an heir to the throne, 

iii. 268, 306. 



Bells : rung (continued) : — 

— on thanksgiving days : — 

— — on specially appointed thanks- 
giving days, iii. 255, 270-1, 299, 342, 
436, 474, 4 8 9 J iv - r M, 82. 

on May 29, Restoration day, iii. 

267, 331. 

on 'Nov. 5, Gunpowder-plot day, 

iii. 493 ; iv. 61. 

— on receipt of good news : — 

of victory by land or sea, i. 71, 

87, IOI, 103 ; ii. 38; iii. 149, 151, 
333, 368, 372, 390, 452, 488 ; iv. 83. 

— — of welcome political events, i. 
303-4 ; iii. 31, 112, 268, 280-1, 476. 

of news welcome in a particular 

parish or college, i. 397 ; ii. 418 ; iii. 
302, 478-9, 533. 

— in honour of a distinguished visitor, 

iii. 510; iv. 77. 
Bonfires : — 

— city, v. 113. 

— college, v. 169. 

— University, v. 118. 

— on state occasions : — 

on the king's birthday, iii. 166, 

240, 406, 493. 

on the king's accession, procla- 
mation, or inauguration day, iii. 129 : 
and afterwards on its anniversary, iii. 
179, 209, 256, 325, 415 ; iv. 56. 

on the coronation-day, iii. 141 : 

and afterwards on its anniversary, iii. 
265, 359, 386, 420, 449. 

— — on receipt of the news of the 
king's landing from over-sea, iii. 339, 

373, 405, 433, 472, 49 1 : and to 
over-sea, iii. 332. 

— — on occasion of a royal visit, ii. 
526; iii. 48, 232, 289; iv. 67. 

on the king's marriage, iv. 66. 

on the queen's birthday, iii. 30, 33, 

360, 421. 

on news of the queen's landing 

from over-sea, i. 90. 

on news of birth of an heir to the 

throne, iii. 268, 306. 

the Jacobites so kept the anni- 
versary of the birth of James Francis 
Edward, iii. 363. 

— on thanksgiving days : — 

on specially appointed thanks- 
giving days, iii. 72, 255, 271, 299, 
342, 436, 474, 489. 

on May 29, Restoration day, iii. 

16, 267, 331. 

on Nov. 5, Gunpowder-plot day, 

ii. 422, 558 ; iii. 169, 281, 406, 493 ; 

iv. 68. 

on Nov. 17, Queen Elizabeth's 

day, iii. 30, 33 ; v. 42. 



INDEX IV. 

Bonfires : {continued) : — 

— on receipt of good news : — 

of victory by land or sea, i. 71, 

101-3; ii. 38, 454; iii. 148-9, 151, 

i9 6 > 333, 3 6 8, 37 2 > 39°> 4 88 5 iv - 5 8 , 
60, 68. 

of welcome political news, i. 303- 

4; ii. 451, 470, 560; iii. 31, 268, 

281; iv. 58. 
of news welcome to a particular 

college or parish, ii. 275; iii. 478-9, 

5.33- 

— in honour of a distinguished visitor, 
iii. 510 ; iv. 82. 

Books and MSS. : — 

— libraries and collections (' studies ') 
of books and MSS., iv. 198. 

— — Oxford colleges and halls, see 
i. 128, and also in Index III under 
each name. 

Oxford University, v. 157. 

Cambridge University, v. 97. 

Cambridge colleges, iv. 198. 

of (pre-dissolution) religious 

houses, i. 222 ; iv. 260. 

private, iii. 9; iv. 198, 235. 

in a coffee-house, ii. 147. 

of Oxford booksellers, iii. 9, 119, 

I 57> iv - 2 35 ; v - 4 1 - 

Andrew Allam's, v. 24. 

Thomas Allen's, v. 24. 

Arundel, v. 104. 

Elias Ashmole's, v. 25-6. 

Ashmolean museum, v. 157. 

John Aubrey's, v. 26. 

earl of Aylesbury's, iii. 166. 

George Ballard's, i. 7, 53 ; iii. 

J 8i, 253, 273, 339; iv. 27, 105-6, 
222, 228, 230, 238, 249 ; v. 37. 

Thomas Barlow's, v. 26. 

Barocci, i. 187. 

— — Bath, ii. 352-3. 

Richard Baxter's, iii. 378. 

Philip Bliss', i. 200 ; ii. 87, 235, 

290 ; iii. 103. 
Bodleian, v. 157. 

— — — ' MSS. Bodley,' ii. 64 ; iv. 
249. 

Ralph Button's, i. 286. 

Arthur Charlet's, v. 37. 

Stephen Charnock's, ii. 495, 509. 

chemistry, v. 157. 

earl of Clarendon's, i. 337. 

Paulus Colomisius' (Colomies), 

iii. 380. 

Cottonian, v. 105. 

Nicholas Cox's, i. 20 ; iii. 9, 119 ; 

iv. 236. 

John Dee's, i. 308; iv. 93, 252, 

267, 298. 

sir Kenelm Digby's, i. 187, 249 ; 



MATTERS. 207 

Books and MSS. : libraries and col- 
lections, &c. (contimted) : — 

ii. 371 (printed books) ; iv. 55, 104, 
118-9, 133, 201, 250-2, 261. 

Roger Dodsworth's, ii. 235, 265 ; 

iv. no, 114, 162, 267-8. 
earl of Dorset's, iv. 264, 269, 283, 

289, 295. 

Francis Douce's, ii. 64 ; iii. 506. 

Dublin, Trinity college, v. 90. 

sir Will. Dugdale's, v. 42. 

Durham cathedral, v. 99. 

Exeter cathedral, iv. 269, 309. 

— ■ — Thomas, lord Fairfax's, ii. 235 ; 
iv. 250. 

Dr. John Fell's, v. 44, col. 2. 

Florence, ii. 160. 

Henry Foulis', v. 45. 

"William Fulman's, v. 46. 

Richard Gough's, ii. 64, 137. 

Thomas Grenvile's, i. 109. 

sir Matthew Hale's, ii. 359. 

Harleian, i. 1, 269 ; iv. 198, 228. 

Christopher, lord Hatton's, ii. 

231 ; iii. 239-40; iv. 251. 

Herald's office, v. 106. 

Edward, lord Herbert of Cher- 

bury's, iii. 344; iv. 275-6. 

Hereford cathedral, ii. 268. 

Robert Huntingdon's, iv. 83, 148. 

Matthew Hutton's, v. 48. 

Thomas Hyde's, iv. 83. 

Henry Jackson's, v. 49. 

Richard James', ii. 124; iv. 89- 

101, 103, 108-10, 118,120-1, 131-2, 

197-8, 260-2 ; v. 55. 

Henry Jones', ii. 87. 

Franciscus Junius', ii. 358, 393, 

iii. 239-40; iv. 75. 
Lambeth, v. 106. 

Gerard Langbaine, senior, v. 57. 

Gerard Langbaine, junior, iii. 119 ; 

iv. 236. 

Lansdowne, iv. 97. 

Lantarnam, v. nr. 

Edward Lapworth's, iv. 120, 198, 

282. 

William Laud's, i. 209; iii. 235; iv. 

93-4, 96, 99, 120, 201, 250, 261 ; v. 58. 

duke of Lauderdale's, iii. 26. 

Martin Lister's, iv. 79. 

Llanerch, v. 92. 

Nicholas Lloyd's, ii. 501. 

Thomas Lockey's, v. 59. 

John, lord Lumley's, ii. p. vii ; iv. 

143,252,307. 

Edmund Malone's, ii. 64; iii. 119. 

Thomas Marshall's, v. 60. 

Robert Mason's, ii. 64. 

mathematical, iii. 167. 

Medicean, ii. 160. 



-208 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Books and MSB. : libraries and col- 
lections, &c. {continued') : — 

sir Jonas Moore's, iii. 167. 

Dr. John Owen's, iii. 470. 

Thankful Owen's, i. 286. 

Henry Parry's, iv. 98, 273, 303-4, 

308. 

Penshurst, ii. 213. 

— — sir Thomas Phillipps', i. 4, 21, 
23, 45, 198; ii. 203 ; iii. 109; iv. 2, 
228, 268 ; v. I. 

— — Edward Pocock's, v. 66. 

Dr. Richard Rawlinson's, i. 2-3, 

7, 10, 47, 182, 346, 398, 446; ii. 
p. vii, 64, 290, 355, 483; iii. 249, 
263, 502, 505, 510; iv. 97, 102, 106, 
130-2, 138-9, 148, 161, 167, 192, 
196, 227-8. 

Dr. John Reynolds', i. 460 ; iv. 

197. 

sir Thomas Roe's, i. 187. 

Royal, v. 106. 

James St.-Amand's, i. 269. 

S. James', v. 106. 

S. Paul's cathedral, v. 107. 

Salisbury cathedral, iv. 297. 

William San croft's, iii. 363. 

John Selden's, v. 68. 

Ralph Sheldon's, v. 69. 

Shirburne castle, iv. 97, 159. 

Thomas Tanner's, v. 71. 

Thomas Tenison's, v. 71. 

John Theyer's, v. 71. 

Brian Twyne's, v. 72. 

Vernon, iii. 106. 

Obadiah Walker's, iii. 282 ; v. 73. 

— — - Anthony Wood's, v. 79 : cata- 
logues of, iii. 195 ; iv. 235. 

Worcester cathedral, iii. 240. 

York cathedral, iv. 263, 268. 

— auction and sale catalogues of books 
and MSS., i. 18-20, 286; ii. 371, 
495, 50^ 553 5 iii- 26, 103, 105, 119, 
138, 157, 160, 166-7, 2I 3> 21 6, 262, 
361, 470; iv. 236. 

— books : — 

chained, ii. 147 ; iv. 60. 

chap, i. 18, 155 ; ii. 367 ; iii. 299. 

— ■ — early printed, iii. 103, 344. 

horn-books, ii. 284. 

horn protection to title on 

binding, iv. 128. 

with old date to later edition, ii. 

475 : with date of issue a year too 
late, iii. 34, 196 : with place of pub- 
lication falsely stated, v. 1 10. 

published by subscription, ii. 

203-4 5 iii- 3 6 9- 

— — ' giving a cut ' for a book, i. e. 
paying for an engraving in it, ii. 
227-8, 545- 



Books and MSS.: books (cont.) : — 
prospectuses of, i. 123; ii. 265, 

511 j iii. 272, 439, 453, 455, 466, 

490. 

' Term Catalogues ' of, i. 15, 466 ; 

ii. 202; iii. 178, 380, 411-2, 475; 
iv. 27, 48, 235. 

borrowing books from a book- 
seller, i. 242, 254. 

issue of books with final letters of 

author's name instead of initials (e. g. 
H. D. = Seth Ward), i. 294, 296. 

— book-binding, v. 127. 

horn-plate on cover, iv. 128. 

— book-plate, i. 8, 22; ii. 510; iii. 
104. 

— public burning of unpopular 
books : — 

(?) by order of king in council, 

i. 82, 319; ii. 503. 
by order of court of law, iii. 

339- 

by order of Parliament, i. 400; 

iii. 414, 437, 440, 445 ; iv. 48. _ 
by order of the University of 

Oxford, ii. 62-3, 75, 338, 340, 428- 

30, 438, 496 ; iv. 46, 50. 

by an Oxford college, iii. 141. 

by an individual, iii. 129. 

other allusions to the custom, ii. 

'297, 533 5 iii- 138, 369, 395, 443- 
of Romanist books, i. 63. 

— MSS., anathema in, iv. 128. 
illuminated, iii. 342 ; iv. 285. 

Candles, iii. 359 ; v. 189. 

— price of: — 1658-66, at intervals, 
Wood bought candles at $\d. per lb., 
i. 238, 401, 405, 410, 444, 454, 458, 
461, 471, 486; ii. 18, 92 : 1659-66, 
he bought also candles at 6d. per lb., 
i. 287, 336, 416, 418, 420-1, 477 ; ii. 
23, 122. The difference in price 
was perhaps due to a difference in 
quality : — ' single rush ' candles, 1663- 
6, being specified as costing $\d. a 
lb., i. 486, 501; ii. 14, 88: while 
' double rush,' 1662, cost 6d. There 
were, however, fluctuations in price ; 
'single rush' in 1663 costing 5^., i. 
503 ; but in 1663-5, 6d., i.507; ii. 23, 
45, 51 : see also next entry. 

— qualities of : — ' rush,' price 6d. per 
lb., 1663, i. 507: 'single rush,' 
' double rush,' see preceding entry. 
In 1 68 1, 'tallow candles made of 
wick ' are ^d. a lb., but ' cotton or 
watching candles,' 5^., ii. 520. 

— Wood's private supply he obtained 
partly in lieu of rent from a tenant, 
i. 237-8, 464, 467; v. 77. 



INDEX IV. 

Candles {continued) : — 

— candles for common-room, v. 189. 

— candles placed in windows for illu- 
mination on days of rejoicing, first 
mentioned in 1685, iii. 129, 141, 210, 
23 1 , 271, 377, 405-6, 415, 420, 
433-4, 43 6 , 47 2 , 475, 49°, 493 : 
sometimes with transparencies, iii. 
271. 

Chaplains : — 

— to king, Charles II, v. 36 ; James II, 
v. 54 ; William III, v. 76. 

— to queen, Mary Tudor, ii. 485 ; Mary 
II, v. 61. 

— to prince, duke of York, v. 50 ; 
Anne, duchess of York, ii. 67 ; prin- 
cess Anne, iii. 56. 

— to archbishop, i. 418 ; ii. 202, 242, 
322 ; iii. 444, 481-2. 

— to bishop, i. 365, 386, 466 ; ii. 118, 
277, 412, 444, 502, 555 ; iii- 27, 87, 
143, 209, 313-4, 490, 521. 

— to nobleman, i. 177, 496, 502 ; ii. 6, 
183, 318, 349, 4!6, 4 J 9, 43*, 49 6 , 
498, 517; iii. 1, 123-4, I2 7, J 94> 
218, 221, 272, 332, 360, 418, 443, 
481, 530 ; iv. 22. 

— to a lady of quality, ii. 118. 

— to a baronet, ii. 275 ; iii. 178. 

— to an ambassador, v. 199. 

— to army, i. 294. 

— to navy, ii. 285, 417 ; iii. 95. 

— to the House of Commons, iii. 313, 

411,475- 

— to a high sheriff, ii. 104. . 
Christmas-box. About Christmas it 

was usual to tip various tradespeople, 
the tip being called a ' box,' no doubt 
from its being dropped into a collect- 
ing-box. Wood's notes of his own 
obedience to this custom are — 

— to his shoemaker's men, i. 210, 229, 
287, 467, 503; ii. 27, 92, 126, 147, 
177. 

— to his barber, i. 230, 471 ; ii. 29. 

— to his tailor's men, i. 230; ii. 98, 122, 

147, 177- 

— to his glover, i. 264. 

— to his doctor's servants, iii. 121. 

— to the common-room man, ii. 147, 
177. 

— to the parish-clerk, i. 235, 467 ; ii. 
183 ; iii. 121. 

— to maid-servants in his brother's 
house, ii. 69, 122 ; iii. 121. 

— to a maid-servant at the tavern, i. 
230, 37 s - 

— to a maid-servant at the eating- 
house, i. 507. 

— he calls these tips ' box money,' ii. 
147 ; iii. 121. 

VOL. V. 



MATTERS. 209 

Christmas-box {continued) ; — 

— there is mention also of a similar 
gift at Christmas by a landlord to 
tenants, iv. 75. 

Coaches : — 

— most frequently mentioned as the 
mode of travelling, in town or country, 
of royalty and nobility, i. 65, 72, 75, 
86, 103, 493, 495, 497 ; ii. 59-60, 
157, 160, 205, 207-8, 210-11, 224, 

385, 387, 466, 493, 5 l8 , 5 2 5, 5 2 8, 
542; iii. 49-51, 53-4, 57, 289, 303, 

339, 423, 486, 494-5, 53 2 - 

these references are probably to 

' coach and six,' which is mentioned 
definitely in connexion with royalty, 
ii. 207; iii. 17, 47-8; nobleman, i. 
61, 412, 494; bishop, iii. 532. 
' Coach of six,' iii. 47-8 : cp. i. 61. 

— coaches are also mentioned as owned 
by the landed gentry, i. 277 ; ii. 314, 

55 1 5 iii- 4, 5, 9 6 > 437, 473- 

— — these were perhaps the more 
modest ' coach and four,' which is 
mentioned as the conveyance of king- 
at-arms, ii. 152. 

expenditure on coaches was an 

extravagance of young bloods, ii. 147. 

— coaches in Oxford were owned by 
some heads of houses, i. 396 (a coach 
and four), 456 ; ii. 140, 208 ; iii. 57, 
161, 436 ; and some canons of Christ 
Church, i. 456. Sir Thomas Clayton 
before becoming warden of Merton 
was content with the ordinary stage- 
coach, i. 385. 

— when the heads of the University 
went out of Oxford on business, they 
went in hired coaches, cp. iii. 106, 
180, 214, with iv. 79-81 ; and espe- 
cially, iii. 477 (' hack- coaches '). So 
also ' commissioners ' of different bodies 
from London who came in coaches, i. 
79, 86 ; iii. 249, perhaps hired. 

— hackney coaches are mentioned as 
passing through Oxford to London, ii. 
450 ; iii. 285, 458 : the same no 
doubt as the stage-coach infra. 

these coaches were controlled by 

the vice-chancellor, iv. 218; v. 144. 

— stage-coach between Oxford and 
London, v. no. 

— customs : — 

coaches sent to attend funerals, ii. 

539 ; iii. 66 (coach and six), 161, 348, 

390, 437, 473, 489. 
coaches sent to swell the train of 

a distinguished visitor, ii. 60; iii. 222, 

532. 

coaches on the ice : at London, 

1676, ii. 363,.and 1684, iii. 86 ^coach 



2TO 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Coaches (continued) : — 

and six) : at Oxford, 1891, ii. 353 

(coach and four). 
Coins : — 

— Parliament coin, iv. 66 : bad money, 

11. 510 : brass money, iv. 66. 

— ancient, i. 265 ; ii. 420. 

British, ii. 346-7 : Roman, i. 223, 

226, 264-5, 281, 4 6 3 I 2 4*> 347- 

— foreign : French, i. 241 ; iii. 181 : 
Spanish, i. 238. 

— collections of coins : — 

Elias Ashmole's, ii. 191, 435. 

• Thomas Lockey's, ii. 455. 

Henry Parker's, ii. 420. 

Ralph Sheldon's, iii. 102. 

Anthony Wood's, v. 79. 

the Bodleian, v. 159. 

— connoisseurs in, i. 233 ; iii. 336 
(' coinist '). 

— guineas are most frequently men- 
tioned, iii. 165, 175, 184, 208, 229, 
283, '288, 350, 378, 404, 438, 480-1, 
483, 510. 

— groat, i. 411 ; iii. 181, 230. 

— silver penny, i. 253. 

— half-crown, i. 264; ii. 13. 
Customs : — 

— at baptism : a boy takes his name 
from one of his godfathers, i. 27, 
29, 44; ii. 271; iii. 261; v. 7-9, 

12, 14, 16-7 : a girl from one of her 
godmothers, i. 29, 30, 279, 436 ; v. 
8, 11-2, 14. 

— godchildren to be ' remembered in 
the will,' iii. 98 : a godson left heir, 
iii. 8. 

— deputy-godfather, iii. 38 : military 
godfather, i. 269. 

— the ■ gossiping-feast,' i. e. at the 
christening, of which the godparents 
shared the expense, i. 279 ; ii. 31. 

— Chtwch : — 

— beating the parish bounds on As- 
cension day (Holy Thursday), i. 510; 
ii. 223-4; iii- I 5~^» 20-1, 45-6. 

— going round the crops on Rogation 
days, ii. 13. 

— bowing to the altar, i. 370, 445. 

— bidding-prayer, the, i. 145, 367, 445 ; 

ii. 238. 

of Oxford city, ii. 434. 

— consecration of bishops, sermon at, 

iii. 80, 169, 366, 371 ; iv. 79. 
dinner after, ii. 243 (at a tavern) ; 

iii. 366 : discontinued, 1695, iii. 477. 

— consecration of a chapel, iii. 11-2, 
449 : sermon at, iii. 449. 

— ordination, sermon at an, iii. 303. 

— graves east and west, i. 276. 

— college, v. 167-9. 



Customs (continued) : — 

— court : — 

— the primate in waiting at birth of 
heir to the throne, iii. 280. 

— anointing with oil at the coronation, 

i. 399. 

— mayor of Oxford serves as butler at 
the coronation, v. J24. 

— gold key of chamberlain, iii. 444. 

— white staff of the lord steward, ii. 
386. 

— maiming for brawling in the precincts, 
iii. 155. 

— standing or walking bareheaded in 
the king's presence, ii. 466, 525; iii. 
289. 

— kissing the king's hand on appoint- 
ment, iii. 65, 155, 195, 197, 283, 
287-8, 412, 418, 424, 471, 474, 484. 

on presentation, i. 495 ; iii. 231, 

2 35> 33°> 381, 528. 

— king's hand given to kiss in token of 
favour, i. 497 ; ii. 58 ; iii. 48. 

— kneeling to speak to the king, i. 495, 
497 5 59> 22 4> 22 9> 2 3 I , 2 34"5> 
525. 

— drinking king's health, i. 167, 316; 

ii. 490; iii. 31, 129, 166, 232; v. 36: 
Jacobites after the Revolution, iii. 322, 
486. 

■ kneeling, ii. 527; iii. 31, 129, 

I "4 I - 

— drinking queen's health, ii. 466. 

— drinking healths of members of the 
royal family, i. 316; iii. 31, 42, 72, 

129, 375, 5 IQ - 

— sturgeon presented to the queen, iii. 

423- 

— queen's bounty to triplets, iii. 469- 
70. 

— queen s present of venison, iii. 426. 

— queen's brief (for church collections), 

iii. 467. 

— washing feet, and Maundy Thursday 
alms, i. 93. 

— touching for the evil, v. 1 29. 

— ceremonies on a royal visit : — 
decorations of boughs and tapestry, 

iii. 226, 228. 

bell-ringing and bonfires, v. 206. 

surrendering the maces of the 

University and City, v. 124, 148. 
presents of money, v. 126: or 

gloves, v. 126, 154. 

strewing herbs, iii. 230. 

guard of honour along the streets, 

i- 494, 499- 

— — lining the streets, ii. 385; iii. 
48. 

procession of the heads of the 

University and City, v. 126, 154. 



INDEX IV. 

Customs : court {continued) : — 

conduit running claret, iii. 48, 

228, 230. 

shouting Vivat rex, ii. 526; iii. 

230. 

speeches, v. 125, 144, 147. 

verses, v. 155. 

— days observed in honour of the 
sovereigns : — 

birthday, v. 30, 36, 53, 62, 76, 

206, 218. 

accession day, v. 53, 76, 206, 218. 

coronation day, v. 31, 54, 76, 206, 

218. 

public mourning for death of, iii. 

480. 

— in connexion with criminals : — 

— pinning a paper, with statement of 
the charge, on an offender, ii. 248 ; 
iii. 153. 

— hanged, drawn, and quartered, ii. 

545.552-3- 

— bodies of the hanged given to sur- 
geons for dissection, i. 165, 250, 510 ; 
iii. 311. 

— permission to try to revive the hanged, 

i. 165, 250; iii. 394. 

— hanging in chains, i. 452; ii. 483; 

iii- 348, 35 1 J iv- 77- 

— speech on the scaffold, gallows 
speech, often fictitious, i. 168, 378; 
ii- 453, 456, 4 6l » 5° 6 ; ni - 5> Il8 > 
153, 37} > 3 8 7- 

— drinking: — 

— drinking healths, i. 316 ; ii. 466 ; iii. 
42, 510 ; v. 210. 

firing salutes at, i. 399; iii. 129, 

149, 271. 

beating drums at, iii. 31, 129, 

271. 

sounding trumpets at, iii. 243, 271. 

— drinking toasts and sentiments, ii. 
466, 490, 498; iii. 218, 249, 256. 

— standing drink to beaters of the 
bounds, ii. 5 1 1 : to municipal electors, 

ii. 272; iii. 256: to parliamentary 
electors, i. 312 ; iii. 489, 492. 

— getting drunk at entertainments, iii. 
135, '5 2 - 

— drinking at settling an account, i. 
388, 502; ii. 190, 484, 503; iii. 27. 

— paying for drink, &c, at the house 
of an acquaintance or relative, i. 260 
(Drope's), 264 (Harris's), 302 ; ii. 24, 
31 (Lower's), 139 (Godwin's), 187 
(sister Kit's) ; v. 27 (Barret's), 80, 82. 

— drinking wine in a cellar, ii. 40, 47. 

— tip to a new drawer at a tavern, ii. 
I5I- 

— tavern reckonings paid by shares, ii. 
282. 



MATTERS. 211 

Customs : drinking {continued') : — 

— throwing out at a reckoning, i. 336 ; 

ii. 117. 

— e ffigy* burning in : — 

— the pope, ii. 422, 468, 500, 558-9; 
iii- 30, 33, 4°6 ; v. 49. 

— prominent Romanists, ii. 422 ; iii. 
406. 

— 'Jack Presbyter,' ii. 558. 

— g/oves, custom of presenting : — 

— by the University, v. 154. 

— by the City, v. 126. 

— to a relative (Petty), i. 321 : to a 
friend, ii. 359 : as tip to a servant, ii. 
389- 

— at a funeral, i. 197 ; iii. 161. 

— custom of a manor, ii. 134. 
■ — miscellaneous : — 

— laying foundation-stone, ii. 485 ; iii. 
44; iv. 139, 147, 149, 173. 

— kidnapping and selling to the Turks, 
i. 452 ; ii. 222. 

— bargain to meet after a lapse of 
years, iii. 160. 

— taking off the coat, as a challenge to 
fight, iii. 510. 

— a wife or the gallows, iii. 394 ; iv. 
8 3 - 

— selecting by dice the man to be 
executed, i. 93. 

— firing salutes, i. 414. 

— ' a presbyter ' (or ' preacher ') ' in 
a tub,' i. 49; ii. 541, 560; iii. 72. 

— the Michaelmas goose, i. 457. 

— charwomen go out hay-making, ii. 
490. 

— lighting a person home, ii. 126. 

— rooms, and chests, secured by several 
keys in separate custody, iii. 519 ; iv. 
123, 126, 183. 

— presentation of a piece of plate for 
services rendered, v. 1 54. 

— society : — 

— ' posting,' i. e. in a coffee-house, as a 
knave, iii. 108, 308. 

— taking the wall of, i. 299 ; ii. 487. 

— eldest child born at house of mother's 
father, ii. 266 : this common custom 
is a grave drawback to Mr. Joseph 
Foster's inference in Alumni Oxoni- 
enses, i. p. vii. 

— laying a bastard at the door, ii. 233 ; 

iii. 132, 139, 142. 

— concubine of gentry, ii. 41 ; iii. 217, 
223. 

— mistress at Headington, iii. 307. 

— married for a piece of money, ii. 22. 

— tips :— 

— at Christmas time, v. 209. 

— to the common-room man, v. 189, 
209. 



212 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Customs : tips {continued) : — 

— to your tailor's men, i. 474 ; ii. 

— to the printers at the University 
press, v. 160. 

to your doctor's man, quarterly, 

ii. 279, 308, 314. 

— to servants after a visit at a friend's 
house, ii. 40, 133, 138, 148, 294, 320, 
34 1 , 3<>6, 389, 496. 

— trade : — 

— discount on paying a bill, iii. 4. 

— ' something into the bargain,' iii. 
i6 5; 

— tailor and cloth-merchant separate 
trades, v. 129. 

— University, v. 15 1-7. 

Dress : — 

— some general notes : — 

— 1598, a B.A.'s wardrobe, i. 202. 

— 1626 circ, gay dress of gentry, ii. 398. 

— 1649-59, gay dress of the Indepen- 
dents, i. 149-50, 221, 300. 

— 1 66 1, gay dress of clerics and acade- 
mics, i. 423. 

— 1663, womanish dress of men and 
mannish dress of women, i. 509-10. 

— 1666, gaudy dress, ii. 96. 

— 1670, unclerical dress, ii. 212. 

— 1674, extravagance in dress, ii. 300. 

— academical, v. 152. 

— state dress of Oxford civic officers, 
i. 490; v. 124-5. 

— dress of a Romanist bishop, iii. 171, 
271. 

— buying (second-hand) part of a friend's 
wardrobe, i. 259; ii. 73, 77, 191; 

iii. 167. 

— mending clothes a regular part of 
a tailor's work, i. 286, 318, 336; ii. 
81, 102, 104, 151, 153, 231. 

— distinction of cloth-merchant and 
tailor, v. 129. 

— materials : — 

— cambric, i. 235, 300. 

— camlet, ii. 190, 404. 

— crape, iii. 94. 

— dimity, iii. 332. 

— frieze, ii. 146. 

— holland, ii. 297-8. 

— lace, i. 215, 509 ; ii. 130, 300. 

— mohair, ii. 300. 

— necterello, ii. 35. 

— plush, i. 509 ; ii. 376. 

— ribbon, i. 215, 254, 300, 509; ii. 96, 
451. 

feret-ribbon, i. 215 : mourning- 
ribbon, i. 220. 

— serge, ii. 73, 294. 

— shag, 1. 230, 284, 389 j ii. 23. 



Dress : materials {continued) : — 

— shaloon, ii. 35. 

— silk, ii. 4, 223. 

— stuff, i. 254, 279: striped stuff, iii. 
389- 

— taffety, i. 407. 

— English tammy, i. 321, 471 ; ii. 80, 
245 : Turkey tammy, i. 407. 

— velvet, i. 300; ii. 451. 

— looplace, iii. 389. 

— packthread, ii. 126. 

— thread, iii. 165, 353. 

— suit, buying cloth for a, i. 220, 279 ; 

ii- 35, 73, 447- 

'inwards' for a, i. 215 ; ii. 73. 

making a, i. 220, 279 ; ii. 35, 73 ; 

iii. 332. 

doing up a, ii. 79 : dyeing a, ii. 

79 : turning a, iii. 74. 

making a suit out of a cloak, i. 474. 

a black, i. 474 ; ii. 35 : a grey, 

iii. 74 : a sad-coloured, iii. 447 : a 

white dimity, iii. 332. 
a mourning, iii. 108 : a puff, ii. 

79: a stuff, i. 254, 279. 

— cloak, i. 474. 

— coat, ii. 281, 314, 375. 

making a, i. 264, 286, 457 ; ii. 

23, 146, 294, 314, 404: facing a, ii. 
484: washing a, i. 501 : scouring a, 
ii. 45 : sising a, ii. 404 : turning a, ii. 
73- 

buying second-hand, ii. 77. 

a riding-coat, i. 509 ; ii. 314, 404. 

a black, i. 230, 501 ; ii. 23 : a 

grey, i. 423; ii. 212: a striped, iii. 

361. 

a frieze, ii. 146 : a hair, ii. 451 : 

a plush, ii. 376 : a serge, ii. 294 : a 
shag, i. 230, 284; ii. 23: a velvet, 
ii. 451 ; iii. 136. 

— surcoat, i. 408. 

— jacket, i. 300. 

— doublet, i. 122, 175 ; ii. 233, 375. 

— vest, i. 509 ; ii. 90, 98, 102, 108, 
151, 190. 

black buckles for, ii. 102. 

— tunic, ii. 108, 190. 

— breeches, i. 300, 509 ; ii. 73, 81, 
294, 314; iii. 288. 

trunk-breeches, ii. 102. 

— girdle, ii. 98, 102. 

— gown, buying cloth for a, i. 215; ii. 
80, 245 ; iii. 94. 

making a, i. 215, 278, 321, 471 ; 

ii. 35, 80, 162, 245 ; iii. 94, 313. 
mending a, i. 226, 287 ; ii. 81, 

162. 

dyeing a, i. 287. 

buying second-hand, ii. 191 ; iii. 

167. 



INDEX IV. 

Dress : gown {continued') : — 

a mourning, v. 153. 

borrowing a, ii. 102. 

a studying, i. 259 ; ii. 4, 34, 245, 

34 6 - 

a laced crape, iii. 94 : blue shag, 

i. 389: English tammy, i. 321, 471 ; 

ii. 80, 245. 

a tufted, iii. 254. 

extravagance in, ii. 96. 

— cuffs, i. 300. 

— bands, cost from is. $d. to 2s. 3^. a 
pair, i. 215, 218, 235, 237, 242; ii. 
126. 

mending bands, ii. 71. 

a present from a friend, i. 478. 

laced bands, i. 300, cost 135-. 6d. 

a pair, ii. 350. 

cambric bands, i. 235. 

band strings, i. 300. 

— hood, i. 407. 

— cravat, i. 216; ii. 88, 281, 342; iii. 
461. 

riding-cravat, ii. 342. 

cravat-bands, iii. 300. 

— lace-whisk, ii. 300. 

— handkerchiefs, ii. 8, 73, 88, 461. 

— gloves, generally is. a pair, i. 229, 
264, 275, 281, 321, 405, 464; ii. 71, 
82, 129: also found at is. 2d. a pair, 

i. 255 : and is. lod. a pair, i. 249 : 
lad's size perhaps 6d., i. 321. 

writing gloves, u. a pair, i. 416, 

501. 

tan gloves, i. 471 : tan leather, 

ii. 35 : tanned, ii. 6, 98 : wash-leather, 

ii. 51, 89, 120 : all is. a pair : tanned 
dogskin gloves, is. 6d. a pair, i. 235. 

colouring gloves, ii. 191. 

fringe-gloves, ii. 208 ; iii. 47 : 

white kid, ii. 208; iii. 47 : embroidered, 

iii. 234. 

buck- or doe-skin, $s. a pair, ii. 

359- 

wedding gloves, i. 505. 

customary presents of gloves, v. 

211. 

— hat, i. 112 ; ii. 300. 

with ribbons, i. 300 ; ii. 96 : tied 

up, ii. 212: turned up, iii. 469: 
buttoned up, iii. 300. 

price of: a flat- crowned, 7*. 6d., 

ii. 8 : a Polonian, gs., ii. 73, or 12s., 

ii. 35 : a broad-brimmed, 1 3^. , ii. 2 2 2 : 
a demi-castor, i8j\ 6d., i. 47 1 : a dinner 
(?) castor, 21s., ii. 455: a hat, lis., 
1. 310; 13J. 6d. f ii. 264; 14s., ii. 
129, 246 ; 14s. 6d, ii. 284; 15J. 6d., 

iii. 145 ; 16s., ii. 317 ; 16s. 6d„ ii. 378 ; 
22s. 6d., i. 218; 24^., i. 255. The 
price in ii. 191 must be wrongly given. 



MATTERS. 213 

Dress : hat (continued) : — 

edging a hat, ii. 27. 

dressing a hat, i. 235, 326, 461, 

468 ; ii. 73, 131; iii. 34. 

dyeing a hat, i. 389. 

lining a hat, i. 468 ; ii. 35, 284. 

hat-band, ii. 85, 191, 284. 

hats worn in church, i. 290, 300-1 : 

in hall, v. 168. 

— montero, i. 509. 

— caps, ii. 88, 120. 

square caps, i. 407; ii. 85, 112 ; 

iii. 300 : round caps, ii. 85 : riding 
caps, ii. 375 : three-cornered cap, iii. 
84. 

skull-cap, iii. 461 : night-cap, ii. 

98, 342 ; iii. 471. 
black cap, ii. 31: plush cap, i. 

509 : quilted cap, ii. 144, 342 : velvet 

cap, ii. 85 ; iii. 166. 

— false hair, ii. 300. 

— wig, head shaved for, ii. 130-1, 
138-9. 

block for, ii. 130. 

hair, ii. 96 : tied with ribbon, ii. 

451- 

affectation of wearing long wigs, 

i- 4 2 3, 5°9 5 »■ 96, 297-8. 

— — price of, 6s., i. 209 : 20s., iii. 344 : 
25J., ii. 479: 27^. 6d., iii. 87 : 30^., 
ii. 248, 360: 32J. 6d., ii. 129, 424: 
36-5-. 6d., ii. 286. 

mending, i. 210; ii. 155. 

usually spelt perwig, or perwige, 

ii. 129-30, 360, 424, 479; iii. 135, 
344 : also, perewige, i. 209 : periwige, 

i. 216 ; ii. 286 : perroke, ii. 248 : per- 
rucke, ii. 155 : peruk, ii. 441. 

— boots, cost 15J., ii. 311: Spanish 
leather, i. 300. 

— shoes, made to order, ii. 271. 
usual price in Oxford, 45-., i. 229, 

235> 250, 284, 287, 327; ii. 45, 92, 
126, 133, 144, 170, 271, 283, 287, 
296, 485 : and in the country, 3^. iod., 

ii. 389, 499. 

many variants occur, some on 

account of difference of leather : — 
35. iod., winter shoes, ii. 389 : 4^., 
black, ii. 170 ; black summer, ii. 283 ; 
waxed, ii. 92 : 4s. 2d., i. 382 ; black, 
ii. 33 : 4J. 4^., i. 220 ; black, i. 410, 
431 ; liquored, i. 452 ; russet, i. 210 ; 
wax, ii. 20 : 4^. 6d., black, i. 431, 
474 ; liquored, i. 410 ; Spanish, i. 
256; Spanish leather, ii. 222; wax 
leather, i. 431 ; winter, i. 503. 

laced, ii. 300 (cp. i. 300) : round- 
toed, i. 452, 470, 474. 

blacking russet shoes, ii. 102. 

soling, cost is. 2d., i. 470 ; ii. 1 2 : 



214 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Dress : shoes (continued) : — 

I*. 4</., ii. 45 : 15. 6d., i. 264, 302 ; 
ii. 71. 

mending, done by the shoemaker 

who made the shoes, i. 215, 441, 478 ; 
ii. r, 27, 98 : also by a humbler artisan, 
the 'cobbler,' i. 271, 314, 407, 501 ; 
ii. 69, 85, 106, 117, 138, 151 : often, 
of course, it is not said which, i. 242, 
264, 382, 430, 467; ii. 20, 120, 184, 
190. 

— shoe-buckles, ii. 27, 94, 98, 117: 
probably also i. 2r8, 220, 237. 

— ■ riding leather-stockings, ii. 344. 

— spurs, ii. 311. 

— pattens, i. 509. 

— shirt, i. 122, 267, 284; ii. 15, 31, 
281, 342 ; iii. 144. 

half-shirt, i. 149. 

— loynings, i.457 ; ii. 106, 281 : flannel 
loynings, ii. 174. 

• — swaiths, ii. 88. 

— linen, ii. 33, 88, 119, 144, 151, 191. 

— stockings, cost 4J. to 5s., i. 433 ; ii. 
189, 300 ; iii. 246, 319. 

worsted stockings, cost 3.5-. to 

55. 6d., i. 433; ii. 450, 558 ; iii. 144, 
300, 340 : yarn stockings, ii. 24. 

black, iii. 243, 340 ; pearl colour, 

i. 433 ; sad-coloured, ii. 144. 
lining, ii. 24, 81. 

mending, i. 226, 242, 249, 278, 

287, 461, 475, 487, 503; ii. 15, 30, 
47, 81, 104, 119, 128, 138, 177, 196. 

— hose ( = stockings), ii. 281 : mending, 

ii. 193. 

— garters, ii. 122, 144. 

— socks, i. 255 ; ii. 342 ; iii. 461 : ankle- 
socks, ii. 27 : woollen, ii. 174. 

— sword, i. 423 ; ii. 98, 212, 376 ; iii. 
43- 

— ruff, ii. 267, 302. 

— muff, i. 509. 

— spanners, i. 509. 

— patches, i. 509 ; iii. 288. 

— spectacles, i. 282, 487 ; ii. 310, 318. 

— cane, iii. 154 : walking-stick, iii. 484. 

— hair-powder, i. 210, 221, 300, 475; 
ii. 20, 191. 

sweet powder, i. 284. 

— razor, ii. 50 : setting a, ii. 122, 191. 

— comb, i. 229. 

— toothbrush, iii. 319, 353. 

— scissors, ii. 8. 

— cloak-bag, ii. 228 : portmanteau, ii. 
227. 

— bridle, i. 289. 
Drink : — 

— dairy-produce : — 

— buttermilk, ii. 85. 

— milk, ii. 35. 



Drink : dairy-produce {continued) : — 

— whey, i. 220, 405, 469; ii. 23, 37, 
75 A 99, 106, 139. 

clarified whey, ii. 106. 

— made drinks : — 

— caudle, i. 138-40. 

— mum, i. 168. 

— 'salted drink,' i. 139. 

— water-gruel, i. 469. 

— infusions : — 

— chocolate, i. 21, 168, 189, 201, 378, 
466-8 ; ii. 15, 24, 27, 89. 

— coffee, i. 21, 168-9, 188-9, 201, 378, 
380, 466; ii. 15, 50, 69, 129, 195, 
212-3, 334. 463- 

aromatic, ii. 119. 

— tea, i. 21, 168-9, 201 > u « 9 2 - 
English tea, ii. 81. 

— cider, i. 221, 231, 233, 238, 242, 405, 
454, 487; 23, 43, 45; 82, 89, 92, 
145, J 55, 163, 187, 189. 

— ales : — 

— ale, i. 21, 84, 154, 380, 469 ; ii. 60, 

97, !95, 399, 437- 

price of, fixed by the vice-chan- 
cellor, iii. 41. 

' twopenny ' ale, iii. 41 : ' sixteen,' 

«• 97- ' ' jfl 
ale and apples, ii. 99 : apples and 

ale, i. 301 ; ii. 296. 

roast beef and ale, i. 312. 

cakes and ale, i. 221 : a banquet 

for the commons (wine and biscuit 

being for the gentry), iii. 508. 
ale for the commons (wine for the 

gentry), i. 397 ; iii. 129, 492. 
barrels of ale broached in the 

streets, &c, on occasions of rejoicing, 

iii. 72, 129 : see infra under beer. 

— beer, i. 84, 469 ; ii. 124. 

price of, fixed by the vice-chan- 
cellor, ii. 357. 

small beer, ii. 494 ; iii. 80. 

barrels of beer broached in the 

streets, &c, on occasions of public 
rejoicing, ii. 38; iii. 129, 149, 268, 

27!,533- 

— spirits : — 

— brandy, ii. 92, 96, 99, 184, 189, 363, 
457; iii- J 37, i 6 3> 188. 

brandy-wine, ii. 363, 

cherry-brandy, iii. 493. 

— metheglin, iii. 481. 

— strong waters, i. 421, 427, 445; ii. 
127-8. 

— wine, i. 21, 84, 167, 231, 399 ; ii. 40, 
165; iii. 129, 210, 446, 495; iv. 
62. 

price of, ii. 281-2 ; iii. 199 : in 

Oxford, fixed by the vice-chancellor, 
ii. 120, 281. 



INDEX IV. 



MATTERS. 



Drink : wine {continued) : — 

a pint of wine, i. 222, 349 ; a quart 

of wine, ii. 146. 

wine with arsenic, ii. 420. 

wine and ale, see supra under ale. 

wine and cakes, i. 399 : wine and 

cake, ii. 26 ; iii. 1 29. 
wine and biscuit, a common form 

of entertainment, i. 312; ii. 261-2; 

iii. 149, 346, 508; v. 214. 
and part of the funeral cere- 
mony, i. 197, 484. 

Alicant, ii. 282. 

Canary, ii. 281 ; iii. 199. 

claret, i. 78, 139, 144, 220, 445, 

475; ii. 12, 297; iii. 129, 191, 210, 

249. 

came in fashion after the 

Restoration, iii. 199. 

4 burnt,' at funerals, iii. 199. 

' the conduit running claret,' 

on the king's accession, iii. 128; on 
the king's coronation, i. 399 ; on a 
royal visit, iii. 48, 228, 230 ; on a civic 
rejoicing, iii. n 2-3. 

' claret and oysters,' i. 503. 

price of, ii. 139, 452 ; iii. 199. 

French, ii. 282 ; iv. 66. 

— — High country, iv. 66. 

Italian, iv. 66. 

langeone, ii. 251. 

Mallagoes, iii. 199. 

Muscadel, ii. 282 : muscadine, 

ii. 5. 

sack, i. 139-40, 144, 213, 238, 

287 ; ii. 5 ; iii. 210. 
went out of fashion at the 

Restoration, iii. 199. 
price of, i. 78, 213, 231, 264, 

302, 405, 410, 418; ii. 126 ; iii. 199. 

Smyrna, iii. 210. 

white wine, ii. 191, 452. 

— drinking, allusions to prevalence of, 
in the University, i. 144, 167, 246, 
356, 360, 3 6 9-7°> 4 2 3> 5°9; 6 , 
25, 174, 266-7, 34-8> 4°°5 4 2 9, 460, 
462 ; iii. 3, 60, 188, 240-1, 245, 354, 
365, 439, 451 : among gentry, i. 458 ; 

iii. 65, 114, 438, 441 : of Germans, i. 
257; iii. 438, 441: of musicians, i. 
485. 

customs, v. 211. 

Eating — 

— prices of food-stuffs fixed by the vice- 
chancellor, ii. 520. 

— fish, ii. 381. 

— fish dinner, ii. 191 ; iii. 491. 

— fish supper, i. 416, 441 ; ii. 40. 

— green fish, ii. 27, 102. 

— souse fish, iii. 465. 



Eating : fish {continued) : — 

— crabs, ii. 40 ; iii. 336. 

— crayfish, iii. 495. 

— herrings, i. 471 ; ii. 184. 

— lobsters, ii. 112, 115, 133, 138, 140, 
191 ; iii. 336, 495. 

— oysters, i. 301-2, 503 ; ii. 47, 85, 
99, 119-20, 126-7, 129-3 1 ? T 44> M6, 
151. 

— salmon, ii. 112, 115. 

—flesh :— 

— beef, ii. 520: roast beef, i. 312: 
rump of beef, iii. 34 : sirloin, iii. 508. 

steak, i. 436. 

— neats' tongues, i. 221 ; ii. 219. 

— bullock's cheek, ii. 2. 

— cow-heel, ii. 88. 

— tripe, ii. 20, 47, 50; iii. 165. 

— mutton, ii. 35, 520 ; iii. 236, 446. 

— pork, ii. 71, 520 : bacon, ii. 520 : 
ham, iii. 236 : boar's head, i. 351 : 
collar of brawn, iii. 172 : roast pig, 
i. in. 

— lamb, ii. 520. 

— veal, ii. 520. 

— rabbits, i. 230, 284 ; ii. 520. 

— venison, i. 123; ii. 490; iii. 426, 
460. 

— fowl : — 

— fowls, i. 87. 

— pullets, chickens, capons, ii. 520; 
iii. 508. 

— green geese, ii. 520. 

— pigeons, ii. 520. 

— eggs, ii. 5, 30, 187, 189. 

— game : — 

— partridge, pheasant, quail, iii. 236. 

— wildfowl, i. 87. 

— dairy -produce : — 

— butter, ii. 520, 538 ; iii. 446. 
bread and butter, ii. 184, 187, 

189. 

— cheese, i. 413 ; ii. 520. 

— cream, ii. 104. 

— junket, i. 298. 

— vegetables : — 

— carrots, i. 259 ; ii. 139. 

— peas, ii. 37. 

— turnips, i. 259 ; iii. 437. 

— salad : — 

— sallating, samphire, iii. 236. 
—fruits, ii. 198, 253-4; iii. 236, 389, 

495- 

— almonds, ii. 5. 

— apples, i. 266, 302, 474, 501 ; ii. 3, 
69, 99, 126-7, ^4; iii- 446: apples 
and ale, i. 301 ; ii. 99, 296. 

— burnet-roots, i. 238. 

— cherries, i. 405, 484; ii. 15, 112, 
139- 

red cherries, ii. 112. 



216 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Eating : fruits (continued) : — 

— currants, i. 469 ; ii. 100. 

■ — figs, i. 434 ; ii. 5 : blue figs, ii. 8. 

— gooseberries, ii. 112. 

— grapes, ii. 88. 

— juniper-berries, i. 168. 

— lemons, i. 275, 277, 477 ; ii. 47, 94 ; 
iii. 236. 

— musk-melon, musmilion, i. 450,452. 

— nectarells, ii. 34. 

— nuts, i. 234. 

— olives, iii. 236. 

— oranges, i. 277, 389, 399, 436; iii. 
236. 

— pears, iii. 236. 

— peermanes, ii. 1. 

— plums, iii. 180, 236. 

— prunes, pruans, i. 277, 401 ; ii. 98, 
100. 

— raisins, ii. 5, 100 : raisins of the sun, 
i. 469. 

— strawberries, i. 475. 

— walnuts, ii. 143. 

— spices, ii. 300. 

— ginger, i. 501. 

— spice, ii. 45, 50. 

— sugar, i. 401, 467, 469, 501 ; ii. 23, 

45> 47 > 5°-*, 9 8 > IOO > 3oo- 

— dishes : — 

— broth, ii. 561. 

— pasty, i. 123 ; ii. 490. 

— pie, i. 266, 420, 454; ii. 187, 561. 
steak -pie, i. 436. 

— puddings, i. 235-6; ii. 50, 561. 
bag-pudding, i. 140. 

— spice-balls, ii. 50. 

— flummery, i. 401. 

— fritters, ii. 13, 189. 

— pancakes, ii. 101. 

— custard, i. 221, 298; ii. 561; iii. 33. 

— tarts, i. 298 ; ii. 2, 561. 
cream tarts, i. 221. 

— cheese-cakes, i. 221, 298, 475; ii. 
33, 35' 77> 104, 561. 

— cakes, i. 413. 

— — and ale, i. 22 ; iii. 508. 

and wine, i. 399 ; ii. 26 ; iii. 129. 

— sweetmeats, i. 415 ; iii. 236, 495. 

— biscuit, v. 215. 

— brown bread, i. 140. 

— hours of meals : — 

— in college, v. 168. 

— breakfast at 9 a.m., iii. 234. 

— dinner at 11 a.m., i. 463. 

at noon, ii. 168 ; iii. 487. 

at 1 p.m., iii. 51. 

about noon, i. 492; ii. 58, 157, 

160, 386; iii. 49, 268, 532. 

— supper after 6 p.m., iii. 234. 
Education : — 

— course of elementary, i. 46-7. 



Education {continued) : — 

— by the parson of a parish, ii. 340. 

— by a private tutor, iii. 8, 158, J62, 
who accompanies his pupil to the 
University, i. 283 ; iii. 158. 

— — in Romanist families the tutor is 
the priest resident in the family, iii. 
98. 

— completed by travel abroad, i. 274, 
276; ii. 196, 335, 538; iii. 13, 98, 
102, 104, 143, 158, 162, 176. 

■ — see Schools. 

Estates, notices of considerable, i. 
386 ; ii. 216, 280, 357, 421 ; iii. 2, 7, 
8, 12, 32, 80, 120, 324, 348, 352, 
35 6 > 363, 367, 376-7, 388, 397, 405, 
410, 413, 420, 441, 447-8, 453, 460, 
463, 465, 49°- 

Fasts : — 

— fasting, ii. 245. 

— Independent, i. 368. 

— 1642-3, monthly, by order of Parlia- 
ment, because of the evil state of 
Ireland, i. 57, 72, 75, 89, 93. 

— 1665-6, because of the plague in 
London, ii. 34, 43, 86. 

— 1666, because of the great fire of 
London, ii. 89. 

— 1669, 'the king's fast,' v. 31. 

— 1672, ii. 245. 

— 1674, against Romanism, ii. 281. 

— University sermons on occasion of, 
v. 120. 

Fires : — 

— pamphlets about, i. 17. 

— at Aberdeen, 1660, i. 351. 

— at Ascot, Oxon, 1662, i. 458. 

— at Einsham, Oxon, 168 r, ii. 537. 

— in Kent or Sussex, 1666, ii. 213. 

■ — at London, iii. 30, 115, 217; v. 
109. 

— at Northampton, 1675, ii. 323; iv. 
74- 

— at Oxford, v. 130. 

— at Sarsden, Oxon, 1689, iii. 313. 

— at Warwick, 1694, iii. 467. 

— in Wiltshire, iii. 45. 

— at Wytham, 1676, ii. 349. 
Floods:— 

— pamphlets about, i. 17. 

— a land flood, iii. 184, i.e. rivers 
swollen beyond banks. 

— at Oxford, v. 130. 
Folklore :— 

— unlucky omens, i. 455. 

— crying at baptism, iii. 279. 

— bleeding at nose, iii. 289. 

— northern 4 dissimulation,' i. 365. 

— cat's blood, iii. 187. 

— weather, ii. 478 ; iii. 188. 



INDEX IV. 

Fuel :— 

— coal, i. 288, 336, 378, 396, 418, 458, 
487; ii. 31, 82. 

— charcoal, i. 133. 

— wood, for the common-room fire, 
v. 168, 189. 

— billet-wood, i. 396, 501 : chumps, 
iii. 143 : cleaved wood, ii. 296 : hard 
wood, ii. 404: rubble-wood, ii. 451, 
539: stack wood, ii. 37, 155; iii. 27. 

— faggots, i. 288, 467-8; ii. 31,98, 296, 
404, 556 ; iii. 27 ; iv. 67. 

— shavings, ii. 151. 

Funerals : Wood had an interest in 
all matters connected with ceremonial, 
and in consequence his notes about 
funerals are exceptionally minute. It 
may be of some interest to have a 
view of them under heads of time, 
place, and manner : — 

— The first point noteworthy is the 
much shorter time between death 
and burial then than now. 

burial on the same day, i. 78, 

338; ii. 145, 321; iii. 144, 173; 
v. 9. 

burial on the next day after death, 

probably the general rule, i. 449, 476 ; 
ii. 44, 103, 219, 285, 344, 346, 350, 
360, 362, 462, 469, 499, 548 ; iii. 6, 
7, 41, 60, 165, 182, 196, 257, 306; 
v. 5-6, 17. 

* — in the case of infections diseases, the 
funerals were at night, ii. 321; iii. 
123, 366: or the burial first, the 
funeral service at a later time, iii. 
189, 366. 

— there are notices of embalming, i. 
104,119, 131,483; ii. 201; iii. 158, 
201 : of lying in state, iii. 97-8, 161, 
412, 420, 459: and of depositing for 
a time in a charnel-house, ii. 349. 

— The second point noteworthy is that 
burials of well-to-do people were as 
a rule within the walls of a church : 
that a wealthy person should wish to 
be buried in the churchyard is noted 
as an oddity, ii. 231, 359, 401. 

burial in the churchyard was the 

lot of poor people : of servants, ii. 
344, 498 ; also, of suicides, ii. 354, 
557- 

— of customs connected with funerals 
the following are noted : — 

the funeral entertainment, iii. 366 : 

of burnt claret, iii. 199; or wine and 

biscuit, v. 215. 
the coats of arms attached to the 

'hearse,' and banners, and hatchment 

over door, v. 204. 
the attendance of heralds at the 



MATTERS. 217 

Funerals : of customs, &c. (cont.) : — 
funerals of the great, i. 82, 480-3 ; 

ii. 51, 66, 317 ; iii. 342. 

the presentation of gloves, i. 197 ; 

iii. 161 : or of rings, at funerals, iii. 
158,161. 

the procession to meet a funeral, 

iii. 66, 161 : the attendance of coaches, 
v. 209 : the escort on horseback, i. 
479; iii. 66, 161, 437^ 

the pall-bearers, ii. 29, 66 ; iii. 

161, 261. 

the music, i. 482-4; iii. 162, 261. 

scattering money, i. 82. 

the funeral speech, i. 481, 483-5 ; 

ii. 66, 373; iii. 162, 262, 348, 379, 
4 2 5, 443- 

the funeral sermon, i. 18, 198, 

204, 243, 387, 399, 418, 453, 466, 
484; ii. 66, 137, 241, 391, 480,492 ; 

iii. 45, 178, 204, 349, 378, 380, 413, 

459> 473 J v - 15- 

— — the funeral, or obituary, verses, 
i. 18, 101, 131, 151, 162, 170, 198, 
203, 250, 258-9, 332, 407, 424, 426, 
468, 484; ii. 39, 81, 115, 122-3, x 32, 
171, 184, 198, 220-1, 265, 329, 435, 
456, 493-4, 562 ; iii. 59-60, 66, 125, 
158, 160, 164, 184, 192, 272, 275-6, 
380, 443, 455, 477, 479; iv. 64-5, 
7 2 -3; v. 155, 168. 

the tolling of a bell at the time 

of the funeral, v. 206. 

funeral expenses were heavy, i. 

78 ; ii. 354 ; v. 9 : occasionally paid 
by a subscription, ii. 361-2. 

— University funerals, v. 1 54. 

— state-funerals, i. 203-4, 479~^3 J ii- 
66, 449 ; iii. 6, 66, 97-8, 158, 161-2. 

— military funerals, v. 205 : carrying 
arms and standards reversed, i. 82 : 
firing volley over grave, v. 205. 

— nonconformist funerals, large attend- 
ance at, by way of manifesto, ii. 317 ; 
iii. 23, 91, 124, 372, 378, 489. 

— white at the funeral of a person 
unmarried, iii. 394. 

— funeral by torchlight, iii. 261. 

Glass, iii. 461. 

— drinking-vessels of, i. 94; ii. 262; 
iii. 84 ; iv. 66. 

■ — ' square ' glass, iii. 436. 

— old glass : — 

at Banbury, i. 276. 

at Bath, ii. 352, 409. 

at Bay worth, i. 270. 

at Bledlow, Bucks, i. 161. 

at Cirencester, ii. 407. 

at Coggs, Oxon, i. 253. 

at Cutslow, i. 353. 



2l8 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Glass : old glass {continued) : — 

■ at Dorchester, Oxon, i. 223, 225. 

at Fairford, i. 323-4 ; ii. 407. 

at Godstow, i. 338-9, 344; ii. 

449- 

at Notley, Bucks, ii. 135. 

at Osney, i. 24T ; iv. 207. 

in Oxford : see in Index III under 

most colleges. 
in the Old Congregation house, 

iv. 152 : in private houses, i. 241. 

at Rewley, i. 241. 

at Sandford, Oxon, i. 403. 

at Southleigh, i. 252. 

■ at Thame, i. 109, 408-9. 

at Waterstock, ii. 137-8. 

Heralds : — 

— incidental and personal mention, i. 
1, 104, 111-2, 137, 248; ii. 70, 109, 
268, 346, 366-7, 371-2, 453 ; iii. 23, 
102,; 107, 115, 335- 

— attendance on the king, i. 103 ; ii. 
532. 

— attendance at funerals, v. 217. 

— 'visitation ' of counties, i. 44-5, 182 ; 

ii. 152, 189, 405, 476, 508; iii. 189; 

iv. 52-3, 237-8. 

had no jurisdiction in the Uni- 
versity, v. 164. 

— grants of arms by, ii. 52, 440, 549 ; 

iii. 189, 207, 242. 

their place supplied by the local 

painter, i. 211 ; ii. 254, 310. 

— fines for assuming arms, ii. 3, 99, 440. 

— Heralds' Office, v. 106. 

— heraldry, students of, i. 19, 182, 209, 
476 ; ii. 140, 229, 262, 295 ; iii. 102 ; 

v. 25, 42, 200. 

books and MSS. on, i. 19, 182, 

476; ii. 140, 229, 262, 295; iv. 236, 
292 ; v. 204. 

Illuminations, i. e. by candles in 
windows, &c, v. 209 : apart from 
bonfires, q. v. 

— These are first mentioned in 1685, 
iii. 129. Their use on a thanks- 
giving day is first mentioned in 1691, 
iii. 377 (Wood either forgetting 1688, 
iii. 271, or looking on that as purely 
a University display). Their use on 
Gunpowder plot-day, in 1692, is noted 
as an innovation in the observances 
of that day, iii. 406. 

— notes of their use : — 

1685, on James H's accession day, 

iii. 129: and so, 1693, on the anni- 
versary of William Ill's accession, 
iii. 415. 

— — — on James H's coronation 



Illuminations : {continued) : — 

day, iii. 141 : and so, occasionally, 
on the anniversary of William Ill's 
coronation, iii. 420. 

1687, on the king's birthday, iii. 

210: and so, occasionally, after- 
wards, iii. 434. 

on a royal visit, iii. 231, 233. 

1688, at the thanksgiving for the 

birth of the prince of Wales, iii. 271 : 
and so kept up by the Jacobites on 
the anniversary of James Francis 
Edward's birth, iii. 363. 

— — 1 69 1 -5, on thanksgiving days, 
iii. 377, 436, 475, 490. 

1692, 1695, on Gunpowder-plot 

day, iii. 406, 493. 
1692-4, on receipt of news of the 

king's return from abroad, iii. 405, 

433, 472. 

— part of the illumination was by 
means of 'torches' on the top of 
square towers, iii. 1 29, 141 (' links '), 
475, 49° C lights'). 

Interest : — 

— pamphlets on usury, i. 21 ; ii. 146. 

— rate of : — 

1670-81, Wood reckoned on 6 

per cent., ii. 194, 206, 358, 393-4, 
416, 450, 452, 467, 485, 503, 544. 
On an old bond he received at that 
rate up to 1683, iii. 56. 

168 1-6, Wood got only 5 per 

cent, from his relatives, ii. 556; iii. 
11, 56, 114, 176, 197: the mention 
of 6 per cent, in 1682 being a slip, 
iii. 27. 

1677, Wood thought 8 per cent. 

possible, ii. 394. 

Languages : some notes of matters 
linguistic (in Oxford chiefly) : — 

— a polyglot, i. 469. 

— Arabic, ii. 398. 

old translations from, iv. 252. 

inscription, iv. 70. 

knowledge of, in Oxford, i. 470 ; 

iii. 2, 324. 

speeches in, in Oxford, ii. 17-8. 

printing of, i. 316. 

professor of, v. 149. 

— Chaldee, i. 470, 498. 

— Dutch, ii. 208, 315. 

— French, v. 86-7. 

— Greek, i. 308; ii. 116, 291, 307. 

inscriptions, iv. 69-70; v. 160. 

. MS., iv. 290. 

editions, i. 316 ; iii. 475. 

grammars, i. 471 ; ii. 7 ; iv. 255. 

study of, i. 234, 470; ii. 296, 

502 ; iii. 399. 



INDEX IV. 

Languages : Greek {continued) : — 

school, v. 162. 

professor, v. 149. 

speech, in Oxford, i. 282-3. 

plays, acted in Oxford, iv. 156. 

in the schools, had to be trans- 
lated into Latin, ii. 278. 

disputations in, i. 297, 300. 

legend of the Greeks, ii. 406. 

— Hebrew, ii. 398 ; iv. 177. 

oration in praise of, iii. 434. 

students of, i. 469. 

school, v. 162. 

professor, v. 149. 

— Italian, ii. 160; iii. 50. 

— Latin, i. 470; ii. 291, 502 ; iv. 147, 
173.. 

inscriptions, ii. 303; iv. 69-70; 

v. 160. 

in the Oxford schools, ii. 277-8. 

of a Cambridge vice-chancellor, 

ii. 241 ; of an Oxford vice-chancellor, 

iii. 27, 132. 

plays, acted, iv. 156. 

school-study of, i. 47-8. 

orthography, ii. 170. 

preferred to English for Wood's 

History and Antiquities of the Uni- 
versity, ii. 172, 292. 

verses, i. 426; ii. 225, 378; iii. 

413, 420, 426, 477. 

in conversation, ii. 332 ; iii. 44. 

theme, iii. 168, 173. 

speeches, i. 16 ; iii. 173, 229, 315. 

was the official language of the 

colleges in speeches to visitors, e.g. 

ii. 59; iii. 49,51,53,162,5325 V. 167. 
was the official language of the 

University, in addresses, letters, 
speeches, verses, v. 154-5 : in Convoca- 
tion, ii. 328 ; iii. 132 : in certain 
sermons, v. 120. 
legend of the Latins, ii. 406. 

— Persian, i. 470. 

— Samaritan, i. 470. 

— Saxon, iii. 239. 

— Scotch, iii. 50. 

— Spanish, ii. 59. 

— Syriac, i. 470. 

Medals, iii. 337, 440, 487 : a medallist, 

iii. 336. 

— Anthony Wood's collection, i. 238. 

— Henry Parker's collection, ii. 420. 

— Elias Ashmole's collection, ii. 435. 

— Thomas Lockey's collection, ii. 455. 

— the Bodleian collection, ii. 529. 

— Ralph Sheldon's collection, iii. 102-3. 
Medicine : — 

— precedence of medicine and law, iii. 
15,85. 



MATTERS. 219 

Medicine {continued) : — 

— professor of, v. 149. 

— notes of medical practice, i. 199, 
229-30, 428, 461 ; ii. 95-6, 101, 143/ 
308-9, 350, 365, 374, 378, 412, 451, 
455> 545= bleeding, i. 215, 461; ii. 
95, 144 : blistering, ii. 101 ; iii. 125 : 
emetic, ii. 143, 150, 246, 316, 374-5 ; 
iii. 195: bone-setting, i. 176: trans- 
fusion of blood, ii. 30. 

— an apothecary's bill, iii. 455. 

— physic drink, ii. 104, 108, 163. 

— scurvy grass drink, i. 273, 382, 452, 
466. 

— resurrectionists supply bodies for 
dissection, iii. 470. 

— bodies of criminals given for dissec- 
tion, v. 211. 

— quack medicines, ii. 14, 277 : quacks, 
i- 377- 

— diseases mentioned in Oxford, v. 
129-30. 

— infectious illness in colleges, v. 168. 

— quarantine, i. 107. 

— country patients came into rooms in 
Oxford for medical attendance, as 
is shown by the death-roll, i. 213, 
260, 338, 350, 421, 462 ; ii. 123, 169, 
235, 252, 264, 295, 380, 396, 414, 

447> 5°3; iii- 23, i34» !94» 

196, 242, 333, 464. 

— tip to a doctor's man, v. 209, 212. 

— adopted as profession by ejected 
clerical fellows in the Puritan times, 
i. 365 ; iii. 8 ; v. 27. 

Militia : — 

— distrusted by James II, iii. 130. 

— called out to suppress riots, iii. 422. 

— of London, v. 110. 

— Oxford University, v. 163 ; City, v. 
125 ; County, v. 132. 

Museums : — 

— Elias Ashmole's, v. 35. 

— Thomas Lockey's, ii. 455. 

— Henry Parker's, ii. 420. 

— Ralph Sheldon's, iii. 102-3. 

— John Tradescant's, ii. 530. 

— in the Anatomy school, ii. 529 ; 
v. 162. 

— in the Ashmolean, v. 157. 
Music : — 

— books on, &c, i. 202, 211, 256-7, 
2 74, 321, 43 6 ; 29, 63, 181, 341, 
39 8 , 499> 5 o1 5 iii- 33 2 5 iv. 295. 

on church music, i. 420, 426. 

— anthem, i. 87, 289-90, 482-3 ; iii. 
362: catches, i. 18, 289; v. 74: 
Christmas carols, i. 18, 352, 423 ; 
v. 168: garlands, i. 18: madrigals, 
i. 289 : rounds, i. 18 : songs, i. 1 8, 
287, 35 1 - 2 ; ii- I5 8 - 



220 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Music {continued) : — 

— singing, i. 173, 178, 246, 287; ii. 
I 43> 230: part-singing, i. 205, 274, 
289, 299 ; ii. 248 : Latin song, i. 321 ; 
ii. 161 , 248, 319. 

— common ; = two-part, music, i. 212. 

— composers, i. 256, 274, 321-2, 458 ; 
ii. 162, 181, 335, 341, 361, 398, 499, 
501 ; iv. 73; v. 33. 

Wood's bibliography of, i. 233; 

iv. 235. 

— music-teachers in Oxford, v. 128. 

— musicians, i. 204-6, 208-9, 233, 257, 
270, 273-5, 316; ii. 148: v. 128. 

foreigners, i. 242, 256, 485 ; ii. 43. 

Londoners, i. 24T, 256; ii. 69. 

choristers, v. 175, 178, 184, 191. 

fiddlers, i. 189-90, 212, 222; 

ii. 148, 342. 

lutinist, i„ 204-5 > 35 2 - 

organist, i. 204, 274, 426 ; ii. 

341, 401 ; v. 59, 175, 184, 191. 

singing-man, v. 175, 180, 191. 

songster, i. 274. 

trumpeter, iv. 52. 

violist, i. 205, 274: bass-violist, 

i. 205 : division-violist, i. 274 ; ii. 181. 
violinist, i. 241-2, 256, 274, 485 

(' violin '). 
waits, iii. 230; iv. 218. 

— companies : — 

the University, v. 164. 

the City, v. 125. 

London, i. 469. 

the kings, ii. 69. 

the duke of Ormonde's, iii. 496. 

— French influence on, i. 212 ; ii. 69. 

— church music, i.e. organ and chant- 
ing, stopped in Puritan times, i. 204- 
205, 298-9 : resumed in 1660, i. 347, 
356-8 : books on, i. 420, 426. 

in a Romanist church, iii. 201. 

— instrumental music favoured by Puri- 
tans, i. 287, 298. 

— instruments : — 

— bells, v. 205-6. 

— citern, i. 190. 

— drums, i. 55, 61 ; iii. 128-9, 144-5, 
321,371 ; v. 204: kettle-drums, iii. 271. 

— flageolet, ii. 69. 

— harpsicon,i. 212 : harpsicord, i. 274. 

— hautbois, iii. 48. 

— lute, i. 205 : French lute, ii. 43 : 
theorbo lute, i. 205, 256. 

— organ, i. 205, 212, 270, 274, 321, 
323~4» 347> 356-8; ii. 161, 407. 

pulled down in Puritan times, 

ii. 407 ; iv. 63. 

at Christ Church, v. 175 : at 

S. John's, v. 180 : at Magd. coll., v. 
185: at New coll., v. 191 : at S. Mary's 



Music : instruments : organ {cont.) : — 
church, v. 118 : at the Music School, 
v. 162 : at the Theatre, v. 162. 

— pipe, ii. 69. 

— sack but, iii. 496. 

— trumpets, iii. 128, 243, 271. 

— viol, i. 204, 211-2, 237, 274; ii. 
161. 

— — strings, i. 231, 237-8. 

bass-viol, i. 190, 205, 210, 212, 

256 ; ii. 158. 

— ■ — counter-tenor viol, i. 205, 212. 

division-viol, i. 208-9; u ' 

lyra-viol, i. 208-9. 

— — tenor-viol, i. 212. 
treble-viol, i. 208-9, 2 1 2. 

— violin, 1. 173, 178, 181-2, 190, 209, 
211-2, 242, 256-7, 274, 316, 321 ; 

i». 433- 

bass, i. 212. 

tenor, i. 212. 

treble, i. 209, 212. 

— virginal, i. 173, 205, 212, 274. 

— wire instrument, i. 190. 
— faculty of music, i. 2 73. 

— degrees in, iv. 135. 

— professor of, deputy-professor, v. 
149. 

— praelector, v. 149. 

the music lecture, or speech, on 

Act Saturday, v. 149. 

— school, v. 162. 

— University : — 

— at the University sermon, v. 118. 

— at the Encaenia, v. 153. 

— at the schools, iv. 138. 

— college : — 

— at chapel services, v. 167. 

— ' nights,' v. 167. 

— private clubs or reunions : — 

— in college-rooms, v. 167. 

— at William Ellis's, v. 42-3. 

— at Gervase Westcote's, v. 74. 

— in taverns, i. 423 ; v. 74. 

— customs : — 

— music at meals, especially state 
meals, i. 212, 321 ; ii. 490 ; iii. 210, 
496. 

— music at state funerals, i. 482-4 ; 
iii. 162, 261. 

— musical performances in honour of 
state-events, i. 316, 321 ; iv. 82. 

in honour of University events, 

e.g. opening of the Theatre, ii. 162, 
165 ; iv. 72 : the introduction of the 
Theatre organ, ii. 223. 

in reception of visitors, ii. 210, 

315, 387; iii. 17, 52, 334, 495; iv. 
76. 

— drums and trumpets at proclama- 
tion of a king, iii. 128. 



INDEX IV. 

Music : custo?ns {continued') : — 

— kettledrums and trumpets at drinking 
toasts, iii. 271. 

— organ-playing while a visitor views 
a college chapel, iii. 17, 50-2 : while 
a visitor enters the Theatre, ii. 386, 
518, and leaves it, ii. 518. 

— the waits playing at royal and 
other visits, v. 125, 164. 

Names : — 

— connected by alias, i. 136, 192, 205, 
306; ii. 212, 247, 321, 367,427,448, 

453» 46i, 463-4. 4 82 > 554 5 iii- *5> 
39, 218, 220, 259, 312-4, 348, 384, 
477 ; iv. 119, 277. 

— two baptismal, i. 29-30, 41 ; iii. 85, 
146, 207, 217, 219, 275, 279, 281, 
308, 328, 333, 341, 379, 389, 420, 
441, 453, 459, 466 : three baptismal, 
iii. 96. 

— Welsh, i. 135. 

— change of surname on accession to 
an estate, iii. 220. 

Wavy : — 

— office, iii. 131, 323, 327, 353; cor- 
ruption of officials, iii. 189-90. 

— officers, i. 509; iii. 13, 40, 164, 189, 

3»> 350, 11}, 39Q> 4 I °> 4 I 3, 425- 

— physician, ii. 192 ; iii. 352. 

— chaplain, ii. 285, 417; iii. 95. 

— marines, iii. 371. 

— ships: Cloudesley, iii. 413: Eagle, 
iii. 290 : Ossory, iii. 410 : Rochester, 
iii. 463 : Sandwich, iii. 391 : Tiger, 
iii. 13 : the guardship, iii. 290, 

— press-gang, iv. 68. 

— 1647, part of the fleet takes Charles I's 
side, i. 227. 

— services : under Commonwealth, ii. 
417: 1665, ii. 37-8, 40: 1666, ii. 
54, 285 : 1667, iv. 69 : 1673, ii. 277 : 
1688, iii. 276 : 1690, iii. 333, 337 : 
1691, iii. 371 : 1692, iii. 390 : 1694, 
iii. 452, 459. 

Newspapers : — 

A brief analysis of Wood's refer- 
ences to the periodical literature of 
his times will be of interest. 

— Mercurius : — 

— the first papers he notes are periodi. 
cals issued under the title Mercurius i . 
Some of these were reprinted at a 
later date, and of these reprints 



MATTERS. 221 

Newspapers : Mercurius (cont.) : — 
Wood obtained copies. Arranged in 
order of time, the references are : — 

1641, Mercurius Britannicus, i. 14. 

1643-4, Mercurius Aulicus, i. 14, 

77, 81-2, 211, 235 ; ii. 13 ; iv. 240. 

— — 1648, Mercurius Academicus, 
issued at Oxford, i. 143. 

— — 1656-60, Mercurius Politicus, 
i. 14 ; ii. 414. 

1659, Mercurius Civicus, i. 307. 

1660-3, Mercurius Publicus, i. 

14, 379' 417; x > 2. 

— the name was afterwards revived as 
title :— 

both of a newspaper: — 1681 2 , The 

Oxford Mercury,' issued in London, 
53i. 

and of literary journals : — 1678- 

90, Mercurius Librarius, i. 15 ; iii. 
327: 1691, Mercurius Eruditorum, 
i. 15. 

— the name was also common in the 
titles of pamphlets: — 1644, Mer- 
curius Hibernicus, i. 50: 1652, Mer- 
curius Cambro-britannus, i. 293 : 
1664, Mercurius Centralis, ii. 19. 

— the name was also frequently used as 
the title of almanacs (' mercury ' = an 
almanac, i. 12) : — 1646, Mercurius 
Coelicus, i. 11 : 1675, Mercurius 
Verax, i. 13 : 1691, Mercurius Angli- 
canus, i. 11. 

— Intelligencer : — 

— the next set of newspapers comprises 
those called Intelligencer or Intelli- 
gence. 

1 641, The English Intelligencer 

is found as a second title, i. 14. 

1 656-58, The Public Intelligencer, 

i. 14. 

— — 1658-65, The Intelligencer, i. 
14-5, 497. 

— the name was afterwards revived in 
various compounds : — 

1 68 1 2 , The Oxford Intelligence, 

published at London, ii. 531. 

1 68 1, Protestant Domestic Intelli- 
gence, ii. 531. 

168 1, The Loyal Protestant Intelli- 
gence, ii. 551, 554. 

1682, Nathaniel Thompson's 

Intelligence, iii. 15, 25 : probably 
the same as Nathaniel Thompson's 
Loyal Protestant, iii. 19, and Natha- 



1 The title 'Mercury' for a newspaper still survives as a chief title in the 
provinces : some others have it as a second title from issues incorporated with 
them. 

2 These issues owed their origin to the interest taken in the struggle between 
Charles II and the Parliament. 



222 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Newspapors : Intelligencer (font.) : — 
niel Thompson's Gazette, iii. 25, and 
a continuation of the preceding. 

1688 S The Universal Intelli- 
gencer, iii. 287. 

— The News : — 

1 1660-63, Wood cites 'the News' 

as his authority for statements, i. 
318-9, 379, 413, 421-2, 439, 510. 

1663-6, Wood's set of it is pre- 
served, i. 14-5. 

1662, Jan., Wood notes a pay- 
ment of 2s. for the last quarter of 
1661 for ' News,' i. 427. This news- 
paper is, therefore, part of the ' news- 
books,' i. 307, 314, 417; ii. 139, whose 
purchase, from 1657 to 1668, first at 
2S. a quarter and afterwards irregu- 
larly, is noted by Wood. See ii. 33, 
39, 71, 99, 1 28, 1 78, and under Edward 
Forest, v. 45, and Thomas Robinson, 
v. 67,. 

— at a later period 'the News' in 
Wood's references is 'short' for the 
coffee-house newsletters described 
infra, iii. 41, 45, 155. 

— The Gazette : — 

— 1665-95, Wood's set of the Gazette, 

i. 15; ii. 413. 

— Wood's note of its first issue, i. 15 ; 

ii. 49-50. 

— Wood notes his purchases of copies, 
1666-94, ii. 92, 108, 122, 151, 397, 
4L3, 483-5, 49 2 , 5°3, 545 ; »i- "» 
i°9> 2 5 I » 302, 319, 342, 359, 380, 
421, 451. 

■ — Wood cites the Gazette as his autho- 
rity, especially for court news and 
(for Athenae purposes) official ap- 
pointments, clerical and legal, iii. 2, 
18-9, 3 1 , 5°> 85, II2 , n6, 125-6, 
136, 145, 160, 163, 173, 179-80, 
206, 219, 249, 280, 282, 285, 305-7, 
312, 327, 344-5, 347-8, 352-4, 356, 
359> 361, 363, 37 J -2, 37 6 , 383, 386, 
391, 405-6, 418, 422, 429, 435, 445, 
451, 455,486; iv. 47. 

— advertisements in, iii. 203, 380. 

— The Philosophical Transactions, i. e. 
the journal of the Royal Society of 
London, v. 107 : — 

• — 1667-70, Wood notes his purchase 
ofcopies,ii.98, 122, 139,163, 189,194. 

— Wood cites it as an authority, ii. 
77-8, 398. 

— 1686, Wood sold his set, iii. 181. 

— Newsletters, Coffee letters, Coffee- 
house letters, v. 114: issued indepen- 
dently of the official Gazette : — 



Newspapers : Newsletters, &f. (fon- 
tinued) : — 

— papers, containing various items of 
news, written (and presumably printed) 
in London, were dispersed throughout 
the coffee-houses in London and the 
provinces. In iii. 274 Wood mentions 
a newsletter in a London coffee-house, 
giving Oxford news. In ii. 494 he 
notes a coffee-house letter at War- 
wick. 

■ — — To judge by Wood's excerpts 
these news-sheets gave mainly eccle- 
siastical and legal appointments, and 
so Wood found them useful for pur- 
poses of his Athenae. 

— — Wood cites ' the news letter,' 
i. e. at Oxford, without further defini- 
tion, ii. 505; iii. 3, 24, 32, 66, 72, 91, 
114, 156, 164-5, I 8o, 206, 219, 225, 
262, 272. He cites newsletters dated 
Tuesday, iii. 28, 45, 86, 138, 164-5, 
184, 187, 189-90, 201, 247, 265-7, 
308 : Saturday, iii. 30-T, 35, 38, 41, 
45, 75, 83, 89, 138, 184-5, 2 °°> 2 44, 
248, 274, 281, 300, 341, 351, 353: 
also Thursday, iii. 44, 138, 166, 
184-5, 302, 321 : Friday, iii. 107: 
and Sunday, iii. 164. Oxford coffee- 
houses had thus almost a daily paper. 

When Wood cites these news- 
sheets definitely, he cites them, as 
a rule, by the Oxford coffee-house 
which took them in : — 

Thomas Short's, most fre- 
quently, v. 70. 

James Hall's, also frequently, 

v. 46. 

Browne's, v. 114. 

Day's, v. 114. 

Mountjoy's, iii. 339, 379. 

Wolley's, iii. 257, 305. 

Frank's, iii. 397 : Puffet's, iii. 

479 : Rife's, iii. 1 56, are possibly 
mis-readings. 

Henry Muddiman was the writer 

of one of these news-sheets, v. 63. 
His letter came to Short's coffee- 
house, iii. 38. In 1686 the Judge of 
Assize attacked it in his charge, iii. 
180. 

1687-8, Wood refers to his collec- 
tion of coffee-house letters, iii. 215, 
257, 278 : 1689, he mentions his pur- 
chase of the letters at Thomas Short's, 
iii. 306. Unfortunately, no copies, so 
far as I have seen, have come down 
in the present Wood collections. 

Wood notes with contempt the 



1 An issue begun in the excitement of the prince of Orange's invasion. 



INDEX IV. MATTERS. 



223 



Newspapers : Newsletters, &c. {con- 
tinued) : — 

practice of compiling books from 
these letters, ii. 475 ; forgetting the 
use he himself made of them. 

— private letters, i.e. letters of news 
written by one friend to another, ii. 
438 ; iii. 36, 38, 164, 166, 183, 278, 
and by him shown to others. We 
learn from John Aubrey (Brief Lives, 

ii. 25) that it was the custom to read 
aloud such letters in company. A 
good idea of their character may be 
got by comparing Wood's excerpts 
from the newsletters, iii. 31-2, with 
his draft of a letter to William Ful- 
man, iii. 32-3. 

— Other minor references are — 

1680-2, Heraclitus Ridens, iii. 1. 

1688, The Public Occurrences, iii. 

274, 278 : see note on p. 222. 
1693, the Gentleman's Journal, 

iii. 436. 

Pamphlets : — 

— Wood's collection of, i. 16-8, 318 ; 

ii. 478 ; v. 36, 45. 

— popular interest in, i. 5 ; ii. 429. 

— about Charles I, v. 31. 

— 1641-59, about the Civil War, the 
Commonwealth, and party leaders, i. 
16-7 : about Oliver Cromwell, ii. 13; 

iii. 455. 

— 1647-9, about the Parliamentary 
visitation, i. 16, 142-4. 

— 1659, about the Cavalier risings, i. 
17, 280. 

— 1660-85, about Charles IPs reign, i. 
17; ii. 457, 471, 521, 530, 551 ; iii. 
32-3 ; v. 36. 

— 1673-88, about James, duke of York, 
and James II, v. 51, 53. 

— 1678-83, about the Popish plot and 
against Romanism, i. 17; ii. 13,429, 

434, 445, 457, 47 5°6, 5 11 \ J 53- 

— 1681-3, for and against Shaftesbury, 
ii. 521, 530 ; iii. 36. 

— 1683, about the Ryehouse, or Presby- 
terian, plot, i. 17 ; iii. 58. 

— 1683-4, about Algernon Sidney and 
other political victims, iii. 82, 97, 118. 

— 1680-85, for and against the duke of 
Monmouth, v. 63. 

— 1687, for and against Romanism, iii. 
246. 

about the Magdalen college case, 

v. 186. 

— 1688-9, f° r an d against the prince of 
Orange, v. 75. 

— 16S9, about William III and Mary, 
v. 61, 76. 



Pamphlets {continued) : — 

— 1 690-1, about the Exeter college 
case, i. 16; iii. 325, 334, 340, 352, 
360. 

— about Oxford, i. 16. 

— about Ireland, i. 17. 

— about marvels, criminals, state-trials, 

i. 17-8. 

— about shows, iii. 29. 

— collections of, v. 24, 37, 45, 57, 60, 70. 
Paper, i. 206, 242. 

— price of, i. 238, 318, 335, 400, 454; 

ii. 24, 139, 194; iii. 181, 328. 
increased by fire of London, ii. 

87, 97- 

— quire of, 1. 238, 249, 318, 335. 

— ream of, iii. 181, 328. 

— Dutch paper, i. 222, 249, 259; ii. 
I3i- 

— mathematical paper, i. 213. 

— painted paper, i. 242. 

— royal paper, iv. 74. 

— ruled paper, i. 211, 213, 215, 230. 

— writing paper, iii. 328. 

— parchment, i. 446. 

— vellum, i. 487; ii. 131 ; v. 1. 
Parliament, i. 16, 21 ; ii. 468, 509 ; 

iii. 86, 365. 

— books burnt by order of, v. 208. 

— House of Lords, i. 23, 131, 318 ; ii. 

366, 437, 447, 500, 505, 517, 529, 
535; 111. 69-71, 84, 169, 315, 394, 
403, 407, 410-1, 414, 434, 444, 453, 

473-4, 479- 
Black Rod, ii. 513. 

— House of Commons, ii. 437, 451, 
500, 505, 518, 529-30, 534-5 5 iii- 
69-71, 86, 170, 313, 410, 414, 475, 
480-1 ; v. 209. 

serjeant-at-arms, iii. 414. 

members for Oxford University, 

v. 148: City, v. 125: County, v. 132. 

elections into casual vacancies : 

' recruiter,' i. 306, 477 ; iii. 163 : ' re- 
cruiting knight of the shire,' iii. 441. 

— — entertainment by candidates to 
voters : — 

— before election, i. 312; ii. 

279; iii. 277,489: omitted, ii. 519: 

omission resented, iii. 136. 
after election, i. 312 ; iii. 492. 

— Parliaments of 1 Mary and 1 Eliza- 
beth, ii. 305. 

— Parliament of 3 Charlesl,the 'Short' 
Parliament, i. 247. 

— Parliament of 3 Charles I, 3 Nov., 
1640, the ' Long ' Parliament, i. 22, 
51, 71, 77, 267 ; ii. 276; iii. 167 ; iv. 
47- 

members of, i. 199, 230, 247, 306, 

311-3; ii. 279. 



224 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Parliament : the ' Long' (cont.') : — 

— 1 6 -| 1 , undertakes war in Ireland, i. 

"5* 

— 1642, appoints lords lieutenant of 
counties, i. 61, 64; and imprisons 
royalist partisans, i. 59. 

— — in the war with Charles I, 
Oxford University is mainly for the 
king, Oxford City mainly for the Par- 
liament, i. 52, 54, 57-60, 62, 64, 66-8, 
75- 

— — passes an Act which interferes 
with the vice-chancellor's court, i. 76, 
84-5 ; v. 145 : and proposes lay 
visitors for all colleges, iv. 217. 

— 1642-3, negotiations with Charles I, 
v. 40. 

— 1643, convenes the Westminster 
Assembly, i. 425. 

— army, v. 205. 

— 1646, receives surrender of royalist 
garrisons, i. 127-8, 130. 

sends preachers to Oxford, i. 

130.. 

is active against Romanists, i. 

131- 

— 1647, orders a visitation 'of Oxford 
University, v. 165. 

is unpopular in London, i. 227. 

— 1648, negotiations with Charles I, i. 
228. 

— 1649, appealed to by Oxford city, i. 

— 1652, makes changes in the visitation 
of Oxford University, i. 174. 

— 1653, registration of births, burials, 
and marriages, i. 183. 

sermons before it, ii. 180, 565 ; 

iv. 270. 

— ' Parliament ' of Charles I, held at 
Oxford in 1644, i. 112. 

sermons before it, i. 411. 

— first Parliament of Oliver Cromwell, 
1654 : petitioned by Oxford Univer- 
sity, i. 187: had only one representa- 
tive from Oxford University, i. 188 : 
letters from it, iii. 167. 

— second Parliament of Oliver Crom- 
well, ii. 453. 

— Parliament of Richard Cromwell, 

i. 267-8. 

— the ' Rump ' Parliament, 1659-60, i. 
18, 288, 303-4, 363; ii. 192. 

— the 'Free' Parliament, 1660, con- 
vened by George Monk, i. 303-4, 
31 1-2, 315 : ordered a visitation of 
Oxford University, i. 318. 

— Parliaments of Charles II, i. 17. 

— first Parliament of Charles II, 1661- 
79 : ' the king's Long Parliament,' 

ii. 447. 



Parliament : first Parliament of Charles 

II (conlimied) : — 
members of, i. 199, 400, 414, 477 ; 

iii. 14, 163. 
hostility of, to the Covenant, i. 

400 ; ii. 61. 
hostility of, to Thomas Ilobbes, 

ii. 91. 

— 1662, passes Act of Uniformity (Con- 
formity), i. 355, 360-1, 407, 453 ; iv. 
137- 

imposes chimney-money, i. 431, 

433- 

— 1665, meets at Oxford, ii. 48-51, 58, 
60-1, 66-7. 

sermons before it, ii. 58. 

passes the Five Mile act, ii. 61. 

— 1666, imposes a poll-tax, ii. 89. 

— 1667, impeaches Edward, lord Claren- 
don, iii. 122. 

— 1670, ii. 206. 

— 1673, becomes afraid of Romanism 
and passes the Test act, ii. 256, 258, 
274,276. 

— 1674-5, prorogations, ii. 282, 330. 

— 1677, ii. 375-6. 

— 1678, imposes a poll-tax, ii. 401. 

— — passes the act for burying in 
woollen, ii. 414, 454, 471 ; iii. 243. 

is keen about the ' Popish ' plot, 

ii. 421-2, 444, 465 ; iii. 157. 

impeaches the earl of Danby, ii. 

432. 

is keen against a standing army, 

iii. 157. 

prorogued, ii. 414, 428, 432. 

— 1679, dissolved, ii. 414, 434, 437, 
442, 529. 

— second Parliament of Charles II, 
March -July, 1679, ii. 457. 

known to be hostile to the duke 

of York, ii. 444 : and to the earl of 
Danby, ii. 445-6, 448. 

is keen about the ' Popish ' plot, 

ii. 445, 447, 465. 

is violently anti-Romanist, ii. 

444-5> 44 8 ~9- 
proposes the Exclusion Bill, to 

deprive the duke of York of the 

succession, ii. 451, 456, 475; iii. 14, 

129-30,141. 
May, prorogued, ii. 451 : July, 

dissolved, ii. 456. 

— third Parliament of Charles II, Oct. 
1679-Jan. 1681, ii. 454, 461, 463-4, 
517 ; iii. 14. 

sermons before it, ii. 505. 

is keen about the ' Popish ' plot, 

iii. 39. 

reproposes the Exclusion Bill, ii. 

499~5°o> 5°5» 5*2 i iU - 7, r 4- 



INDEX IV. 

Parliament : third Parliament of 

Charles II {continued') : — 
is prorogued and re-prorogued, ii. 

473,478,485,511. 
petitions are sent in for its meeting 

again, ii. 476, 484, 498, 513. 
dissolved, ii. 511, 513, 537. 

— fourth Parliament of Charles II, 21- 
28 March, 1681, iii. 14, 238. 

sermons before, ii. 515, 522, 

531-2. 

pamphlets and verses about it, ii. 

521, 53Q-4- 
meets at Oxford, ii. 511, 513-5, 

517-9, 521-4, 528-32, 541 ; iii. 

87- 

presses on the Exclusion Bill, iii. 

238. 

is dissolved, ii. 521, 532, 537. 

— 1682, expectation of a new Parlia- 
ment, iii. 7. 

— 1684, Charles II is intriguing to se- 
cure a Parliament in the court interest, 
iii. 86 ; v. 35. 

— Parliament of James II, 1685-7, iii. 
127, 1 30-1, 136, 157, 170-2. 

— 1688, expectation of a new Parlia- 
ment, iii. 277-8, 283, 287. 

— the Convention Parliament, 1689-90, 
iii. 296, 298, 302, 304-5, 309, 313, 
316-7, 319, 321-2, 324, 328. 

— first Parliament of William and Mary, 
March 1690-Oct. 1695, iii. 325,327, 

331, 34 8 , 350, 359. 371, 373-4, 
376-7, 380-1, 383, 386, 394, 407-11, 
413-5,418,423,431,434,437,440-1, 
444-6, 450-2, 473, 476, 480-1,484-5, 
491-2. 

sermons before, iii. 443. 

— Parliament of William III, Nov. 
1695, iii. 489, 492. 

Pedigrees : — 

— in the heralds' visitations, i. 44-5. 

— collected by Anthony Wood, i. 23-42, 
50-1, 119, 126, 162, 180, 192-4, 
202-3, 214, 239-40, 244-5, 263, 267, 
285, 305 ; ii. 142, 147, 269, 326, 340, 
347, 364, 368-71, 377, 392,468,481, 
565 ; »i- 94, 99~ 102 , 206, 259, 335, 
416, 466 ; iv. 292 ; v. 2. 

— collected by Ralph Sheldon, iii. 98, 
102-4, IQ 6, 115 ; iv. 292-3. 

— collected by John and Augustine 
Vincent, iii. 102. 

— by others, v. 20. 
Plays :— 

— writers of, ii. 2, 125, 226, 275, 478 ; 
iii. 39, 112, 374, 218, 413. 

— actors, ii. 1 2 5 ; iii. 192,411 : actresses, 
i. 406. 

evil repute of, ii. 125. 

VOL. V. Q 



MATTERS. 225 

Plays : actors {continued) : — 

the king's company of players, 

v. 36, col. 2. 
the duke's company of players, 

v. 5?- 

— playhouses, at London, v. 107. 

— printed plays in great demand after 
the Restoration, i. 297, 301 ; ii. 56, 
87, 240, 430. 

price of, ii. 430. 

collections of, i. 258, 297 ; iii. 119 ; 

iv. 236, 292. 
catalogues of, i. 19-20 ; ii. 519 ; 

iii. 119 ; iv. 236, 292. 

— pamphlets about the stage, ii. 180 ; 
iii. 167. 

— obscenity of the stage, i. 353. 

— titles of plays : — 

All 's Lost by Lust : tragedy by 

William Rowley, i. 405-6. 
Bays : comedy by the duke of 

Buckingham, iii. 218. 
Cambyses, king of Persia: tragedy 

by Elkanah Settle, ii. 226. 
The City Gallant : second title of 

Green's Tu Quoqne, infra, i. 405. 
City Wit : comedy by Richard 

Brome, i. 405. 
The Committee : comedy by Sir 

Robert Howard, iii. 193. 
Flora's Vagaries : comedy by 

Richard Rhodes, ii. 2, 148. 
Green's Tu Quoque : comedy by 

John Cooke, i. 405 : see an allusion 

to this favourite play, i. 266. 
The Guardian, i. 322 : either the 

comedy by Philip Massinger, or that 

by Abraham Cowley. 
Herod and Antipater : tragedy 

by Gervase Markham and William 

Sampson, i. 20. 
A King and no King : comedy by 

Beaumont and Fletcher, i. 22. 
Love in a Tub : George Etherege's 

comedy, generally called The Comical 

Revenge, ii. 165. 

— — A Mad World, my Masters : 
comedy by Thomas Middleton, i. 405. 

Masque of Flowers, 1614, i. 20. 

The Milkmaids: comedy, i. 405-6. 

Nicomede : tragi- comedy, trans- 
lated from Corneille, i. 20. 

The Old Law : comedy by Philip 

Massinger, Thomas Middleton, and 
William Rowley, i. 20. 

The Ordinary: comedy by William 

Cartwright, i. 350. 

Paria : Latin play by Thomas 

Vincent, i. 20. 

The Parson's Wedding : comedy 

by Thomas Killigrew, iii. 39. 



226 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Plays : titles of plays (continued) : — 

The Poor Man's Comfort : tragi- 
comedy by Robert Daborne, i. 406. 

The Projector lately dead, i. 20. 

The Rape of Lucrece : tragedy by 

Thomas lleywood, i. 405. 

— — The Rump : comedy by John 
Tatham, i. 406. 

The Spanish Lady, i. 406. 

The Tricks : second title of Flora's 

Vagaries, supra, ii. 2. 
Tu Quoque, i. 405-6 ; i. e. Green's 

Tu Quoque, supra. 
The Very Woman : second title 

of The Spanish Lady, supra, i. 406 : 

not identified. 
Volpone : comedy by Ben Jonson, 

i. 467. 

The Wedding : by James Shirley, 

ii. 28. 

Wit in a Constable : comedy by 

Henry Glapthorne, ii. 2. 
■ The Young Admiral : tragedy by 

James Shirley, i. 405-6. 
comedy, unnamed, by Nahum 

Tate, iii. 413. 
■ — plays acted in Oxford, in colleges, by 

members of the University : — 
1554, at Christ Church, Greek and 

Latin comedies, iv. 1 56. 
on the occasion of royal visits : — 

e.g. 1605, before James I, iv. 200: 

1636, before Charles I, iv. 56. 
prohibited by the Puritans, 1649- 

59, i. 299, 322. 
acted by students by stealth, i. 

299> 336. 

in 1660, about the Act time, acted 

openly by students in a dancing- 
school, i. 322 ; and in Dec, at Glou- 
cester hall, i. 350. 

after the Restoration encouraged 

by the Royalists, i. 322, 360 ; ii. 2. 

these college plays took place 

about Twelfth day, ii. 2, 28. 

■ — plays acted in Oxford, in the town 
hall, by prentices and tradesmen : one 
notice only, about Twelfth day, 1663 : 
i.467. 

— plays acted in Oxford, by professional 
companies : — 

at one time these were discouraged 

by the University, e.g. 1621, iv. 
217. 

Wood says they were prohibited 

by the Puritans, 1649-1659 presum- 
ably, i. 299, 406 : but he mentions 
plays, at the Act time, in 1657, i- 220 ; 
1658, i. 255; and 1659, i. 279. 

after the Restoration the Royalist 

party encouraged them, i. 360, and 



Plays : acted in Oxford, &c. (cont.) : — 
the year 166 1 was marked by a bad 
outbreak of stage-lunacy, i. 406. 

these professional plays were 

exhibited at the Act time, v. 151 : if 
there were no plays, few people came 
to the Act, iii. 105 : and when the 
authorities forbade an Act, they molli- 
fied opposition by allowing plays, iii. 
191. 

these professional plays were 

exhibited (i) in inn-yards, i. 405-6 ; 
and so probably, i. 220, 255, 279, 
when Wood does not say that they 
were by professionals : (ii) in a tennis- 
court, ii. 490 : (iii) in the lower gild- 
hall, ii. 15. 

the price of admission is noted 

as (i) 4</., i. 274, cp. ii. 15 : (ii) 6d. f 

i. 255, 405-6 : (iii) is., on the first 
day, i. 405, cp. i. 220. 

women were taken to these 

plays, and the price of their seats was 
higher, if we may judge by Wood's 
reluctance to squire his sister-in-law, 

ii. 265. 

Political parties and terms : — 

— Association, Shaftesbury's, iii. 63, 
70 ; v. 68. 

— bishops, vote of the, questioned, ii. 
434- 

— Black Bartholomew, i. 361, 453. 

— Black box, the, Monmouth's, v. 62. 

— Bloody Assize, the, iii. 164, 168, 170. 

— broken times, the, i. 291 ; ii. 223, 
431, 446. 

— Cabalists, the, ii. 516. 

— cavaliers, i. 123, 186, 310, 337 : rising 
in Kent, 1648, i. 146 : risings in the 
west, 1655, i. 194-6: and 1659, i. 
280 ; iii. 40. 

— Cromwellian, ii. 192, 525. 

— dispensing power men, iii. 317. 

— Engagement, the, i. 363, 394 ; ii, 
507 ; iv. 62. 

— Exclusion bill, the, iii. 137; v. 
34-5> 5o, 224-5. 

— fanatics, the, v. 231. 

— Fifth Monarchy men, i. 271. 

— Five members, the, ii. 480. 

— Five Mile act, the, ii. 61, 96. 

— Green Ribbon club, iii. 42, 302, 508 : 
Green Ribbon men, ii. 512; iii. 265. 

— Interval men, i. 356-7. 

— Jacobites, iii. 413, 462, 471, 486, 
49 1 5 v - 54-5, 61, 75, 206, 210. 

— Levellers, i. 153, 155. 

— Loyalists, ii. 263. 

— malignants, i. 49, 105. 

— non-swearers, i. e. nonjurors, iii. 360, 
371, 373; 376. 



INDEX IV. 

Political parties and terms : non- 
swearers {continued} : — 

nonjuring clergy, iii. 330, 337, 

380, 396, 398, 483, 490 ; iv. 85. 

nonjuring bishops, iii. 330, 359, 

37 J > 388, 399, 4 QI - 

nonjurors in Oxford, iii. 373, 375, 

402 ; v. 42. 

nonjurors charged double income- 
tax, iii. 445 ; iv. 25, 27. 

— Olivarian, i. 258 ; iii. 176. 

— Parliamenteers, i. 92, 114, 291: 
Parliamentarians, i. 120. 

— passive obedience, iii. 300. 

— penal laws, the, iii. 70. 

— Popish plot, the : — 

1678, first intimation of, ii. 416, 

418. 

subsequent agitation against Ro- 
manism and persecution of Romanists, 
ii. 405, 414, 416, 418-20, 422-4, 429, 
431, 452, 464-5, 562 ; iii. 105. 

incidental mention of, iii. 26, III, 

I57> I59> J 63- 

reaction against, ii. 515. 

witnesses in, ii. 416, 452, 466-7, 

515, 562 ; iii. 40, 153, 185. 
history of, i. 377 : pamphlets 

about, i. 17-9 ; ii. 416 ; v. 223. 

— ports, stopping the, ii. 419 ; iii. 5, 
464. 

— prerogative, the, iii. 14. 

— Presbyterian plot : — 
1679, ii. 465-6. 

1683, Presbyterian (iii. 60, 64 

'Protestant' in error, 65, 84), 
Whiggish (iii. 58), phanatical (iii. 
58), crop-eared (ii. 545; iii. 117, 
130), Rye (iii. 375), i.e. Ryehouse 
plot, iii. 58-9, 62, 64. 

history of, iii. 58 : pamphlets 

about, i. 17. 

— privy council, jurisdiction of, i. 251 ; 

ii. 274, 418 ; iii. 30,42, 58-9, 69, 89, 
268. 

— Roundheads, i. 48-9, 65-6, 80, 101, 
140; ii. 431, 526; iii. 398, 465. 

roundheaded, iii. 30. 

— Royalist, i. 148, 156, 186, 201, 282, 
298-9, 364, 366; ii. 525. 

— Rump, the, i. 18, 304: Rumper, i. 
304 ; ii. 192. 

— Ryehouse plot, set Presbyterian, 
supra. 

— Test act, the, ii. 256, 258, 276, 330; 

iii. 179 ; v. 224, 230. 

— Toleration, i. 21; ii. 244; iii. 172, 
191. 

— Tory, 1. 137 ; iii. 7, 44, 70. 

— trimmer, iii. 214 : trimming, iii. 141. 

— Whigs, ii. 431 ; iii. 7, 44, 130, 134 : 

Q 



MATTERS. 227 

Political parties and terms ; Whigs 

{continued) : — 

Whiggish, iii. 58 : Whiggism, i. 239 ; 
iii. 117. 

Whig principles, a statement of, 

iii. 69-71. 
Portraits : — 

— engraved, i. 238, 270, 314, 381, 428 ; 

ii. 183, 274, 291, 319, 380,434; iii. 
17-8, 122, 367. 

Hope collection of, ii. 63, 267. 

— painted, ii. 267, 291 ; iii. 367, 506. 

— of Anthony Wood, v. 79. 
Post Office :— 

— letters opened by the authorities, ii. 
419, 426 ; iii. 134. 

— price of postage, ii. 72. 

— the penny-post, iii. 31, 33, 310, 437. 

— the post retarded by command, ii. 
532. 

Press, the : — 

— newspaper, v. 221. 

— University, v. 160. 

— censorship of the press, iv. 9. 
licenser : — 1690-2, James Frazer, 

iii. 350, 398 ; iv. 17, 22, 39 : 1692-3, 
Edmund Bohun, iii. 413-4. 

passages struck out by, iii. 419 ; 

iv. 9, 39. 

passages communicated by, to 

those affected, iv. 22. 

books stopped by, iii. 481. 

pamphlets issued without licence, 

iii. 182, 187. 

a non -licensed press, iii. 425. 

devices to avoid : — wrong date, 

ii. 305 : wrong place, v. 86, 110, 229. 

1679, l a P se of the act about, ii. 457. 

licences from James II, iii. 198 ; 

v. 52, 73- 

— printing, pamphlets about, i. 21: 
verses on, ii. 319. 

on satin, ii. 361. 

— printers, v. 110, 128, 161. 
Processions : — 

— University, v. 1 54. 

— college, v. 167. 

— City, v. 126. 

to welcome a mayor who has been 

knighted, iii. 301. 

— county : — 

of the high-sheriff, at his entry on 

office, v. 132. 

of the lord lieutenant, on a state 

visit to Oxford, iii. 127 : at proclama- 
tion of a king, iii. 128. 

of the gentry, to welcome a dis- 
tinguished visitor, i. 412 : to welcome 
royalty, iii. 47. 

— horse, iii. 532. 

— coach, v. 209. 



228 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Processions (continued) : — 

— funeral, v. 209, 217. 

— military : guard of honour to king's 
commissioners, iii. 249. 

— ambassador's, iii. 222. 

— torchlight, ii. 516, 522 : lining the 
street with torches, i. 494 ; ii. 207 ; 
iii. 261, 317; iv. 67, 73. 

— ecclesiastical, v. 210. 

Proverbs and proverbial expressions : — 

— Scotch proverbs, v. 91. 

— English proverbs to be turned into 
Latin in the Schools, ii. 277. 

— bar, to throw over the, ii. 508. 

— bason, to raise a storm in a, i. 
297. 

— bed from under you, sooner give the, 
iii. 198. 

— bees, ii. 494. 

— bird flown, to find the, i. 146. 

— bread out of other folk's mouths, to 
take the, i. 391. 

— breakfast, to give a, i. 74, 

— cheek by jowl, i. 465. 

— clouts, a king of, iii. 142. 

— common road, out of the, ii. 278. 

— crests fallen, ii. 434. 

— cushion at one's head, to throw a, ii. 
419. 

— distance, to tell at a, ii. 108. 

— dog, no more religion than a, iii. 
187. 

— dog at mutton, like a, i. 140. 

— dog's barking at the moon, a, ii. 
532. 

— dunghill, on his own, iii. 358. 

— ears, to prick up the, ii. 422, 437. 

— Easter day, rain on, iii. 188. 

— feathers, to get. ii. 284. 

— fool's bolt, a, iii. 507. 

— fools, the paradise of, iii. 528. 

— games, in at many, i. 363. 

— gasping, to lie a, literally, i. 172: 
metaphorically, i. 268; v. 18. 

— glove to, to throw a, iii. 458. 

— good-morrow, to bid, i. 190. 

— grease in the fist, to, i. 170. 

— groat, not worth a, iii. 230. 

— hand to fist, to set, i. 179. 

— hanged, go and be, ii. 557. 

— head, to break one's, ii. 312. 

— holes in one's coat, to pick, iii. 365. 

— holes in, to pick, i. 364; iii. 4, 222, 
368. 

— horn, to pluck in one's, ii. 414. 

— irons in the fire, ii. 418. 

— kick when falling, to, ii. 432. 

— lick spittle, to, i. 366 ; iii. 84. 

— long legs to, to make, i. 366. 

— nail, on the, ii. 331. 

— nose, with a bloody, iii. 130. 



Proverbs (continued) : — 

— pot, to go to, i. 144. 

— roast meat, to give, and beat with 
the spit, ii. 296. 

— rob Peter to pay Paul, to, i. 267. 

— saddle on the right horse, to set the, 
iii. 336. 

— sick turkey, a, ii. 17. 

— skin, to live in a whole, ii. 233. 

— thick and thin, to go through, i. 
348. 

— throat of, to cut the, iii. 218, 385. 

— tinker's scolding, a, iii. 428. 
Punishments : — 

■ — University, v. 164. 

— college, v. 169. 

— military, v. 205. 

— the birch at school, ii. 436. 

— degrading a clergyman, for a political 
offence, iii. 199, 339. 

— burning at the stake, iii. 258. 

— maiming, iii. 155 : mutilation (crop- 
ping ears), i. 358. 

— whipping, ii. 140; iii. 97, 153, 189, 
200. 

— the pillory, iii. 143, 153, 156-7, 
177-8, 189, 200, 305, 3I3-4. 325, 
328. 

— the stocks, i. 265, 299, 437, 457. 

— standing exposed to derision, ii. 248 ; 
iii. 153. 

— ducking scolds, ii. 67. 

— riding on the stang, iii. 513. 

— a private cudgelling, ii. 473, 548 ; 

iii. 241. 

— putting under the pump, iii. 97. 

— burning books, v. 208. 

Religious parties and terms : — 

— the Church : — 

— Apocrypha, the, i. 415. 

— Articles, the XXXIX, ii. 351, 537; 

iv. 137- • 

— Beast, number of the, ii. 87. 

— Bible, i. 47, 415; ii. 170, 258, 333, 
477; iv. 219; v. 154, 160. 

Biblia Polyglotta, 1657, J 8o. 

— bishops accused of Romanism, iii. 7. 

— canons, the, i. 364. 

— cathedral establishments, ii. 458. 

— Church papist, v. 3. 

— church used for school, iii. 401. 

— church, compulsion to attend, i. 353. 

— churches, 9000, in England, iii. 

— churchwardens, iii. 270. 

— clergy, attacks on, iii. 355. 

— contempt of the clergy, ii. 240, 242. 

— Common Prayer, book of, i. 364, 
426; ii. 148, 305; v. 154. 

left off in Puritan times, i. 163. 



INDEX IV. 

Religious parties, &c. : Common 

Prayer {continued) : — 
resumption of, 1660, i. 313, 319, 

323, 355, 357- 
growth of conformity to, i. 413; 

iii. 70, 116. 

suggested changes in, iii. 315. 

state prayers in, iii. 125, 177. 

special services, i. 318; iii. 2, 72, 

255, 404; iv. 69. 

— consecration of a bishop, v. 210: of 
a chapel, v. 210. 

— Convocation, house of, i. 327; iii. 

137, 3H-5. 

— customs, v. 210. 

— decorating a church with bays, iv. 
63. 

— divinity, practical, ii. 56. 

— divinity, senior doctors of, their 
authority in doctrine, iii. 60. 

— divorce, ii. 183. 

— Easter communion, iii. 173, 183, 
264. 

— episcopacy, pamphlets about, i. 20, 
5 1 - 

— first-fruits, ii. 397. 

— formulas, i. 21. 

— Friday, fish dinner on, iii. 408 : no 
dinner on, iii. 503. 

— Holy Thursday, i. 317 ; v. 210. 

— homilies, the, i. 364. 

— kneeling on entering church, i. 297 : 
to receive a blessing, i. 282. 

— Lent, observance of, dispensation 
from, i. 89 ; iv. 210. 

— licence, marriage by, iii. 79. 

— linen, church, i. 118. 

— Lord's Prayer, use of, i. 297, 367. 

— metropolitan, the, iii. 220. 

— nonjurors, v. 226-7. 

— ordinal, the, i. 327. 

— ordinations in Oxford, i. 388 ; iii. 
200, 268, 303. 

fee for, ii. 250. 

— Passion Sunday, iii. 215. 

— S. Paul, Conversion of, i. 508. 

— plate, church, i. 118. 

— practical divinity, ii. 56. 

— prayers, in pulpit, i. 367 : of beggars, 
ii. 212 : for the sick, iii. 125. 

— preaching, unlicensed, iii. 315. 
change of style of, i. 423. 

— prelatical party, the, i.e. churchmen, 
i. 298-9, 355, 357, 360-1, 366 ; ii. 
43i. 

— presbyterianize the Church, proposals 
to, 1643, i. 89. 

— Rogation days, v. 210. 

— saints' days, kept as holidays (by 
implication), i. 48 : Puritan dislike 
of, i. 1 74 : marked in calendars by 



MATTERS. 229 

Religious parties, &c. (continued) : — 
red letters, i. 508 ; compulsion to 
attend church on, i. 5 1 1 : precedence 
of, iii. 90. 

— Sunday, observance of, i. 356, 359; 

ii. 280, 396, 463, 553 : neglect of, 

iii. 380 : coffee-houses open on, ii. 
396. 

— supremacy, the, v. 3, 17. 

— surplice, Puritan hostility to, i. 356, 
35 8 -9> 38o, 4° 6 , 4 66 5 »• 5°5 5 "i- 
5H- 

resumption of, i. 347, 355, 357. 

— surplice days, i. 511. 

— Whitsunday, iii. 20. 

— Greek Church, i. 154-5, 282-3; ii. 
185, 379 5 iii- J 43, 156; v. 83, 105. 

patriarch, i. 282-3. 

— Romanist Church : — 

■ — Romanists resident in Oxford, v. 126. 
private chapels in Oxford, ii. 49, 

59, 68 ; iii. 182, 224, 275. 
chapels at Christ Church, v. 174: 

Magd. coll., v. 185 : Univ. coll., v. 197. 

— Romanist gentry in Oxfordshire, 
v. 132. 

— Romanists in London, ii. 422 ; iii. 
164, 340. 

— popish recusants, ii. 422, 436, 439. 

— concealed Romanists, ii. 275-6, 346, 
421-2, 439-40; iii. 182, 214; v. 3. 

— converts to Romanism, in Oxford, 

ii. 269-70, 275-6, 389-90, 427, 431 ; 

iii. 176-7, 182-6, 213-4. 

elsewhere, i. 276; ii. 169, 219, 

221, 405, 419, 423, 427; iii. 2, 26, 

73, I9 1 * 4°7- 

— converts from Romanism, ii. 270-1, 
327-S, 337-8, 342, 394, 4 2 8; iiL 
266, 313. 

— English Romanists in foreign service 
or in foreign convents, ii. 72 ; iii. 98- 
101. 

English college at Rome, ii. 182. 

— Romanist books, i. 21 ; ii. 181, 183, 
227, 235, 247, 252-3, 273, 321, 333, 
34 2 , 449, 475, 5io, 550, 562; iii. 
34, io 5, 131, 164-5, J 8i, 246; v. 
52, 73- 

with the imprint ' Paris/ to escape 

the censorship of the press, ii. 252, 
464. 

almanac, i. 13; iii. 131, 176. 

— anti-Romanist books, i. 21, 77, 21 i s 
486; ii. 166, 185, 333, 428-9, 431, 
475, 5 6 2 ; iii. 32, 246, 293-4. 

— dress of a Romanist bishop, iii. 172, 
271. 

— Romanist schoolmasters, i. 194 ; iii. 
124, 313. 

— 1640: up to this date Romanists 



2 3 0 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Religious parties, &c, Romanist 
church (continued) : — 
came to Oxford University, after- 
wards they were educated abroad, 
i. 301, 419, 465. 

— 1641-2, the Romanists take Charles 
I's side, i. 317 : and are consequently 
harassed and slandered by Parlia- 
mentary partisans, i. 63, 77. 

— 1 660 onwards, are allowed to frequent 
Oxford, i. 360, 486 ; ii. 93. 

— 1666 onwards, appear more boldly 
in public, ii. 93, 125, 185, 428. 

— 1669, the Jesuits are active in 
England, ii. 181-2 : Charles II is 
expected to repeal the penal laws, ii. 
170, 182. 

— 1673-4, agitation against Romanism, 
ending in the Test Act, ii. 166, 227-8, 
259, 274, 276, 279, 281. 

— 1678-9, general unpopularity of 
Romanists, ii. 439-40, 468, 473; iii. 
157 : and persecution, because of 1 the 
Popish plot,' v. 227. 

— 1680, continued agitation against 
Romanism, ii. 504-5. 

— 1685, outburst of Romanist activity 
on the accession of James II, v. 51 : 
a Romanist committee in London 
planning the Romanizing of England, 
iii. 172, 176. 

— 1685-6, consequent agitation against 
Romanism, iii. 116, 137, 169, 183. 

— 1686-7, attempt to Romanize Oxford, 
v. 51-2, 72-3. 

— 1688, persecution of Romanists, iii. 
284-7. 

— 1689, expulsion of Oxford Romanists, 
iii. 291, 297-8. 

— abstinence from flesh, iii. 273 ; v. 3, 

— baptizing bells, i. 184-5. 

— beads, i. 339, 346. 

— bishop in partibus, iii. 264. 

— titular bishop, iii. 262, 266. 

— breviaries, iii. 90. 

— Church papist, v. 3 : strong papist, 
v. 4- 

— confession, i. 339 ; ii. 435. 

— crosier of an abbess, i. 344. 

— dead, prayers for the, i. 220, 272, 
408-9; ii. 367,406-7; iii. 232. 

— Friday, fish dinner, ii. 191. 

— holy water, i. 140, 346. 

— indulgences, ii. 181. 

— Lent, observance of, ii. 341, 401, 
403. 

— lights, i. 342 : tapers, holding lighted, 
iii. 264, 270. 

— mass, iii. 517. 

— penance, doctrine of, ii. 488, 491. 



Religious parties, &c, Romanist 
church (continued) : — 

— preachers, iii. 238. 

— procession with tapers, iii. 266. 

— purgatory, doctrine of, i. 140; ii. 
491 ; iii. 138, 267. 

— saints' days, i. 174; iii. 91; v. 
11. 

— souls, prayers for, ii. 212, 409. 

— transubstantiation, iii. 138. 

— unction, of a king, i. 399. 

— unction, extreme, ii. 185, 226; iii. 

459- 

— Augustinians (canons regular), ii. 
343 ; iv. 118. 

— Austin friars, iv. 120. 

— Benedictines, i. 194, 279; ii. 225-7, 

321, 333, 342, 392, 453, 464. 545, 
554, 562; iii. 266, 344; iv. 105, 
1 1 8-9, 296. 

— Benedictine nuns, i. 344. 

— Black canons, i. 223. 

— Black friars, i. 223. 

— Canons Regular, ii. 343 ; iv. 118. 

— Carmelite friars, iv. 120, 240, 253, 
257, 278, 308; Carmes, iii. 256. 

— Carthusians, iii. 264, 343, 369; iv. 
119, 161. 

— Cistercians, ii. 381; iv. 119, 202, 
296. 

— Dominicans, ii. 423 ; iii. 460. 

— Franciscans, i. 193-4; ii. 203, 230, 
271 : see Minorites. 

— Grey friars, iv. 119 : see Minorites. 

— Jesuits, i. 22, 190, 194, 226, 458, 
486 ; ii. 181-3, 269, 334, 337, 426-7, 
435, 444, 45o» 457, 461, 464. 467, 
545, 55° 5 m - 96, 100, 142, 200, 215, 
222, 236-7, 257, 260, 265-6, 276, 
285, 293, 298, 328, 331, 378, 386. 

— Knights Templars, i. 272, 286, 386, 
403 ; iii. 343 ; iv. 109. 

— Mendicant friars, iv. 121, 302. 

— Minorite friars, ii. 203 ; iv. 240, 
268-9, 2 9^ : see Franciscans, Grey 
friars. 

— Poenitentiarian friars, ii. 336. 

— Preaching friars, iv. 207 : see Domi- 
nicans. 

— Secular priests, i. 22. 

— seminary = a seminary priest, iii. 
162. 

— White friars, iv. 120 : see Carmelites. 

— the Lutheran Church, i. 472 ; ii. 
200, 497. 

— the Dutch Church, ii. 112 ; iii. 
316. 

— Protestant sects : — 

— Anabaptists, i. 194, 279-80, 293-4, 
29 6 , 302, 364, 379, 404 ; ii. 240, 244, 
4*7, 53i; iii- 36, 58-9, J 9*- 



INDEX IV. 

Religious parties, &c. {continued} : — 

— Anti-sabbatarian, i. 353. 

— Calvinists, i. 364 ; ii. 448. 

— conventicles, v. 239. 

— Covenant, the, i. 363, 400 ; ii. 50, 
61, 484, 507; iii. 63: Covenanteer, 
a, ii. 429, 507. 

— dissenters, ii. 500, 535; iii. 70, 190-1, 
315. 378. 

— fanatics, phanatics, the Tory and 
High-church name for the anti-court 
and Low -church or nonconformist 
party, i. 303, 317, 363, 379, 388, 465, 
500,510; ii. i, 166, 184, 212, 217, 
237, 244, 263, 332, 335, 416, 489, 
500, 504-5, 514, 565 ; iii. 35, 72, 80, 
136-7, 142, 157, 177; iv. 26. 

fanatical, i. 301, 312, 406, 477; 

iii. 2, 19, 58, 142, 396, 489. 

— Huguenots, used of English Protes- 
tants, ii. 437 : of French, v. 86. 

— Independents, i. 130, 147-9, x ^7> 
268, 296, 298, 301, 319, 328, 356-7, 
359, 363-4, 368-70, 435, 499; ii. 
240, 244, 431, 488, 536; iii. 224, 
379, 39 6 - 

— Lollards, ii. 437-8; iv. 257, 300, 
308. 

— Nonconformists, i. 248, 453 ; ii. 196, 
53 6 , 55 2 J iii- 33, 36, 9 1 , ^o, 164, 
448. 

— Nonconformist funerals, v. 217. 
nonconforming, iii. 23. 

— phanatics, see fanatics. 

— Precisians, ii. 192. 

— Presbyterians, i. 20, 130, 147-9, 167, 
234, 268, 279, 293, 296, 298, 301, 
31 2, 319, 328, 355-8, 363-4, 368-70, 

384, 4°5, 4 2 3> 435, 481 ; ii. 274, 
346, 416, 419, 429, 431, 453, 457-8, 
468, 472, 489, 500, 504, 507, 514, 
533, 55 s ; iii- 22 4, 2 39> 299-300, 
3°3, 393, 396, 399- 

Presbyterian ' meetings,' i. 297, 

300, 326 : the ' morning exercise,' iii. 
224. 

— Puritans, ii. 50, 196, 237. 

Puritan customs : — 

standing at prayer, i. 300. 

singing metrical psalms, i. 49, 

356, 359- 

taking notes of sermons, i. 

356, 359- 

repetition of sermons, i. 49, 

359- 

omission of ' saint,' i. 297. 

omission of the Lord's Prayer, 

i. 297, 300, 367. 
tale-bearing, i. 296-9, 366, 

37o. 

— Quakers, i. 12, 16, 18, 20, 190-1, 



MATTERS. 231 

Religious parties, &c. {continued) : — 
280, 293 ; ii. 145, 394, 463 ; iii. 233, 
308-9, 374, 437, 440, 461, 476. 

— sectaries, i. 20, 364. 

— Isms : — 

— Arianism, i. 454. 

— Arminianism, i. 300, 370, 445, 465 ; 

ii. 96, 258, 364. 

— Atheism, i. 257, 301, 355 ; ii. 91, 
96, 116, 125, 339, 379-80, 492, 559 ; 

iii. 3. 

— Brownism, iii. 343. 

— Calvinism, i. 364; ii. 448 ; iii. 453. 

— Familism, family of love, i. 248. 

— Latitudinarianism, i. 355, 452; iii. 
474- 

— Millenarianism, iii. 453-4. 

— Muggletonians, ii. 301. 

— Pelagianism, ii. 97, 168, 312. 

— Quietism, iii. 307, 440. 

— Separatist, i. 248. 

— Socinianism, ii. 97, 166, 316; iii. 
338,427-8, 440, 452,475. 

— Jews, i. 353, 407, 422 ; v. 85. 
Romans, the, i. 223, 226, 461 ; ii. 241, 

347; iii. 56. 

— coins, v. 210. 

— inscriptions, ii. 162, 303 ; iv. 69. 

— urns, i. 264. 

Schools in England : — 

— Wood's collections about, i. 246 ; iv. 

237- 

— Christopher Wase's collections about, 
i. 321 ; ii. 268. 

— private, ii. 245, 380, 477; iii. 175, 
22 5> 2 53, 4 r 7 : presbyterian, ii. 235; 
iii. 247: Romanist, i. 194; iii. 124, 
3*3- 

— Abingdon, Berks, iii. 480. 

— Ashford, Kent, iii. 401. 

— Barton-Kirk, Westmor., i. 237. 

— Bath, Som., ii. 409. 

— Charlbury, Oxon, i. 267 ; ii. 280. 

— Croydon, Surrey, ii. 333. 

— Denton (?), iii. 30. 

— Dorchester, Oxon, v. 134. 

— Eton, Bucks, v. 95. 

— Feversham, Kent, iii. 343. 

— Grantham, Lines, iii. 122. 

— Hastings, ii. 417. 

— Kingston-on-Thames, Surr., iii. 385. 

— Leicester, i. 108; ii. 116. 

— London : Merchant Tailors', v. 107. 
Westminster, v. 109. 

— Martock, Som., ii. 284. 

— Northleach, Glouc, ii. 543. 

— Oxford : Christ Church choir, i. 358. 

Magdalen college school, v. 186. 

New college school, v. 192. 

Nixon's school, v. 121. 



2 3 2 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Schools in England {continued) : — 

— Steejple-Aston, Oxon, i. 145. 

— Strixton, Nortliis, iii. 453. 

— Taunton, Som., iii. 26. 

— Thame, Oxon, v. 136. 

— Tunbridge, Kent, ii. 232. 

— Westminster, v. 109. 

— Winchester, v. 101. 

— Woodstock, Oxon,i. 320-1 ; iii. 85. 

— Worcester, i. 136, 166. 
Sermons : — 

— University, v. 119-20, 154. 
Assize, v. 120. 

Gunpowder, v. 49. 

Fast, v. 120. 

Thanksgiving, i. 102 ; v. 120. 

Latin, v. 1 20. 

— before the king, i. 102, 411, 437, 
495; ii. 58, 297-8, 515, 522, 531-2 ; 
iii. 181, 186, 232, 237-8, 327. 

at Whitehall, iii. 132, 215. 

before court during Lent, ii. 439. 

— before Parliament, v. 224-5. 

— at consecration of a bishop, v. 210 : 
of a chapel, iii. 449. 

— at an ordination, iii. 303. 

— at a feast, v. 126. 

— at funerals, v. 217. 

— annual, in parish churches, ii. 401. 

— endowments for, in parish churches, 

ii. 543- . 

— repetition of, in the University, v. 120. 
in Puritan families, i. 49, 359. 

— printed sermons : — 

in vogue after the Restoration, 

ousting substantial treatises on Divi- 
nity, i. 297, 301 ; ii. 87. 

fall in price of, ii. 430. 

collections of, ii. 175, 565. 

dodge to sell, iii. 180. 

— abundance of, in Puritan times, i. 
2 97> 3oo, 353-7, 360-1. 

length, i. 300, and violence of 

Puritan sermons, i. 292-3. 
week-day courses, i. 356, 359-60, 

445- 

— ■ — practice of taking notes of the 
sermon, i. 356, 359. 

— memoriter preaching, ii. 298; iii. 
237-8. 

— ■ preaching old sermons, ii. 48 ; iii. 
442. 

— ■ on Arminian-Calvinist points for- 
bidden, i. 371 ; ii. 66, 258, 448 ; v. 
30. 

— bitterness of political expressions in, 
i. 368-70; iii. 35, 72, 143, 442. 

— bitterness of anti-Romanist polemics, 

iii. 116, 169, 193. 

— personalities in, i. 502 ; ii. 108, 522 ; 
iii. 368. 



Sermons {continued) : — 

— bombastic, ii. 212. 

— heresy-procedure, v. 154. 
Speeches : — 

— University, v. 154-5. 

by the Vice-chancellor, v. 144, 151. 

by the Proctors, v. 147. 

by those presenting to degrees, 

v. H7. H9- 
by the Terrae-fdii ', v. 1 50-1. 

— University : on occasions of welcom- 
ing visitors : — 

by the Vice-chancellor, v. 144. 

by the Senior Proctor, v. 147. 

by Bodley's librarian, v. 159. 

by the Public Orator, v. 147. 

— college, v. 167. 

— City, by the mayor, v. 1 24. 
by the recorder, v. 125. 

— funeral, v. 217. 

— gallows, v. 21 1. 

— memorial : — 

Bodleian oration, v. 28. 

Harveian oration, ii. 350. 

in memory of John Fell, iii. 

460. 

— in Arabic, iii. 17-8 : in Dutch, ii. 
208: in German, ii. 158: in Greek, 

i. 282-3 : in Italian, iii. 50. 

— in English, v. 125, 147 : in Latin, v. 
147, 219 : 'music,' v. 149. 

— learnt by heart, iii. 141, 210. 

Taxes, iv. 218. 

— pamphlets about, i. 21. 

— University privilege in respect of, iv. 
15 ; v. 164. 

— under Charles I : — 

knighthood-money, i. 79. 

ship-money, i. 16. 

excise, i. 112. 

— under Charles II, ii. 397, 403. 
chimney-money, imposed 1662, 

2s. a year for each hearth, i. 398, 431, 
433 5 ii- 61-2, 86, 95, 397 5 * v - 69. 
— Wood paid it for his attic, 

ii. 1. 

poll-tax [imposed 1666, ii. 89, 

and again 1678, ii. 401, is. a head by 
each subject, ii. 89 ; a 1 gentleman ' 
to pay £1 in addition, ii. 89 ; and a 
doctor in any faculty £5 in addition, 
ii. 89, 402], ii. 89, 95, 103, 401-3, 
408 ; iv. 15. 

Wood, most reluctantly, had 

to write himself ' gentleman ' for this 
purpose, ii. 89, 103. 

— — one per cent, duty on income, 
mentioned in 1666, ii. 89 ; iv. 69. 

a general quarterly tax, mentioned 

in 1674, ii. 283. 



INDEX IV. MATTERS. 



2 33 



Taxes : under Charles II (cont.) : — 
income-tax, a tax on salaries, 

mentioned in 1678, ii. 403. 

excise, i. 201 ; ii. 397, 404. 

poor-rate, mentioned in 1678, ii. 

43°- 

— under James II, iii. 388. 

licences, iii. 190. 

chimney-money, iii. 191. 

— under William III, ii. 103 ; iii. 
350 : complaints of their heaviness, iii. 
3*9> 34 8 > 4 l 5', iv. 9, 27. 

poll-tax : 1689, Wood paid as a 

gentleman, iii. 319; 1692-3, exacted 
quarterly, iii. 386-8, 395, 414; iv. 
15. 2 7- 

— — — Wood escaped the ' gentle- 
man ' part, 1690, iii. 332 ; and 1694, 
iii. 467, 474. 

one-half per cent, on incomes, 

1689, iii. 319. 
one per cent, and more on incomes, 

1693, iii. 418, 423, 437 : and again, 

1694, iii. 445. In 1693-4 this was 
doubled to nonjurors, iii. 445 ; iv. 
25> 27. 

five per cent, property or land 

tax, iii. 319, 380. 

chimney-money, iii. 423. 

— ■ — tax on bachelors, mentioned 1695, 

iii. 490. 

stamp-duty, mentioned 1695, iv. 

85- 

Thanksgivings : — 

— special forms of prayer were issued for 
Church services for the thanksgivings 
appointed from time to time, i. 87, 
318; iii. 255,404: as also for the annual 
court thanksgiving days, v. 36, 53-4, 

— at these thanksgiving services an 
anthem was often sung, i. 87 ; v. 118. 

— there was a University sermon in the 
forenoon, v. 120. 

— the popular acts of celebration 
were — 

bell-ringing, v. 206. 

bonfires, v. 206. 

fireworks, first mentioned 1686, 

iii. 1 79, 406 : crackers, first men- 
tioned 1685, iii. 129 (' crackes'), 406 : 
squibs, first mentioned as used at 
thanksgivings in 1693, iii. 434 (but 
mentioned in 1666, ii. 86). 

firing off guns, i. 399; iii. 129, 

271. 

illuminations, v. 218. 

— occasions of: — 

— Charles I : — 

1642, for Edgehill, i. 87. 

1643, for victories, i. 87, 102. 



Thanksgivings : occasions of {con- 
tinued) : — 

— commonwealth : — 
1649, i. 158. 

— Charles II :— 

1660, for the king's return, i. 

318; iv. 64. 

1665, f° r victory, ii. 40. 

1666, for abating of the plague, 

ii. 84. 

1683, for failure of the Rye- 
house plot, iii. 72. 

— James II, v. 51, 55, 120. 

— William III, v. 76, 120. 
Tobacco, use of: — 

— pamphlets about, i. 21, 168, 201, 
430- 

— not expected in a freshman, i. 139. 

— to drug liquors, i. 179. 

■ — possibly begun by Wood, aetat. 27, 

i. 284. 

in 1 66 1 bought by Wood at 8d. 

an oz., i. 416 : later purchases, ii. 30, 
184; iii. 353. 

Wood's tobacco-box, first men- 
tioned 1666, ii. 74, 144. 

— in college rooms, 1650 onwards, fre- 
quently with an implied disparage- 
ment, i. 298, 455 ; ii. 25, 446, 448 ; 

iii. 191, 328, 354-5. 

— in common-room, v. 189. 

— part of an entertainment, ii. 437 ; iii. 
492. 

— the after-dinner pipe, ii. 242. 

— pipes, iii. 447 ; v. 189. 

Weather, Oxford notes of the : — 
1633, Apr., great drought, ii. 106. 
1639, Dec., great gale, ii. 214; iv. 
73- 

1658, Aug., great gale, i. 258-9. 

1659, J m Y> drought, plague of flies, and 
great gale, i. 279-80. 

1660, Dec, thunderstorm, i. 350. 

1661, Jan., Apr., May, a flood each 
month, i. 401. 

1662, Feb., great gale, i. 431-3- 

1663, May, great rain, i. 474 ; ii. 279. 

— July, great rain, i. 479, 483. 

1664, May, great hail, and great heat, 

ii. 13. 

1665, great floods, and great frosts, ii. 
24, 54- 

1666, Feb.-Mar., great drought, ii. 74. 

— summer, great drought, ii. 82, 95. 

— autumn, abundant harvest, ii. 82, 86. 

— Sept. , great gale, ii. 88. 

— winter, great rain, ii. 95. 

1667, March, great east winds, and 
heavy snow, ii. 102-3, I2 8. 

— Apr., great drought, ii. 105. 



2 34 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Weather: 1667 {continued) : — 

— July, great heat, and great drought, 
ii. 1 1 5, 

— Sept., great thunderstorm, and great 
rains, ii. 118. 

— Nov., fog, ii. 120 : and heavy snow, 
ii. i2i. 

1668, Jan., dry weather, ii. 127. 

— Feb., a forward spring, ii. 128-9. 

— March, dry weather, ii. 132. 

— May-June, great rains and flood, ii. 

i-H-5* J 3 8 - 

— Nov.-Dec. , great rains and flood, ii. 
146. 

1669, J an »j severe frost, ii. 149. 

— March, severe frost and snow, ii. 152. 

— Sept., drought, ii. 170-1. 

— Nov., thunder, ii. 176. 

— Dec, great frost, ii. 178, 187. 

1670, Jan., great gale, ii. 184. 

— Jan.-Feb., frost and snow, ii. 184, 
187. 

— Apr., rain and flood, ii. 190. 

— July, good fruit year, ii. 198. 

— Oct., thunder, ii. 203. 

— Dec, lightning, ii. 211. 

1671, July, plague of flies, ii. 228. 

— Oct., heavy rains, ii. 231. 

— Dec, hard winter, ii. 238. 

1672, Aug.-Oct., great rains: ruined 
harvest : epidemic, ii. 249-54. 

— Dec, hot weather, rains, floods, ii. 
255. 

1673, June, great flood, ii. 265. 

1674, Jan., heavy snow, and great flood, 
ii. 279. 

— Feb.-Mar., great frost and snows, ii. 
282-3. 

— May-June, great drought, ii. 288. 

— Sept., fine weather, ii. 295. 

1675, Jan., mild weather, ii. 307. 

— spring and summer, cold and wet, ii. 
317- 

— autumn and winter, great drought, 
»• 33i- 

1676, Jan., heavy snow and rain, floods, 
»• 331- 

— Feb., mild weather, ii. 340. 

— spring and summer, great drought, 
but good harvest, ii. 355. 

— Nov.-Dec, great frost, ii. 355, 359, 

363* 365- 

1677, Jan., heavy rains, ii. 365. 

— Feb., frost and snow, ii. 365. 

— March, heavy snow, ii. 371. 

— May, great rains, ii. 375. 

— Aug., rains, ii. 385. 

— Sept.-Oct., great heat, ii. 389, 391. 

— Nov., frost, ii. 394. 

— Dec, rain, and flood, ii. 395 : and 
fog, ii. 397. 



Weather {continued) : — 

1678, Jan., great rains, and flood, ii. 
399- 

— Jan.-Feb., thunderstorms, ii. 400-1. 

— July, drought, ii. 412 ; and frost, ii. 
414. 

— Aug.-Sept., great heat and drought, 
ii. 415. 

— Nov., thick fog, ii. 423. 

— Dec, frost and drought, ii. 426, 449. 

1679, Jan.-Feb., great cold and severe 
frost, ii. 432-3, 439. 

— Feb.-March, severe frost and dry 
weather, ii. 433, 439, 444, 449. 

— Apr., drought, ii. 449-50, 452. 

— May-Aug., great heat, ii. 457. 

— June, heavy rains, ii. 452. 

— Aug.-Oct., heavy rains : ruined har- 
vest : floods, ii. 457, 462, 464, 467. 

— Nov., hot, sultry weather : epidemic, 

ii. 470. 

— Dec, great cold, ii. 473-4 : flood, ii. 
474- 

1680, May, thunder and hailstorms, ii. 
486 : wet weather and flood, ii. 487. 

— June, great heat, ii. 489. 

— July, heavy rain, ii. 492. 

— Nov., flood, ii. 501. 

— Nov.-Dec, prolonged frost, ii. 504-5. 

1 68 1, Apr.-May, great heat and drought, 
ii- 538. 

— Oct., wet weather, ii. 558. 

— Nov.-Dec. init., dry, and mild 
weather, ii. 558 ; iii. 3. 

— Dec, floods, ii. 562. 

1682, Jan., mild weather, ii. 558; iii. 3. 

— Feb., severe frost, iii. 3 : followed by 
great rains and flood, iii. 7. 

— Apr.-May, great rains and floods, 

iii. 13. 

— May, great gale, iii. 13, 17. 

— Sept., fine weather, iii. 27. 

— Oct., wet and cold, iii. 27. 

— Dec, flood, iii. 34: a mild winter, 
iii. 81. 

1683, May, rains and flood, iii. 45, 56. 

— Dec, heavy snow and great frost, iii. 
88, 105. 

1684, Jan.-Feb., great frost, iii. 86, 88, 
105. 

1685, Jan., great cold, iii. 123. 

— Feb.-Mar., drought, iii. 135-6, 174. 

— May-June, drought and water- 
famine, iii. 143-4. 

— Aug.-Sept., water-famine, iii. 156, 
163. 

— Dec, heavy rains, iii. 172, 176: 'a 
green Yule ' and its result, iii. 1 73, 
180. 

1686, Feb., a forward spring, iii. 180. 

— Apr.-May, heavy rains, iii. 184. 



INDEX IV. 

Weather : 1686 {continued') : — 

— May, lightning, iii. 185. 

— May-June, alternate great cold and 
great heat, iii. 187-8. 

— Dec., flood, iii. 200. 

1687, Jan.-Feb., dry weather, iii. 208, 
214. 

— May, great wind, iii. 219. 

— Sept., wet weather, iii. 225. 

— Oct.-Nov., rains, and floods, iii. 240, 
242, 244. 

1688, Apr., heavy snow, iii. 263. 

— Dec, severe frost, iii. 291. 

1689, Mar., great gale, iii. 300. 

— Mar. -Apr., great rains and flood, 
iii. 301. 

— May, extreme heat, followed by cold, 
iii. 303. 

— Dec, great rains, iii. 320. 

1690, Jan., great gale, iii. 321. 

— Feb.-Mar., cold and dry weather: a 
backward spring, iii. 329. 

— Aug., great thunder, iii. 337. 
1692, Jan.-Feb., frost, iii. 381. 

— Apr., cold and wet weather : a back- 
ward spring, iii. 388. 



MATTERS. 235 

Weather: 1692 (continued): — 

— June, great rains, iii. 391. 

— Aug., wet and frost, iii. 397. 

— Sept., exceptional cold, iii. 402-3. 

— Sept.-Oct., drought, iii. 404-5. 

— Dec, great gales, iii. 41 1-2. 

1693, Feb., heavy snow, iii. 417. 

— Apr., great rains, iii. 421. 

— Aug., great rains, iii. 431. 

— Oct., great heat, iii. 432 : followed 
by wet, iii. 432-3. 

1694, Aug., great rains : ruined harvest, 
iii. 463. 

— Sept., great gale, iii. 467 : followed 
by drought, iii. 471. 

— Oct., snow, iii. 470-1. 

1695, Jan.-March, severe frost and heavy 
snow, iii. 475-6, 478, 481. 

— Apr., exceptional cold : no spring, 
iii. 483. 

— May, cold : wet : floods, iii. 484. 

— June, wet weather, iii. 486. 

— Oct., thick fogs, iii. 493. 
1854-5, great frost, ii. 364. 
1 89 1, great frost, ii. 363-4. 



INDEX V 



WORDS 



A little space may be reasonably claimed for some words and spellings charac- 
teristic of Wood's writing, and for a few minor subjects which have not found 
a place in the preceding index. 



a = I, i. 381. 

a = on, a horsback, i. 381 : a foot, i. 

abbatiss = abbess, ii. 301. 
A.b.cdarian, i.e. an infant teacher, ii. 
284. 

abduction, iii. 33, 223 : death penalty 

for, iii. 348. 
abscond oneself, to, i. 194. 
Absolution Saturday, i. 149. 
academian, i. 140 ; ii. 550. 
academy = university, i. 291-2. 
accidence = Latin grammar, i. 47. 
accidently = by accident, ii. 185. 
achivement, iii. 216, 429 : anchivement, 

i. 445. 

acquittance, iii. 114, 138, 197. 
acrostic, ii. 179. 
act-book, iv. 210. 
affableness, iii. 263. 
affray ed, to be, iv. 123. 
affrighten, to, ii. 86. 
affrightment, i. 114. 
aglet, i. 491. 
ally = kindred, i. 246. 
Amazon, an, iii. 347; woman person- 
ating man, iii. 460. 
ambigue, iii. 236, 495. 
ambulatory, ii. 529. 
amove, to, iii. 527. 

anagram, i. 131, 154; ii. 179, 284,361, 

473; iv. 169. 
anatomized, to be, i. 165, 250 ; iii. 311. 
anticks = stone grotesques, iv. 75. 
antient, auntient = flag, i. 55, 66, 82. 
antient = elderly, i. 446. 
antimonarchist, i. 258: antimonarchical, 

iii. 69. 

antipodes to, to go, i. 356. 



apage, iii. 136. 
apes, i. 367. 

apoditery = vestry, iii. 224; v. 156. 

apoplectical, iii. 125. 

apoplexity = apoplexy, ii. 9. 

apothegm, i. 133. 

apparitions, i. 17, 349 ; ii. 4, 55. 

appearance = apparition, ii. 4. 

appertenent, an, i. 311. 

apprentice, binding out, ii. 373 ; v. 126. 

apricots, ii. 54. 

aqua fortis, i. 228. 

archery, i. 59 ; ii. 226 ; v. 204. 

area = clear space in the middle of a 

room, iii. 23, 495. 
arras, i. 477. 
arsenic, ii. 420. 
articled against, to be, ii. 48. 
ascent, in a pedigree, v. 19. 
ashen-keys, ii. 355. 
assasianate, an, iii. 58. 
astrology, i. 227, 309 ; ii. 87, 543; v. 

12. 

Atlas, the (i.e. Moses Pit's, ii. 489), 
iii. 27. 

attilery = artillery, ii. 466. 

auditory, i. 257, 293 ; iii. 219. 

aulary, i. 243 ; iv. 169 : aularians, iii. 

authentic = authoritative, i. 445; iv. 130. 
auxilary = of the militia, i. 414, 494, 
499- 

avouch, to, ii. 443. 

awry upon, to look, i. 364. 

back-friend, ii. 9, 10. 

balcony, i. 476 ; ii. 213, 270, 335, 467 ; 

iii. 228 : the first in England, ii. 185. 
ballace= ballast, iii. 288. 



INDEX K 

bannimus, a, i. 488; ii. 351 ; iii. 68, 96, 
107. 

bantering, 1676, ii. 332, 334, 364, 371, 

429 ; banterers, ii. 419, 436. 
barges, on Thames at London, iii. 290. 
barley, ii. 538. 
barrows, ii. 284. 
bastinado, to, i. 139. 
bate, to = hold back, i. 464 ; ii. 450. 
battalia, i. 139. 

battells, iii. 08 : Wood generally spells 
'battles,' i. 215, 222, 231,238,258; 
iii. 120. 

baubles, iii. 184. 

bays, iii. 88. 

beans, ii. 520. 

beard, affected by Puritans, i. 333. 

— affected by Greek church, i. 282 ; 

iii. 156. 

beast, a, ii. 138 ; iii. 143, 195, 352. 
beauties, Oxford, ii. 244 ; iii. 165, ? 354. 

— London, iii. ? 354, 466. 
beech poles, iv. 54. 

beggars, i. 166, 466 ; ii. 152, 212, 399. 

— licence [to Oxford students] to beg, 

iv. 210, 308. 

beheading, mode of, i. 153: see Rox- 

burghe Ballads, vii. frontispiece, 
behind = past, ii. 279. 
bejant, ii. 5. 
Bellarmine, a, ii. 399. 
bellferry = belfry, iv. 63. 
beseated, ii. 534. 
bespatter, iii. 385. 
bet, iii. 62 : see wager, 
bibbing, adj., i. 369 ; ii. 180. 

— noun, i. 455 ; ii. 448. 
Bibliotheca, the title Wood intended to 

give his biographical work, called 

afterwards Athenae Oxon., iii. 82. 
Bibliotheca Politica, James Tyrrell's, 

iii. 397-8. 
birds, flight of, iii. 331. 
bishop-elect, ii. 252, 316, 521. 
blab, to, ii. 343. 
Black Assizes, ii. 104. 
blacken, to, iii. 408. 
black-pot-men, the, ii. 460. 
blacks = mutes at a funeral, iii. 98. 
blade, a=man, ii. ill, 150. 
blankets, i. 505 ; ii. 165 ; iii. 239. 
blazing star, 1577, ii. 56 ; 1664, ii. 24- 

5, 53 ; 1668, ii. 131 ; 1680, ii. 503 ; 

1682, iii. 25; 1688, iii. 281; 1692, 

iii. 403 : see comet, 
blind, to = conceal, i. 262. 
blind alehouse, a, i. 358. 
blind preacher, a, ii. 244, 551. 
blink-eyed, ii. 467. 
blinking, iii. 236. 
blocks, in a library, iii. 178. 



WORDS. 237 

blocks, in the streets, i. 490 ; ii. 515. 

blooded, ii. 143. 

blood- hounds, i. 140. 

bloodiness, iii. 281. 

Bloody Assizes, the, iii. 299. 

blunderbuss, iii. 5. 

boar's head, the, i. 351-2. 

bobs, ii. 473. 

body = nave, i. 472. 

body = person, iii. 33. 

bole, of a hat, i. 112. 

bombast, ii. 212. 

bonny, ii. 527. 

boon, i. 161, 298-9, 316 ; ii. 1 1 1. 

boones = gifts, iii. 120. 

boot, of a coach, ii. 155. 

bordure, a = border, ii. 213: bordure, 

to, iii. 55. 
bottom, a, iii. 122. 
bow, of a key, iv. 124. 
box-arbours, i. 270. 
braggadocio, ii. 452. 
brags, to make, i. 283. 
brains, to break one's, i. 465. 
breeder, i. 440. 

bribery, for places in Crown influence- 
iii. 208. 

bridge-bone, iii. 109. 

bridle, a newly invented, iii. 297. 

brief, i. 401, 463 ; ii. 205, 317. 

brief, a = short account, ii. 292. 

brown-bill, a, iv. 59. 

bruit, i. 54, 63, 65. 

brutish, i. 492. 

budge, i. 491. 

buffoon, i. 175 ; iii. 120. 

buffooning, i. 172, 510; ii. 240: buf- 
foonery, ii. 348, 472. 

bulk, a, i. 359 ; ii. 383. 

bull = jest, i. 133. 

bull-maker, a, iii. 1 20. 

bulls, papal, iv. 118, 120-1, 152, 174 
I79> '95- 

burning-glass, vitrum ustorium, ii. 318. 

' busiee,' a, iii. 218. 

busy-man, a = busybody, i. 471. 

' button-hole,' a, i. 414. 

buzz, to, i. 395. 

by-blow, a, iii. 189. 

by-place, a, ii. 113. 

by-room, a, ii. 114. 

by the by = casually, ii. 272. 

cabal = a secret meeting, i. 194, 227 

iii. 172, 176, 363. 
cabins, iv. 217. 
cajole, to,i. 291. 
calash, a, iii. 290. 
calculator, ii. 443. 
call all to naught, to, i. 507. 
Calvinistical, iv. 258. 



2 3 8 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



cambred = climbed, iii. 453. 
camomile, iii. 230. 

camps, ancient, i. 419; ii. 283 ; iii. 
461. 

candlestick of lead, ii. 24. 

canonist, iii. J 09. 

canton (window), i. 403 ; iii. 208. 

canvass, to have the, = to be ' at the 

bottom of the poll,' ii. 461 ; iii. 171 : 

so also ' to receive the canvass,' ii. 

439 : and ' to be canvassed,' ii. 516. 
capacitate, to, iii. 35. 
cap a pee, iii. 62. 
capricio, a, ii. 538. 
carbineers = carbines, iii. 271. 
cards, ' Plot,' ii. 468. 
career, ii. 432, 434. 
caroche, a, ii. 144. 
carouse, to, ii. 527. 
carrier-pigeons, 1695, iii. 489. 
carriers = bearers at a funeral, ii. 280. 
carrots, i. 259 ; ii. 139. 
carry one off, to, ii. 448. 
carting a strumpet, iv. 63. 
cashier, to = to disinherit, iii. 352 : to 

dismiss from the service, i. 166, 194, 

302 : =to set aside, ii. 395. 
cashier = treasurer, iii. 353. 
cassock, i. 149, 297, 366'; ii. 212. 
cast, to be, i. 397. 
catechistical, iii. 14. 
causeway, a, i.e. paved, ii. 278. 
cavalier = Italian ' cavaliere,' ii. 162. 
cavaliering, i. 171. 
cavee — coffee, i. 201. 
centenarians, reputed, in Oxford, i. 402, 

507 ; ii. 220, 258, 461, 476 ; iii. 

367. 

cerebrosity, i. 139. 

chair = sedan, iii. 171, 334. 

chalice, i. 95, 118; ii. 235. 

chanter, chantor = precentor, i. 363 ; ii. 

322 ; iii. 10. 
chantership, ii. 389. 
chantries, valuation of the, iii. 175. 
chaplain-errant, a, i. 294. 
chapman, a, i. 363. 
chapter, a, i. 410. 
cheap, to make, ii. 523. 
check, a, ii. 503 : check, to, iii. 93, 472 

(■' checque'), 520. 
Chevy Chase, the tune, ii. 229. 
child marriages, iii. 30, 122, 216, 277, 

348, 367. 
children, 23, of one mother, iii. 74. 
chimelia, iii. 75. 
chimney, i. 304, 464. 
chimney-piece, a, iii. 207. 
china-ware, i. 169. 
chirograph, iv. 225. 
chirurgian = surgeon, i. 190; iii. 84. 



chop, a, i. 140. 
chop at, to, i. 363. 
chronogram, i. 409 ; iii. 269. 
chronologer, ii. 285. 
church papist, a, v. 3. 
chyle, ii. 36. 

circingle = cincture, i. 149, 366. 

clancularly, i. 346. 

clatter, a, ii. 350. 

clear, to, i. 489. 

clisterpipe, i. 205, 395. 

cloutes, a clout = layette, i. 275; iii. 31. 

cloy, to, ii. 265. 

clubs, at ale-houses and coffee-houses, 
i. 423. 

— at Tilliard's, i. 466 ; v. 71. 

— the chemical, i. 474. 

— at Jeans', frequented by Wood, ii. 
215. 

— at Wilkins', ii. 258; v. 74. 

— at Harding's, ii. 270. 

— Obadiah Walker's Romanist, iii. 
255- 

club-men, ii. 232. 
coadjutor, i. 262. 

cock one's hat, to, i. 359 ; iii. 256. 
cockloft, i. 147 ; ii. 176, 541 ; iii. 344. 
cockleloft, i. 129, 147, 163; ii. 176, 
379- 

— cottleloft, i. 432 ; ii. 267 : kotleloft, 
i. 382. 

cocoa-nut cup, i. 95. 
cofnngh = coughing, ii. 399. 
coif, serjeant of the, iii. 486. 
coinist, iii. 336. 
collaterals, iii. 25. 
collocution, iv. 166. 
collogue, to, i. 398 ; ii. 484. 
colour of, for the, i. 261. 
comets, pamphlets about, i. 17 ; ii. 33 : 
popularly called ' blazing stars.' 

— 1577, 56. 

— 1664, ii. 24-5, 53. 

— 1665, ii. 33. 

— 1668, ii. 131. 

— 1676, ii. 355. 

— 1677. 372, 375- 

— 1680-1, ii. 503-4. 

— 1682, iii. 25. 

— 1688, iii. 281. 

— 1692, iii. 403. 
cominalty, i. 246. 

commendam, in, i. 126 ; iii. 260, 274, 
395, 397- 

commissionated, i. 421 ; iii. 69, 206. 
commoner, the richest, in England, iii. 

463- 

common, turned to, iii. 428. 
commorant, iii. 100. 
composure = settlement, i. 371. 
compromiser, a, v. 6. 



INDEX V. 

concernment, i. 465; iii. 277. 
concurrency, i. 92. 
condolement, iii. 477. 
confessarius, ii. 435. 
conform, to, iii. 116. 
conformable, iii. 24, 355. 
conformist, iii. 36, 45, 359. 
congedelere, ii. 331, 336, 396 ; iii. 397. 
congratulate, to, i. 316. 
conjunction, iii. 309. 
conjuring, i. 498. 

consort = concert, i. 212, 256-7; ii. 
161. 

consult, a, iii. 226. 
controlment, iii. 135. 
conveen, to =■= convent, i. 489. 
conventicle, i. 293, 360, 499, 509 ; ii. 
236, 241, 561 ; iii. 190, 316. 

— conventicleer, i. 509 ; ii. 450. 
conventicle it, to, iii. 224. 

convent, to, i.e. cite before a court, i. 

57, 85. 
conventus, iii. 77, 107. 
convex, to, i. 345. 
cope, a, i. 342. 
cophie = coffee, i. 168. 
copped, iii. 236. 
copper-plate, iv. 30, 84. 
copy, a = transcript, i. 302. 
cordial = drink, i. 176. 
cordial, adj. = earnest, i. 367. 
cordial = quack medicine, ii. 277. 
corn, price of, iii. 421, 433, 437, 446. 
corn riots, iii. 421-2, 425, 433-4. 
Corporean =of C. C. C, iii. 106. 
\ corps ' are, iii. 399, 403. 
corps, a dead, ii. 245. 
couchant, i. 120. 

coule-staff, iii. 513 : cowle, i. 62. 

country = county, iii. 97, 308. 

course, to, i. 174. 

courser = disputant, i. 242-3. 

court, to, i. 291. 

courtment, i. 364. 

covetuous, i. 212, 391. 

covetuousness, i. 395 ; iii. 332. 

cowslip, ii. 285. 

cozen, to, i. 377, 422 ; iii. 44. 

creature, the, i. 298, 458. 

crisped work, iii. 208. 

crop-eared, ii. 77. 

cross, mark of, made at parish bounds, 

i. 510; ii. 224; iii. 15-6, 20-1. 

— sign of, used by Romanists, iii. 215. 

— built where a corpse rested, i. 343. 

— worn by a Romanist bishop, iii. 

\ *7i- 

— burnt as a Protestant demonstration, 

ii. 422 ; iii. 141. 

— of St. George, iii. 141, 147. 
cross-legged figures, i. 272, 287. 



WORDS. 239 

crowner = coroner, i. 262 ; ii. 281, 388 ; 

iii. 83, 179. 
crusted work, iii. 208. 
cucchenell = cochineal, i. 80. 
cully, ii. 483. 

curioso, i. 257 : curiosi, ii. 526. 
currmudgin, i. 396. 

cut = engraving, i. 416 ; ii. t6i, 227-8, 
545 ; iii. 54 : of clothes, i. 300, 366 : 
metaphorical, i. 328. 

cypher, i. 254; ii. 419, 495; iii. 307, 
4 8 7> 495- 

damp, a, i. 140. 
dapper, i. 156. 
dark nights, ii. 6 ; iii. 398. 
dash, a, ii. 152. 

dashed = brought to nothing, i. 441. 
dates, ii. 54. 
daub, to, iii. 408. 

daughter-in-law = stepdaughter, i. 227: 

probably also ii. 558. 
dead place, a, ii. 93. 
deafish, ii. 476. 

dearth, i. 401 ; ii. 538 ; iii. 437, 446. 
debonare, iii. 243. 
decline, to = lose favour, iii. 171. 
decretals, iv. 152. 
defecate, ii. 528. 
defraudation, i. 489. 
defunct, i. 479 ; ii. 540. 
demicannon, i. 139. 
demi-rainbow, ii. 504. 
deodands, i. 372; ii. 125; iv. 210-1. 
217. 

desperate = daring, i. 156, 171 ; ii. 448. 

devices, iii. 436. 

devolution, i. 383, 471. 

devolve, to, i. 383. 

dialing, diallist, i. 136 ; ii. 151. 

diminish = lessening, iii. 103. 

diplomated, i. 334, 346, 398. 

dire, i. 367. 

discomposed, iii. 475. 

discomposure = tumult, i. 320 ; ii. 271. 

discoursive, ii. 169. 

disenable, to, i. 330. 

disi'd, iii. 154. 

disincouragement, i. 368. 

dismiss = dismissal, ii. 163. 

disprivilege, to, ii. 85. 

disrelish, to, i. 361. 

dissembled = imitated, ii. 242. 

distaste, to, i. 62 : distaste, a, ii. 41. 

divert, to, i. 456. 

Doctor, as courtesy title of a physician, 
even though not M.D., i. 44 ; ii. 20, 
98, 503 ; iii. 218, 451. 

dog, to, ii. 548 ; iii. 4. 

dogs, ii. 212, 239. 

donative, a, i. 126. 



240 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Doomsday book, iv. 179. 
dorse, ii. 475. 
double jugs, i. 139. 
double-married, ii. 78. 
double-mounded, iii. 461. 
double vicar, ii. 559. 
drenching a horse, ii. 112. 
dribbling, i. 67 ; ii. 460, 462. 
droll = comic man, i. 201. 
drollery, iii. 6 : in fashion after the 
Restoration, i. 297, 301, 510; ii. 

— drolleries, printed, i. 18, 416 ; ii. p. 
viii. 

— drolling books, ii. 240 : a drolling 
speech, ii. 497. 

drowned, iii. 95. 
dudgeon, ii. 232. 

duel, i. 83, 91, 422 ; ii. 32, 559 ; iii. 

186, 220, 406, 461. 
dun, to, ii. 479. 
durance, iii. 314; v. 18. 
dusky, i. 493. 

dying speech = speech on quitting office, 

ii. 311. 

earl, patent for, ii. 421. 
earthquakes, pamphlets about, i. 17. 

— in England, 1601, ii. 302 : 1665, ii. 
54: 1666, ii. 70: 1676, ii. 336: 1683, 

iii. 73 : 1692, iii. 401-3. 
ear- witness, i. 511. 

eclipse of the sun, 1652, i. 174. 
edibles, i. 298. 

effigies = picture or statue, i. 216, 277, 
385-6, 408 ; ii. 409-10, 529 ; iii. 447, 
471. 

effigies = effigy, iii. 317 ; v. 88. 
Egyptian antiquities, iii. 56. 
elaboratory, i. 290, 473-4- 
elderberries, i. 168. 
Eliana, the romance called, ii. 42. 
elms, i. 224, 432 ; ii. 188, 479 ; iii. 297, 
321,485. 

elogium = praise, iii. 55 : elogy = eulogy, 
iii. 265. 

emblem, in a transparency, iii. 271. 
embowelling = disembowelling, ii. 545. 
emot, ii. 228. 
encomiastic, iii. 6. 
encomium, ii. 180, 262, 391. 
endearments, i. 298. 
endited = indicted, ii. 335. 
English temper, a true, i. 45. 
engraved pictures, i. 433 ; ii. 313, 455 ; 
iii. 207, 299. 

— portraits, v. 227. 
enterchangeable, i. 342. 
enthusiasm, i. 369. 
ephemeris = almanac, i. 14. 
errant = arrant, i. 395. 



escocheons = coats of arms, i. 1 46 ; v. 
204. 

essays = attempts, ii. 531. 
estated, i. 135. 
esurient, i. 326. 

etymologies, of Godstow, i. 341 : popu- 
lar, ii. 134-5, 4°6, 411. 
excrementize, to, i. 476 ; ii. 335. 
exhibit to, to, i. 425 ; ii. 380. 
expurge, to, ii. 186. 
extemporary, i. 367. 
extenuate = to lessen, ii. 183. 
extracts, i. 290. 
extraordinaries, iii. 141. 

fact, the, ii. 453. 
fag-end, the, i. 115 ; ii. 342. 
failer — failure, ii. 442. 
fairs, i. 189, 343, 458; ii. 404, 407, 
409. 

family = household, iii. 81. 

fantastics, iii. 436. 

farthing tokens, 1644, i. 112. 

fasces, ii. 241, 261. 

fat parsonage, a, i. 152. 

fathered on, to be, literally, ii. 324 : 

metaphorically, ii. 48, 239, 490 ; 

iii. 1. 

father-in-law = stepfather, iii. 308: cp. 

iii. 242. 
feast, a village, i. 457. 

— Oxford, v. 126. 
ferriage, i. 503. 

fiddler, contemptuous, i. 212. 
fighting between M.A.s, i. 184; ii. 272 ; 
iii. 3, 112. 

— between students, i. 246 ; ii. 56. 

— in common-room, iii. 3. 

— between colleges at the University 
disputations, i. 297, 300; ii. 75; v. 
162. 

— town and gown, ii. 125, 248, 270, 
299 ; iii. 42, 178, 244, 511. 

— between students and troopers, iii. 
241, 245. 

figleaves, iii. 528. 

filazer, philiser, i. 126 ; ii. 105. 

' fines,' on renewing leases, iii. 258, 283 ; 

v. 148. 
fishponds, i. 404, 409. 
flam, a, iii. 489. 
flambo, a, iii. 533. 
Flanders mares, i, 412. 
flankers, iii. 25. 

flashes of rain, ii. 82, 190, 355 ; iii. 

156 : flashy rain, iii. 136. 
flashy, ii. 522 ; iii. 458. 
flasket, a, iii. 230. 
fleering = flirting, ii. 53. 
flies, i. 280 ; ii. 228. 
flop, to, ii. 270. 



INDEX V. WORDS. 



241 



flourest = ? botanist, ii. 124. 
flourish, to, iii. 475. 
flourishing, ii. 334; iii. 287. 
flouts, iii. 19 : flout, to, iii. 257. 
flowers, garden, i. 396 : at table, i. 414 : 

bouquets of, ii. 158 : sold in Oxford, 

iii. 180. 
fly further, to, i. 348. 
flying-coach, ii. 155; v. no. 
foolery, ii. 428. 
fooleries, ii. 117, 240. 
foot-clothes, i. 493-4; iii. 128, 227-8. 
footmen, i. 494. 

' foreigners,' i.e. not citizens of Oxford, 
i. 83. 

foreigners, see outlanders. 

— admitted to the Bodleian, iv. 148. 
formosity, ii. 409. 

forwardness, ii. 2. 
f others, iv. 54. 

found = ? fount (in casting), i. 212. 
foundling, iii. 7. 
fourth generation, the, iii. 367. 
freakish, ii. n. 
freemason, v. 4, 21. 
free warren, i. 403. 
freshwater = tyro, i. 139. 
fret work, iv. 55. 
freyter = frater, ii. 535. 
frizzle, to, ii. 302. 
frontispiece = front, i. 224. 
frostbite, ii. 303. 
frostnailing, i. 288. 
fry, the young, i. 299, 367. 
fume, to, ii. 451 : fume, a, i. 415. 
function, the, i.e. clerical orders, iii. 136. 
furniture, household, i. 395-6, 398, 503, 
505-6- 

furniture = equipment, i. 54, 56. 
fuz'd, iii. 152. 

gables, iv. 54. 
Galenical, iii. 436. 
gallant, i. 177 ; iii. 144. 
gallantry = good service, ii. 507. 
galliard, iii. 513. 

Gangraena, the book so called, iii. 36. 

garbler, iii. 430. 

Garter, the, ii. 371 ; iii. 278. 

— blue ribbon of, iii. 230 : order of, ii. 
248 ; iii. 102. 

gazetteer, a, iii. 163. 
generalissimo, i. 107, 311. 
generality, the, i. 298, 310-1, 465. 
genie, i. 173, 182, 326. 
gentile = genteel, i. 308 ; ii. 519. 
gentilely, i. 331. 

George, the, i.e. jewel of the Garter, ii. 

205, 375 ; iii- 2 30, 278. 
S. George, cross of, iii. 141, 147. 
gestamen, ii. 525. 



gests, ghests = actions, ii. 367; iv. 311. 
ghosts, i. 17. 

giants, in legend, iv. 96, 304. 

— in popular antiquarianism, i. 141, 
241, 304. 

— in shows, ii. 140, 226, 548. 
gibberish, ii. 334. 

gin, a, iv. 53. 

gird, a, i. 423 ; iii. 72. 

girn at, to, i. 360 ; iii. 244, 257. 

girn, to, iii. 201, 223. 

godly party, the, i. 268. 

God's judgments, i. 17, 49, 153, 251, 

262, 322, 379, 388, 395 ; iii. 41, 447-8, 

488. 

gold found in England, iii. 232. 
gooddy, ii. 15 : goody, iii. 142. 
goodwife, ii. 461 ; iii. 144. 
gossipping, i.e. at a christening, i. 405, 

grace, a, ii. 561, i.e. a grace-night, v. 
188. 

grace-cup, i. 95, 300 ; iii. 509. 
gratis, i. 176, 386. 

gravel, i. 213 ; ii. 445 ; iii. 226 ; iv. 67. 
graves, north and south, i. 276. 
great with, to be, iii. 117. 
grin at, to, i. 408 ; ii. 259. 
grin, to, iii. 264. 
guns = cannon, i. 422. 

hackney preachers, i. 361. 

hail, i. 101 ; iii. 369, 420, 425. 

hallow, to = shout, iii. 510. 

hammer at, to, i. 174; ii. 256 : hammer 

for, to, iii. 132. 
hammerer, a, ii. 241. 
handbills, i. 201, 377 ; iii. 156, 275. 
handle upon, to, ii. 272. 
handrist, ii. 143. 
hang after, to, i. 475. 
hanker, to, i. 208. 
harangue it, to, ii. 208. 
harbingers, ii. 523. 
hat, a, i. 299. 

hatchment, i. 481 ; ii. 139 ; iii. 97, 429 ; 
v. 204. 

haul taverns, to, ii. 83, 390. 

hay, i. 92, 401 ; ii. 265, 452, 520, 538. 

— compressed hay, iii. 351. 

hearse = generally, the frame on which 
the coffin was carried, on this coats 
of arms were pinned, i. 154, 198, 229, 
236, 429, 459; ii. 91, 105, 250, 262, 
322, 346, 374,402; iii. 7, 33, 192, 
215, 218, 243; v. 204: also verses, 
i. 170, 198 ; v. 217. 

left in church, i. 341-2, 498. 

— =also, a carriage for conveyance of 
the coffin, ii. 480; iii. 66, 161, 348, 
437 : first mentioned by name of 



VOL. V. 



R 



242 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



hearse (continued) : — 

hearse in 1672, ii. 245 ; in 1663, 
called a horse-litter, i. 479 ; in 1668, 
called a caroche, ii. 144. 

heat, iii. 153. 

herb-house, iii. 484. 

hermit, iii. 273. 

high = high-handed, ii. 274, 276. 
high, to act, ii. 456, 513. 
high, to live, i. 233 ; ii. ir, 147. 
highway robbery, i. 156, 186, 307-8; ii. 

185, 198, 245; iii. 307, 348, 380, 

411, 415, 419, 438, 449. 
hirsute, i. 243. 
hollow = shout, iii. 509. 
Holyrood day, ii. 465. 
Holy Thursday, i. 289 ; ii. 192, 223-4; 

iii. 15, 45. 
homestall, i. 419. 
honest, i. 178, 184; iii. 308. 
honour, marks of, ii. 186. 
hoop = whoop, iii. 508. 
hop-garden, i. 332. 
horn, tenure by, ii. 405. 
horn-cups, i. 94. 

horse-hire, i. 213, 235, 275,441 ; ii. 82 ; 

iii. 291. 
horse-litter, a, i. 479, 485. 
horse-way, the, i. 251. 
horses of state, ii. 524-5. 
hostle, i. 473. 

hot-head, a, ii. 279, 516 ; iii. 450. 

hot-headed, ii. 522; iii. 1. 

housing, i. 169; ii. 9: apparently for 

housen, iii. 28. 
houted = hooted, ii. 76: houting, i. 73- 
hubbub, a, ii. 454. 
hue and cry, iii. 203, 348. 
huff out, to, iii. 170; to huff at, iii. 305. 
huff = hoof, i. 257. 

hum, to = applaud, iii. 48, 52, 63, 508. 
hummings = applause, ii. 208, 526, 531. 
— deprecated as mere noise, i. 175 ; ii. 
H9- 

hums = applause, ii. 208; iii. 52, 63, 

520, 528. 
hum down, to = hoot at, ii. 76. 
humour, a, i. 424. 
humourous, i. 273. 
hurray = hurrah, iii. 472. 
hurricane, iii. 17. 

hurry, a, ii. 426, 450 ; iii. 281 : hurry, 

i. 93 : hurrying, ii. 452. 
husband, an ill = spendthrift, ii. 94. 
husbands, six, i. 448. 
huswife, i. 207 ; ii. 95. 
huzzaies, iii. 289. 

ichnography, i. 223, 225, 450; iii. 449. 

ignoramus, ii. 560. 

ile = aile, iii. 153 j v. 15, 17. 



impalements, ii. 407. 
imperial = royal, iii. 130. 
importances, i. 298, 397. 
imposlhume, ii. 420. 
impostor, iii. 384. 
impreese = motto, i. 170. 
impression = right to print, ii. 543. 
imprimerie, ii. 529. 
impropriator, i. 160, 323. 
impropriation, i. 271. 
impunity, iii. 526. 
inadvertency = carelessness, ii. 175. 
inauguration day, i. e. accession day, iii. 
4I5- 

incognito, i. 402, 456 ; ii. 376 ; iii. 118, 

188, 288, 422. 
indiction — indictment, ii. 418. 
Infanta, the, iii. 30. 
infimous = base, i. 345, 476. 
informations, ii. 215. 
ingraver, iv. 30. 
ingrossers, iii. 434. 
ink, ii. p. viii ; iii. 88. 
inkling, iii. 476. 

inoculating, in gardening, ii. 141. 
insensibly = imperceptibly, i. 242, 257. 
instalment = installation, iii. 249. 
instinct = instance, ii. 88. 
instruments, i. e. documents, i. 385, 391. 
interdict, i. 373. 
interloper, an, ii. 425. 
interval, the, i. e. 1649-60, i. 357, 359, 
441. 

intituled, i. 402, 508. 
inwards = lining, i. 215. 
isle = aisle, i. 409, 415.. 
Italian hand, i. 98. 
item — hint, iii. 290. 
itinerants, i. 293. 

Jacobite, tribal use, i. 188; ii. 212: 

political use, v. 226. 
jelly, to kick into a, iii. 458. 
jerk, to, i. 443. 
jessamy, ii. 184. 
jest, a = hoax, ii. 242. 
Jewish whip, iv. 83. 
joining = adjoining, ii. 158. 
jointure, troubles with, i. 284; ii. n, 

194: joynter, ii. 11, 194. 
jorney = day of battle, i. 408. 
joy, to = congratulate, ii. 192. 
judgment, a, i. e. divine visitation, i. 

388 ; ii. 124 ; iii. 41, 447-8, 488 : in 

astrology, i. 227. 
judicature = judgeship, i. 332. 
juncto, ii. 437. 
juridical, ii. 87. 
juvenility, iii. 441. 

kauki = coffee, i. 201. 



INDEX V. WORDS. 



243 



keen = skein, Hi. 165. 
kervet, to, i. 1 10. 
ketch, a, Hi. 288, 290. 
keys, of the ash, ii. 355. 
kidderkin, ii. 34. 
kill-bishop, ii. 253. 
king's messengers, Hi. 487. 
kleptomaniac, i. 424. 
knife, i. 230. 

knights, catalogues of, Edward III— 

Charles I, iii. 102. 
knighthood-money, i. 79. 
knight's-service, ii. 283. 
knot, iii. 3, 162, 393. 

lackey, iii. 227-8. 

laic, layman, i.e. a citizen as opposed 
to a member of the University, i. 
293; iii. 75, 77 : laity = the citizens, 
ii. 526. 

lakish, i. 272. 

lampoons, Oxford, i. 394, 488 ; ii. 44, 
150, 496, 550; iii. p. vii; iv. 138. 

handbook, a, iv. 89. 

langable, ii. 340. 

lately = by-and-by, ii. 266. 

laureate, ii. 401. 

laurel, iii. 88. 

lawn-sleeves, iii. 135. 

lay, to = lie, i. 199, 210, 268, 444, 456, 
479, 482 ; ii. 145, 411. 

layman, i. e. not of the given faculty, i. 
332. 

lead, iv. 54-6. 

leaden coffin, i. 255, 485; ii. 22. 

lead-pencil, i. 3. 

leaguer, i. 100. 

lealty = loyalty, i. 331. 

least = lest, i. 326. 

leiger = resident, i. 168. 

leiger-book, i. 278, 286, 410, 460; ii. 

82 ; iii. 342 : called also simply 

'leiger,' ii. 30, 134. 
leir-horse, iii. 282 : leer-horse, ii. 205. 
letters = matrixes, iv. 75. 
liberal = outspoken, iii. 309. 
liberty, a free, i. 127. 
lift, a dead, ii. 202. 
lift out, to, i. 299. 
lights = lungs, ii. 36. 
ling m hang, ii. 303. 
link, a, ii. 435 ; iii. 141, 317. 
liquor, to, i. 287. 
list, a, ii. 504. 

livery, i. 386 ; ii. 324, 525 ; iii. 260. 
livery, a = servant in livery, ii. 525. 
locks, ii. 82. 

lodgings, cost of a week's, in London, 
ii. 109 : at a watering-place, iii. 460. 
loggerhead, i. 442. 
lolpoop, i. 394. 

R 



lone-house, a, ii. 143. 
lonish, i. 181. 
lordship = manor, i. 423. 
lowermost, iv. 124. 
luggish, iii. 123. 
lunatics, ii. 409. 
lyter = lighter, iii. 412. 

machet, ii. p. viii. 
machination, ii. 418. 
mad-merry, i. 49. 

maggot-headed, i. 273; magotie-headed, 
ii. 117. 

magisterial = of M.A., i. 411. 

magistracy, the, i. e. M.A.s, ii. 56. 

Mahommedans, iii. 156. 

major = larger, i. 502. 

make much of, to = take care of, i. 322. 

malapert, ii. 422. 

malapertness, ii. 428. 

male = mail, iii. 459. 

mandamus, i. 460 ; iii. 207-8, 214, 217- 

8, 246, 274, 430, 518, 525. 
mandatary, iv. 60. 
mandatory, adj., iii. 274. 
manor-place, v. 7. 
marble, staining of, ii. 160, 213. 
marchise = Italian ' marchese,' ii. 162. 
mark, of a witness, i. 3, 50, 146. 
markets, granted by Charles II, ii. 404, 

407. 

martyrology, a, iv. 89. 

master of the horse, to a lord, iii. 89, 

115. 
match, iv. 1 23. 
matricula, a, iii. 203. 
May-game, a, i. 356 ; iii. 301. 
May-pole freshmen, i. 140. 
mazer-bowl, i. 95. 
meale-mouthed, iii. 199. 
mealy-mouthed, i. 395. 
medallist, iii. 336. 
Medicaeae stellae, ii. 161. 
mellow, iii. 130. 
memorable, a, i. 291. 
memory, a = record of an event, ii. 

483- 

mercate = market, i. 278, 349 ; ii. 
404. 

Merry Andrew, a, iii. 459. 
mess, a = set, ii. 437. 
messuage = message, i. 492 ; ii. 62. 
metalsome = mettlesome, i. 156. 
meteors, ii. 133-4, 433 > I 9 I » 2 8i, 
433- 

microscope, ii. 318. 
mimic, i. 175. 336. 
miracles, i. 486 ; ii. 54, 79. 
— miracle-monger, i. 486. 
minchery = nunnery, i. 403-4 : myn- 
chons, i. 340. 

2 



244 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



minding, the, ii. 314. 
mint, the, i. 80-1 ; iii. 196, 324. 
miscarriage, iii. 468. 
misinformations, ii. 117. 
misling, iii. 180: misled, ii. 432. 
miss, iii. 341. 

mistrust, to, ii. 442 ; iii. 326. 
mobile = mob, iii. 303, 317, 533. 
mohair, ii. 300. 
monastical, iv. 93-4. 
monsters, i. J7, 349; iv. 64; v. 36, 
200. 

monstrous births, prodigious births, ii. 
24, 53-4- 

monteigh = monteith, iii. 84; iv. 79. 
montero, i. 509. 
moonshine, adj., iii. 487. 
moorish, i. 272 ; ii. 467. 
mother-in-law = stepmother, v. 14. 
motto, ii. 494; iii. 104, 271. 
mounteers, i. 103. 
mounth = month, ii. 12; v. 13. 
mourning-cloth, i. 479. 
mouth, the City, ii. 525 ; the University, 
iii. 48. 

muffled = blindfolded, i, 85. 
mulberry, ii. 305. 
murders, i. 17 ; v. 130. 
murrein, ii. 144. 
mutineers, iii. 525, 528. 
mutton-tuggers, i. 293. 
mynchons, i. 340, 404. 

napkins, table, i. 414. 
necessary, ii. 222. 
negligence = neglect, i. 449. 
nest=niche, iv. 57. 
network, ii. 14, 483. 
nightingale, ii. 106. 
nine o'clock, ii. 382-3. 
noctivagation, ii. 390, 403 ; iii. 41. 
noctivagator, a, ii. 400. 
noddle, iii. 458. 
nogging pot, i. 468. 
noint = anoint, i. 140. 
noisomeness, ii. 217. 
non-admission, ii. 541. 
non-licet = unlicensed, ii. 242. 
non-party, the, ii. 443. 
nonplussed, to be, i. 356. 
nons, the, ii. 443. 
non-subscribing, i. 453. 
non-swearer = nonjuror, v. 226. 
non-visiting, ii. 547. 
nosegay, a, ii. 158. 
nother = another, iii. 481. 
notitia = information, iii. 440. 
notorious = discreditable, ii. 96. 
null, to = annul, iii. 279. 
nurseries = colleges, i. 292, 294. 
nut, to, i. 176. 



oats, i. 74; ii. 520, 538 : oatmeal, ii. 
100. 

obital book, Wood's, iii. 330, 410, 443. 
obital day, iii. 460. 
obnoxious, i. 348, 397 ; ii. 318. 
obnoxious = guilty, iii. 528. 
obnoxious = exposed to, iii. 198. 
observator, iii. 317. 
octopus, ii. 280. 
off-hand, iii. 446. 
office, iii. 34. 

omens, bad, i. 455 ; ii. 356 ; iii. 339. 

one = on, ii. 265. 

open voice = audible, iii. 64. 

operator, i. 290; iii. 55. 

option, iii. 363. 

ordinary = eating-house, iii. 464. 

original = cause, i. 370. 

orthography = elevation, iii. 449. 

orthography = correct spelling, iii. 12. 

oubliette, i. 224. 

out, to be, i. e. in error, iii. 131. 

out, to, i. 363 ; ii. 418 ; iii. 118. 

out, i. e. losing the thread of a speech, 

ii. 17 ; iii. 49 : or sermon, iii. 86. 
outlander = foreigner, i. 189, 242 ; ii. 

148 ; iii. 190, 296. 
outlandish = foreign, iii. 5. 
outshade, to, i. 198. 
overclouded, iii. 222. 
over-familiar, iii. 12. 
overlash, to, iv. 59. 
overplus, i. 316. 
overpress, to, i. 394. 
overseer, v. 6. 
overstocked, iii. 526. 
overtaken, to be, i. 298. 
overtop, to, i. 362, 502. 

packed jury, a, iii. 25. 
pack-horse, metaphorical, iii. 436. 
pad nag, iii. 289. 
padoragy = progeny, iii. 455. 
paintings, ii. 168, 420, 475, 529 ; iii. 17, 
239 ; v. 227. 

— wall-paintings, i. 225, 309. 
palisadoes, ii. 134. 

panes = panels, iv. 123. 
papistical, i. 355. 
parator, iii. 429. 

parliamentarian, i. 129, 161 ; iii. 202. 
parretter, iii. 267. 
peak = pique, ii. 396. 
pearls, i. 491. 

pedagogical, i. 348, 423 ; ii. 68. 
pedagogy, i. 108. 
pedlar, ii. 367, 389. 
peebles = pebbles, iii. 25. 
penny commons, i. 140. 
pensions, ii. 484 ; iii. 348, 446. 

— pensioners, ii. 513 ; iii. 446. 



INDEX V. WORDS. 



245 



pensioners = paying students, i. 294. 
perambulation, i. 156. 
pervert, to, ii. 275. 
pettie-inne, i.,.273. 
pettifogger, a, ii. 327. 
pews, square, i. 284. 
pewter spoons, i. 94. 
philery hedges, iii. 88. 
philiser = filacre, i. 126; ii. 105. 
phisnomy, ii. 527. 
phlebotomise, to, i. 461. 
piaculum, ii. 422. 
piecemeal, i. 423-4. 
pigs of lead, iv. 54. 
pike, trailing a, iii. 123. 
pillion-cloth, i. 505. 
pillow-beer = pillow-case, iii. 358; iv. 
83. 

pistoletto, i. 139. 
place house, i. 409, 458. 
plank-stone = lid of a stone coffin, i. 
345- 

platform = view of, i. 346 ; ii. 313: 

= description of, i. 332. 
play, to bring into, i. 368. 
play upon, to, i. 442 ; ii. 332. 
plenary, more, v. 19. 
plump, to cry, iv. 207. 
plural births, iii. 331, 420. 
poaching, ii. 328. 
podex, iii. 458. 
poet, the family, iii. 112. 

— sponging on patrons, ii. 360, 362. 

— poet-laureate, ii. 218; iii. 191, 409, 
413, 421. 

poetical licence, i. 131. 
point-blank, ii. 418. 

poisoning, i. 128, 199, 260-3, 267, 
34 2 ~3, 475 5 »■ io 4> 250, 420 ; iii. 
25, 242, 302, 495. 

pol., ii. 5. 

pole, to, ii. 443 : pole, a, ii. 516. 
pomander, i. 131. 
port = gate, ii. 59. 
portable, iii. 136. 
pot-companion, ii. 450. 
potency, i. 473. 
potluck, ii. 348. 

potmen, ii. 279, 443; iii. 171: pot- 
party, ii. 232. 

practic, i. 316. 

praevaricator, i. 221, 266. 

pragmatic, i. 292, 369. 

pragmatical, i. 383, 471 ; iii. 200. 

pre-approbation, i. 438. 

prebendary = pre bendal stall, ii. 285. 

prefect = head of a college, i. 411. 

premisses, the = aforesaid subjects, i. 
37 1 - 

presidents = precedents, ii. 8. 
priest's hole, a, iii. 122. 



prime = first, i. 164: = leading, i. 369; 

iii. 302. 
primer, iv. 131. 

principality = principalship, iii. 108, 1 26, 
158, 163, 185. 

private = not printed, i. 449 ; iv. 189. 

processioning, noun, i. 449 : proces- 
sioning, adj., i. 510; processioning, 
verb, ii. 223. 

proclamation of the king, ceremonies of, 
at London, iii. 125-6: at Oxford, iii. 
128-9. 

prodigies, i.e. portents, i. 378, 387,410, 

43i> 437, 4 68 ; 5 11 ; iii- 185, i9 J » 
280-1, 331. 
prodigious, i. e. monstrous, births, ii. 24, 

53-4- 
prog, to, i. 123. 

programma, ii. 129, 215, 298, 426, 429; 

iii. 51, 117, 142 ; iv. 65, 67. 
programme, iii. III. 
prophecies, pamphlets about, i. 17. 

— traditional, i. 160; iv. 310. 

— Puritan, i. 388. 

— mock, ii. 54, 436; iii. 296, 454-5. 

— personal, ii. 237 ; iii. 261. 
pro and con, iii. 246. 

pros and cons, iii. 14. 
Protei, i. 369. 

protobune, i. 115 = pro-tribune. 

provant master, i. 269. 

Psalms, metrical versions of, i. 444 : 

Ps. 94, iii. 472. 
pump, a, ii. 350. 

puns, i. 174, 177, 221, 258, 478 ; ii. 152, 
239, 244, 348, 436, 535 5 iii- J 2o. 

— punner, a, ii. 239. 
pure = poor, ii. 21, 427. 
purpose, to the, i. 442. 
pursevant, to, iii. 143. 
push, to be put to a, ii. 46. 
puther, a, ii. 323. 
putlogs, iv. 54. 

quadrant, ii. 237. 

quaffing, i. 246. 

quarrels, of glass, ii. 352. 

quarter, to cry, i. 115. 

quarteridge, i. e. quarterly payments, ii. 
478, 480, 485-6, 489, 519, 542, 547, 
554, 561; iii. 9, 11, 23, 27, 59, 74, 
91, 114, 136, 165, 172, 196, 490. 

quatenus, ii. 274. 

queen's bounty, iii. 469-70 : queen's 

letters, iii. 467. 
quelshing, i. 280. 
querie = equerry, iii. 288. 
quietus = dismissal, i. 166; iii. 272. 
quietus est = dismissal, ii. 506, 515 ; iii. 

45- 

quilt, iii. 372. 



246 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



quire = choir, i. 417, 483. 
quitting!— acquitting, iii. 272. 
quondam, i. 171,197-8,201 ; iii. 198, 213. 
Quo warranto, iii. 269, 311 ; iv. 77, 81. 

ragman, i. 117. 
rally up, to, i. 457. 
rapier = sword, ii. 354. 
rapiers = rapparees, iii. 380. 
rat's- banc, i. 199 ; iii. 25. 
reader = professor, i. 308. 
reading-glass, ii. 202. 
rebaptize, ii. 417. 
rebus, i. 94 ; iii. 436. 
recantation, ii. 557 ; iii. 20, 41, 59, 87, 
156. 

rechosen, i. 490. 

reformadoes, i. 122. 

regalia, iii. 314. 

regiment = dietary, i. 332. 

register, regester = registrar, i. 183, 302, 

476-; ii. 308; v. 147. 
reipublican, iii. 69. 

relations = relatives, i. 93; ii. 143 ; iii. 108. 

relish with, to, iii. 173. 

relegated, iii. 390. 

reluctancy, i. 78, 186, 197 ; ii. 478. 

rent = interest, v. 29. 

reprehender, i. 369. 

' revelations,' i. 292, 297. 

revels, i. 360. 

rhapsody, i.e. miscellany, iv. 220. 

rhyming, 'the folly of,' ii. 553. 

richest commoner in England, iii. 463 ; 

richest subject, ii. 394. 
riding, i. 165. 

rings, i. 255 ; ii. 425; iii. 1, 241: funeral 

rings, iii. 158, 161. 
rip up, to, iii. 247, 490, 524. 
road = rote, i. 1 73. 
robbery, see highway robbery, 
rogue, to play the, ii. 49. 
roguery = quizzing, i. 234; ii. 548; iii. 6. 
rogues, i. 17. 
Roman nose, a, v. 6. 
romancy = romantic, i. 269. 
rooked, ii. 27. 
Rosicrucian, i. 472. 
rot, a, i. 435. 

rotular = in form of a roll, iv. 89. 
rout, a = crowd, i. 347; ii. 335; iii. 16, 42. 
rubble, iii. 461. 
rugs, i. 505. 

russelling = rustling, ii. 4. 
rustical, i. 157. 
rye, ii. 558. 

sacrilege, ii. 272. 

sacrilegist, i. 309. 

sad priest, a, ii. 48. 

' Saint,' omitted by Puritans, i. 297. 



saint, slang use of, i. 366 ; ii. 6, 228. 

Saints, MS. Lives of, ii. 221 ; iv. 310-2. 

sale of government offices, iii. 96. 

salivation, iii. 202. 

salmon in the Thames, iii. 330. 

salt-cellars, i. 95. 

salting freshmen, iv. 60 ; v. 168. 

saltpetre diggers, iv. 217. 

salvo, iii. 528. 

sanctified, slang use of, i. 366 ; iii. 508, 

514. 
sandals, ii. 235. 

sarcenet, ii. 158; iii. 141 ; iv. 73: it is 

satin, ii. 160-1. 
sargeant-porter, iii. 208. 
satire, see lampoon, 
scaffold = gallery, ii. 332. 
scandalum magnatum, iii. 31, 33, 156. 
scarlet, v. 124, 152. 

— scarleteers, ii. 386, 525. 

— scarleters, ii. 525. 

— scarlatical, ii. 243. 
scheme, a, v. 7. 

scholastical = ? mediaeval, i. 423. 
scholastical = school, i. 1 29 : — univer- 
sity, i. 275. 
schoolman, i. 441. 
scot free, ii. 73. 
scotheon = scutcheon, i. 211. 
scourers, the, iii. 1 20. 
scout, to, iii. 357-8. 
scouted about, to be, ii. 227. 
scramble, a, iii. 236. 
scrambler, a, iii. 237. 
scrape, to, i. 189. 
scrapes, i. 366. 

scrutiny, i. 500, 502 ; ii. 132, 443. 

sculk, to, iii. 74. 

sculptor = engraver, ii. 160. 

scutcheon, scocheons = coat of arms, iii. 

97-8 ; v. 204. 
seal, i. 264 : the broad seal, iii. 160 : 

Anthony Wood's, ii. 202; iii. 480; 

iv. 14, 24, 31, 33. 
sedan, ii. 532 ; iii. 171, 334. 
seer-cloth, iii. 222. 
semblance, ii. 86. 
semi-hoop, iii. 226. 
seminary = priest, iii. 162. 
seringe, to, ii. 378, 455 ; iii. 272. 
set, to = sit, i. 262. 
shaft, the, of a comet, ii. 504. 
shag-pate, i. 199. 
shark, a, iii. 108, 269. 
shark, to, i. 167, 179. 
shark away, to, ii. 49, 149. 
sharkingly, ii. 49. 
sharps, ii. 559. 
shatter-brain, iii. 381. 
she, used as adjective to express sex, ii. 

139- 



INDEX V. WORDS. 



shedes, i. 446. 
shells, ii. 420. 
shifted of, to be, ii. 100. 
shifting, iii. 89. 
shoare = sewer, i. 463. 
shoeing-horn, a, metaphorical, i. 395, 
397- 

shore = shower, i. 499; ii. 13, 412. 
shorthand, i. 235. 

shot through and through, metaphorical, 

iii. 348. 
shreife = sheriff, i. 159. 
shrivalty, iii. no. 
shuffrons, iii. 97-8. 
shuttings = shutters, ii. 3, 139. 
Siamese twins, iii. 1 56 ; iv. 64. 
sick-day, ii. 176. 
sickish, iii. 191. 
silver, value of, i. 81. 
sinecure, iii. 169. 
Sir (Sr.) = title of a priest, i. 220. 
sister, half, whole, iii. 468. 
six-yard-land, i. 419. 
sizar, ii. 498. 

sizes = assizes, i. 468; ii. 6. 

skeleton, iv. 66. 

skid, iv. 53. 

skirts, the, ii. 350. 

slabby, ii. 433. 

slate, i. 235. 

slave, a, ii. 425. 

sleep-walking, i. 109; ii. 281. 

sleight (slight), to, i.e. dismantle, i. 170; 

iii. 79. 
slickstone, i. 438. 
slops, i. 177 ; ii. 164. 
smooth boots, a, iii. 359. 
smootie, iii. 14. 
snake-bow, i. 300. 
snew = snowed, ii. 282, 307. 
snips with, to go, iii. 201. 
snotty, i. 453. 
soaker, a, ii. 460. 
society man, a, iii. 424. 
sojourn, to = board, i. 108 : sojourner = 

boarder, i. 108, 440 ; ii. 1 ; iii. 

471. 

solemn, i. e. meeting regularly, iii. 75-6. 

sophister = disputant, i. 242-3. 

sound, to = swoon, i. 445 : soun, a = 

swoon, i. 379 ; ii. 424. 
sovereign, i. 229. 

sown, a = swoon, i. 176, 388 : sown, to 

= swoon, i. 176. 
spanners, i. 509. 
sparkish, ii. 116. 
spectrum, a, i. 347. 
speech, to, ii. 58. 

speech it, to, i. 348; ii. 208-9; 
345- 

speecher, a, iii. 14. 



spelling, iii. 12. 

spider, i. 223. 

spits, ii. 560. 

sport upon, to, iii. 107. 

squibs, ii. 86 ; iii. 434. 

squint-eyed, i. 199; ii. 108; iii. 4. 

stack, a, of buildings, i. 404. 

stairer = doorkeeper, iii. 496. 

stand upon, to, ii. 48. 

standard, a, i. 45. 

stander, a, ii. 474. 

standing, a, i. 413. 

stang, the, iii. 513. 

startle, i. 344. 

starve, to, of cold, ii. 177, 282. 
state, a, iv. 66. 

state, a chair, or seat, of, ii. 157, 159, 

209-10 ; iii. 17, 494. 
state, a great, ii. 302. 
statua = statue, ii. 480; iii. 197, 209-10, 

339- 

stickler, a, ii. 233, 418. 

stipulate, to, ii. 309 : stipulatio, iv. 2, 

20: stipulator, iv. 20, 22. 
stomach, a sharp, ii. 17. 
stone-coffin, i. 304, 342, 345, 404 ; ii. 

235, 2 4i.. 
stone-throwing, iii. 511. 
streamers, iii. 97-8. 
streyn = strain, ii. 2. 
strong = strange, ii. 253. 
strucken, to be, i. 172, 228. 
studied = learned, ii. 552. 
study = room where a scholar's books 

are kept, i. 307 ; ii. 191, 471 : or the 

collection of books, i. 416; ii. 178. 
sturgeon, ii. 378; iii. 423. 
sub-delegacy, a, ii. 515. 
subject, the richest, in England, ii. 

394- 

suffrages = prayers, i. 345. 
sullins, the = sulks, ii. 215. 
sumpter-horse, i. 56, 87 ; iii. 282. 
sundial, ii. 151. 
sun-halo, ii. 511 ; iii. 280. 
sunshiny, ii. 1 21. 
superstitions, i. 179; ii. 355, 372. 
supplicat, a, ii. 16. 
supporters, ii. 302. 
surrogate = deputy, iii. 163. 
swaggerer, a, ii. 150. 
swash, to, i. 423. 

swearing, i. 299, 356, 360, 366 ; ii. 96, 

237 5 i»- 5io-i- 
sweat, a cold, iii. 359. 
sweepstakes, i. 541 
swinge away, to, ii. 514. 
S. Swithin's day, iii. 486. 
sword, wearing the, v. 214. 
swordfish, iii. 465. 
sycophantizing, i. 395. 



248 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



tabby, i. 490. 

tabernacles « booths, iii. 173- 

tabernacular, ii. 411. 

take, to, i. e. a drawing of, ii. 20. 

take up, to, i. e. reform, ii. 147. 

taken, to be, i. 62. 

tammy, v. 212. 

tapestry, i. 477- Several large fragments 
of this, being portions of an exceed- 
ingly interesting map of England, are 
now in the Bodleian. 

tart, i. 139. 

tay = tea, i. 201. 

teats, i. 341. 

Te Deum, iii. 268. 

tee = tea, i. 201. 

telescope, ii. 318. 

temper, losing, i. 507. 

tenent = tenet, i. 370. 

tergiversation, ii. 442. 

terrier, i. 398. 

Testaments, ii. 483. 

testimony, iii. 11. 

tey = tea, ii. 81. 

thee = tea, i. 168. 

theirn = theirs, ii. 533. 

then = than, i. 420, 481 ; ii. 33. 

theologist, i. 423 ; ii. 132. 

thin, iii. 7. 

thorough-paced, i. 327, 364; ii. 460; 

iii. 359. 
thorough-stone, a, ii. 304. 
three-knotted, iii. 317. 
throne = seat of honour, ii. 495. 
thuribulum, iv. 126. 

tides, two in a day, iii. 208 : three in a 

day, i. 349. 
timber, iv. 53-5. 
tinged with, to be, ii. 526. 
tippet, i. 481-2. 
tippling-houses, i. 129. 
tithes, i. 21 : lesser tithes, i. 217, 
to = two, iii. 364. 
togated, iii. 85. 
tongue, to, iii. 247. 
tonitruate, i. 139. 
tonnell, a, i. 224. 

tow = two, i. 479; ii. 95, 256, 262 ; 
v. 18. 

tragedious = tragic, ii. 485. 

train = train -bands, i. 53. 

transmutation, ii. 431. 

transportation, ii. 86. 

treasure-trove, iv. 210. 

treble vicar, ii. 559. 

tribune, i. 115. 

tribute = tax, i. 431. 

trimming, iii. 141. 

triplets, i. 508 ; iii. 182, 417, 469. 

trouling, i. 287. 

tub = desk, i. 177. 



tuck, to = scratch, i. 134. 
tuck, a = scratch, i. 139. 
tuck ^ short sword, ii. 354. 
tug, ii. 113. 
tunable, i. 323-4. 
turncoat, i. 83. 

turned off, to be, i.e. hanged, iii. 353. 
turnips, i. 259 ; ii. 194. 
Twelf days, iii. 176. 
twychen, ii. 222. 
typography, a, i. 316. 

uncapability, i. 84. 
uncoothly, i. 367. 
under-reader, i. 308. 
under-title, iii. 456. 

undervalue, an, i. 399 : undervalue, to, 

iii. 224. 
unlegible, ii. 226. 
unpeaceable, iii. 71. 
untunable, iii. 274. 
urging = urgent, i. 412. 
use = interest, ii. 438. 
use-money = interest, ii. 450; iii. 118, 

138. 

' uses,' in sermons, i. 291. 

usher = under-master, i. 108, 223 ; iii. 

usuage, iii. 467. 
usurpers, iii. 369. 

vales = perquisites, iii. 509. 
vary, to, v. 188. 
vendible, i. 266 ; ii. 520, 530. 
vendition, i. 233. 

verse writers, disappointed, iii. 133. 

vertigo, i. 140. 

vertuosity, ii. 360, 362. 

vestigia = remains, i. 338, 345 ; ii. 492. 

veterans, veterani, ii. 90-1. 

vice = abbreviation for vice-chancellor, 

ii. 547. 
viduated, iii. 218. 
virgin wax, i. 481. 

virtuoso, virtuosi, i. 201, 473; ii. 530; 

iii. 253. 

visions, pretended, i. 292, 297, 388. 
visiting = one of the degree ceremonials, 

ii. 547. 
voluntary, a, iii. 50. 

volunteers, for the king, i. 59, 61 ; iii. 
I 45> x 54> 3°°> 3 21 : against the king, 

iii. 284, 323. 
votaress, i. 385. 
vowess, i. 339. 
voyage = journey, i. 190. 

wager, ii. 82 : see bet. 
waggish, i. 283 : waggery, i. 283 ; ii. 
548. 

wainscot, iv. 55 ; v. 189. 



INDEX V. 

waiting-gentleman, a, ii. 127. 
watch, a brass, iii. 434. 
waterhouse, iii. 485. 
weapons, carrying, i. 174: see sword, 
weavings, i. 342. 
weildy, iii. 227. 
weir, ii. 30. 
well-day, i. 176, 178. 
well-ordering, a, i. 294. 
well-studied, ii. 552. 
welt, ii. 235. 
wistly = wistfully, i. 391. 
whales, ii. 375; iii. 356, 403-4, 419, 
43i- 

wharfage, iv. 70. 
wheat, ii. 538. 
whirlwind, iii. 464. 
whistling, i. 501. 
widgeons, i. 367. 

witches, i. 6, 17, 434, 452, 458; ii. 87, 
3°3> 314. 



WORDS. 249 

withdrawing-room, ii. 242 ; iii. 254. 
withoutside, ii. 410. 

wits, i. 170, 201, 427, 466; ii. 332, 

women-rioters, iii. 42. 
wonder-craft = magic, i. 344. 
woods, i. 100, 156, 281 ; iii. 461. 
woody = capable of growing trees, iii. 
461. 

wool-trade, i. 409. 
wretching, i. 177. 

xx, i. e. viginti, written over numerals, 
as c = 100, iv. in. 

yard-land, i. 195 ; ii. 284. 

yatch = yacht, iii. 290; yatcht, iii. 350, 

353- 
year = ear, i. 392 ; ii. 38. 
yeoman, iii. 105. 
yew-trees, ii. 164. 



INDEX VI 



PERSONS 

Wood's Life and Times contains a much greater number of names than most 
books of the kind. This arises from the writer's peculiar tastes and studies. He 
was passionately fond of genealogical research, and seldom let slip an opportunity 
of bringing into his text some portion of the notes he had amassed. He used his 
diaries also as memorandum-books during the compilation of his Athenae, and 
thus introduced a multitude of names of writers and ecclesiastics which have no 
natural place in them. In the last ten years of his life, when his deafness cut him 
off from human society, he was thrown back on the newspapers, and, according 
to his manner, made copious notes from them on the subjects in which he took 
interest, e. g. promotions civil and ecclesiastical for his Athenae, or deaths and 
matches of peers for his additions to Dugdale's Baronagium. 

It has been a wearisome task to index these references, frequently so insignifi- 
cant ; but it seemed necessary, since otherwise they could certainly not be dis- 
covered in Wood's thousand and more pages. 

This index is chiefly of Oxford interest, and I have therefore taken pains to give 
the college or hall of members of the University ; to distinguish Oxford citizens 
by the mark opp. = oppidanus or oppidana ; and, where it seemed right, to mark 
people outside Oxford as extr. = exiraneus or extranea. The year of death has 
been added (distinguished by the mark +), where I was able to ascertain it: in 
other cases, the year of first mention is generally given. 



A., J., iii. 307 : see Joan of Headington. 
a Barton, see Barton, 
a Becket, see Becket. 
Abbo, Floriacensis, iv. 250. 
Abbott, Geo., archbp. Cant., + 1633, ii. 
538; iv. in. 

— Martha (mar. Brent), i. 162 ; ii. 369. 

— Rob., bp. Sarum, f 161 8, i. 162 ; ii. 
369- 

Abdy, Chr., 1650, Mert., i. 137. 

— sir John, f 1692, iii. 381. 
Abelard, Peter, ' Ethica,' i. 441. 
Abendana, Isaac, 1693, iii. 422. 
Abendon, see Abingdon. 
Abercromy, Jecamiah, f 1645, i. 118. 

— dr. (David), 1688, iii. 266. 
Abergavenny : Neville, baron : — 

— John, eighth baron, f 1660, iii. 206 : 



Abergavenny, baron {continued) : — 
Elizabeth (Chamberlaine) , baroness, 
iii. 206. 

— George, ninth baron, f 1666, ii. 54. 

— George, tenth baron, f 1695, iii. 482. 

— George, eleventh baron, f 1721, iii. 
482. 

Abingdon, dr. Henry, 142 1, Mert., i. 

211; 235, 332. 
Abingdon (Abington, Habendon), 

Thomas, antiquary, f 1647, l - 4 I ^> 

ii. 277. 

Abingdon : Bertie, earl of : — 

— James, first earl, f 1699, v. 23: 
Eleanor (Lee), countess, f 1691, ii. 
117, 241 ; iii. 362. 

— Montague, second earl : 1682-99, 
styled lord Norreys, iii. 59 : was 



INDEX VI. 



PERSONS. 



Abingdon, earl of {continued?) : — 

captain of the horse-troop of Oxford 
University militia against Monmouth, 
1685, iii. 148-9, 152 : 22 Sept. 1687, 
mar. Anne Venables and was called 
lord Venables, iii. 277: 1690, M.P. 
for Oxfordshire, iii. 327, 493. 

Abrahall, Geo., Ball., f 1674, ii. 341. 

— John, Ball., f 1676, ii. 341. 
Abryncensis, Henricus, iv. 259. 
Abulpharagus, Gregorius, i. 316. 
Acherius, Lucas, 1668, iv. 295. 
A'court (Court), John, 1662, Line, i. 

333 ; ii. 144, 151, 153, 178, 189, 190. 
Acton, Paul, New c, f 1687, iii. 209. 

— miss ... (mar. Read), f 1657, i. 223. 
Acworth, Tho., 1677, Ch. Ch., ii. 383. 
Ad., iii. 314, see ... Adams, infra. 
Adam, ii. 151. 

Adams, Andrew, 1660, extr., ii. 548. 

— Cath. (mar. Clerk), 1660, iii. 216. 

— Fitzherbert, Line, f 17 19, v. 23. 

— Joan, 1676, Wood's bedmaker, ii. 
343, 363 ; also ii. 351 (old Joan). 

— John, 1660, extr., iii. 150. 

— John, 1680, author, ii. 475. 

— John, 1686, ?opp., iii. 174. 

— Rich., 1637, Line, i. 46-7. 

— Rich., M.D., Alls., f 1716, iii. 208 : 
princ. Magd. h., iii. 444, 446. 

— Rich., D.D., Line, Magd. e, f 1724, 
iii. 150, 531. 

— Sam., Exet., tJ.741, ii. 516, 522; 
iii. 256, 496. 

— Susanna (nee Brent), ii. 369. 

— Sylvester (Silvester), 1661, Mert, 
S. Alb. h., i. 407, 416, 503 ; ii. 15, 18. 

— Thomas, opp., smith, f 1664, i. 176 ; 

ii. 26 ; iv. 54, 57, 60, 63, 66. 

— Tho., 1662, Bras., nonconformist, 

iii. 204. 

— Will., 15 — , extr., ii. 369. 

— Will., 16 — , extr., iii. 216. 

— Will., senior, 1664, Line, ii. 15, 18. 

— Will., junior, Line, f 1692, ii. 548 ; 

i«- I5°> 34 2 - 

— ... , 1648, Lond., i. 227. 

— ... , 1660, opp., bookseller, i. 338, 
486. 

— ... , 1682, opp., apothecary, iii. 23, 
314 ('Ad.'). 

Adderly, Andrew, 1693, ? opp., iv. 42. 
Addison, Anth., Qu., +1719, iii. 386, 
455, 486 ; iv. 84. 

— Lancelot, Qu., f 1703, i. 256 ; iii. 45 
(' Laurence,' in error). 

A'deane, miss ... (mar. Gregory), 15—, 

i. 245 : see also Deane. 
S. Adelmus, bishop, ii. 333. 
Adhelbertus, iv. 91. 
Adison, see Addison. 



Adkins, sir Edw., see Atkins. 

— Will., 1665, °PP>> butcher, ii. 55 ; 
iii. 242. 

— miss... (mar. Bowell), 1660, opp., 
iii. 242. 

— see also Atkins. 

Adler (Adlard), Anth.,1649, Line, ii. 1 7. 
Adolphus, prince, of Sweden, 1660, iii. 
57- 

Adolphus Johannes, prince, of Germany, 

1683, iii. 57. 
Aeschwyne, bishop, i. 225. 
Aesop, ii. 8, 179, 258. 
Agapius, a Greek bishop, 1685, iii. 156. 
Agard, Arthur, 15 — , iv. 91, 179. 
Agas, Daniel, 15 — , Corp., i. 180. 

— Daniel, 1664, Corp., ii. 18. 

— (Jane) (mar. Cole), 15 — , i. 180. 

— Ralph, 1578, map of Oxford, i. 254 ; 

ii. 49» 3*3 5 iv - 6 3, 2 9°- 

— ... , 15 — , i. 180 : ? whether Ralph. 
Aghrim, Godert de Ginkell, baron, 

f 1703, iii. 382. 
Aglionby, major ... , 1645, i. 121. 
Ahirst, see Ayerst. 

Ailesbury (Aylesbury), sir Tho., f 1657, 

i. 83, 249. 

Ailesbury : Bruce, earl of : — 

— Robert, first earl, f 1685, iii. 166. 

— Tho., second earl, f 1 741, iii. 289-90. 
Ailiffe, see Ayliffe. 

Ailmoth, see Almont. 

Ailnoth, see Alnut. 

Ailredus, abbot of Rievaux, iv. 250. 

Ailworth, see Aldworth. 

Airay, see Ayray. 

Aisgill, Joshua, 1623, Corp., ii. 390. 

— Mary (mar. Eyans), f 1675, ii. 390. 
Aitkin, James, 1687, Scotch bishop, iii. 

209. 

Akers, Rebecca (mar. Holloway), 1679, 

opp., ii. 469. 
Aketon, Will., ? 14 — , Cambr., iv. 203. 
Akworth, The, 1677, Ch. Ch., ii. 383. 
Alasko, count Albert, 1580, iv. 145. 
Alban, saint, iv. 310. 
Albemarle : Monk, duke of : — 

— George, first duke, f 1670, v. 62 : 
Anne (Clarges), duchess, ii. 216. 

— Chr., second duke, f 1688 : 1670, 
succeeds to the title, ii. 184 : 1674, 
buys Clarendon house, i. 337 : is 
chancellor of Cambridge, iii. 136: 
1685, accused of intriguing with Mon- 
mouth, iii. 144 : 1687, governor of 
Jamaica, iii. 279 : incidental mention , 

ii. 528 ; iii. 376, 402. 

Eliz. (Cavendish), duchess, ii. 184 ; 

iii. 37 6 > 4° 2 - 

Albemarle, Henry Fitzjames, duke of, 
iii. 390. 



252 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Albericus, Philip, iv. 251. 
Albertus, iv. 251. 

— of Prusia, iv. 311. 

Albiis, Tho. tie, + 1676, see White. 

Albizi, cardinal, ii. 182. 

Alder (Aldar), Francis, 1664, opp., 
tenant of part of the Wood property, 
ii. 1, 271, 273, 427, 451, 509; iii. 35. 

Alderne, Ldw., Exet., f 1671, iii. 320. 

Aides (esSlade), Theodore, 1666, iii. 
318. 

Aldrich (Aldridge), Henry, Lond., 
f 1683, iii. 39. 

— Henry, dean of Ch. Ch., f 1710, v. 
23-4- 

Aldworth (Aldsworth, Alworth), Anne 
(nee Wood), 1689, opp., i. 28, 31 ; 
"i- 3io, 397, 468. 

— Charles, Magd. c, f 1720, v. 24. 

— Henry, see Aylworth. 

— John, 1676, Alls., ii. 334 ; iii. 41, 83, 
87,136. 

— Rich., 16 — , Lond., ii. p. viii. 

— Rich., M.A., S. Jo., Alls., f 1707, i. 
496 ; iii. 41. 

— Rich., B.C.L., S. Jo., f 1701, iii. 41. 
■ — Rob., 1689, opp., chandler, i. 28, 

31 ; iii. 310, 468. 

— miss ... (mar. Wilmot), 1656, ii. 
p. viii. 

— see also Aylworth. 

Aleman, Matthew, Spanish author, i. 
306. 

Alex, Peter, 1690, D.D., iii. 331. 
Alexander, bp. of Line, f 1147, i. 340. 
Alexander IV, pope, f 1261, iii. 343. 
Alexander VII, pope, f 1667, ii. 181. 
Alexander VIII, pope, f 169J, iii. 354, 
356. 

Alexander, Geo., 1660, Magd. c, i. 330. 

— John, 1689, Ball., iii. 311. 

— see Stirling, earl of. 
Aleyn, Charles, f 1640, iii. 174. 
Alfarache, Guzman de, i. 306. 
Alford, Will., fi644, i. 112. 

Alfred, king, iv. 251, 277: in the Oxford 
legend, iv. 96-7, no, 306 : 1 arms ' of, 
iv. 251 : MS. life of, iv. 251 : Asser's 
life of, ii. p. vii ; iv. 252 : printed 
lives of, ii. 93, 421, 449 : statue of, at 
Univ. college, 1683, iii. 35. 

Aliff, see Ayliffe. 

Alington : Alington, baron : — 

— Will., second baron, f 1685, iii. 124, 
463-4- 

— Giles, third baron, f 1691, iii. 372. 
Alkindus, iv. 252. 

Allam (Allum), Andr., senior, 1655, ii. 
5°9- 

— Andr., S. Edm. h., + 1685, v. 24. 

— Bridget, 1655, ii. 509. 



Allam, KHz., 1681, ii. 544. 

— Mary, 1681, ii. 544, 546; iii. 4. 

— Thomas, see IJallum. 

— ... , brother of Andrew, 1682, iii. 4. 

— see also Ilallum. 
Allcctus, coin of, i. 463. 

Alleine (Allen), Joseph,Puritan preacher, 
f 1668, iii. 432. 

— Theodosia, widow of Joseph, iii. 432, 
440. 

Allen (Alleyn), Catherine, 1679, °PP-> 

ii. 454. 

— Catherine, t 687, opp., iii. 217. . 

— Charles, see Aleyn. 

— Edward, 1662, Lond., i. 466. 

— Edward, 1683, opp., iii. 37. 

— Frances (nee Ashhurst), ii. 137. 

— John, opp., f 1687, iii. 217. 

— Joseph, see Alleine. 

— Peter, Ch. Ch., f 1667, ii. 13, 118. 

— sir Rich., extr., ii. 137. 

— Theodosia, see Alleine. 

— Tho., Gloc. h., f 1632, v. 24. 

— sir Tho., + 1685, iii. 164. 

— sir Tho., Lond., f 1690, i. 321 ; iii. 
346. 

— miss ... (mar. Ashhurst), ii. 137. 

— rev. ... , 1671, ii. 237. 
Allestree, James, 1654, Lond., iii. 198. 

— James, Ch. Ch., f 1686, ii. 490, 564 ; 

iii. 24, 52, 198 ('Jacob'); iv. 71. 

— Rich., Ch. Ch., f 1681, v. 24-5. 
Alleyn, E., 1662, Lond., i. 466. 

— see also Alleine, Allen. 

Allibond (Allibone), Job, senior, ii. 
142. 

— Job, junior, 1687, Magd. c, ii. 142 ; 
iii- 523, 5 2 5- 

— John, Magd. c, f 1659, i- T 44» 2 49 ; 
ii. 141-2 ; iii. 523, 525. 

— Margaret (nee Ballam), 1600, ii. 142. 

— Peter, Magd. c, f 1629, ii. 141-2. 

— Peter, Line, + 1641, ii. 142 ; iv. 57. 

— sir Richard, f 1688, ii. 142 ; iii. 260, 

274- 523. 

— Thomas, 15 — , ii. 142. 

— 15—, ii- J 4 2 - 

— lady (n^e Blaxstone), ii. 142. 

— miss ... (mar. Hood), ii. 141-2. 
Almont (Almond) , James, 1687, steward 

of Magd. c, iii. 519. 

— Rob., Magd. c, + 1709, iii. 249, 524 
(' Ailmoth'), 529. 

— Roger, Trim, + 1710, ii. 546; iii. 
369- 

Alnewick, Will., 1436, bp. of Line., iv. 
ii3- 

Alnut, sir Henry, 1663, ii. 229, 476 
(< Ailnoth '). 

— John, 1663, ii. 476. 
Alphonso, 16 — , musician, i. 233. 



INDEX VI 

Alport, Millicent (nee Astrey), 1657, 
opp., i. 220. 

— Philip, 1657, opp., apothecary, i. 
213, 220, 279, 337, 389, 400, 469; 
ii. 8, 19. 

Alridge, see Aldrich. 

Alsop, Nathaniel, 1669, Bras., ii. 165, 

168, 172, 177. 
Alston, sir Edw., f 1669, iii. 405. 

— Sarah (mar. Grimstone), f 1692, iii. 
405. 

— sir Tho., 1648, ii. 138. 

— Tho., S. Edm. h., f 1668, ii. 138. 
Altham, Roger, sen., Ch. Ch., t^Mi 

ii. 318, 542 ; iii. 13, 18, 40, 43, 375, 
404, 458, 511. 

— Roger, jun., Ch. Ch., f 1730, ii. 542 ; 

iii. 319, 404, 421, 438. 

Alvey, Tho., Mert.,fi704, ii. 151, 184, 

393 ; I"- 9> l8 7- 
Alworth, see Aldworth, Aylworth. 
Ambler, Brian, 1647, Mert., i. 136, 164, 

166, 477. 

— John, 1689, Alls., i. 136. 
Ambrose, Isaac, Bras., Puritan, + 1664, 

iii. 174, 204. 
Ambrosius, 1539, i. 498. 
Amcell, Robert, 1444, iv. 98. 
Amhurst, ... , 1688, iii. 288. 
Amicia, of Chester, ii. 188. 
Amphibalus, martyr, iv. 195, 310. 
Anderson, Andrew, 1670, Edinb., ii. 

202. 

Anderton, Will., Lond., f 1693, iii. 425. 
Andover, see Berkshire. 
S. Andrew, MS. life of, ii. 221. 
Andrew, bp. Geo., f 1648, iii. 174. 
Andrews, Charles, New c, f 1684, iii. 
115. 

— Will., 1663, almanac-maker, i. 11, 
13- 

— ... , 1660, butler of Exet., i. 302. 

— 16—, opp., iii. 243. 

— miss ... (mar. Pont), f 1687, iii. 243. 
Angell, John, Magd. h., Puritan, f 1655, 

ii. 513. 

Angelo, 1688, extr., iii. 256. 
Anglesey : Villiers, earl of : — 

— Charles, second earl, iii. 87 : Mary 
(Bayning), countess, iii. 87. 

Anglesey : Annesley, earl of : — 

— Arthur, first earl, f 1686 : 1662, buys 
Bletchington, i. 436 : 1673, lord privy 
seal, ii. 385, 388, 467, 516 ; iii. 28 : 
1685, intrigue with Monmouth, iii. 
157 : incidental mention, i. 386, 457 ; 
ii. 277; iii. 175, 204, 255. 

— James, second earl, i. 457 ; iii. 329. 
Anglicus, Jeffrey, iv. 297. 

— Johannes, iv. 296. 

— Robert, iv. 251. 



PERSONS. 253 

Angus, earl of, courtesy title : — 

— James Douglas, + 1692, killed at 
Steinkirk, iii. 454. 

— William Douglas, f 1694, iii. 454. 
Anian, see Anyan. 

Ann, see Anne. 

Anna Maria, of Austria, queen of France, 

f 1666, i. 230. 
Annand, Will., Univ., + 1689, iii. 10. 
Anne, consort of Henry VIII (? Boleyn, 

1 1536), iv. 138. 

— princess, daughter of Charles I, iv. 
56. 

— of Austria, see Anna. 

— duchess of York, v. 25. 

— princess, afterwards queen, v. 25. 

— 1677, cook at Ralph Sheldon's, ii. 
366, 389. 

— 1694, maidservant, iii. 468. 
Annesley, Arthur, see Anglesey, earl of. 

— Frances (mar. Thompson), iii. 255. 

— James, Ch. Ch., f 1690, i. 457 ; iii. 
329- 

— Rich., Magd. c, dean of Exeter, 
t 1701, ii. 277, 385, 516; iii. 12, 
204, 368, 459, 471. 

Annus Mirabilis, i. 347, 350, 378, 387, 

410, 431, 433, 437, 466: Puritan 

pamphlet so named. 
Ansell, ... , 1 781, auctioneer, iii. 103. 
Ansley, sir Rich., 1691, iii. 376: in 

error for Onslow, q.v. 
Anstis, John, herald, f 1745, i. 1. 
Antichrist expected, 1666, ii. 87 : because 

666 is the number of the Beast. 
Antonianus, duke of Valence, ii. 294. 
Antonini ' Itinerarium,' iv. 294. 
Antrim, Randal M'Donnell, first 

marquis of, f 1682, iii. 294. 
Anyan (Anian), Martha (nee Vaughan), 

t 1675, i. 154 ; iv. Plate IV. 

— Susan (mar. Holloway), f 1685, ii* 
308. 

— Thos., Corp., f 1632, i. 154 ; ii. 308 : 
implied in Mrs. lies, ii. p. viii. 

— ... , 1580, extr., ii. 30S. 

Appleby ( Apleby), Thomas, 1663, °PP»5 
grocer, i. 501; ii. 30, 45, 47, 50, 
450. 

— sir Peter, see Apsley. 
Appleton, sir Henry, 16 — , iii. 99. 

— Joan (nee Sheldon), 16 — , iii. 99. 
Apronanus, ii. 303. 

Apsley, sir Alan (Allen), + 1683, ii. 462, 
492 ; iii. 76. 

— sir Peter, f 1692, iii. 380. 
Archer, Benj., Exet., +1732, iii. 67, 

204, 334> 439- 

— Edw., 1665, extr., iii. 67. 

— John, 1687, iii. 204, 349. 

— rev. ... , 1657, i. 233 ; iii. 67. 



254 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Arden, John, 1610, cxtr., i. 193; ii. 
230. 

— Margaret (mar. Napier), opp.,f 1675, 
i. 193 ; ii. 230. 

— Robert, 1600, extr., iv. 290. 
Arderne, James, dean of Chester, f 1691, 

iii. 15, 25, 291. 
Argyll : Campbell, earl of: — 

— Archibald, eighth earl, created 
marquis of Argyll, iii. 143, 442. 

Margaret (Douglas), countess, iii. 

442 : in footnote, following Burke, 
erroneously said to be lady Vere Ker, 
who was the wife of Neil, second son 
of Archibald, eighth earl. 

— Archibald, tenth earl, iii. 348. 
Aristeas, ii. 179. 

Aristotle, ii. 472; iv. 252, 295, 309. 
Arlington : Bennet, earl of : — 

— Henry, first earl, -f 1685 : student of 
Ch. Ch., i. 459 ; ii. 7 : 1662, secretary 
of state, i. 459 ; ii. 168, 262 ; iv. 73 : 
1665, created baron Arlington, and, 
1672, earl of Arlington, ii. 7, 304: 
1674, l° r( i chamberlain, ii. 328, 514, 
523, 528, 532 : 1685, death, iii. 155 : 
incidental mention, ii. 7, 34, 517. 

Arminius, Jacob, + 1609, v. 231-2. 
Armoner (Armorer), Nich., f 1685, ii. 
99. 

Armstrong, sir Tho., f 1684, iii. 97. 
Arnold, <? Edmund), 1 663, Lond., i. 395. 

— John, 1680, Lond., ii. 485. 

— Robert, Wadh., f 1635, v. 198. 
Arran, earl of, in the peerage of Scot- 
land, see Hamilton. 

Arran : Butler, earl of, in the peerage of 
Ireland : — 

— Rich., first earl, fi686, ii. 385-6; 

iii. 178-9. 

— Charles, first earl, created 1693, 

ti759> »»• 44 I »444- 
Arrowsmith, ... , 1681, Lond., iii. 31-2. 
Arsick family, i. 253. 
Arthur, 1666, ii. 85, i.e. Fowler, q. v. 

— Dan., 1678, Lond., ii. 419, 422. 

— Dr. John, ?f 1682, i. 334; iii. 470. 

— ... , 1666, opp., ii. 76. 

Arundel, Tho., archbp. of Cant., f 14 — , 

iv. 112, 252. 

Arundel : Howard, earl of, iii. 460 : — 

— Thomas, fourteenth earl, + 1646, iii. 
342 : owner of the Arundel library, 

v. 104. 

— Henry Frederick, fifteenth earl, 
+ 1652, ii. 314; iii. 459. 

— i. 320, note 4, delete 'earl of Arundel.' 
Arundell of Trerice, Richard Arundell, 

first baron, + 1688, iii. 87. 
Arundell of Wardour, Henry Arundell, 
third baron, f 1694, iii. 172, 460, 475. 



Arwaker, Kdm., 1694, iii. 455. 
Ascham, Anthony, 1648, iii. 167. 
Ascott, Charles Dormer, viscount, 

courtesy title, ?f 166-, i. 440. 
Ash, bp. St. George, ii. 385. 

— ... , 1670, ii. 194. 
Ashburnham, John, 1648, i. 227. 

— Will., f 1679, ii. 471. 

— ... , 1643, i. 91. 

Ashby, sir John, f 1693, iii. 425. 
Ashcombe, Frideswyde (mar. Lyde), 
f 1613, iii. 259. 

— ... , 15—, iii. 259. 
Ashendon, John, iv. 252. 

Ashford (Ayshford), Dan., 1681, Hart 

h., ii. 561 ; iii. 24, 28, 174. 
Ashhurst, see Ashurst. 
Ashley, sir Jacob, 1643, i. 86, 91, 96. 

— John, 1663, Magd. c, ii. 81. 
Ashley-Cooper, see Shaftesbury. 
Ashmole, pedigree of, iii. 335. 

— Anne (nee ...), 15 — , iii. 335. 

— Anne (nee Bowyer), f 1646, iii. 335. 

— Eleanor (n^e Man waring), f 1641, 
iii- 335- 

— Elias, herald, f 1692, v. 25-6. 

— Elizabeth (nee Dugdale), 166S, ii. 
164; iii. 334-5- 

— Mary (nee Forster), + 1668, iii. 335. 

— Simon, f 1634, iii. 335. 

— Thomas, +1621, iii. 335. 

Ashton (Assheton), rev. James, 1682, 
S. Jo., iii. 1 2 : or Aston. 

— John, captain, f 1691, iii. 350, 353, 
357. 359, 388. 

— sir Ralph, Bras., f 1644, ii. 198. 

— sir Ralph, Bras., f 17 16, ii. 198 ; iii. 
444. 

— Tho., 1646, extr., ii. 198-9. 

— Tho., 1656, Bras. : see Will., infra. 

— Tho., Bras., 1*1670, ii. 198-9. 

— Will, (in error for Tho., Puritan 
fellow of Bras., 1656), ii. 514. 

— Will., D.D., 1674, Bras., iii. 302. 

— see also Aston. 

Ashurst, Cassandra (nee Bradshaw), ii. 

— Diana (nee Paget), ii. 137. 

— Elizabeth (nee Draper), ii. 137. 

— Frances (mar. Allen), ii. 137. 

— Henry, Lond., f 1680, ii. 137. 

— sir Henry, sen., first baronet, ii. 137 ; 
iii. 378. 

— sir Henry, jun., ii. 137. 

— Judith (nee Risley), ii. 137. 

— Thomas Henry, ii. 137. 

— sir Will., f 1720, ii. 137; iii. 470. 

— sir William Henry, 1787, ii. 137. 

— William Henry, 1891, ii. 137. 

— 15— , ii. 137. 

— 16—, ii. 137. 



INDEX VI. 

Ashurst, ... , 164-, M.P., ii. 137. 

— 164-, colonel, ii. 137. 

— ... , mrs. ... (nee Allen), ii. 137. 
Ashwell, Geo., Wadh., + 1694, ii. 334, 

468. 

— Tho., Magd. c., f 1688, iii. 276. 
Ashwood (Barth.), Exet., f 1681, iii. 

440. 

Ashworth, Dorothy (mar. Hawley), 
f 1672, ii. 251. 

— miss ... (mar. Hallum), 16 — , ii. 229. 
Asketell, Will., iv. 252. 

Asley, mr. ... , 1666, ii. 81. 
Asser Menevensis, ii, p. vii ; iv. 198, 
252. 

Asteyne (Astyn, Austen), Edward, opp., 
attorney, f 1673, i. 30; ii. 25, 70 
(Austen), 240 (Austen), 269, 285 ; 
iv. 64; v. 14. 

— Grace (nee Chesterman), 1665, opp., 
i. 30 ; ii. 70 (Austen), 269 ; v. 14. 

— Grace (mar. Smyth), 1673, ii. 269, 
385. 

— James, Qu., f 1664, ii. 25, 269. 

— Will., sen., 15 — , ii. 269. 

— Will., jun., 16—, ii. 269. 

— mrs. ... (nee Seabright), ii. 269. 

— mrs. ... (nee James), ii. 269. 
Astley, Herbert, dean of Norwich, 

f 1681, iii. 9. 
Aston, sir Arthur, +1649, i. 85, 90 
(' Ralph'), no, 172. 

— Gerard, 1653, ii. 17. 

— James, S. Jo., see Ashton. 

— sir Ralph, i. 90, in error for Arthur, 
q.v. 

— sir Roger, + 161 2, ii. 458. 

— sir Willoughby, 1686, ii. 264; iii. 
194. 

-—miss... (mar. Houghton), 16 — , ii. 
458. 

— rev. ... , 1692, iii. 389. 
Astry, Francis, 1686, iii. 199. 

— James, Bras., + 1709, ii. 380. 

— Millicent (mar. Alport), 1657, °PP-> 
i. 220. 

at-East, Matthias, 1682, iii. 7. 
Athanasius, saint, ii. 2. 
Atheiton, Geo., Ch. Ch., -f 1701, iii. 
174. 

Athlone, viscount : see Wilmot of Ath- 
lone. 

Athlone, Godert de Ginkell, earl of, 

1 1703, "i- 3 82 - 
Athole, John Murray, first marquis of, 

+ 1703, iii. 356. 
Athrop, John, Mert., f I 6S5, i. 436, 

461 ; iii. 122. 
Atkins, Emma (mar. Weeks), 15 — , i. 

442. 

— sir Edw., f 1669, 2 54- 



PERSONS. 255 

Atkins, sir Edw., + 1698, iii. 9. 

— sir Rob., f 1710, i. 254; ii. 450, 

5 X 9> 55°, 5 6 °; »i- 4°9> 47*- 

— Will., 1683, opp., writ-server, iii. 42, 
511. 

— miss ... (mar. Fitzherbert), 1658,1. 
2 54- 

— mr. ... , 1653, ii. 17. 

Atkinson, Charles, 1671, almanac- 
maker, i. 11, 13. 

— Will., Qu., f 1700, iii. 147. 
Atley, John, New c, f 1660, i. 349. 
Atterbury, Francis, Ch. Ch., afterwards 

bp. of Roch., f 1732, iii. 81. 

— Lewis, Ch. Ch., f 1693, iii. 81. 

— Thomas, 1687, iii. 247. 
Atwood, James, 1618, iv. 148. 

— Will., 1689, iii. 190. 
Aubigny, see Danbigny. 

Aubrey (Awbrey), John, Trin., 1697, 
v. 26. 

— sir John, first baronet, 1648, iii. 158, 
162. 

— sir John, ? second baronet, ii. 117. 
Aucher, Rob., Qu., f 1682, iii. 10. 

— sir Anthony, 1645, iii. 10. 
Audley, Edmund, bp. of Sarum, *f* 1524, 

iv. 160. 

— ... , 'the rich,' i. 219. 

S. Augustin, of Canterbury, iv. 306. 

Aungier, see Longford. 

Austen (Austin), Edward, see Asteyne. 

— James, see Asteyne. 

— John, Cambr., ii. 334. 

— Ralph, opp., registrar to Pari, vis., 
f 1677, i. 142, 167, 230, 302 ; ii. 163, 
374; iv. 60. 

— Robert, 1691, iii. 353. 

— major ... , 1691, iii. 350, in error for 
capt. John Ashton. 

— ... , 16 — , extr., i. 462. 

— mrs. ... (nee Pimm), f 1662, i. 462. 

— see also Asteyne. 
Aval on, see Mordaunt. 
Avery, ... , 1666, extr., ii. 93. 
Avice, prioress of Godstow, i. 339-40. 
Avis, in a popular tradition, iv. 83. 

a Wood, see Wood. 

Awbrey, see Aubrey. 

Axtell, col. Dan., ii. 507. 

Ayerst (Ahirst), Tho., Univ., f 1730, ii. 

115,187. 
Aylesbury, see Ailesbury. 
Aylesford, Heneage Finch, earl of, 

v. 44. 

Ayliffe (Ailoff, Ayleff, Ayloffe, Aylyff), 
sir Geo., i. 431. 

— John, S. Edm. h., f 1685, iii. 168. 

— Joseph, 1681, Ch. Ch., ii. 548. 

— Will., New c, \ 1664, i. 109, 409 ; 
ii. 11. 



256 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Ayliffe, ... , Lond., ii. 367. 

— miss ... (mar. Hyde), i. 431. 
Aylworth (Ailworth, Alclworth, Al- 

worth), Anthony, New c, '|- 1 6 1 9 , 

i. 214, 236. 

— Anthony, 16 — , opp., i. 236. 

— Catherine (nee Page), 16 — , opp., i. 
236. 

— Eleanor (nee Tooker), f 1667, ii. 2, 
108. 

— Henry 1 , senior, New c., D.C.L., 
chancellor of the diocese of Oxford, 
fi699, ii. 2, 108, 476; iii. 12, 127, 
146, 305, 427 ; iv. 80. 

— Henry, junior, 1693, Ch. Ch., M.A., 

iii. 427. 

— Martin, Alls., f 1658, i. 214, 
236. 

— Will., 1670, opp., i. 214. 

— mrs. ... (nee Bayly), 15 — , i. 214. 

— see also Aldworth. 

Ayray (Airay), Adam, S. Edm. h., 
1 1658, i. 444. 

— Christ., Qu., f 1670, i. 444. 

— Henry, 1621, (?) Lond., i. 247-8. 
Ayre (Ayres), see Eyre. 

Ayres, Philip, 1682, Lond., i. 351. 
Ayshford, see Ashford. 

B., J., 1679, nom-de-plume, ii. 446. 

— J., iii. 104. 

— sir T., 1665, ii. 48. 

— W., ii. 179. 

Baber, Francis, Trim, f 1669, iii. 319. 

— Henry, Trim, + 1649, x 5^- 

— Will., 1675, Ch. Ch., ii. 319. 
Babington, Franc, 1560, Line, i. 262; 

iv. 127. 

Backhouse, Flower (mar. Hyde), 1670, 

ii. 202 ('lady' Backhouse). 

— John, 1659, Wadh., i. 283 ( c Will.' 
in error). 

— Will., Ch. Ch., fi662, i. 283; 

ii. 202. 

Bacon, Francis, i. 354, 436, 461; ii. 

239, 2 5 6 > 336. 

— John, iv. 253. 

— Roger, ii. 199; iv. 180, 201, 253-7, 
267, 306. 

— capt. ... , 1660, iv. 64. 
Baconthorpe, John, iv. 253. 
Badcock, John, 1682, servant of Mert, 

iii. 21. 

Baden-Baden, Ludwig Wilhelm, mar- 
grave of, iii. 438, 441-2. 

Badger, James, New c, ti.717, iii. 
492. 



Badger, ... , 1610, opp., mason, iii. 122 ; 
iv. 55- 

— 1636, opp., bookbinder, iv. 56-7. 

— mrs. ... (nee Pointer), 1695, iii. 492. 
Baes, Martin, engraver, i. 279. 
Bagett, Rich., 1683, extr., iii. 46. 
Bagford, (John), 1694, iii. 440. 
Baggs, ... , 17—, opp., i. 168. 
Bagnal, lieut. ... , 1645, i. 122. 

— miss ... (mar. Burke), 1672, iii. 182. 
Bagshaw, Edw., Ch. Ch., fi67i, i. 

268, 359, 369; ii. 11, 235, 240; iii. 
415. 

— Franc, 1685, Magd. c, iii. 147, 
I 49-5°i J 52, 250, 524, 529, 533. 

— Henry, Ch. Ch., f 1709, i. 415, 490. 

— John, 1654, extr., iii. 147. 

— John, 1680, Ch. Ch., ii. 485. 

— Margaret, f 1693, iii. 415. 
Bagwell, John, Exet., f 1725, iii. 482. 
Bailies, Thomas, 1677, extr., ii. 395. 
Bainbridge (Banbridge, Bambridge), 

John, Mert., f 1643, i. 27, 62, 75, 80, 
84, 86, 104; ii. 234, 263; v. 9. 

— John, 1683, Univ., iii. 78. 
Bainham, see Baynham. 
Bainrafe, Tho., pseudonym, ii. 284. 
Baker, Augustine, O.S.B., f 1641, ii. 

321 ; iii. 295, 320. 

— Geoffrey, chronicler, iv. 257. 

— John, Qu., f 1673, ii. 257. 

— John, 1677, extr -> ii- 366, 389. 

— Margaret (mar. Cogan), 1673, ii. 
257- 

— Michael, 1646, i. 131. 

— sir Rich., + 1645, ii. 235, 241, 262 ; 
iii. 167, 513. 

— Tho., 1683, Alls., iii. 83. 

— Tho., 1684, town-clerk, iii. n 2-3, 
140, 149, 228, 244, 280. 

— (?Tho., Magd. h., f 1690), iii. 440. 

— ... , 1600, extr., ii. 257. 

— ... , 1670, ? opp., ii. 187. 

— ... , 1678, extr., ii. 407. 

— mrs. ... (nee Tibbald), ii. 257. 

— miss ... (mar. Kate), 1673, ii. 257. 

— miss ... (mar. Wood), 1705, i. 29. 

— rev. ... , 1694, iii. 440. 
Balderston, John, Cambr., +1719, iii. 

221. 

Baldwin, Edward, 1663, extr., ii. 492. 

— Henry, Mert., f 1680, ii. 492. 

— <? John, B.C.L., 1647), iv- 64. 

— Rich., 1688, Lond., i. 19, 169; iii. 
334. 336, 376. 

— Tim., Hart h.,fi696; fellow of Alls., 
1648, i. 201 ; ii. 484; ?iv. 64: 1660, 



1 Miss Anne Alworth, who endowed the school of S. Michael's parish, Oxford, 
was probably his daughter. The family buried in S. Michael's church, and 
probably lived in what is now Frewin Hall. 



INDEX VI. 

Baldwin {continued) : — 

D.CL. : one of Charles II's com- 
missioners, i. 324: principal of Hart 
h., i. 328. 

Bale (Baleus), John, bishop, + 1563, i. 

184, 211, 3H-5 5 »• J 75> 498; iii. 

215; iv. 121, 257, 265, 279. 
Balham (Ballam), Margaret (mar. Alli- 

bond), 16 — , ii. 142. 

— Rich., 16 — , ii. 142. 
Balie, see Bayly. 

Baliol family, i. 315 ; ii. 316. 

— ■ Devorgnilla de, iv. 154. 

Ball, (Henry), 1684, herald, iii. 115. 

— John, Wadh., f 1660, i. 282-3, 
322-3, 326. 

— Rich., Wadh., f 1692, iii. 402. 

— Will., yeoman-bedell of Arts, + 1679, 
i- 76, 157, 333 5 ii- 6-7, 80, 82, 474, 
476; iv. 57, 65-6, 72, 130. 

— ... , 1685, opp., coffee-house, iii. 171, 
215 : conceivably an error for Hall; 
but see the plan at p. 4 of Rev. 
F. H. Penny's Buried Oxford, 1899, 
where ' Mr. Ball's coffee-house ' is 
outside Smithgate in 1713. 

— rev. dr. ... , f 1684, iii. 94. 
Ballam, see Balham. 
Ballantyne, lord, iii. 389. 
Ballard, Geo., f 175.S, v. 207. 

— Gregory, 1645, °PP-> i- IJ 3> 3 2 8 ; 
iv. 64. 

— John, Exet. ('S. Jo.,' in error), 
f 1678, ii. 404. 

— John, 1682, New c, iii. 14, 77-8. 
Balliofergus, i. 315 ; iv. 154. 
Balliol family, i. 315 ; ii. 316. 

— Devorguilla de, iv. 154. 

Ballow, 1678, S. Jo., ii. 404: in 

error for Ballard, Exet. 
Bally, John, 1618, S. Jo., iv. 143. 
Baltimore, mrs. ... , iii. 32. 
Baltzar (Baltzier), Tho., musician, 

f 1663, i. 242, 256, 475, 485-6 ; ii. 213. 
Bambridge, see Bainbridge. 
Bamfield, Franc, Wadh., f 1684, iii. 89. 
Bampton, James, New c, f 1683, ii. 

531 ; iii. 45, 468. 
Banastre, Margaret (mar. Lewis), 1662, 

i- 435- 

Banbridge, see Bainbridge. 

Bancroft, John, Univ., bp. of Oxford, 

•1*1641, i. 47, 267, 415; ii. 506; iv. 

56, 172. 

Banger, Bernard, esq. bed. of Div., 
f 1615, i. 202. 

— Cath. (mar. Rainsford), i. 202. 
■ — Eliz. (mar. Skinner), i. 202. 

— George, 1620, town-clerk, i. 202. 

— Joan (mar. Huggins), i. 202. 

— Mary (nee Tillyard), i. 202. 



PERSONS. 257 

Banger, Nicholas, opp., f 1632, i. 202. 

— mrs. ... (wife of Geo.), f 1690, i. 
202. 

Bangor, bishops of, v. 91. 
Banier, ... , (?), 1663, °PP-> i- 5°4« 
Banister, Jasper, Oriel, 1*1691, iii. 376. 

— John, 1666, Lond., musician, ii. 69. 

— (Thomas), opp., apothecary, +1691, 

iii. 378. 

— ... , 1660, i. 353. 

Banks, Henry, New c, f 1672, ii. 251. 

— sir John, judge, + 1644, i. 112. 

— John, 16 — , extr., ii. 29. 

— sir John, 1688, iii. 272. 

— Jonathan, 1668, i. 379. 

— Mary (nee Dew), ii. 29. 

— Tho., 1661, opp., i. 414. 

— mrs. ... (nee Perott), f 1665, ii- 2 9- 
Baram, see Barham. 

Barbara, 1668, extr., ii. 133. 

Barbarini (Barberini), Francis, cardinal, 

f T679, ii. 181-2, 476. 
Barber, Edward, Ch. Ch., f 1682, ii. 

319 ; iii. 33. 

— Geo., 1677, Oriel, ii. 381, 400, 451 ; 

iv. 76, 186. 

— ... , ? 1663, extr., ii. 415. 

— ... , 1671, opp., ii. 222. 

— mrs. ... (nee Hanns), ? 1663, ii. 415. 
Barbon, John, Exet., f 1688, iii. 349. 
Barclay, see Berclay. 

Bard, Dudley, f 1686, iii. 32. 

— Frances, iii. 32. 

— Henry, second viscount Bellarnont, 
iii. 32, 320. 

Barefoot, Alice (mar. Repinghale), opp., 
f 1682,1.448. 

— Rich., opp., letter-carrier, f 1674, i. 
448. 

— mrs. ... , 1665, opp., i. 448 ; ii. 56. 
Barham, sir Nich., + 1577, ii. io 4- 
Barington, see Barrington. 

Barker, Henry, Trin., + 1740, ii. 372; 
iii. 136, 253. 

— Hugh, New c, f 1632, i. 425. 

— Joseph, Corp., + 1677, 35 2 , 37 2 - 

— Mall, 1665, opp., sempstress, ii. 33, 
88, 119, 144, 151. 

— dame Margaret, 16 — , iv. 97. 

— Rich., 1693, New c, iii. 430. 

— Rob., 1604, Lond., iv. 147. 

— Rob., 1679, Mert, ii. 470 ('Berker'). 

— Will., New c, f 1669, i. 411, 413 ; 

ii. 220. 

— miss ... (mar. Holloway), 16 — , ii. 
220. 

— major ... , 1689, iii. 306. 
Barksdale, Charlton, 1680, Magd. c, 

iii. 484. 

— Clement, Glouc. h., f 1688, i. 439, 
503; ii. 541; iii. i35.4 8 4- 



VOL. v. 



s 



258 WOOD'S LIFE 

Barksdale, Clement, 1695, Magd. c, 
iii. 484. 

— Francis, lOKI, Magd. c, iv. 62. 
Barkstead, sir John, 1656, i. 208. 
Barlaeus, Gaspar, 1660, i. 402. 
Barlow (Barloe), Lucy, 1656, i. 208 ; 

ii. 476, 482, 487, 493 : or Walters. 

— Thomas, Qu., f 1691, v. 26-7: 
bishop of Lincoln. 

— William, 1598, iii. 167. 

— capt. ... , 1686, iii. 186. 
Barn, see Baron. 

Barnaby, Gabriel, 1694, New c, iii. 
45°- 

Barnard, see Bernard. 

Barncote, Eliz., 1589, extr., i. 25 ; v. 21. 

— John, sen., 1587, i. 24, 25 ; ii. p. vii ; 
v. 2-3, 20-1. 

— John, jun., 1592, i. 25 ; v. 21. 

— John, f 1597, v. 21. 

— Mary (nee Wood), 1587, i. 24-5 ; ii. 
p. Vii ; v. 2, 4, 20-1. 

— Tho., f 1665, i. 24-5, 228, 249-50, 
5°3 5 »• 31, 33 5 v. 4, 20. 

Barnes, John, 1639, opp., bookbinder 
and bookseller, i. 446, 487 ; iv. 57-9, 
64-5, 73, 137; v. 1: ? whether also 
University printer, iv. 73. 

— Joshua, 1689, i. 151. 

— Miles, 1685, Cambr., ii. 298 ; iii. 
137- 

— Philotheus, 1660, extr., iii. 370. 

— Rob., 1691, Line, iii. 370. 

— rev. ... , 1694, iii. 472. 

— 1678, S. J., ii.426. 

— mrs. ... , opp., f 1679, ii. 461. 

— miss ... (mar. Yardley), 1679, °PP-> 

ii. 461. 

Barnesley, ... , 1678, S. J., ii. 426. 
Barnet, B., 1675, 3 2 9 (? Benjamin, 

M.A., Mert, 1675). 
Baron, James, Magd. c, f 1683, i. 148 ; 

iii. 40, 349. 

— see also Barron. 

Barret, John, opp., milliner, + 1695 ; v. 
27. 

— Mary (nee Wickham), 16 — , Lond., 
i. 244. 

— mrs. ... (wife of John), 1690, opp., 
mercer, ii. 127; iii. 334. 

— ... , 16 — , Lond., i. 244. 
Barrington (Barington),sir John (James), 

f 1691, iii. 377. 

— lt.-col. ... , 1 1689, iii. 316. 
Barron, Robert, iii. 175 : see also Baron. 
Barrow, Geo. (in error for 'John'), 

1682, iii. 25. 

— Hugh, 1681, Corp., ii. 558. 

— Isaac, bishop of Man and S. Asaph, 
fi68o, ii. 183, 447, 489, 497; iii. 
38. 



AND TIMES. 

Barrow, Isaac, master of Trin., Cambr., 
-(• 1677, ii. 376 ; iii. 264. 

— rev. John, f 1685, iii. 25. 
Barry, pedigree of, ii. 81, 481. 
Barry, Adrian, 16 — , Lond., ii. 481. 

— Agnes (nee Merry), ? 14 — , ii. 481. 

— Agnes (mar. Daubeney), 1 5 — , ii. 
481. 

— Anne (nee Denton), 15 — , ii. 481. 

— Anthony, 15 — , ii. 481. 

— Catherine, see Katherine. 

— Christopher, 16 — , ii. 481. 

— Edward, 1656, Oriel, ii. 481 ; iii. 
256. 

— Eliz. (nee Scrope), 16 — , ii. 481. 

— Francis, 15 — , ii. 481. 

— Francis, 1677, Oriel, i. 116, 382 ; ii. 
481. 

— Jane (nee Buckner), 15 — , ii. 48 r. 

— John, ? 14 — , ii. 481. 

— John, 15 — , ii. 481. 

— Katherine (mar. Venner), 16 — , ii. 
481. 

— Katherine, f 1683, iii. 37. 

— Leonard (Laurence), 15 — , ii. 481. 

— Margaret (mar. O'Connor), 1688, iii. 
256. 

— Richard, 14 — , ii. 481. 

— Rich., second earl of Barrymore, 
f 1694, iii. 473. 

— Robert, 16 — , ii. 481. 

— Sarah (nee Clarke), 16 — , ii. 481. 

— Vincent, 15 — , ii. 481. 

— Vincent, of Thame, f 1666, i. 122; 
ii. 81, 481-2 ; iii. 37. 

— Vincent, of Hampton Gay, + 1680, 
ii. 481 ; iii. 37. 

— mrs. ... (nee Croft), 15 — , ii. 481. 

— mrs. ... (nee Southbie), 16 — , ii. 481. 

— miss ... (mar. Oakley), 16 — , ii. 481. 

— miss ... , f 1684, iii. 37. 

— mr. ... , f 1684, iii. 37. 
Barrymore, Richard Barry, second earl 

of, f 1694, iii. 473. 
Bartholomew (Bartelmew), Rob., Line, 

f 1728, iii. 69, 117, 131, 199. 
Bartie, Charles, 1691, iii. 363: see 

Bertie. 

Bartlett, Catherine (mar. Butler), f 1680, 
ii. 289. 

— Edward, 1663, opp., carrier, i. 506. 

— Edward, junior, 1670, opp., coach- 
owner, ii. 196, 245 ; iii. 370, 390. 

— Eliz. (mar. Cave, mar. Yates), *f 1689, 
ii. 289, 539. 

— John, 1688, opp., carrier, iii. 395 ; 
iv. 82. 

— Roger, 1668, opp., bookbinder, i. 
249, 460; ii. 180, 299, 413; iii. 11, 
13 ; iv. 71, 82. 

— mrs. ... , opp., f I0 9i, iii. 37°« 



INDEX VI. 

Bartoli, Daniello, S. J., ii. 20, 182. 
Barton (a Barton), John, ? 14 — , iv. 
257. 

— John, Mert, + 1683, 75- 

— Tho., Magd. h., + 1682, i. 502. 

— Will., 1656, extr., iii. 279. 

— Will., 1688, Line, iii. 279. 
Baset, see Basset. 

Bash, sir Edward, 1683, extr., iii. 
46. 

Basire, Isaac, Cambr., f 1676, ii. 241, 
357- 

Baskerville, Hannibal, Bras., f 1669, i. 
94, 269-70; ii. 152; iii. 512. 

— Matthew Thomas, 1693, i. 94, 269. 

— sir Thomas, f 1597, i. 269; ii. 
152. 

— Thomas, bom 1629, died 1700, i. 
270 ; iii. 492. 

— mrs. ... , 1695, iii. 492. 
Baskerville, pedigree of, i. 270: see 

Hearne's Collections (O. H. S.), iv. 
353- 

Basnett, Sam., Alls., f 1666, i. 148. 
Bassett (Baset), Joshua, 1687, Cambr., 
iii. 214, 221. 

— sir Will,, f J 693, iii. 431. 

— ... , ii. 469. 

Baston, Robert, 131 4, friar, iv. 257. 
Bate, see Bates. 

Bateman, Catherine (mar. Clark), 16 — , 
i. 124. 

— Catherine (mar. Rowney), 1665, 
opp., i. 30 ; v. 14. 

— Charles, 1685, iii. 172. 

— John, Mert., f I 7 2 %> »• x 33> i 39> 
143, 145 ter, 146, 149, 151, 153, 177, 
184, 187, 189, 208, 216, 278; iii. 15, 

93, 433- 

— John, 1673, ii. 257 ; iii. 43. 

— Tho., 1600, i. 124. 

— Tho., Univ., f 1690, iii. 336. 

— Tho., Magd. c, ^1722, iii. 250, 
524,529,533. 

— ... , 1694, Lond., iii. 440. 

— miss ... (mar. Salisbury), 1683, iii. 
43- 

Baterson, see Batterson. 
Bates (Bate), Geo., S. Edm. h., f 1669, 
i. 475 ; ii. 69, 435 ; iii. 167. 

— Geo., 1661, ii. 507. 

— Hannah (mar. Noble), 1645, opp., 

i. 138. 

— <? Rich.), 1694, Alls., ii. 475. 

— Stephen, Wadh., + 1724, ii. 77. 

— dr. Will., 1677, ii. 391 ; iii. 378. 

— ... , 1686, ii. 69. 

Bath : Bourchier, earl of : — 

— Henry, fifth earl, f 1654, ii. 150. 
Rachel (Fane), countess, f 1680, 

ii. 150. 



PERSONS. 



Bath : Granville, earl of : — 

— John, first earl, +1701, ii. 509; iii. 
376, 382, 387. 

Jane (Wyche), countess, + 1692, 

iii. 382. 

— Charles, second earl. + 1701 : styled 
viscount Granville of Lansdowne, iii. 
311, 381, 384. 

Martha (Osborne), his viscountess, 

f 1689, iii. 31 1. 
Bath and Wells, bishops of, v. 137. 
Bathurst, Anne (mar. Gryning), iii. 242. 

— sir Edward, 1670, i. 42 ; ii. 192 ; iii. 
242. 

— Laurence, 1670, i. 42 ; ii. 192, 194, 
250 ; iii. 242. 

— Mary (nee Tristram, widow of 
Palmer), f 1690, wife of dr. Ralph, 
i. 306-7; ii. 26; iii. 329: a distant 
relative, ii. 26, but an enemy of 
Wood's, ii. 192, 258, 271, 281. 

— Mary (mar. Coxeter), i. 42 ; iii. 
242. 

— dr. Ralph, president of Trin., f 1704, 
v. 27. 

— Susanna (nee Cook), ^1687, ii. 2 50 ; 
iii. 242. 

— Villiers, 1675, Trin., ii. 318. 

— William, 1682, iii. 8. 
Batman, see Bateman. 
Batrice, see Betteris. 

Battell, rev. Ralph, 1680, ii. 501. 
Battely, rev. John, 1688, iii. 260. 
Batterson (Baterton), Tho., 1690, cook 

of Line, iii. 338. 
Battishill (Battershell), Jonathan, Exet., 

1 1693, iii. 420. 
Battles, ... , 1671, extr., ii. 226. 
Baxter, Alex., 1688, Bras., iii. 284. 
■ — Margaret (nee Charlton), f 1681, ii. 

556 ; iii. 65. 

— Richard, Puritan divine, + 1691, i. 
422, 453; ii. p. viii, 137, 166, 178, 
515, 556; iii. 63, 65, 355, 378. 

— ... , 1668, extr., ii. 133. 

Bayly (Baily, Baylie, &e), Catherine, 
f l6oo, i. 95. 

— Eliz. (nee Robinson), f 1668, ii. 115, 
144. 

Eliz., f 16 — , ii. 115. 

— Geo., 1610, Corp., iv. 146. 

— James, (called ' Bayly junior' to 
distinguish him from his contemporary 
Thomas), Magd. c, + 1699, ii. 544 ; 
iii. 250, 524, 529. 

— John, 1663, S. Jo., ii. 115. 

— Mary (mar. Mews), ii. 115. 

— Priscilla (nee Rither), ii. 144, 341. 

— dr. Rich., S. Jo., f 1667, v. 27. 

— Rich., Lond., f 1676, ii. 115, 144, 
340-1. 



260 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Bayly, Sarah (mar. Dighton), ii. 115: 
cp. iii. 23. 

— Thomas, Magd. c, f 1663, iii. 464. 

— Thomas (in 1669 termed 'Bayly 
junior' to distinguish him from his 
contemporary Walter; but in 1681 
he is 'senior'; see James supra), 
Magd. c., f 1707, ii. 157, 160, 392; 
iii. 249, 455, 524, 529, 532. 

— Thomas, N. I. H., ^1709, iii. 107, 
305, 38o- 

— Walt., New c., f 1592, i. 236, 261. 

— Walt., 1 661, Magd. c., i. 261, 413; 

ii. 76, 91, 104, 157. 

— Will., Magd. a, f 168S, i. 330, 490. 

— Will., opp., f 1683, ii„ 384; iii. 62. 

— ... , 1680, extr., i. 245. 

— miss... (mar. Aylworth), 15 — ,i. 236. 

— miss ... (mar. Michell), 16 — , ii. 115. 

— mrs. ... (nee Gregory), 1683, i. 245. 
Baynard, Eliz. (nee Palmer), i. 307. 

— Geo., Wadh., f 1693, i. 307. 

— Tho., 1660, extr., i. 307. 
Baynham (Bainham), Rob., New c, 

•f 1669, i. 330; ii. 177 ; iii. 45. 
Bayning, Eliz. (mar. Lennard, mar. 
Walter), f 1686, i. 217; ii. 449; iii. 
192. 

— Mary (mar. Villiers), iii. 87. 
Bayning, Paul Bayning, first viscount, 

f 1629, ii. 449; iii. 87. 
Baynton, Henry, f 1691, iii. 374. 
Bayock, Charles, 1677, ii. 368, 465 ; 

iii. 124. 

— Onesimus Charles, 1684, iii. 98. 
Beach, Will., Ball., fi7n, iii. 361. 
Beacham, see Beauchamp. 

Beale, John, 1685, Corp., iii. 205, 216, 
277. 

Bearblock, see Bereblock. 
Beard, Tho., 1685, iii. 136, 145. 

— ... , 16 — , Lond., iii. 136. 

Beare (Beer), Alice (nee Wood), f 1634, 
i. 4, 24-5 ; ii. p. vii ; v. 2-4, 21. 

— Eliz., f 1668, i. 5, 24-5 ; v. 3-4, 21. 

— Geo., 1578, i. 25 ; v. 21. 

— John, f 1595, i. 24-5 ; ii. p. vii; v. 
2-3, 21. 

— Rob., 1595, i. 25; v. 21. 

— Will., f 1586, i, 25 ; v. 21. 
Beasifo, ... , 1686, Lond., iii. 180. 
Beatrice, see Betteris. 

Beau (Beaw, Bew), Will., bp. of Llan- 
daff, f 1706, iii. 121, 190, 361-2, 

375, 413- 

— Will., Magd. c, + 1738, iii. 190. 
Beauchamp family, ii. 493. 

— see Warwick, earl of. 
Beauchamp, Henry Seymour, (by 

courtesy) viscount, f 1654, and Mary 
(Capel), f 1 7 15, his viscountess, ii.394. 



Beauchamp (Beacham, Beeham), John, 

1690, Trin., iii. 338, 492. 
Beauelerc, James, f 1680, ii. 237. 

— see St. Albans. 

Beauforest (Beawforest), Anne (inar. 
Lyde), iii. 259. 

— Rich., f 1555, i. 278; iii. 259. 
Beaufort, Henry de, or de Woodstock, 

f 1447: bp. of Lincoln, iv. 113: bp. 
of Winchester, iv. 114. 
Beaufort : Henry Somerset, first duke 
of, f 1699 : styled lord Herbert of 
'Raglan' and Chepstow 1642-67, 

i. 496; ii. 394: 1667, third marquis 
of Worcester, ii. 394 ; iii. 6, 32 : 
1682, created duke of Beaufort, i. 
496 ; ii. 394 ; iii. 6, 32, 60, 285. 

Mary < v Capel), duchess of, f 1 715, 

ii. 394 ; iii. 60. 

Beaulieu, Luke, f 1723, iii. 124. 

Beaumont, Francis, + 1616, i. 21. 

Beaw, see Beau. 

Beawforest, see Beauforest. 

Beby (Beeby), John, Queen's, + 1672, 

i. 29, 243, 402, 470; ii. 19, 35-6, 

251, 254; v. 10, 13. 
Bee, Thomas le, bp. of Line, -j-1347, 

iv. 113. 
Becham, see Beauchamp. 
Bechino, Sam., 1637, Line, i. 46. 
Beck (Beke), ... , 1663, extr., i. 475. 

— Ga., 1647, i. 143. 

— rev. Henry, + 1670, ii. 201. 

— Marmaduke, 1684, New c, iii. 85. 
Becket (a Becket), Thomas, archbp. of 

Canterbury, f 1170, ii. 28; iv. 266, 
304- 

Beckford, Ralph, 1646, opp., book- 
binder, i. 213, 220, 254, 301 ; iv. 199- 
200, 209, 211. 

Becon, Thomas, T563, ii. 38. 

Bede, ii. 31, 275; iv. 251, 257-8. 

Bedell, Martha (mar. Taverner), 16 — , 
i. 40. 

— Matthew, 16 — , Lond., i. 40. 
Bed en, capt, 1658, i. 264. 
Bedford, John, 1676, extr., ii. 350. 

— Will., 1687, Ch. Ch., iii. 217, 319, 
427. 

Bedford : Russell, earl, and duke of: — 

— Francis, fourth earl, f 1641, iii. 419- 
20, 478. 

— Will., fifth earl, f I 7oo, i. 137; ii. 
170; iii. 60, 118, 418, 459: 1694, 
created duke, iii. 446, 478. 

Bedingfield, Edmund, 1693, Ch. Ch., 

iii. 43i- 

Bedlow (Bedloe), Will., fi68o, ii. 

436-7, 452, 467, 494. 
Bee, Matthew, 165 1, Univ., i. 175. 
Beeby, see Beby. 



INDEX VI. 



PERSONS. 



Beech, Will., Trin., + 1711, iii. 361. 
Beecham, see Beauchamp. 
Beer, see Beare. 

Beesley (Besely), Henry, Mert., f 1675, 

i- 233 5 ii- 133^ 3 r 4 5 44- 

— Tho., Mert., + 1668, ii. 133. 

— miss ... (mar. Peacock), f 1683, iii. 
44. 

Beeston (Beiston), Henry, New c, 
f 1701, v. 27. 

— Eliz. (nee Burt), + 1690, iii. 74, 329 
(' Anne,' in error). 

Beke, Marmaduke, 1684, New c, iii. 
85- 

Bel, ii. 458. 
Belasyse, ... , i. 234. 

— see Fanconberg. 
Belasyse : Belasyse, baron : — 

— John, first baron, f 168 1, iii. 310. 

— Henry, second baron, + 1691, iii. 
3/0, 4 I 3> 486. 

— — Anne (Brudenell), baroness, 
f 1722, iii. 413, 486. 

Belchior, John, 1660, i. 302. 

Belet, Mich., iv. 259. 

Beleth, iv. 258-9. 

Bell, Edw., 1680, Lond., ii. 316. 

— John, esq. bedell of Arts and Medi- 
cine, 4/1638, iii. 44; iv. 139. 

— sir Rob., f 1577, ri. 104. 

— Rob., 1684, Magd. c, iii. 105-6. 

— mr. ... , 1662, i. 457. 
Bellamont, Henry Bard, viscount, 

f 1660, iii. 32, 320. 
Bellamont, Richard Coote (baron 
Coote), first earl of, + 1700, iii. 419, 
421. 

Bellarmine, ii. 399 ; iii. 64. 
Bellingham, sir Henry, ii. 263-4. 

— Kath. (nee Willoughby), + 1673, ii. 
263-4. 

Bellomont, Charles Henry Kirkhoven, 

first earl of, f 16S3, iii. 35. 
Bellot, Tho., ii. 352. 
Belluacensis, Johannes, iv. 259. 
Belson, Augustus, 1688, Magd. c, iii. 

530. 

Belton, ... , 1686, iii. 201. 
Belwood, Roger, + 1694, iii. 448. 
Bendish, sir Tho., 1650, i. 168. 
Bendlowes (Benlowes, Benlous), An- 
drew, 16 — , ii. 361-2. 

— Edward, Cambr., + 1676, i. 267 ; ii. 
I39> 335> 360-2. 

— Philippa (mar. Blount), f 1667, 
361-2. 

— Will., junior, 15—, if. 361-2. 

— Will., senior, 1555, ii. 361-2. 
Benedict, anti-pope, 1395, iv. 269, 297. 
Benedict XII, pope, iv. 119. 
Benedict XIII, pope, iv. 276. 



Benefield, Sebastian, Corp., f 1630, i. 
441. 

Benet, see Bennet. 

Benevolus, i. 267 ; ii. 361 ; anagram for 

Edward ' Benlowes,' q.v. 
Benfield, see Benefield. 
Benford, mr. ... , 15 — , iii. 259. 

— mrs. (nee Lyde), 15 — , iii. 259. 
Benlowes, see Bendlowes. 
Bennet, Baud, ii. 304. 

— Henry, see earl of Arlington. 

— sir John, senior, f 1658, ii. 304. 

— sir John, junior, f 1695 : see Ossuls- 
ton. 

— John, 1669, Lond., ii. 185. 

— John, extr., f 1690, iii. 348. 

— * lady,' ii. 7, 304. 

— ' lord,' ii. 7. 

— Peter, Magd. c, f 1680, ii. 501. 

— Thomas, Ch. Ch., +1681, ii. 180, 

232- 3, 272, 554. 

— Tho., Univ., f 1692, iii. 217, 231, 

2 33- 4> 355, 390- 

— Tho., 1690, Lond., printer, iii. 320, 

345> 35°> 3 6 5> 369* 3 8 5~6, 39 6 5 iv. 
17-8, 28-9, 39. 

— Will., extr., 1640, ii. 501. 

— ... , 1672, ii. 304. 

— miss ... (mar. Brent), 16 — , ii. 369. 

— see Ossulston. 

Benock, Edw., 1642, Mert., i. 134. 

— John, 1625, i. 134. 

Benson, Geo., Qu., ti.692, i. 328; iii. 
37 ('Samuel' in error), 192, 205, 
400, 402. 

— mrs. ... (nee Fell), iii. 37, 192. 
Bent, Eliz. vnee Petty), i. 37. 

— Will., 16—, extr., i. 37. 
Bentham, Tho., bp. of Lichfield, + 1579, 

ii. 175; iii. 174. 
Bentinek, see Portland. 
Bently, ... , 1693, iii. 414. 
Benwick, Ambrose, i. 498 : in error for 

Bonwick. 
Berclay, William, iii. 64. 
Bereblock, John, 1566, iv. 202. 
Berge, Peter van der, 1666, iii. 318. 
Berkeley (Berkley), Charles, second 

earl, f 1710, possibly iii. 381. 

— Geo., earl of, see infra. 

— Geo., Ch. Ch., f 1694, ii. 277; iii. 
471. 

— John, Ch. Ch., f 1697, ii. 456. 

— lord, iii. 381. 

— Mary (mar. Grey of Werk), iii. 30. 

— capt. ... , 1685, iii. 124. 
Berkeley: Berkeley, baron, and earl of: — 

— George, *f* 169S : succeeded in 1658 
as nineteenth baron, ii. 277: 1679, 
created earl, iii. 30, 33, 155, 232, 266, 
2 75> 47 1 - 



262 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Berkeley, Charles, second earl, '(-1710: 

? styled 'lord Berkeley,' iii. 381. 
Berkeley of Stratton : Berkeley, baron : — 

— John, first baron, f 1678, ii. 224, 
456. 

— Charles, second baron, + 1682, iii. 13. 

— John, third baron, f 1697, ii. 456. 
Berker, see Barker. 
Berkinghead, see Birkenhead. 
Berkshire : Howard, earl of : — 

— Thomas, first earl, f 1669, i. 61, 70, 
37 2 - 

— Charles, second earl, f 1679 : styled 
viscount Andover, i. 58, 70. 

Bermingham, Remigius, 1677, ii. 387. 

— major ... , + 1689, iii. 316. 
Bernard (Barnard), Edw., S. Jo., f 1697 

(Cat. MSS. Angl. et Hibern.), i. 6 ; 

ii. 105, 118, 184, 268; iii. 77-8, 270, 
311, 318, 382, 429, 455, 466 ; iv. 74, 
87, 107. 

— Eleanor (nee Howell), 1693, iii. 429. 

— Elizabeth (nee Lench), 1630, iii. 429. 

— dr. Francis, 1690, Lond., ii. 353; 

iii. 320, 396. 

— Francis, 1690, S. Jo., iii. 330, 349. 

— John, Line, f 1683, iii- 67, 171. 

— John, 1682, Bras., v. 27-8. 

— Joseph, 1630, iii. 429. 

— Nicholas, Cambr., f 1661, i. 203-4. 

— William, 1674, Mert., ii. 283, 333, 
422, 485, 506, 538, 550, 559; iii. 77, 
89, 93, 142, 152, 187. 

Berne, Rich., 1466, iv. 162. 
Berrie, see Bury. 

Berriman (Berryman), Charles, 1660, 
Oriel, iii. 95. 

— George, 1684, Oriel, iii. 95. 
Berry, see Bury. 

Bertie family, iii. 131 : see earl of 

Abingdon, earl of Lindsey. 
Bertie, Albemarle, Univ., -1*1742, iii. 

210, 494. 

— lady Catherine (mar. Dormer), ii. 
147. 

— capt. Charles, 1683, iii. 47. 

— Charles, f 171 1, iii. 363 ('Bartie'), 
435- 

— Francis, f 1643, i- io 4- 

— capt. Henry, 1681, ii. 524; iii. 135, 
145, 171, 277, 283-4, 286, 296, 325. 

— James, see earl of Abingdon. 

— lady Mary, f 1709, iii. 479. 

— Montagu, see Abingdon. 

— Montagu, see Lindsey. 

— sir Peregrine, 16 — , iii. 105. 

— Peregrine, f 171 1, iii. 444, 484. 

— Philip, Trim, f 1728, iii. 52, 149, 

x 52, 405, 435- 

— capt. Rich., 1685, iii. 171. 

— Robert, see Lindsey. 



Bertie, miss ... (mar. Levinz), i. 105. 

— mrs. ... (nde Norreys), iii. 283. 
Bertun, see Betun. 

Berwick, James Fitzjames, duke of, 

f 1734, iii. 290-1, 390. 
Besills, sir Peter, f 1424, iv. 259. 
Besongne, N., 1661, ii. 180. 
Bess's, 1670, ii. 189. 
Bessel, John Ernest, 1661, ii. 21. 
Best, Edward, 1652, Ball., i. 177. 
Bethlem, Johannes de, iv. 301. 
Bets, see Belts. 

Betteris (Beatrice), Rich., 1654, °PP'> 

surgeon, i. 190. 
Bettham, Anne (nee Petty), i. 33. 

— Hugh, i. 33. 

Betts (Bets), John, Corp., f 1695, 
393- 

— Thomas, 1678, opp., cooper and 
wood-merchant, ii. 404, 451, 556; 
iii. 27. 

Betty (i.e. Elizabeth), 1680, maidservant 
at Weston Park, ii. 496. 

Betun (Bertun), Rob. de, bp. of Here- 
ford, f 1 148, iii. 268 ; iv. 300. 

Beveridge, Will., bp. of S. Asaph, 
f 1708, iii. 360-2. 

— Will., 1667, almanac-maker, ii. 104. 
Beverley, John de, ii. 22 ; iv. 310. 
Beversham, sir Will. (Rob.), f 1689, 

iii. 295. 
Bevis of Hampton, i. 18. 
Bew, see Beau. 

Bewlie, Eliz., 1677, Lond., iii. 375. 
Biddle (Bidell), John, Magd. h., f 1662, 

i. 454 ; iii. 206. 
Bidgood, John, Exet., -fi6gi, ii. 186; 

iii- 352, 375- 
Bierley, ... , f 1695, iii. 484. 
Bigges, Anne (mar. Walter), 16 — , i. 

216. 

— sir Thomas, 15 — , i. 216. 
Bigot, Emericus, 1668, iv. 295. 
Bileth, John, iv. 259. 

Billers, John, 1681, Cambr., ii. 555. 
Billinghirst, ... , 1679, J es -> 444- 
Billingsley, Benj., 1685, Lond., iii. 
160. 

— capt. ... , f 1689, iii. 308. 
Billowes, John, 1681, Cambr., ii. 555. 
Bilson, Tho., bp. of Winton, f 1616, ii. 

118. 

Bingham, Joseph, Univ., fi723, iii. 

474, 492, 5°2- 
Birch family, ii. 514. 
Birch, Andrew, 1656, ii. 514. 

— col. John, f 1691, iii. 361, 454. 

— Nich., 1650, extr., iii. 470. 

— Nich., Bras., f 1694, iii. 402, 470. 

— Peter, Ch. Ch., + 1710, ii. 263, 332, 
514; iii. 116, 145, 272, 310, 313, 



INDEX VI. 

Birch {continued') : — 

337-8, 395> 397, 4<>5, 443, 473, 
476-7, 481. 

— Sam., Corp., f 1680, ii. 477. 

— The, 1650, extr., ii. 514. 
Birchall, Mary (mar. Wood), extr., v. 20. 
Bird, Eliz., +1691, iii. 371. 

— James, 1670, extr., iii. 372. 

— James, Queen's, f 1691, iii. 371-2. 

— Roger, 1654, extr., iii. 372. 

— Roger, 1673, Qu., iii. 372. 

— Will., 1642, Lond., i. 247. 

— Will., 1658, opp., stonecutter, i. 
241; ii. 160, 213; iii. 240; iv. 64, 
69-71. 

— ... , 1683, opp., watchmaker, iii. 511. 
Biridanus, Simon, iv. 261. 

S. Birinus, i. 223, 225. 
Birkenhead (Berkinghead), sir John, 
Alls., f 1679, i. 143, 427; ii. 61, 

285, 435, 47 1 , 473- 
Birket, Henry, see Birkhead. 

— John, 1688, Qu., iii. 252. 
Birkhead (Birket), Henry, Alls., f 1696, 

i. 454 (H. B.); iii. 252, 440. 
Biron, see Byron. 

Birton (Byrton), The, 1675, S. Edm. 

h., ii. 334. 
Biscoe (Biscow), John, N. I. H. f 1679, 

Puritan, iii. 204-6, 349-50. 
Bishe, see Byshe. 

Bishop, Eliz. (mar. Dodwell), 168 1, 
opp., ii. 381. 

— Geo., quaker, + 1668, i. 190 ; ii. 145. 

— Humphrey, 1650, ii. 171. 

— John, 1668, Wadh., ii. 171. 

— John, extr., f 1677, 388. 

— Nich., 1432, opp., iv. 180, 193. 

— Sam., Wadh., f 1695, iii. 488. 

— Tho., Wadh., f 1669, 171-2. 

— dr. Will., f 1624, iii. 251. 

— Will., 1677, extr., ii. 388, 548 ; iii. 
487. 

— Will., 1685, Trim, Mert., iii. 141, 

197. 369. 

— Will., 1689, Ball., iii. 308, 377. 

— ... , 1657, opp., musician, i. 220, 229 
(called 'the tasker'), 237, 266 : query, 
whether the same as the next. 

— ... , junior, 1657, opp., musician, i. 
210. 

— 1665, opp., cutler, ii. 50; iii. 
411. 

— ... , 1677, extr., tailor, ii. 389. 
Bissaeus, Bisshe, see Byshe. 
Bisse (Biss), Edward, ii. 353. 

— G. P., 1735, i. 8; ii. 234. 

— James, Wadh., +1748, i. 8, 9; iii. 

38i, 385, 39 6 , 399, 445, 49 8 , 50°-!, 
504. 

Blaby, Nich., 15 — , ii. 369. 



PERSONS. 263 

Blaby, miss ... (mar. Brent), 16 — , ii. 
369. 

Blackburne, John, 1661, Bras., i. 384; 
iii. 53- 

— Lancelot, Ch. Ch., +1723, iii. 87, 
476. 

Blackman, Cate, 1667, opp., ?cook, ii. 
104. 

— Joan (nee Rudley), opp., cook, 
f 1662, i. 448. 

— Joan (nee Brooks), 1663, opp., cook 
and alehouse-keeper, i. 448, 486-7, 
501, 503 : see infra. 

— Joan (mar. Kayle), ii. 308. 

— John, 1675, °PP-» i« 448. 

— Mary (mar. Jackson), born 1655, 
opp., i. 448. 

— Mary (nee Vernouil), 165^, opp., i. 
448. 

— Rich., 1665, ii. 35. 

— Robert, opp., + 1675, 448- 

— Will., the elder, opp., cook, f 1666, 

i. 420, 448, 454. 467-8 ; ii. 2, 5. 

— Will., the younger, opp., cook, born 
1631, f 1672, i. 448-9 ; ii. 308, 471. 

— Will., bom 1665, i. 448. 

— ... , 1664, opp., ? alehouse-keeper, ii. 
24, 33, 43, 45, 82, 85, 98, 115, 141, 
163 : perhaps Joan supra. 

Blackmore, sir Rich., S. Edm. h., 

f 1729, ii. 351 : iii. 4. 
Blackston, Jane (mar. Wood), extr., v. 20. 
Blackway, see Blakeway. 
Blackwell, Mary (nee Petty), 16 — , i. 34. 

— Sam., Line, + 1719, ii. 565 ; iii. 136. 

— ... , extr., 16 — , i. 34. 

Blagg, col. The, f 1660, i. 114-6. 
Blagrave, Edward, 1681, ? son of Tho., 

opp., ii. 512 : perhaps also, 1694, iii. 

456. 

— John, esq. bed. of Div., + 1652, i. 
27, 157 ; iv. 60 ; v. 8. 

— Jonathan, Magd. h., f 1698, iii. 317, 
389. 

— Kath. (mar. Smyth), opp., f 1687, 

ii. 236. 

— Margery, 1624, opp., i. 27; v. 8. 

— Susan, 1665, ii. 51. 

— Thomas, 1624, opp., of S. Ebbe's, i. 
27 ; ii. 236, 340; v. 8. 

— miss ... (mar. Good), 1657, ii. 340. 

— miss ... (mar. Gregory), 1681, ii. 512. 

— 1694, iii. 458 : see Edward supra. 

— ... , 1690, iii. 332. 

— ... , 1610, opp., of S. Giles', iv. 188. 

— 1657, opp., bookseller, i. 220, 
230, 254, 266, 268, 271, 275, 327, 
331, 335-6, 378, 388, 401, 404-5, 
416, 418. 

Blaine, see Blane. 

Blaire, sir Adam, 1690, iii. 333. 



264 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Blake, Eliz., + 1687, Hi. 213. 

— Francis, f 1681, ii. 5<>2. 

— Joan (mar. Davis), opp., f 1688, ii. 
128. 

— Peter, 1687, Lond., i ; i. 2T3. 

— Peter, 1687, Ball., iii. 213. 

— admiral Robert, 1 65 7 , iii. r6o. 

— The, Ch. Ch., f i<^57, iii- 204. 

— f 1642, i. 70. 

— 1662, i. 486. 

Blakeway, Rich., Ch. Ch., f 1717, iii. 
3I9- 

— Rich., 1695, Corp., iii. 493. 
Blakgrave, see Blagrave. 
Blanchard, John, 1670, ii. 185. 
Blancks, see Blanks. 
Blancpaine, Mich., iv. 259. 

Bland, Tho., 1635, opp., glover, i. 492, 

505 ; iv. 55, 65. 
Blandford, Walter, Wadh., f 1675, v. 

28. 

Blane (Blaine, Blaney, Blayne), Alan, 
1656, Qu., ii. 473 ; iii- 174, 3*9- 

Blanks, James, 1649, extr., i. 160, 
162. 

— John, 1647, Mert., i. 136, 160, 164, 
166. 

Blaxston, 16 — , ii. 142. 

— miss ... (mar. Allibond), 16 — , ii. 
142. 

Blayne, see Blane. 

Blayney, Henry Vincent Blayney, fifth 

baron, + 1689, iii. 325. 
Blechington, Rich., S. Jo., f 1697, iii. 

169. 

— Rich., S. Jo., f 1736, iii. 415. 
Blenerhasset, Anne, 1660, i. 350. 
Blesensis, Peter, iv. 92. 
Blickard, 1663, i. 477. 

Bliss, Dr. Philip, i. 2-4; iii. 119; iv. 

142 ; v. 207. 
Blofield, see Bluffield. 
Blome, Rich., 1673, ii. 539. 
Blomfield, capt. f 1645, *• IT 9- 
Blondy, lady, +1681, iii. 2. 
Blood, Thomas, f 1680, ii. 222. 
— ■ 1671, ii. 222. 
Bloodwell, col. 1645, ii. 55. 
Bloodworth, see Bludworth. 
Blount, Charles, f 1693, iii. 414, 429, 

431,481. 

— sir Henry, + 1682, i. 168. 

— Lister, 1667, ii. 362. 

— Philippa (nee Bendlowes), + 1667, 
ii. 361-2. 

— Samuel, Mert., 1642, i. 134. 

— Thomas, f 1679, v. 28. 

— sir Thomas Pope, + 1697, iii. 449. 

— Walt., f 1671, ii. 361-2. 

— f 1663, ii. 240. 

— mrs. ... (nee Church), i. 317. 



Blount, see Newport. 

Bludworth (Bloodworth), sir Tho., 

Lond., \ 1682, ii. 447 ; iii. 14, 

402-3. 

— sir Tho., Lond., f 1692, iii. 402. 

— miss ... (mar. Jones), 1692, iii. 403. 
Bluffield (Blofield), Eliz., i. 245. 

— Giles, i. 245. 

— Robert, 1672, iv. 259. 

' Blundel/ 1679, S.J., ii. 453-4. 
Blundel, 1694, iii. 467. 
Blunt, see Blount. 

Boat, John, 1658, i. 36, 256, 3x7 ; ii. 
28 ; v. 14. 

— Judith (mar. Petty), f 1661, i. 36. 

— Mary (nee Wroughton), f 1683, i. 
317- 

— Nicholas, 16 — , i. 36. 

— Norris, 1683, i. 317. 

Bobart, Jacob, keeper of the Physic 
Garden, f 1680, i. 238; ii. 158, 164, 
208, 478. 

Bodicote's tavern, frequented by Wood, 
1657-66, i. 220, 229, 255, 310, 331, 

338, 349, 377, 4i6» 433, 454, 461, 
507; ii. 69 : in 1666, it passed into 
the hands of Richard Pont, q. v., 

ii. 74. 

Bodicote, Humphrey, 1649, opp., vint- 
ner, iii. 217 ; iv. 62. 

— miss ... (mar. Whitehall), iii. 217. 

— miss ... (mar. Cross), iii. 217. 
Bodily, opp., f 1675, ii. 318. 
Bodley, sir Tho., f i6if , v. 28. 
Bodyn, see Bowden. 

Boen, see Bowen. 

Boethius, ii. 143, 199; iv. 251, 259. 

Bofey (Bofin), lord, iii. 420. 

Bogan, Zachary, Corp., f 1659, i. 281 ; 

iii. 172. 

— Will., 1627, extr., i. 282. 
Bohun, earl of Hereford, ii. 135. 
Bohun, Edmund, 1689, Lond., iii. 300, 

4 J 3, 4H- 

— Robert, see Boon. 
Bold family, ii. 347. 
Bold, sir Henry, ii. 347. 

— Henry, Ch. Ch., f 1677, i. 359, 369, 

435, 437 5 ii- 389; iii- 1 15- 

— Henry, New c. , see Bowles. 

— Martha (nee Colwell), ii. 347. 

— Michael, 1684, Mert., iii. 96-7. 

— Norton, Corp., f 1676, esq. bed. of 
Div., i. 330; ii. 151, 180, 232, 
347-8- 

— sir Rich., ii. 347. 
-— Will., 1468, iv. 260. 

— Will., f 1582, ii. 347. 

— Will., f 1624, ii. 347. 

— Will., ii. 347. 
Boles, see Bowles. 



INDEX VI. 

Bolingbroke : St. John, earl of : — 

— Oliver, first earl, f 1646, i. 61. 

— Oliver, second earl, + 1688, iii. 261. 

— Paulet, third earl, f 1711, iii. 261. 
Bolls (Bolles,Booll),sir John (William), 

1669, ii. 162, 181. 

— rev. 1665, ii. 41. 

— 1662, opp., cook, i. 450, 452, 

454> 47i> 474; 79; io 8- 

— see also Bowles. 

Bolman, Edmund, 1690, iii. 320. 
Bolt, Jane (mar. Wicks), opp., f 1629, 
i. 442. 

— Mar}', 1687, opp., iii. 214. 

— 15— , i- 44 2 - 

— 16—, i. 214. 

— mrs. ... (nee Wickham), i. 214, 

— see also Boult. 

Bolter, Francis, 1653, i. 178. 
Bolton, Alice (nee Wood), + 1634, i. 4, 
24-5 ; ii. 138 (alluded to) ; v. 2-4, 21. 

— Edmund, iii. 431 : iv. 260. 

— Edward, opp., f 1653, i. 24. 

— Eliz. (nee Beare), 4/ 1668, i. 24; ii. 
138 ; v. 21. 

— John, senior, 16 — , i. 24-5 ; v. 2-3, 
21. 

— John, junior, i. 24 ; v. 21. 

— mrs. 1657, i. 230: possibly widow 
of Edward. 

— 1658, i. 255: perhaps a son of 
John, junior. 

Bolton : Paulet, duke of: — 

— Charles, first duke, f 1699 : 1675, 
succeeded as sixth marquis of Win- 
chester, i. 147 ; ii. 498 ; iii. 316, 387 : 
1689, created duke of Bolton, iii. 
3i6, 387. 

Mary (Scrope), his marchioness, 

f 1680, i. 147 ; ii. 498. 

— Charles, second duke : styled earl of 
Wiltshire, 1675-89, iii. 387: styled 
marquis of Winchester, 1689, iii. 404, 
409. 

Boman, see Bowman. 
Bomick, 1683, S. Jo., iii. 40. 
Bonaventura, f 1274, i y - 2 °o. 
Bond, Dennis, f 1658, i. 258-9. 

— sir Henry, 1689, iii. 306. 

— John, New C, f 1612, iv. 173. 

— John, Puritan preacher, f 1680, iii. 
439- 

Boneel, ... , 1689, iii. 312. 
Boniface VIII, f 1303, pope, ii. 204; 
iv. 152. 

Boniface IX, 1395, pope, iv. 269, 297. 
Bonner, Edmund, f 1569, iv. 309. 
Bonsell, John, 1637, Line, i. 46. 
Bonwick, Ambrose, S. Jo., *f 1722, i. 

498 ('Ben wick' in error); ii. 319, 

460; iii. 51, 116. 



PERSONS. 265 

Bonwick, Benjamin, 1683, S. Jo., iii. 
40-1. 

Booker, John, 1646, almanac-maker, i. 

1 1-3 ; ii. 306. 
Boolde, Will., 1468, iv. 260. 
Booll, see Bolls. 

Boon (Bowne, Bohun, Boune), Robert, 
opp., f 1653, i. 127; ii. 103. 

— (? Margaret) (mar. Smyth), 16 — , i. 
127; ii. 103. 

Booth, sir Geo., see baron Delamere. 

— Henry, see earl of Warrington. 

— Margaret, 1677, maidservant, ii. 
389. 

— Robert, Ch. Ch., +1730, ii. 490, 
5°9- 

— widow, extr., f 1664, 22 - 

— 1694, iii. 463 (/Both ). 
Boraston, see Boreston. 
Bord, Andrew, 1542, i. 459. 
Boreman, Rob., 1653, i. 295-6. 

— see also Bowerman. 

Boreston (Boraston), Geo., 1665, 

Wadh., iii. 349. 
Borlase, Edmund, f 1682, iii. 476. 
Bornestus, Maur. Ern. Rappe, f 1664, 

ii. 21. 

Borodzycz (Borosky), George, + 1682, 

iii. 5. 

Boscawen, Hugh, viscount Falmouth, 

1 1734> iii- 44 6 - 
Bosco, A., i. 23, 310; iii. 344. 
Boscobel, ii. 226. 
Boshier, major 1689, iii. 306. 
Bosseville, Godfrey, 16 — , iv. 190. 
Bossewell, John, 1572, i. 182. 
Bostock, Michael, 1620, Trin., i. 135. 

— Robert, 1646, Mert., i. 135, 137. 
Bostonus, Buriensis, Johannes, iii. 35 ; 

iv. 260 : archbp. Usher's copy was 
recently sold in one of sir Thomas 
Phillipps' sales ; and is now in Cam- 
bridge University Library, press-mark 
MS. Add. 3470. 

Boswell (Bosvile\ Dionysia (mar. 
Frankish), f 1681, ii. 538-9. 

— (Edward), 16 — , ii. 538-9. 

— Will., opp., draper, f 1638, ii. 402. 

— ? sir Will., f 1647, iv. 155. 

— William, 1661, Wadh., Alls., i.406 ; 
ii. 22. 

— Will., Wadh., fi678, i. 252; ii. 
256, 402, 538. 

Bosworth, Alice (nee Wicks), 1634, *• 
211, 231. 

— Eliz. (mar. Smyth), f 1673, i. 211, 
231. 

— Henry, opp., brewer, f 1634, i. 211, 
230-1 ; iii. 139. 

Bot, 1683, iii. 61 : an unsolved 
contraction. 



2 66 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Boteler, Anne (mar. Sedley), 16 — , ii. 
169. 

— Henry, 15 — , ii. 169. 

— sir Will., f 1644, i- 1 ro - 

— see also 1 killer. 

Botero, an Italian, ii. 180. 
Botevile, see Thynne. 
Both, 1694, iii- 463. 
Botoner, Will., iv. 261. 
Bouchier (Boucher, Bourchier), Rich., 
New c, f 1627, i. 109, 409. 

— Tho., archbp. of Canterbury, f i486, 
iv. 112. 

— Tho., S. Alb. h., f 1723, v. 28. 

— f 1695, iii. 488. 

— see Bath. 

Bouffiers, marshall, 1693, iii. 101. 
Boughen, Edward, Ch. Ch., + 1661, i. 
134- 

— Edward, 1644, Mert., i. 134. 
Boughton, Margaret (nee Petty), 1668, 

i- 35; 

— Stephen, 1668, Magd. c, i. 35. 
Bouillon, Emanuel, cardinal, +1715, 

iii. 401. 

Boult, opp., 1662, ?cook, i. 439: 

perhaps Bolls. 
Bourbon, due de, 1688, iii. 291. 
Bourbon, Louis de, 1681, Ch. Ch., ii. 

547- 

Bourchier, see Bouchier. 
Bourne, Immanuel, Ch. Ch., f 1672, iii. 
251. 

— Will., ? 14—, iv. 261. 

— Will., 1662, Lond., i. 463. 
Bovery, sir Edmund, + ^94, iii. 

448. 

Bowden, Tho., butler of Corp., f 1676, 
359- 

— 16 — , groom of Corp., ii. 359: 
see Will. Bodyn, in Dr. Fowler's 
C. C. C. (O. H. S.), p. 460. 

Bowdler, Jane (mar. W ardour), f 1653, 
i. 127. 

Bowell, John, 1663, opp., draper, i. 

473 5 ii- 5 J 2, 5*7» 5 2 5 5 iii- 14°, 
242-3. 

— John, Ch. Ch., f 1687, iii. 242. 

— Nicholas, f 1688, iii. 242-3. 

— mr. 1660, i. 350. 

— mrs. ... (nee Adkins), 1664, iii. 
242. 

— mrs. ... (nee Maynard), iii. 243. 

— mrs. iii. 243. 

— mrs. iii. 243. 

Bowen, John, 1664, Mert., ii. 16. 
Bowerman (Bowreman, Boreman), 
Mary (nee Hyde), 16 — , ii. 380. 

— Rob., see Boreman. 

— Will., 1656, Pembr., i. 173. 

— 16 — , Corp., ii. 380. 



Bowes alias Mcriton, Sabina, see 

Meriton. 
Bowl, col. Rich., 1655, i. 195. 

— see also Bolls. 

Bowles (Boles), Henry, 1681, New c, 
ii. 559; iii. 24-5. 

— Phineas, 1690, iii. 323. 

Bowman, Francis, 1656, opp., book- 
seller, i. 205, 260. He is (cp. i. 211, 
260) the bookseller ' Bowman ' of 

i. 2ii, 279, 378, 407, 418, 424, 428 ; 

ii. 23, 89 ; iii. 167. 

— Leonard, 1642, opp., draper, i. 63, 

427 ; iv. 57- 

— Mary (nee Coxeter), i. 42. 

— Maud (nee Petty), 16 — , i. 34. 

— Robert, 16 — , extr., i. 34. 

— Robert, 1660, New c, i. 330. 

— Thomas, 1687, opp., bookseller, iii. 
213. 

— mrs. 1656, opp., i. 205. 

— 1692, iii. 380. 

— 16 — , Lond., i. 42. 
Bowne, see Boon. 

Bowring, Dorothy (mar. Hall), 1645, 

i. in. 
Bowser, Henry, iv. 97. 
Bowsher, Rob., 1672, New c, iii. 391. 
Bowyer, Anne (mar. Ashmole), f 1646, 

iii- 335- 

— Anthony, 15—, extr., iii. 335. 

— Bridget (nee Fitch), 15 — , iii. 335. 

— Bridget (mar. Pagit), 16 — , iii. 335. 

— John, 1624, Exet., ii. 51. 

— John, Alls., f 1675, ii. 325. 

— Robert, 1638, Lond., iv. 118, 176. 

— Thomas, 1626, S. Jo., ii. 51. 

— Will., 1692, extr., iii. 384. 

— rev. 16 — , ii. 51. 

Box, sir Ralph, f 1694, iii. 448. 

— ...,iv. 130. 

Boyland, Richard de, 1285, iv. 181. 
Boyle, Michael, archbp. of Armagh, 
f 1713, iii- 2. 

— Rob., Ch. Ch., 1 1691, i. 290, 472 ; 

»• 57: x 37 ; iii- 38°> 44°, 4 8 7- 

— see Burlington, Clifford, Orrery. 
Boyne, Will., 16 — , extr., i. 332. 
Boys, John, 1663, iv. 72. 

— Mallina, f 1584, ii. 518. 

— Nathaniel, 1673, Univ., v. 28. 
Brabourne, John, Magd. c, f l 7$, 

iii. 531. 

Brabrook, see Braybroke. 

Brace, Tho., 1664, S. Jo., i. 366; ii. 6. 

— 1693, extr., iii. 423. The name 
' Brace ' was common in Worcestershire. 

Bracey (Brasy), Edmund, 1690, iii. 327. 

— Edward, 1682, iii. 4. 

Brackley, Charles Egerton, (by courtesy) 
viscount, f 1687, iii. 217. 



INDEX VI. 

Bracton, Henry, iii. 526; iv. 261. 
Braddon, 1694, iii. 451. 
Bradeley, Tho., 13—, iv. 143. 
Bradford, Judith (nee Wickham), 1669, 

i. 244. 

— Will., 1669, Lond., i. 244. 
Bradford : Newport, earl of : — 

— Francis, f I 7°8 : succeeded 
as second baron Newport of High 
Eicall, ii. 288; 1675, created viscount 
Newport, iii. 46, 387, 409-10, 478 ; 
1694, created earl of Bradford, iii. 
478. 

Diana (Russell), countess of, 

f 1695, iii. 478. 
Bradley, Savile, 1661, New c, i. 388. 
Bradshaw, Cassandra (mar. Ashurst), 

ii. 137. 

— Henry, D.D., f 1690, iii. 74. 

— John, extr., ii. 137. 

— John, 1677, Corp., ii. 379-80; iv. 
76. 

— Judith (nee Burt), iii. 74. 

— cornet 1645, i. 122. 

— mr. 1638, Lond., iv. 177-8. 
Bradua, ii. 303. 

Brady, rev. Nich., -^1726, iii. 459. 

— Rob., 1681, Cambr., ii. 509, 533. 

— dr. Will., iii. 64. 

Bragg, Francis, Wadh., + 1728, iii. 87. 
Braibroke, see Braybroke. 
Brainthwaite, see Branthwait. 
Brainton, see Braynton. 
Bramhall, John, bp., *J" 1663, ii. 472. 
Bramston, sir John, Wadh., ^1700, 
ii. 13. 

Branker (Brancker), Tho., Exet., f 1676, 
i- 453, 473 : see next. 

— Tho., Bras. (?), iii. 175: probably 
in error for the preceding. 

Branthwait (Brainthwaite), Rich., + 1 645, 

i. 118, 470; ii. 543 ; iii. 329. 
Brasier, John, 1668, S. Jo., ii. 145. 
Brasy, see Bracey. 
Brattle, sir John, + 1692, iii. 410. 

— Tho., 1663, Ch. Ch., i. 500. 
Brawne, Hugh, 1685, Univ., iii. 147. 

— rev. John, 1656, iii. 147. 
Bray, sir Edmund, + 1684, iii. 23. 

— Giles, f 1682, iii. 23. 

— Reginald, 1680, ii. 490; iii. 23. 
Braybroke (Brabrook, Braibroke), 

16 — , ii. 41. 

— miss ... (mar. Hyde), f 1665, ii. 
41. 

Braynton (Brainton, Breynton), Isabel 
(Eliz.) de, 1497, abbess of Godstow, 
i. 338, 344- 

— John de, f 1342, iii. 343. 

Breach, Will., Ch. Ch., f 1708, iii. 142, 
183. 



PERSONS. 267 

Breconson, iv. 261. 
Bredon, Simon, iv. 261. 
Breerwood, see Brerewood. 
Brees, ... , 1670, opp., barber, ii. 190. 
Breise (Brice), Anne (mar. Petty), i. 
33-4- 

— Stephen, extr., i. 34. 
Brekinsaw, iv. 261. 

Bremicham, Will., 17 — , opp., smith, 
ii. 45. 

Brent iamily, ii. 368-71. 
Brent, Abigail, ii. 370. 

— Anchor, father of sir Nathaniel, i. 
105, 162 ; ii. 368-9. 

— Anchor, jun., ii. 369. 

— Anne (mar. Cole), i. 180 ('Elizabeth,' 
in error) ; ii. 370. 

— Anne, ii. 370. 

— Anthony, ii. 369. 

— Barbara (nee Dixwell), ii. 370. 

— Basil, 1646, Mert, i. 135 ; ii. 369. 

— Christiana (nee Keyt), f 1681, ii. 368, 
554- 

— Eliz. (mar. Levins), f 1646, i. 105 ; 
ii. 369. 

— Eliz. (mar. Cole), i. 180, see Anne 
supra. 

— Eliz. (mar. Dixwell), ii. 368. 

— Eliz. (nee Prat), ii. 369. 

— Eliz. (mar. Butler), ii. 370. 

— Ferdinando, ii. 368. 

— Geo., f 1649, ii. 369. 

— Geo., ii. 371. 

— Giles, ii. 371. 

— Helena (nee Parr), ii. 370. 

— Henry, f 1643, ii. 370. 

— Hester (mar. Hurst), ii. 369. 

— Hester (nee Webb), f 1656, ii. 370. 

— Hester, ii. 370. 

— Hezekiah, ii. 369. 

— John I, ii. 368. 

— John II (grandson of John I), ii. 368. 

— John III (son of John II), ii. 368. 

— John IV (son of Anchor), counsellor- 
at-law, i. 180 ; ii. 369-70. 

— John V (grandson of Anchor), ii. 369. 

— John VI (son of John IV), ii. 370. 

— Kath. (mar. Chamberlaine), ii. 368. 

— Margaret (nee Toly), ii. 368. 

— Margaret, ii. 368. 

— Margaret (mar. Corbet), f 1657, i. 
2 35 ; 369 (' Mary,' in error). 

— Margaret (nee Horsley), ii. 371. 

— Martha (nee Abbot), i. 162 ; ii. 369. 

— Mary, ii. 368. 

— Mary (mar. Davis), ii. 369. 

— Mary (mar. Corbet), ii. 369 : see 
Margaret supra. 

— Maude, ii. 368. 

— sir Nathaniel, warden of Merton, 
f 1652, v. 28. 



2 68 



WOOD'S LIFE AND TIMES. 



Brent, Nathaniel, son of si